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Patent Searching and Data


Title:
ACCESS CONTROL MODULE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2014/005176
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An access control module (10) for preventing access of a first moving object to an area located behind the access control module, for allowing access of a second moving object to the area, and for allowing exit of the second moving object from the area, the access control module (10) including: a substantially planar base (12), having opposing sides (18), a front (14) facing away from the area and a rear (16) facing towards the area; at least one portal (20) for use by the second moving object when accessing or exiting; at least one link connector (22), the link connector (22) located at, or near one side (18) of the base (12), and at, or near the front (14) of the base (12), the link connector (22) configured to accept at least one link for linking the access control module (10) with a barrier system, and configured to enable hinged movement between the link and the link connector (22) about the vertical axis.

Inventors:
BUCKLEY, Nigel (76 Albion Road, Ashburton, Victoria 3147, AU)
Application Number:
AU2013/000722
Publication Date:
January 09, 2014
Filing Date:
July 03, 2013
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
TALLWANG HOLDINGS PTY LTD (76 Albion Road, Ashburton, Victoria 3147, AU)
International Classes:
E01F13/12; E01F13/00; E01F15/00; E01F15/02
Foreign References:
AU2004287901A1
US7654768B1
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MACAULEY, Colin et al. (Callinans, 1193 Toorak RoadCamberwel, Melbourne Victoria 3124, AU)
Download PDF:
Claims:
THE CLAIMS DEFINING THE INVENTION ARE AS FOLLOWS:

1. An access control module for preventing access of a first moving object to an area located behind the access control module, for allowing access of a second moving object to the area, and for allowing exit of the second moving object from the area, the access qontrol module configured to be used with a selected barrier system, the access control module including:

a substantially planar base, having opposing sides, a front facing away from the area and a rear facing towards the area, the base for placing on a ground surface;

at least one portal for use by the second moving object when accessing or exiting;

at least one link connector having a notional vertical axis, the link connector located at, or near one side of the base, and at, or near the front of the base, the link connector configured to accept at least one link for linking the access control module with the barrier system, and configured to enable hinged movement between the link and the link connector about the vertical axis; and, at least one interface located at a predetermined height above the base and extending between or within the opposing sides of the base, the interface configured to meet with a part of the first object moving in a direction toward the front of the base in a collision, and configured to cause the collided first object and the access control module to become substantially locked together during at least a part of a post-collision time, such that the first object is substantially prevented from pitching post-collision movement and upward post-collision movement,

wherein the access control module allows part of the first object pre-collision energy to be partially dispersed as post-collision energy via frictional sliding movement of the access control module with respect to the surface, and, wherein the access control module, through the linking of the access control module and the barrier system, allows part of the first object pre-collision energy to be partially dispersed as post-collision energy via frictional sliding movement of the barrier system with respect to the surface.

2. An access control module according to claim 1■, wherein, the link connector is further configured to interact with the link, such that both the link and the link connector are impelled to remain in, or near in a notional horizontal plane when the access control module is subject to post-collision forces impelling the access control module, the link connector and the link to tilt away from the plane.

3. An access control module according to either claim 1 or claim 2, wherein the link connector includes a plurality of flanges, each flange joined on a first side to an outer perimeter of the link connector and at or, towards a lower end of the link connector and each flange joined on a second side, perpendicular to the first side, to the base, the flanges for maintaining rigidity between the link connector and the base.

4. An access control module according to any one of claims 1 to 3, wherein the link connector includes an inner sleeve and an outer sleeve, the inner sleeve joined to the outer sleeve via at least one annulus. <

5. An access control module according to claim 4, wherein the base includes an

aperture and an outer perimeter at a lower end of the inner sleeve is joined to an inner perimeter of the aperture.

6. An access control module according to either claim 4 or claim 5, wherein the outer sleeve is adapted to flex and/or crush at, or near at least one point of contact between the link and the link connector during the post-collision time, such that both the link and the link connector are impelled to remain in, or near in a notional horizontal plane when the access control module is subject to post-collision forces impelling the access control module, the link connector and the link to tilt away from the plane. '

7. An access control module according to any one of claims 1 to 6, further including an arm for further maintaining rigidity between the link connector and the base, one end of the arm movably connected at, or towards an upper end of the link connector, the other end of the arm movably connected to the base, such that, during the post-collision time, the arm is allowed limited movement with respect to the base and with respect to the link connector.

8. An access control module according to any one of claims 1 to 7, including two link connections, the link connections located at, or near respective opposing sides of the base.

9. An access control module according to any one of claims 1 to 8, wherein the first moving object includes any one of more of: a truck, a car, a motorbike, and/or other vehicles.

10. An access control module according to any one of claims 1 to 9, wherein the

second moving object includes any one of more of: a truck, a car, a motorbike, and/or other vehicles, human pedestrians, animals and/or other non-vehicular moving objects.

11. An access control module according to any one of claims 1 to 10, wherein the at least one portal includes an opening through the access control module, the opening configured to be suitable for the second moving object to pass there through.

12. An access control module according to any one of claims 1 to 11, wherein the at least one portal includes an access control device including any one or more of: a turnstile, a gate, a traffic barrier and/or an arm barrier.

13. An access control module according to claim 12, wherein the at least one interface is integrated with the access control device.

14. An access control module according to any one of claims 1 to 13, wherein the link forms part of the barrier system and is fixed relative to the barrier system.

15. An access control module according to any one of claims 1 to 14, wherein the link is separate from the barrier system and the link forms a part of the access control module.

16. An access control module according to claim 15, wherein the cross-sectional shape of the link is an elongate ring, such that the link accepts the access control module link connector at a first end of the elongate ring and further accepts a barrier system link connector having a notional vertical axis at a second end of the elongate ring, and wherein the link is configured to enable hinged movement between the link and the access control module link connector, and to enable hinged movement between the link and the barrier system link connector, such that the link enables double hinging movement between the access control module and the barrier system.

17. An access control module according to claim 16, wherein the link includes at least two ring straps, each ring strap having the cross-sectional shape of the link, each ring strap spaced apart from a next ring strap along a notional axis of the link, the link further including at least one spacing strap between adjacent ring straps for maintaining the spacing apart and for maintaining rigidity of the link.

18. An access control module according to claim 17, wherein each ring strap includes a plate strap joined around an outer perimeter of the ring strap, the plate strap for maintaining rigidity of the ring strap.

19. An access control module according to any one of claims 16 to 18, wherein the link includes a gusset plate located towards the second end of the elongate ring, sides of the gusset plate joined to opposing sides of the elongate ring, and wherein the gusset plate locates the barrier system link connector snugly against the second end of the elongate ring, such that, during post-collision movement, the link maintains substantially hinged movement with respect to the barrier system link connector.

20. An access control module according to claim 1 , wherein the access control

module link connector is able to move between the first end of the elongate ring and the gusset plate, such the link further enables substantially horizontal movement between the link and the access control module link connector.

21. An access control module according to any one of claims 16 to 20, wherein the cross-sectional size of the access control module link connector is larger than the cross-sectional size of the barrier system link connector, such that the link has a substantially egg-shaped cross-section.

22. An access control module according to any one of claims 16 to 21, wherein the cross-sectional shape of the access control module link connector and the cross- sectional shape of the barrier system link connector are substantially circular.

23. An access control module according to any one of claims 1 to 22, wherein the base configured to have limited flexibility during at least a part of a post-collision time.

24. An access control module according to any one of claims 1 to 23, wherein the selected slidable barrier, system includes at least one barrier module, the barrier module including a substantially planar base and a frame joined to the base, the barrier module base and frame configured to allow removable masses to be stored on the barrier module to provide weight for the barrier system.

25. An access control module according to claim 24, wherein the removable masses are configured to be able to slide with respect to the barrier module base during post- collision motion of the barrier system, whilst maintaining force on the barrier system towards the ground.

26. An access control module according to either claim 24 or claim 25, wherein the removable masses are loosely connected to the frame to enable sliding and then to enable the fame to drag the masses when the loose connection becomes taught.

27. An access control module according to claim 26, wherein netted rings provide the loose connection.

28. An access control module according to any one of claims 1 to 27, wherein the base of the access control module includes a fault line towards the rear of the base, such that, if the base pitches sufficiently during post-collision movement, the base is able to bend at the fault to assist in preventing the base from digging into the ground.

29. An access control module according to claim 28, wherein the fault is a series of x aligned cuts in the base.

30. An access control module according to any one of claims 1 to 29, wherein the base of the access control module includes a friction reducing device extending at least partially along the rear edge of the base, such that, if the base pitches sufficiently during post-collision movement, the base is able to slide along the surface to assist in preventing the base from digging into the ground.

31. An access control module according to claim 30, wherein the friction reducing device is a tube joined to the rear edge of the base.

32. An access control module substantially as hereinbefore described with reference to the accompanying drawings.

Description:
ACCESS CONTROL MODULE FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The present invention relates to an access control module, which may be used with a barrier system. The access control module may be particularly useful for preventing selected motor vehicles, for example, trucks, cars, or the like, from accessing an area behind the access control module and barrier system.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] Barrier systems have been used in peacetime and wartime circumstances for preventing selected vehicles and or pedestrians from entering into a protected area, or from transiting across a border. Such barriers are typically composed of large slabs of material, for example, concrete blocks, a large number of rocks assembled in a metal basket system, or the like. Sometimes the barriers are composed of hollow plastic containers, which may be filled with water to add weight, and which are more-readily moveable without the water inside.

[0003] Barriers are designed to stop even relatively large, fast-moving motorised vehicles from going past such barriers. For example, if a loaded truck were to crash into such a barrier, the barrier should be strong enough and heavy enough to repel the truck, even if the barrier moves backwardly after the collision, so as to partially disperse post- collision energy.

[0004] Existing barrier systems typically also require some gap through which permitted vehicles, people and the like can pass. However, this gap, through which traffic can pass, must also be protected from selected unwanted vehicles, or other unwanted traffic, such as people, animals etc.

[0005] Sometimes the gap in the barrier includes some sort of gating system, for example, a turnstile, a gate, a traffic barrier, or an arm barrier. Typically, such gating devices are built into the barrier system, or may be permanently installed in the gap area within the barrier system.

[0006] Such previous barriers and gating systems have a number of problems. One problem is that they are not configured so as to more-efficiently disperse post-collision energy of a moving object, which collides with the gating system. Further, such previous gating systems lack means for controlling movement of the vehicle during at least a part of the post-collision time.

[0007] If a gating system (whether or not in cooperation with the barrier system) does not efficiently disperse post-collision energy, then the gating system may fail, thus allowing the undesired moving object to enter into an area, or to cross a border.

[0008] Even if such previous gating systems do not completely fail, the undesired moving object may be allowed to move too far into the area from which it should be excluded. Such failing or near-failing of previous gating systems may result in injuries to people and/or property within the protected area, as a result of the moving object, or parts of the moving object, striking such people and/or property.

[0009] In other circumstances, the moving object may be a truck laden with explosives, which are timed to detonate, or triggered to detonate, when in the protected area. In such circumstances it is even more vital to exclude such a moving object from the protected area as much as possible.

[0010] Some previous gating systems and/or barrier systems are poorly designed so that, for example, a truck colliding with such gating or barrier systems becomes very uncontrolled after a collision with those systems, such that the truck can tilt upwardly into the air and partially or completely move over such gating or barrier systems. It has been shown that systems, such as the common raising and lowering bollard gating systems, can cause such tilting and/or hopping and/or jumping movement of, for example, a truck.

[0011] Yet another problem with previous gating systems is that they are immoveable, being permanently installed, or are impractical to move, given they are heavy, monolithic (that is formed as a single object, which is not readily disassembled) and/or they are configured in awkward shapes, so as to be not readily transported.

[0012] It is an object of the present invention to overcome, or at least ameliorate, some or all of the above-mentioned problems in the prior art. It is a further object of the present invention to possibly overcome or possibly ameliorate other problems in the prior art, which have not been mentioned above.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0013] Accordingly, the present invention provides an access control module for preventing access of a first moving object to an area located behind the access control module, for allowing access of a second moving object to the area, and for allowing exit of the second moving object from the area, the access control module configured to be used with a selected barrier system, the access control module including: a substantially planar base, having opposing sides, a front facing away from the area and a rear facing towards the area, the base for placing on a ground surface; at least one portal for use by the second moving object when accessing or exiting; at least one link connector having a notional vertical axis, the link connector located at, or near one side of the base, and at, or near the front of the base, the link connector configured to accept at least one link for linking the access control module with the barrier system, and configured to enable hinged movement between the link and the link connector about the vertical axis; and, at least one interface located at a predetermined height above the base and extending between or within the opposing sides of the base, the interface configured to meet with a part of the first object moving in a direction toward the front of the base in a collision, and configured to cause the collided first object and the access control module to become substantially locked together during at least a part of a post-collision time, such that the first object is substantially prevented from pitching post-collision movement and upward post-collision movement, wherein the access control module allows part of the first object pre-collision energy to be partially dispersed as post-collision energy via frictional sliding movement of the access control module with respect to the surface, and, wherein the access control module, through the linking of the access control module and the barrier system, allows part of the first object pre-collision energy to be partially dispersed as post-collision energy via frictional sliding movement of the barrier system with respect to the surface.

SUMMARY OF OPTIONAL EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

[0014] In one optional embodiment, the link connector is further configured to interact with the link, such that both the link and the link connector are impelled to remain in, or near in a notional horizontal plane when the access control module is subject to post- collision forces impelling the access control module, the link connector and the link to tilt away from the plane.

[0015] In another embodiment, the link connector includes a plurality of flanges, each flange joined on a first side to an outer perimeter of the link connector and at or, towards a lower end of the link connector and each flange joined on a second side, perpendicular to the first side, to the base, the flanges for maintaining ri idity between the link connector and the base.

[0016] In a further embodiment, the link connector includes an inner sleeve and an outer sleeve, the inner sleeve joined to the outer sleeve via at least one annulus.

[0017] In yet another embodiment, the base includes an aperture and an outer perimeter at a lower end of the inner sleeve is joined to an inner perimeter of the aperture.

[0018] In yet a further embodiment, the outer sleeve is adapted to flex and/or crush at, or near at least one point of contact between the link and the link connector during the post-collision time, such that both the link and the link connector are impelled to remain in, or near in a notional horizontal plane when the access control module is subject to post- collision forces impelling the access control module, the link connector and the link to tilt away from the plane.

[0019] In an embodiment, the access control module further includes an arm for further maintaining rigidity between the link connector and the base, one end of the arm movably connected at, or towards an upper end of the link connector, the other end of the arm movably connected to the base, such that, during the post-collision time, the arm is allowed limited movement with respect to the base and with respect to the link connector.

[0020] In another embodiment, the access control module includes two link connections, the link connections located at, or near respective opposing sides of the base.

[0021 ] In a further embodiment, the first moving object includes any one or more of: a truck, a car, a motorbike, and/or other vehicles.

[0022] In yet another embodiment, the second moving object includes any one of more of: a truck, a car, a motorbike, and/or other vehicles, human pedestrians, animals and/or other non- vehicular moving objects.

[0023] In yet a further embodiment, the at least one portal includes an opening through the access control module, the opening configured to be suitable for the second moving object to pass there through.

[0024] In an optional embodiment, the at least one portal includes an access control device including any one or more of: a turnstile, a gate, a traffic barrier and/or an arm barrier. Alternatively, the at least one interface is integrated with the access control device.

[0025] In an embodiment, the link forms part of the barrier system and is fixed relative to the barrier system. Alternatively, the link is separate from the barrier system and the link forms a part of the access control module. In this alternative embodiment, the cross-sectional shape of the link may be an elongate ring such that the link accepts the access control module link connector at a first end of the elongate ring and further accepts a barrier system link connector having a notional vertical axis at a second end of the elongate ring, and wherein the link is configured to enable hinged movement between the link and the access control module link connector, and to enable hinged movement between the link and the barrier system link connector, such that the link enables double hinging movement between the access control module and the barrier system.

[0026] Further, in such an alternative embodiment, the link may include at least two ring straps each ring strap having the cross-sectional shape of the link, each ring strap spaced apart from a next ring strap along a notional axis of the link, the link further including at least one spacing strap between adjacent ring straps for maintaining the spacing apart and for maintaining rigidity of the link. Each ring strap may include a plate strap joined around an outer perimeter of the ring strap, the plate strap for maintaining rigidity of the ring strap.

[0027] In such embodiment, the link may include a gusset plate located towards the second end of the elongate ring, sides of the gusset plate joined to opposing sides of the elongate ring, and wherein the gusset plate locates the barrier system link connector snugly against the second end of the elongate ring, such that, during post-collision movement, the link maintains substantially hinged movement with respect to the barrier system link connector. Further in such embodiment, the access control module link connector is able to move between the first end of the elongate ring and the gusset plate, such the link further enables substantially horizontal movement between the link and the access control module link connector.

[0028] In an embodiment, the cross-sectional size of the access control module link connector is larger than the cross-sectional size of the barrier system link connector, such that the link has a substantially egg-shaped cross-section. Further, the cross-sectional shape of the access control module wherein the cross-sectional shape of the access control module link connector and the cross-sectional shape of the barrier system link connector may be substantially circular.

[0029] It will be understood that the link, or links (sometimes referred to as a lateral hinge or lateral hinges), also acts to control the rotating movement of the access control module. This will be further understood as acting to control the rotating moment of the access control module in one or more directions (or, in one or more dimensions). The link may act to control the rotating movement of the access control module in cooperation with the link connector(s) and other essential or optional parts of the access control module.

[0030] In another embodiment, the base is configured to have limited flexibility during at least a part of a post-collision time. [0031 ] In a further embodiment, the selected slidable barrier system includes at least one barrier module, the barrier module including a substantially planar base and a frame joined to the base, the barrier module base and frame configured to allow removable masses to be stored on the barrier module to provide weight for the barrier system.

[0032] In yet another embodiment, the removable masses are configured to be able to slide with respect to the barrier module base during post-collision motion of the barrier system, whilst maintaining force on the barrier system towards the ground.

[0033] In yet a further embodiment, the removable masses are loosely connected to the frame to enable sliding and then to enable the fame to drag the masses when the loose connection becomes taught. In such an embodiment, the netted rings may provide the loose connection.

[0034] It will be understood that the access control module is intended and/or designed, in various optional embodiments, to be able to interface into many different types of existing or future barrier systems. One optional embodiment is to configure the access control module to work with a "Hesco" bag system (Hesco being a trademark for a known barrier bag system). In another embodiment, the access control module may be configured to work with the various existing road safety barriers, for example, the portable road safety barriers that are filled with "ballast" material (such as water) when in operating position.

[0035] In an optional embodiment, the base of the access control module includes a fault line towards the rear of the base, such that, if the base pitches sufficiently during post- collision movement, the base is able to bend at the fault to assist in preventing the base from digging into the ground. In such embodiment, the fault may be a series of aligned cuts in the base.

[0036] In yet another embodiment, the base of the access control module includes a friction reducing device extending at least partially along the rear edge of the base, such that, if the base pitches sufficiently during post-collision movement, the base is able to slide along the surface to assist in preventing the base from digging into the ground. The friction reducing device may be a tube joined to the rear edge of the base.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0037] For a better understanding of the invention, and to show how it may be performed, optional embodiments thereof will now be described, by way of non-limiting examples only, and with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

[0038] FIG 1. is a perspective view of an embodiment of the access control module

(the feature of the interface is not shown in FIG. 1);

[0039] FIG 2. is a front elevation view of FIG. 1 ;

[0040] FIG. 3 is a plan view of FIG. 1 ;

[0041] FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an embodiment of the access control module, similar to that shown in FIG. 1 (the feature of the interface is also not shown in FIG. 4);

[0042] FIG. 5 is a side elevation view of an alternative embodiment of the access control module, showing a link connector with a substantially taller inner tube than outer tube;

[0043] FIG. 6 is a side elevation x-ray view, showing some features depicted from

FIG. 5;

[0044] FIGS. 7A, 7B, 7C, 7D, 7E and 7F are perspective views of components of the inner sleeve of the link connector;

[0045] FIGS. 8A, 8B, 8C, 8D, 8E, 8F and 8G are perspective views of components of the outer sleeve of the link connector; [0046] FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the access control module linked to a barrier system, on one side, the view being from the protected side of the access control module barrier system;

[0047] FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the same embodiment as depicted in FIG. 9, looking from the "attack side" of the access control module/barrier system;

[0048] FIG. 11 is a front elevation view of FIG. 10;

[0049] FIG. 12 is a perspective view of a detail of the access control module linked to the barrier system, the view being from the protected side;

[0050] „ FIG. 13 is a perspective view of a detail of the access control module linked to the barrier system, the view being from the "attack side";

[0051] FIG. 14 is a front elevation x-ray view of the access control module linked to the barrier system;

[0052] FIG. 15 is a perspective view showing one link connector from the access control module, linked to an example barrier system;

[0053] FIG. 16 is a detailed view of the link connector and linking shown in FIG.

15;

[0054] FIG. 17 is a front elevation view of a detail of the link and an example barrier system;

[0055] FIG. 18 is a perspective x-ray view of an embodiment of the link;

[0056] FIG. 19 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of the link, with two links for either side of the access control module shown;

[0057] FIG. 20 is a plan view of an embodiment of the link, as shown in FIG. 19; [0058] FIG. 21 is a plan view of an embodiment of the base of the access control module;

[0059] FIG. 22 is a perspective view of an embodiment of an access control device, being a traffic barrier;

[0060] FIG. 23 is a perspective view of an embodiment of the access control device, being a traffic barrier;

[0061 ] FIG. 23 is a perspective view of an embodiment of the access control module, including an example access control device, being a traffic barrier, the figure also showing the interface feature of the access control module integrated into the traffic barrier;

[0062] FIG. 24 is a plan view of an embodiment of the access control module

(interface feature not depicted), wherein the access control module is linked to two barrier modules in the selected example barrier system;

[0063] FIG. 25 is a perspective view of the access control module linked to the selected example barrier system as shown in FIG. 24;

[0064] FIG. 26 is a perspective view of an embodiment of the access control module, linked on both sides to barrier modules from an example barrier system, the barrier system is also shown with removable masses thereon;

[0065] FIG. 27 is a perspective view of an embodiment of the access control module, showing an alternative example of an access control device, being narrower than other shown examples, wherein the interface integrated into the access control device is also narrower than in other shown embodiments. FIG. 27 also shows an alternative arrangement of removable masses on the barrier system, wherein the removable masses are stacked; [0066] FIG. 28 is a plan view, including three ghosted plan views of an

embodiment of the access control module and selected barrier system, exemplified before, during and after a collision with a moving object;

[0067] FIG. 29 is a plan view showing an alternative example arrangement of two access control modules linked to a selected example barrier system;

[0068] FIG. 30 is a perspective view of the embodiment and arrangement shown in

FIG. 29;

[0069] FIG. 31 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of the access control module, linked to another example selected barrier system; and,

[0070] FIG. 32 is a perspective view of an embodiment of the access control module linked to yet another example selected barrier system.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF OPTIONAL EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

[0071] FIG. 1 shows an embodiment of the access control module 10, including a base 12 and two link connectors 22, positioned at either side of the base. FIG. 1 does not show the feature of the interface (please refer to FIG. 23).

[0072] The base is substantially planar, and may be formed from steel or other such suitable materials. In a collision incident, the material from which the base is formed will be somewhat flexible, so as to assist with dispersion of part of the energy of such a collision. The base has a front 14, which faces away from a protected area, or a protected side of the access control module 10. The base 12 also has a rear 16, which faces towards the protected area, or the protected side of the access control module 10. Further, the base 12 has two opposing sides 18. In an embodiment, the dimensions of the base are selected so as to be suitable (when the access control module 10 is disassembled) to be stored in a shipping container, or loaded for air transport.

[0073] With an access control device and an interface (shown in later figures), the access control module 10 assists in preventing selected first moving objects from moving through the access control module into a protected area, or crossing a border. The first moving object may be, for example, a motorised vehicle, such as a truck, a car or a motorbike.

[0074] The access control module 10 includes a portal 20, which allows selected second moving objects to pass through the access control module. The portal 20 may simply be a gap, or plurality of gaps through the access control module 10 (or through the access control device, which is not shown in FIG. 1). However, the portal may also include, for example, one or more turnstiles, gates, traffic barriers and/or arm barriers (boom gates), so as to regulate passage of one or more second moving objects through the access control module portal.

[0075] Examples of second moving objects include motorised vehicles, human pedestrians, animals, non-motorised vehicles, and any other moving object which is allowed to pass into or out of a protected area or cross a border, as regulated by the access control module 10.

[0076] The access control module 10 includes two link connectors 22, each link connector located at, or towards a side 18 of the base 12, and each link connector 22 located at, or towards the front 14 of the base 12.

[0077] The link connectors 22 also include arms 24, which are movably joined at, or near the top of each link connector and also movable connected at, or near the base 12. Each arm 24 includes connecting means at either end thereof, wherein the connecting means accept, for example a nut and bolt arrangement for movably securing the end of the arm 24 to its respective part of the access control module 10. The arms 24 provide increased rigidity and/or stability for the link connectors 22 in a post-collision scenario.

[0078] . It will also be understood by a person skilled in the art that the link connectors 22 are located towards the front 14 of the base 12 in order to provide stability during at least a part of a post-collision time. Further, the location of the link connectors 22 (in conjunction with links and the weight of a selected barrier system, not shown in FIG. 1) provides a configuration which counters rolling moment/tilting/pitching of the access control module 10 (in conjunction with the first moving object) due to post-collision forces and movement. It will also be recognised that countering such rolling

moment/tilting/pitching assists in controlling post-collision movement, and therefore assists in a more-highly regulated and efficient dispersion of post-collision energy.

[0079] It will be understood that the sum of kinetic energy of the first moving object immediately pre-collision will transform into post-collision energy. The pre- collision energy is mostly in the form of kinetic energy. However, post-collision, such energy is transformed into both kinetic energy of the first moving object and the access control module, along with the selected example barrier system and other types of energy, such as sound and heat (caused by friction between the access control module and the selected example barrier system moving with respect to the ground).

[0080] The link connectors 22 in the embodiment shown in FIG. 1 include an outer sleeve 26 and an inner sleeve 30. This arrangement provides for further rigidity between the link connector 22 and the base 12. As shown in FIG. 1, the outer sleeve 26 includes a plurality of flanges 28, which join on one side to the outer sleeve 26 of the respective link connector 22, and join on another side, perpendicular to the first-mentioned side, to the base 12. The inner sleeve 30 may also include flanges (example shown in later figures).

[0081 ] The inner sleeve 30 is connected to the outer sleeve 26 by at least one annulus 32. In FIG. 1, the annulus 32 is shown in a position towards the top of the link connectors 22.

[0082] In the access control module 10 joins which are intended to be permanent can be formed by seam welds between metal parts. Such joining provides for a strong construction.

[0083] It will also be noted that other parts can be configured so as to be assembled and disassembled. Such an arrangement allows for easier transportation of the access control module.

[0084] FIG. 2 shows the same example embodiment as shown in FIG. 1, from a front elevation view. [0085] FIG. 3 shows the same example embodiment of the access control module

10, as shown in FIG. 1, from a plan view. Also referenced in FIG. 3 are the movable connection between the arms 24, the link connectors 22 and the base 12. Each arm includes a moveable connection mean 34 between the arm and the base. At the other end of the arm 24 there is another moveable connection 36 between the arm and the link connector 22.

[0086] FIG. 4 shows a similar embodiment to that depicted in FIGS. 1 , 2 and 3.

More clearly shown are base bars 38, which extend from a bottom part of the link connectors 22 towards the rear 16 of the base 12. The arms 24 are configured to movably connect to the base bars. The base bars provide further rigidity and/or stability between the link connectors 22 and the base 12. . s

[0087] Also depicted in FIG. 4 is a friction reducing device 40. In this

embodiment, the friction reducing device 40 is a tube, which is welded to the rear 16 of the base 12. The friction reducing device assists in preventing the access control module 10 from digging into the ground on which it has been resting during a post-collision time. It will be understood that, although the access control module is configured so as to at least minimise rolling moment/tilt/pitching, sometimes the forces which result in such movement are so strong that the base 12 will roll backwards/tilt backwards/pitch backwards, thus causing a greater likelihood of the base digging into the ground.

[0088] If the base were to dig into the ground, this would cause a further problem as the digging in would result in a pivot point being established, which could potentially result in further rolling moment/tilting/pitching of the base 12 with respect to the ground.

[0089] Accordingly, in such circumstances, the friction reducing device 40 assists in preventing digging in of the base into the ground.

[0090] FIGS. 5 and 6 show embodiments of the link connector 22, wherein the inner sleeve 30 is substantially taller than the outer sleeve 26. Such configuration may be useful for employment with different selected example barrier systems, which may require linking at a higher point. Further, extending the inner sleeve 30 of the link connector 22 to a greater height can provide a point for attaching an access control device, such as an arm barrier (boom gate).

[0091 ] FIGS. 7 A to 7F show components which may be used for manufacturing an inner sleeve 30.

[0092] FIG. 7A shows an inner sleeve tube 41. FIG. 7B shows a plurality of flanges 42 (similar in form and use to the flanges 28 for the outer sleeve 26). FIG. 7C shows an individual flange 42 for the inner sleeve 30. The flanges 42 are joined on one side to the inner sleeve tube 41.

[0093] FIG. 7D shows an annulus 44, which is joined at the base of the inner sleeve tube 41. The flanges are also joined, on a side perpendicular to the first-mentioned side, to the annulus 44. In an example embodiment, the outer perimeter of the annulus 44 and the outer perimeter of the inner sleeve tube 41 are both joined (for example, by seam welds) to the base 12.

[0094] FIG. 7E shows a circular disc 46, being the top plate for the inner sleeve tube 41.

[0095] FIG. 7F shows the components depicted in FIGS. 7A to 7E assembled into an inner sleeve 30.

[0096] Similarly to FIGS. 7A to 7F, FIGS. 8A to 8G depict components of the outer sleeve 26, individually (FIGS. 8A to 8F) and assembled (FIG. 8G).

[0097] . FIG. 8A shows an inner sleeve tube 48. FIGS. 8B and 8C show, respectively, a plurality of, and a singular flange 28. FIG. 8D shows an annulus 50, which is located on top of the plurality of flanges 28 and joined thereto by a seam weld. The annulus 50 is also joined on an inner perimeter thereof to the inner sleeve tube 48, again by a seam weld.

[0098] FIG. 8E depicts another annulus 52, which is located under the plurality of flanges 28, and joined thereto by seam welds. An inner perimeter of the annulus 52 is joined at the bottom of the inner sleeve tube 48. Further, an outer perimeter of the annulus 52 and an outer perimeter of the bottom of the outer sleeve tube 48 are both joined to the base 12 by seam welds.

[0099] FIG! 8F shows annulus 32, which joins the outer sleeve tube 48 with the inner sleeve tube 41. This can also be seam welded, respectively, on its outer perimeter and its inner perimeter to the outer sleeve tube 48 and the inner sleeve tube 41.

[0100] FIG. 8G shows the components of FIGS . 8A to 8F assembled into the outer sleeve 26.

[0101] FIG. 9 shows an example embodiment of the access control module 10 linked to a selected example barrier system 56, via a link 54. The link 54 is not fixed to (or is separate from) both the access control module 10 and the barrier system 56.

[0102] The barrier system 56 includes a barrier module 57. The barrier module 57 includes a base 58, a barrier module frame 60. The barrier module frame 60 includes frame posts 62 and a frame cross bar 64.

[0103] The barrier system 56 (or barrier module 57) includes a barrier system link connector 55, which accepts the link 54. The access control module 10 also includes a link connector 22, which accepts the link 54.

[0104] It will be understood that, in other embodiments, the link may form a part of the barrier system, wherein such link is fixed into the barrier system.

[0105] In the embodiment shown in FIG. 9, the barrier system link connector 55 is an additionally reinforced frame post 62.

[0106] In this embodiment, the barrier system link connector 55, the access control module link connector 22 and the link 54 are configured so as to enable hinged movement between the link 54 and the barrier system link connector 55, and to enable hinged movement between the link 54 and the access control module link connector 22. Accordingly, such configuration enables a double hinging movement between the access control module 10 and the barrier system 56.

[0107] It will be appreciated that the barrier system 56, as depicted in FIG. 9, is shown without any substantial masses being loaded thereon.

[0108] The base 58 of the barrier module 57 is configured to be able to slide across the ground surface on which it is situated during post-collision movement of the barrier system 56 and post-collision movement of the access control module 10. It will be appreciated by a person skilled in the art that the frictional movement of the access control module 10 with respect to the ground on which it is situated, the frictional movement of the barrier system across the ground on which it is situated, along with the double hinging movement between the access control module 10 and the selected example barrier system 56, each contribute to substantially controlling movement of the axis control module and the barrier system, along with the first object (substantially locked together with the access control module), during a post-collision time. Such controlled movement of the access control module 10 and the barrier system 56, so as to remain as much as possible in horizontal post-collision movement, allows for more-efficient dispersion of energy during the post-collision time.

[0109] In particular, it will be appreciated that the configuration of the hinge 54 is designed to substantially limit rolling moment/tilting/pitching of the access control module 10 and the barrier system 56. In this regard, when loaded with mass, the barrier system 56 provides a dead- weight, such that forces, which would otherwise impel the access control module 10 and the barrier system 56 to roll/tilt/pitch backwardly, are controlled. Such rolling/tilting/pitching forces are instead dispersed as forces which are dissipated through substantially horizontal movement of the access control module and the barrier system 56. Such horizontal movement then disperses energy through frictional engagement with the ground by the base 12 of the access control module 10 and the base 58 of the barrier module 57 in the barrier system 56.

[0110] Due to the double hinging movement encouraged by the link 54, the access control module 10 via its link connector 22 and the barrier system 56 via its link connector 55 are able to interact in such a way as to encourage dispersion of rolling moment/tilting/pitching forces, encountered during a post-collision time, to become substantially horizontal movement of the access control module and the barrier system 56.

[0111] FIG. 9 also shows an aperture 66 in the base 12 of the access control module

10. The aperture 66 allows the inner tube 41 of the inner sleeve 30 of the link connector 22 to snugly fit therein. The bottom part of the inner tube 41 can then be seam welded to the base 12, thus providing further rigidity and/or stability for the inner sleeve 30 and the link connector 22 with respect to the base 12.

[0112] FIG. 10 shows a perspective view from the "attack side" of the access control module 10, of the embodiment shown in FIG. 9.

[0113] The same embodiment shown in Figs. 9 and 10 is shown in FIG. 1 1 from a front elevation view. As can be more-clearly seen in FIG. 1 1, the link 54 includes a top ring strap 70 and a bottom ring strap 72, wherein the bottom ring strap 72 is wider than the top ring strap 70. Also shown in FIG. 11 is a plurality of flanges 68 on the link connector 55 of the barrier system 56. Such flanges provide further rigidity and/or stability between the link connector 55 and the base 58 of the barrier module 57.

[0114] FIG. 12 shows more details of the embodiment of the link, as shown in

FIGS. 9, 10 and 11. The top ring strap 70 includes a top ring strap plate strap 74.

Similarly, the bottom ring strap 72 includes a bottom ring strap plate strap 76. The plate straps 74, 76 may be joined to their respective ring straps 70, 72 via a seam weld. The plate straps are configured to be perpendicular to the ring straps, and in this way provide substantially greater rigidity and/or stability. Further, the increased rigidity and/or stability of the ring straps, via the plate straps, encourages the previously-mentioned hinged movement between the link and the access control module link connector 22 and the barrier system link connector 55.

[0115] Also shown in FIG. 12 are gusset plates 78, 80. The top gusset plate 78 is located towards the end of the top ring strap adjacent the barrier system link connector 55. Further, sides of the top gusset plate 78 are adjoined to opposing inner sides of the top ring strap 70. Similarly, the bottom gusset plate 80 is located towards the end of the bottom ring strap 72 adjacent the barrier system link connector 55. The top and bottom gusset plates 78, 80 are configured to locate the barrier system link connector 55 snugly against respective ends of the elongate top and bottom ring straps 70, 72. Such an arrangement assists in maintaining substantially hinged movement between the link 54 and the barrier system link connector 55, during post-collision movement of the access control module 10 and the barrier system 56.

[0116] Further, FIG. 12 shows that there is a top gap 75 formed between a side of the top gusset plate 78 and the access control module link connector outer sleeve 26.

Similarly, there is a bottom gap 77 formed between a side of the bottom gusset plate 80 and the access control module link connector outer sleeve 26. The top and bottom gaps 75, 77 enables substantially horizontal movement between the link 54 and the access control module link connector 22, which also enables substantially horizontal movement between the barrier system link connector 55 and the access control module link connector 22. Such horizontal movement, along with the previously-mentioned hinged movement, encourages dissipation of forces (including rolling/tilting/pitching forces) into horizontal movement of the barrier system and the access control module, such that the base 58 of the barrier system 56 and the base 12 of the access control module 10 are both enabled to frictionally slide across the ground surface, so as to dissipate energy during post-collision time.

[0117] FIG. 13 shows the same embodiment of the link 54 as shown in FIG. 12.

Perhaps more-clearly shown is a spacing strap 82, which causes the top ring strap 70 to be spaced apart from the bottom ring strap 72, along a notional vertical access of the link 54. The spacing strap 82 also assists with maintaining rigidity and/or stability of the link 54.

[0118] In FIG. 14, it can be more-clearly seen that the bottom ring straps may be composed of a double strap, including an upper strap 72 A and a lower strap 72B. Such double strap configuration provides greater strength and rigidity to the bottom ring strap 72. It will be appreciate that, during post-collision movement, the bottom ring strap 72 experiences a large amount of force, being located toward a bottom part of the access control module link connector 22 and a bottom part of the barrier system link connector 55. [0119] It will be further appreciated by a person skilled in the art that, during post- collision movement, the access control module link connector 22 may experience forces which cause it to roll/tilt/pitch away from a notional horizontal plane in which the link connector rests pre-collision. This post-collision rolling/tilting/pitching movement of the access control module link connector 22 is partially controlled by the configuration of the link 54, which encourages hinged movement, rather than non-horizontal movement of the link connectors 22, 55, with respect to each other and with respect to the link itself.

[0120] It will be further appreciated that, where such post-collision

rolling/tilting/pitching movement of the access control module link connector 22 goes beyond a certain limit, the configuration of the link connector 22 is such that the outer sleeve tube 48 is able to flex and/or crush/crumble/bend, such that the

rolling/tilting/pitching movement of the link connector 22 is substantially ameliorated.

[0121] FIGS. 15, 16 and 17 show further views of the embodiment of the link, as shown in FIGS. 9 to 14. FIGS. 15 to 17 are provided to show features of the link 54 with greater clarity.

[0122] FIG. 18 shows the same embodiment of the link as shown in FIGS. 9 to 17 in x-ray view. In FIG. 18, it can be seen that the bottom ring strap 72 includes two gusset plates, including an upper bottom gusset plate 80A and a lower bottom gusset plate 80B. The double gusset plates 80A, 80B assist in encouraging hinged movement between the link 54 and the barrier system link connector 55.

[0123] FIG. 19 shows an alternative embodiment of the link 54, with two links shown. In this embodiment, the link is formed by a single ring strap 84. The link 54 also includes indicia 86.

[0124] FIG. 20 shows a plan view of the embodiment of the link 54 shown in FIG.

19.

[0125] FIG. 21 shows an embodiment of the base 12 of the access control module

10. In this embodiment, the base includes a fault line 88, which is located towards the rear 16 of the base. The fault line 88 is provided so that, if there is significant post-collision rolling/tilting/pitching backward movement of the access control module, the fault line is able to deform so as to cause a bend in the base 12. It will be appreciated that the bend in the base, along with the friction reducing device 40 (being the tube welded to the rear 16 of the base 12) should assist the base 12 in moving horizontally, rather than digging into the ground, along which the base is moving/sliding.

[0126] FIG. 21 also shows "attack side" indicia 90, being an arrow marked on the base 12 for indicating how to orientate the access control module 10 to meet an undesired first moving object during a collision.

[0127] FIG. 22 depicts an example embodiment of an access control device 92 to be used with the access control module 10. The access control device 92 is a traffic barrier, which can be raised or lowered for, respectively, preventing or allowing motor vehicle traffic to pass through the portal 20 of the access control module 10.

[0128] The access control device 92 includes a traffic barrier gating plate 94, which raises and lowers via a plurality of hydraulic actuators 100. The access control device also includes a traffic barrier base 98, which sits on the base 12 of the access control module, and is affixed thereto by any suitable means.

[0129] It will be appreciated that the access control device 92 may be removably connected to the access control module 10, so as to allow for ready transportation of both the access control module and the access control device.

[0130] In the embodiment shown in FIG. 22, the access control device 92 incorporates an interface 96. The interface is formed from an elongate strip of metal, which, when the traffic barrier gating plate 94 is raised, locates the interface 96 at a predetermined height above the base 12. The interface 96 extends between and/or within opposing sides 18 of the base 12. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 22, the interface 96 is designed to extend within and between the link connectors 22 of the access control module 10, when the access control device 92 is situated on the access control module.

[0131] Further, when the traffic barrier gating plate 94 is in a raised position, the interface 96 extends forwardly of the access control device 92, such that, it is configured to meet with a part of the first object moving in a direction towards the front 14 of the base 12 in a collision. In this way, in most collision scenarios, the interface 96 will meet with a part of the first object in a collision, before other parts of the access control device 92 are able to meet with corresponding other parts of the first object.

[0132] It will be appreciated that, due to the configuration of the interface 96, a first moving object, such as, for example, a truck (or part thereof), will meet with the interface, and, in a collision, the part of the truck which meets the interface will buckle/crush/deform around the interface. In this way, the interface 96 is configured to cause the collided first object and the access control module 10 to become substantially locked together during at least a part of a post-collision time, such that the first object is substantially prevented from rolling-tilting-pitching post-collision movement. The first object is also substantially prevented from upward post-collision movement with respect to the access control module 10.

[0133] It will be appreciated by a person skilled in the art that the substantial locking together of the first moving object and the access control module 10 during at least a part of the post-collision time enabled the access control module to be able to better control movement of the first object, in cooperation with the link 54 and the selected example barrier system 56.

[0134] It will also be appreciated that the substantial locking together at least ameliorates the problem of colliding objects, such as trucks, from pitching upwardly and over the access control module. A person skilled in the art will understand that such controlled of movement of the first object during a post-collision time enables more- controlled dispersion of the kinetic energy of the first moving object through the access control module 10 and through the barrier system 56, via the link 54.

[0135] In other embodiments, the interface 96 may be integrated into, for example, a turnstile, a gate, or an arm barrier (boom gate). The interface 96 may also be

incorporated into other kinds of access control device which are suitable to be used with the access control module 10. The interface 96 should serve the purposes of meeting a part of the first object and causing the first object and the access control module to become substantially locked together during at least a part of a post-collision time, such that the first object is substantially prevented from rolling forward/tilting/pitching post-collision movement and is substantially prevented from upward post-collision movement.

[0136] FIG. 23 shows an example of the access control device 92, from FIG. 22, situated on an embodiment of the access control module 10. As can be seen in FIG. 23, the access control device (traffic barrier 92) provides a means for controlling movement of second moving objects (for example, motor vehicles, people, animals) through the portal 20 of the access control module 10. The access control device 92, with the interface 96 integrated therein, and suitably attached to the access control module 10, provides a means to prevent access of a first moving object (for example, an undesired motor vehicle, such as a truck laden with explosives) into a protected area behind the access control module, or through a border protected by the access control module.

[0137] FIG. 24 shows a configuration of the access control module 10 linked into a barrier system 56. The barrier system includes two barrier modules 57, one each located on either side of the access control module 10.

[0138] FIG. 25 shows a perspective view from the "attack side" of the example configuration shown in FIG. 24.

[0139] FIG. 26 is a perspective view from the "attack side", showing the access control module 10 linked to the barrier system 56, wherein the barrier modules 57 of the barrier system 56 are loaded with removable masses 102. The removable masses are moveably connected to the barrier module frame 60 via a wire mesh arrangement 104. The " wire mesh arrangement 104 may be described as netted rings, which are located around a removable mass 102 and also, where suitably located, are looped around a frame post 62 of the barrier module frame 60.

[0140] In this way, during post-collision movement of the barrier system 56, the base 58 of the barrier module 57 is weighed down by the masses 102. However, the base 58 is able to slide with respect to the ground surface and with respect to the masses 102, wherein the masses provide load so as to prevent rolling/tilting/pitching movement of the barrier module, and the masses 102 provide for higher frictional force between the barrier module base 58 and the surface of the ground. Accordingly, the masses 102 act to cause more-efficient dissipation of kinetic energy from the barrier system 56 into the ground. It will be appreciated that much of the kinetic energy is transformed post-collision into heat and sound energy.

[0141] When the barrier module 57 slides with respect to the removable masses

102, such movement reaches a limit to cause the netted rings 104 to become taught, so that when this unit during movement is reached, the netted rings 104 begin to drag the masses 102 along with the barrier module 57 via the barrier module posts 62 in the barrier module frame 60.

[0142] The barrier module frame 60 is configured with a frame cross bar 64 and a plurality of frame posts 62, so as to provide a more rigid and/or stable barrier frame and barrier module.

[0143] FIG. 27 shows an embodiment of the access control module 10, which includes a narrower access control device 92. The interface 96, which is incorporated into the access control device 92, is also correspondingly narrower. This configuration of the access control module provides two open space portals 20 on either side of the access control device 92, which allows for unimpeded access and exit of, for example, pedestrians, through the access control module, while controlling access and exit of, for example, larger motor vehicles, such as cars, trucks and the like, through the access control module. Of course, the access control device 92 and interface 96 serve to act in stopping unwanted first objects, such as trucks laden with explosives, from progressing through the access control module.

[0144] Also shown in FIG. 27 is an alternative configuration of removable masses

102, 106, wherein there is a bottom row of removable masses 102, with a top row of removable masses 106 (shown in ghost lines) stacked thereon. [0145] FIG. 28 shows an example of movement of the axis control module 10 in cooperation with the link 54 and the barrier system 56, before, during and after a collision event.

[0146] Before the collision the access control module 10A, the link 54 A and the barrier module 57A are aligned. After impact of a first moving object into the access control module, the access control module is shown in a displaced position 10B (shown in ghosted lines), the link 54B is shown to have enabled double hinged movement between the access control module 10B and the barrier module 57B. The barrier module 57B, at this time, has begun to drag the removable masses 102B backwardly.

[0147] At a further time post-collision, the access control module IOC is shown

(shown in fainter ghosted lines) in a final resting position, having dragged the barrier module 57C in to its final resting position, via the link 54C. Further, the removable masses 102C have been dragged back to their final resting position.

[0148] FIG. 29 shows an alternative arrangement with two access control modules

10 linked to a barrier system 56.

[0149] FIG. 30 shows the same arrangement as shown in FIG. 29 from a perspective view from the "attack side".

[0150] FIG. 31 shows an alternative embodiment of the access control module 10, linked to an alternative selected example barrier system 56. In FIG. 31, the embodiment of the link 54 is shown as being integrated with the barrier system 56. In such an

embodiment, the link 54 hinges with respect to the access control module link connector 22. However, there is not double hinged movement between the access control module and the barrier modules 57, which are located on either side of the access control module.

[0151] Similarly, FIG. 32 shows an embodiment where the links are fixed and do not hinge with respect to the barrier system 56. In FIG. 32, the barrier system is monolithic and does not have removable masses. Moreover, it can be seen that one side of the barrier system can be composed of multiple barrier modules 57. [0152] The invention is susceptible to variations, modifications and/or additions other than those specifically described, and it is to be understood that the invention includes all such variations, modifications and/or additions, which fall within the scope of the following claims.

[0153] Throughout this specification and the claims which follow, unless the context requires otherwise, the word "comprise", and variations such as "comprises" and "comprising", will be understood to imply the inclusion of a stated integer or step or group of integers or steps but not the exclusion of any other integer or step or group of integers or steps.

[0154] The reference to any prior art in the specification is not and should not be taken as an acknowledgement or any form of suggestion that the prior art forms part of the common general knowledge.