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Title:
ACCESS LOCKING SYSTEM
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2016/146175
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The invention relates to an access locking system for allowing passengers access to a restricted area comprising a passenger identifying device, a processor unit for storing and/or receiving luggage information data from an airline/airport system based on the passenger's check-in data and for prosecuting an access routine, a luggage checking device for checking the luggage associated with the passenger, wherein the luggage checking device comprises at least a weighing means and one or more sensors for indicating the dimensions of the luggage, a controller to allow access of the passenger and the luggage to the restricted area if the weight and the dimensions of the luggage are within predetermined limits defined by the luggage information data provided by the processor unit, and a barrier adapted to be unlocked for the passenger if the controller allows access. The system is useful for carry-on luggage of a passenger.

Inventors:
SCHMIDT, Robert (Arndtstraße 9, Greifswald, 17489, DE)
Application Number:
EP2015/055592
Publication Date:
September 22, 2016
Filing Date:
March 17, 2015
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
SCHMIDT, Robert (Arndtstraße 9, Greifswald, 17489, DE)
International Classes:
B64F1/36; G06Q10/02; G07B15/04; G07C9/00; G07C9/02
Domestic Patent References:
WO2005087590A12005-09-22
Foreign References:
ES2461940A12014-05-21
EP2390844A12011-11-30
US20110231212A12011-09-22
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
LATZEL, Klaus (Traunstraße 3, Munich, 81825, DE)
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Claims:
CLAIMS

1. An access locking system for allowing passengers access to a restricted area comprising,

a passenger identifying device comprising a scanner for scanning the passenger's boarding card and reading out passenger's check- in data,

a processor unit for storing and/or receiving luggage information data from an airline and/or airport system based on the passenger's check- in data and for prosecuting an access routine,

a luggage checking device for checking the luggage associated with the passenger using the access locking system, wherein the luggage checking device comprises at least a weighing means and one or more sensors for indicating the dimensions of the luggage,

a controller associated with the weighing means and the one or more sensors, wherein the controller is adapted to allow access of the passenger and the luggage to the restricted area if the weight and the dimensions of the luggage are within predetermined limits defined by the luggage information data provided by the processor unit, and

a barrier adapted to be unlocked for the passenger if the controller allows access, wherein the luggage is any carry-on luggage of a passenger intended for bringing into the restricted area.

2. An access locking system according to claim 1, further comprising means for hindering the passenger to bypass the barrier when being locked by the controller.

3. An access locking system according to claim 1 or claim 2, wherein the processor unit receives luggage data with regard to the pieces, weights and sizes allowed to be carried on by the passenger using the access locking system and the controller is adapted to indicate the weight and size for each piece of the luggage of the passenger and to allow access if any piece of the luggage is within the predetermined limits.

4. An access locking system according to any of the aforementioned claims, wherein the luggage checking device comprises a conveyor band for transporting the luggage of the passenger from a luggage injection area to the restricted area via the weighing means and the one or more sensors.

5. An access locking system according to any of the aforementioned claims, further comprising means for returning the luggage back to the luggage injection area and/or a drop-off system for processing the luggage indicated by the controller as exceeding the predetermined weight and/or dimension limits. 6. An access locking system according to claim 4, wherein the drop-off system comprises a monitor indicating the exceeding of the predetermined weight and/or dimension limits, inputting means for assessing optional supplementary payment, printing means for printing a luggage tag, and conveying means for conveying the checked luggage to a conveyer system for checked luggage. 7. An access locking system according to any of the aforementioned claims, further comprising a door to a check-in and/or drop-off counter for manual luggage drop-off

8. An access locking system according to any of the aforementioned claims, wherein the passenger identifying system and the controller are interconnected with the check-in data processor for verifying the check- in status and luggage status of the passenger. 9. An access locking system according to any of the aforementioned claims, further comprising a security check apparatus for checking the content of the luggage.

10. An access locking system according to any of the aforementioned claims, further comprising a passenger monitoring system for monitoring the passenger during the use of the access locking system. 11. An access locking system according to claim 10, further comprising an alarm system for sending an alarm signal if the passenger leaves the access locking system without allowed access and/or if the passenger leaves the luggage in or at the output area of the access locking system.

12. An access locking system according to claim 10, further comprising means for providing image data of the passenger to a supervisor monitor, means for exchanging image or voice or electronic data from the passenger to the supervisor and from the supervisor to the passenger, and means for manually or electronically locking or opening the barrier by the supervisor.

Description:
ACCESS LOCKING SYSTEM

The present invention relates to an access locking system for allowing passengers access to a restricted area, especially the access to a gate at an airport, where restrictions as to the luggage, such as to pieces or weight or dimensions of luggage, have to be respected by the passengers.

Generally, at airports or other areas with restrictions as to the carry-on luggage, the luggage of passengers or people (in the following called passengers) has to be controlled to be in conformity with the regulations applying to the restricted area before the passengers enter the restricted area. Such situation applies for example at a gate where the boarding personal has to check the pieces, dimensions and weight of the carry-on luggage. In the past, this check mostly was done during the check-in process at the check-in counter by the staff of the airline or airport. In the last years, more and more passengers travel with carry-on luggage only or have already checked-in at home or via their mobile devices so that they only come to the drop-off machines at the airport. The drop-off machines mostly are self-service stations with reduced personal of an airline. Therefore, there is more and more the problem that passengers with heavy-weight or big carry-on luggage go directly through the security check and proceed to the gate. At the gate, the heavy-weight and oversized carry-on luggage must be identified and checked into the airplane by manual intervention of the boarding crew. In order to check the dimensions of the carry-on luggage, the airlines usually use cages in which the luggage in conformity of the respective airline's regulation must be placed before you can proceed to the security check, the gate or through the gate to the airplane, respectively. If the luggage does not fit into these cages, the passenger must drop the luggage at the gate to be delivered to the cargo compartment by the boarding crew separately. This manual checking and/or loading of oversized or overweight luggage being not in conformity with the airline's regulations take a lot of time for the boarding crew, needs more manpower and is annoying for the passenger because he has to go to the luggage or baggage claim area at the destination airport. This takes him additional time and, thus, there are often lengthy discussions between the boarding crew and the passengers if the luggage is not in conformity with the airline's regulations.

Considering the above problems which can be seen at most of the airports worldwide, the inventor recognized that the problem of manually checking the oversized and heavy-weight luggage at the gate need to be solved. Therefore, it is an objective of the present invention, to provide a solution for being faced at the gate with heavy-weight or oversized luggage.

This and other problems have been solved by the access locking system for allowing passengers access to a restricted area according to claim 1. The dependent claims solve the same and further objectives by defining further embodiments of this automatic carry-on luggage check system.

The access locking system according to the present invention is an access locking system for allowing a passenger access to a restricted area only after his carry-on luggage has been checked for being in conformity with the luggage regulations of the restricted area. The access locking system comprises:

- a passenger identifying device comprising a scanner for scanning the passenger's boarding card and reading out passenger's check- in data,

- a processor unit for storing and/or receiving luggage information data from an airline system based on the passenger's check- in data and for prosecuting an access routine, - a luggage checking device for checking the luggage associated with the passenger using the access locking system, wherein the luggage checking device comprises at least a weighing means and one or more sensors for indicating the dimensions of the luggage,

- a controller associated with the weighing means and the one or more sensors, wherein the controller is adapted to allow access of the passenger and the luggage to the restricted area if the weight and the dimensions of the luggage are within predetermined limits defined by the luggage information data provided by the processor unit, and

- a barrier adapted to be unlocked for the passenger if the controller allows access.

The luggage to be checked by the access locking system is any carry-on luggage of a passenger intended for bringing into the restricted area. Carry-on luggage is in the sense of the present invention any luggage which is carried with a passenger, such as a suitcase, a bag, laptop case, or anything else. Personal belongings such as small handbags for women or laptops or tablets or a book do generally do not fall within the definition of carry-on luggage. Nevertheless, the definition can be predetermined by each airline separately and it can be shown on a screen to the passenger what is allowed as personal belonging and what has to be checked and controlled by the access locking system as defined herein. The information as to the personal belongings can be received by the processor unit from the luggage information data provided by the airline or airport system or can be based on the passenger's check-in data, or any combination thereof.

According to the invention, a passenger identifying device can be any scanner such as a barcode scanner, a picture scanner or a reader which is suitable for reading out the check-in data from a passenger's boarding pass or, alternatively, from passenger's input of the flight data and passenger's data or passenger's ID card if the boarding pass is not in a format which can be scanned by the scanner. However, in this case, a boarding pass has to be already issued and stored in the airline system. Otherwise, the passenger is asked to stop the access routine and to go to the check-in counter or helpdesk for further information and processing with preparing a readable boarding pass.

The processor unit comprised in the system is adapted for storing and/or receiving luggage information data from an airline system based on the passenger's check- in data. Thus, the processor unit usually has any data of the checked passengers stored in an internal storage or will be connected with the airline system in which the check- in data and passenger's data are stored. Based on the boarding pass information and the check-in data stored in the airline system or processor unit, the processor unit goes on with prosecuting an access routine. In the process routine, the processor unit receives the predetermined limit of pieces of carry-on luggage allowed as well as the predetermined limits of the dimensions and weights of each of the luggage pieces allowed for the passenger presently using the system. The controller in the system is associated with the weighing means and the one or more sensors. The controller receives the luggage information data form the processor unit, identifies and compares the weight and the dimensions of the luggage with the luggage information data, and is adapted to allow access of the passenger and the luggage to the restricted area if the weight and the dimensions of the luggage are within the predetermined limits defined by the luggage information data. If the dimensions or the weight or both, the dimensions and the weight, do exceed the predetermined limits, the controller does not open the barrier and/or does not allow the passenger to enter the restricted area. At the same time, the controller does not transport the luggage into the restricted area, so that the passenger has the possibility to check-in the luggage which has identified to be oversized or overweight luggage.

The predetermined limits of the luggage are either the weight or the dimensions of the carry- on luggage. That means the controller receives the total weight from the weighing means and the length, width, and height from the one or more scanners of the luggage checking device. In order to comply with the requirements of the dimensions, generally all three parameters, namely the length, the width, and the height, of a luggage must be in conformity with the airline's regulation. If one of the length, the width, or the height would be outside the predetermined limits, the luggage is identified as being oversized and has to be checked in by the passenger.

The barrier according to the invention can be any physical or optical barrier which can be closed physically or by optically observing any passing of the passenger before the access has been allowed. That means, a barrier in the sense of the invention can be a star handle (e.g. waist height or full height turnstile), a door such as a sliding or swinging door in any height, e.g. a full height or waist height door, a safety light barrier connected to an alarm system or the like. Alternatively, ultrasound systems or similar acoustic systems can be used as well in the same manner as the optical sensors or in addition to the above-described barriers.

In airports, for example, the access locking system of the invention is advantageously used in front of the security check of an airport in order to avoid that any passenger's luggage not in conformation of the airline's regulations as to the weight and dimensions of carry-on luggage is brought into the restricted area behind the security check and to the gate area. This facilitates the process that the passengers not personally checked-in by an airline crew member will be checked automatically and can be directed back to the check-in or bag drop off counters of the respective airline in order to check in or drop off the respective luggage piece. Alternatively, the access locking system can be at the entrance of each gate or gate area with a number of gates so that the boarding process is not hindered by carry-on luggage which must be handled manually at the gate. In this case, however, it is useful that the system of the invention is combined with a bag drop off system and luggage handling system which directs each checked luggage directly to the fright carrier at each gate to be loaded into the plane without substantial delay. In order to have enough time for the freight carriers to handle the additional luggage which is checked-in after it was identified as being not in conformity with the carry-on luggage regulations of the airline, the access locking system is located between the general check-in counters or bag drop off counters and the security check, because the security check usually is the process with the longest waiting times. If the access locking system is directly located before the security check, the passenger clearance can be timed in nearly the same clearance interval as the security check to avoid that long waiting lines are between both check points. The clearance interval can easily be adjusted either automatically or manually by the staff of the security check if the access locking system is located quite before the security check. For example, if the waiting line at the security check is longer then regularly, the access locking system clearance interval can artificially prolonged by respective controlling means which can be controlled by the security check staff or the operator of the access locking system or by automatic feedback control.

The access locking system is thereby adapted that any passenger passes this system before he enters the restricted area, for example the area of the security check or the gates. If passengers do not have any carry-on luggage, they can input this information either by using a button or via a touch system or the like, so that they can process to the restricted area by giving them access through the barrier. If passengers, however, are not able to use this system or have problems during the use of the system, a manual check line where the same check is done by a staff member can be used for these passengers. This can be an extra line next to the automatic lines with the access locking system installed. For example, families with small children or babies or disabled passengers or passengers needing assistance in any circumstance could proceed to this special line for checking the carry-on luggage. This special line could also be a special security check in line where the security check and the carry-on luggage check is carried out. This can for example be done at the same time by the same staff.

The access locking system of the present invention is not only suitable for airports, but can be used at any entrance to a restricted area such as ships, trains, concert halls, theaters, museums, or stadiums and similar areas with specific requirements for the carry-on luggage.

Further aspects and problems solved will be described in the following at the hand of exemplified embodiments of the access locking system according to the present invention. The embodiments are preferred possibilities to change or adapt or adjust the system to the respective intended usage, but without the intention to restrict the invention to the specific embodiments. In the following section, any aspect can be embodied to the above defined system according to the invention either alone or together with one or more of the preferred embodiments described. Thus, even a specific combination is not explicitly mentioned herein, any combination of the single embodiments is encompassed herewith and can be claimed in a separate claim. As the access locking system according to the present invention is used for blocking the access of passengers with unauthorized carry-on luggage or for passengers having not checked their carry-on luggage at all, the system preferably further comprises means for hindering the passenger to bypass the barrier when being locked by the controller. That means that a passenger trying to step over the barrier or not using the system correctly will be notified by the system. Bypassing in the sense of the invention does not only mean that the passenger itself passes over the barrier, but it means also that the passenger does not put any carry-on luggage without being checked through or over the barrier or pushing it under the barrier to the restricted area. After the notification of such an event, the controller preferably sends an alarm to the staff monitoring the access locking system. This can be done by a noise or an optical visualization of the alarm event.

Exemplified means for notifying the passenger stepping over the barrier or crossing through the barrier without allowance by the system can be an optical sensor such as a light beam or laser beam which gives an alarm if the beam is interrupted in a state of a blocked barrier. Ultrasound sensors or the like can be used as well. Another example is camera observation of the barrier by a monitoring staff or by a personal directly at the barrier. In order to reduce manpower at such a system and to automatize the system, optical sensors are preferred. According to another preferred embodiment, the processor unit receives luggage data with regard to the pieces, weights and sizes allowed to be carried on by the passenger using the access locking system from an airline server or the data are stored in the system before for each airline. Usually, each airline has different regulations as to the carry-on luggage so that it has to be checked individually for each passenger depending on the boarding card information. From the boarding card information, the airline, the flight, and the boarding class can be gathered and depending on these information, the carry-on luggage regulations can be determined by the processor unit. Thus, after the passenger has put the individual boarding information into the system, especially by scanning the boarding card, the processor unit knows how many pieces with which weight and dimensions are allowed for this passenger. Generally, the airlines' regulations allow not more than two pieces for first class or business class passengers at the moment. Some changes as to these regulations may apply in the future or at the moment. The following definitions are based on these presently applying regulations for carry-on luggage of most of the airlines at the filing date of the present application. The skilled person can derive from the present application how to adjust these limits, if there might be changes in the future. The general dimensional limits by most of the airlines are 55 x 40 x 20 cm and the weight limits are 8 or 10 kg for each piece at maximum. In addition to these luggage regulations, there are some airlines allowing laptops or small bags for the ladies separately. For these personal belongings, some airlines have regulations as well. Generally, those pieces of luggage should have a maximum weight of 2 kg and dimensions of not bigger than 40 x 30 x 10, for example. Some airlines do not have weight limits or have slightly different dimensional limits so that it is useful that this information can be stored for each individual airline in the system or be read out from the airline system. The processor unit then provides the controller with the predetermined limits for the passenger. After having received the predetermined limits from the processor unit, the controller is adapted to indicate the weight and size for each piece of the luggage of the passenger and to allow access if any piece of the luggage is within these predetermined limits. If the access is allowed, the barrier for the passenger will be opened and the carry-on luggage checked will be transported to the restricted area as well. This is preferably done at the same time to avoid that the passenger is within the restricted area and the luggage is not correctly passed through the system into the restricted area. In addition, if the passenger does not enter the restricted area by the barrier, the system blocks the transport of the luggage into the restricted area in order to avoid that luggage will be left at the system unattended by the passenger or can be taken by an unauthorized person.

For the transportation of the luggage of the passenger through the system, it is preferred that the luggage checking device comprises a conveyor band. The conveyor band is adjusted for transporting the luggage from a luggage injection area to the restricted area via the weighing means and the one or more sensors for identifying the dimensions of the luggage. The conveyor band can be a single belt on which the luggage can be put and which transports the luggage to an area where the weight of the luggage is measured. At the same time or before or after the weighing of the luggage, it can be measured in all three dimensions by one or more scanners, preferably a 3D scanner system. Alternatively, this can be done manually by pushing it through a mechanical or virtual gate with the maximum dimensions allowed for the luggage three times to check all three dimensions of the luggage separately, that means the length, the width, and the height. As 3D scanner systems are known, it is preferred to use such optical or acoustical scanners for checking the dimensions by building up a virtual cage around the luggage. If the cage is interrupted at one side, the luggage will be identified as being outside the predetermined limits. Exemplified embodiments of such conveyor bands can be roll conveyors, belt conveyors, band conveyors, flat conveyors or similar conveyor bands. It can consist of only one conveyor band or of a number of conveyor bands such as an in-feed conveyor or an exit conveyor and a number of conveyor belts inside a housing where the weighing means and the one or more scanners are located. It can be advantageous if the conveyor band has one or more switches useful for providing a waiting position for luggage already controlled but waiting for being transported to the restricted area. This is, for example, useful if more than one pieces of luggage are checked by the same passenger. Thus, during one luggage is checked for the weight and the dimensions, a second or further (e.g. a third, fourth, fifth or the like) luggage can be placed in the waiting position. The passenger can be informed on a monitor which piece of his luggage is checked at the moment.

According to an embodiment of the system according to the invention, the conveyor band is adapted to transport the luggage into the direction of the restricted area or in the opposite direction for returning the luggage which is not in conformity with the regulations or after the passenger has interrupted and stopped the checking process back to the injection area. It is also possible, that the luggage can be checked at this time by the passenger so that it is transported over a switch to a drop-off system or separate handling system of checked luggage. Therefore, the access locking system optionally comprises means for returning the luggage back to the luggage injection area and/or a drop-off system for processing the luggage indicated by the controller as exceeding the predetermined weight and/or dimension limits.

As already mentioned before, it is generally necessary that the passenger puts information into the system or is informed of the actual checking status of his luggage. Therefore, the access locking system according to another embodiment comprises a monitor or screen and inputting means such as buttons or virtual buttons at a touch pad. If a drop-off system is integrally provided in the access locking system, it is therefore advantageously that the drop-off system comprises a monitor indicating the exceeding of the predetermined weight and/or dimension limits, inputting means for assessing optional supplementary payment, printing means for printing a luggage tag, and conveying means for conveying the checked luggage to a conveyer system for checked luggage. In this case, the passenger can easily check his luggage at this system without need to go back to the check-in counters of the airline and waiting time for an additional check of the remaining carry-on luggage.

As some passengers may not be able to use the system without personal assistance or do not have a valid card for payment, the access locking system according to the aforementioned embodiments comprises a door to a check-in and/or drop-off counter for manual luggage drop-off In this case, the passenger can decide to use either the automatic drop-off system of the access locking system of the invention or the general check-in or bag drop-off counters where he can speak to staff or supervisors of the airline or the airport.

In order to get the information needed for processing the access routine with varying luggage regulation data based on the airlines, the passenger identifying system and the controller are preferably interconnected with the check-in data processor for verifying the check-in status and luggage status of the passenger. As already explained before, this enables the system of the invention to handle luggage more accurately and also according to different regulations of each airline. It is common that the luggage dimension, weight and pieces allowed to bring on board depends on the airline, the boarding class (passengers of the first class or business class, or frequent travelers having a special status are allowed to carry more than one piece and/or heavier luggage than the regular passengers), the plane, and so forth. Therefore, it is advantageous if this information can easily be derived from the boarding pass. After the passenger has checked in, the boarding pass is available and the system can derive the data from the check- in data processor of the airline system. Accordingly, it is also possible that the system shows the passenger via the monitor or screen what can be taken on board as so called personal belongings such as a small bag for ladies, a laptop, tablet, mobile, or book. Then, the passenger can take this information and can put only that carry-on luggage into the luggage checking device needed for being checked through for compliance with the carry-on luggage regulations of the airline used. Such an interconnection with the check-in data processor enables the system also to collect data of the carry-on luggage of each passenger booked on one flight. This collection enables the airline to set a limit of carry-on luggage pieces or of the total weight of carry-on luggage which is intended for one flight. If a predetermined limit has been reached for one flight, the system can automatically request the further passengers not yet passed through the access locking system to drop-off their luggage in order to facilitate the boarding process at the gate. In addition to this function of the system, the interconnection with the check- in data processor enables the airline or airport or the freight operators to receive data as to the total weight or total pieces of carry-on luggage for each of the flights separately.

According to a further preferred embodiment, the access locking system according to the invention can be integrally provided into the security check counter or line. Therefore, it is preferred that the access locking system further comprises a security check apparatus for checking the content of the luggage, for example, by means of x-ray scanners or the like. That means that the luggage will be scanned not only for the weight, the dimensions, and the pieces, but also will at the same time or in the same line scanned for dangerous or not allowed goods such as knifes, arms, explosive goods, and so on.

As the passengers using such automatic systems sometimes try to use the service stations incorrect or try to avoid checking the carry-on luggage correct because of overweight or oversize, it is preferred that the access locking system according to the invention further comprises a passenger monitoring system for monitoring the passenger during the use of the access locking system. If the system is not correctly working or is misused, the operator watching the process via the monitoring system can assist or stop the process.

For this embodiment, it is also preferable to embody an alarm system for sending an alarm signal if the passenger leaves the access locking system without allowed access and/or if the passenger leaves the luggage in or at the output area of the access locking system. Security personal or staff can promptly check the situation and assist the passenger if assistance is necessary. This ensures that nobody enters the restricted area with carry-on luggage having oversize or overweight or with a not allowed high number of luggage pieces. Of course, even if such an alarm system is installed, it is preferred to check the access process by staff of the airport. The staff can also be helpful to explain the system and to assist those passengers who are not used to use such devices.

The monitoring of the passenger can be accomplished with means for providing image data of the passenger to a supervisor monitor, means for exchanging image or voice or electronic data from the passenger to the supervisor and from the supervisor to the passenger, and means for manually or electronically locking or opening the barrier by the supervisor. Then, the supervisor can monitor and control the system from a separate room or place and does not need to be located directly at the system. This enables to watch over and monitor more than one system at the same time. The supervisor can sit in a control room and monitoring a number of such access locking devices at the same time.

The access locking system according to the invention was described at one specific example of such systems for the use at airports. However, it is clear for a skilled person that this is only a preferred usage of such systems and that a lot of similar usages are possible, for example, for passengers travelling by train or ship, or for people visiting museums, theaters, sport events, or the like. The present invention will now be exemplified by describing embodiments of the access locking system in accordance with the present invention with reference to the accompanied drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a schematic plan view of the access locking system according an embodiment of the invention, and

Fig. 2 is a schematic side view of the access locking system according to another embodiment of the invention.

Fig. 1 shows a plan view of an access locking system according to the invention. The system consists of a waiting line arrangement 10, a conveyor belt 20, a luggage checking apparatus 30, a boarding card scanner 35, a bar barrier 40, an exit to a restriction area 50, and an exit to a check- in or bag drop-off counter 60.

The waiting line arrangement 10 is thus configured that the passengers individually come to the luggage checking apparatus 30. The passenger checking his carry-on luggage put his carry-on luggage on the conveyor band 20, scan his boarding pass at the boarding card scanner 35 so that the system can check the check-in status of the passenger. The routine gives him the information as to the airline regulations as to his luggage which are valid for his flight via a monitor. Then, he is asked how many pieces of carry-on luggage he will check by the system. If he has no carry-on luggage, then the system will open the barrier 40 so that he can proceed to the exit and enter the restriction area 50 through the open barrier 40. If he answers that he want to check one or more pieces of his luggage, the conveyor belt will transport the luggage into the luggage checking apparatus 30. In this the weighing means and 3D scanner system and a switch for the waiting line for the second or third piece of luggage are integrated and he will receive the information as to the weight and the dimensions of his luggage separately for each luggage or will only be informed that his luggage fits the regulations of the booked flight. In this case, he will be informed either by the monitor or a flag, such as a green light, and the barrier 40 is opened by the system so that he can enter the exit to the restriction area 50. At the same time as he goes through the barrier, his luggage is transported into the restricted area by the conveyor belt 20 as well. He can then take his luggage and proceed to the gate. In this embodiment, the barrier is a bar barrier with three rotating bars. Generally, the waiting line and the barrier are adjusted such that the passengers cannot easily step over the barrier or go around the barrier or can go with carry-on luggage such as a bag or trolley through the barrier. By means of a three bar rotating barrier, the rotating bars usually hinder the passengers to pull their bags through the barrier. Thus, they have to lift it over the barrier which can easily be monitored by the staff. In case one or more of the pieces of luggage are not in conformity with the regulations, for example having overweight or oversize, or if there are more pieces than allowed by the airline, he will be asked to check the respective luggage by payment of an additional fee. Then a bag tag will be printed and placed by the passenger at his luggage. After the passenger has finalized his check- in of the luggage, the respectively checked luggage is transported automatically by a switch in the conveyor band system to a luggage handling system of the airport and to the freight operators so that can be loaded into the airplane. The luggage in conformity of the regulations of the airline will be processed as has been described before. Thus, the passenger is informed of the finalization of the checking process and the barrier is opened and the luggage is transported to the restricted area 50 by the conveyor band 20. If the passenger cannot pay the fee or cannot finalize the luggage checking process, he can stop the process and the luggage is transported back by the conveyor band to the injection area. Then, the passenger can take his luggage and go to the bag drop-off counter or check-in counter by the exit 60.

Fig. 2 shows a side view of the access locking system according to another embodiment according to the invention. The system again consists of a waiting line arrangement 10, a conveyor belt 20, a luggage checking apparatus 30, a boarding card scanner 35, a bar barrier 40, and an exit to a restriction area 50 as has been described before. In this embodiment, the barrier 40 is a swinging door. In order to avoid the lifting of any luggage over the door, a sensor 70 in the form of a laser light is used. If a passenger lifts his bag through the light beam of the sensor 70, an alarm signal will be given to the staff. Thus, the lifting of luggage over the barrier or the overrunning of the barrier, especially, by stepping over the door, can be easily monitored and stopped.

The invention was described at specific examples and embodiments. It will be appreciated by the skilled persons that numerous variations and modifications can be made to the herein exemplified embodiments without departing from the general scope of the present disclosure. Any embodiments or examples described herein are intended for illustrating the invention only, but are not considered to be restrictive for the invention which is solely defined by the following claims.