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Title:
ADJUSTABLE LUMINAIRE AND METHOD USING HARVESTED NFC SIGNALS
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/024506
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The invention provides a luminaire having an adjustable illumination and/or sensing operation. The luminaire comprises at least one adjustable component, configured to adjust an illumination or sensing operation as a function of a position or orientation of that component. The adjustable component is configured by means of one or more actuators, being driven by a power signal generated by harvesting NFC wireless signals. In particular embodiments, a luminous output direction of the luminaire may be adjustable by means of the adjustable component and/or a direction of sensitivity of the luminaire to one or more input signals may be adjustable by means of the adjustable component.

Inventors:
DE SAMBER, Marc, Andre (5656 AE Eindhoven, 5656 AE, NL)
ABBO, Anteneh, Alemu (5656 AE Eindhoven, 5656 AE, NL)
KARAGKOUNI, Katerina (5656 AE Eindhoven, 5656 AE, NL)
DELLIMORE, Kiran, Hamilton (5656 AE Eindhoven, 5656 AE, NL)
VAN DE WOUW, Doortje (5656 AE Eindhoven, 5656 AE, NL)
Application Number:
EP2017/068451
Publication Date:
February 08, 2018
Filing Date:
July 21, 2017
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
PHILIPS LIGHTING HOLDING B.V. (High Tech Campus 45, 5656 AE Eindhoven, 5656 AE, NL)
International Classes:
H04B5/00; H05B33/08; H05B37/02
Domestic Patent References:
WO2015025267A12015-02-26
WO2014102797A12014-07-03
WO2015025267A12015-02-26
Foreign References:
US20130250590A12013-09-26
GB2517948A2015-03-11
US20130250590A12013-09-26
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
VERWEIJ, Petronella, Danielle et al. (Philips Lightning B.V, Philips Lightning Intellectual PropertyHigh Tech Campus 45, 5656 AE Eindhoven, 5656 AE, NL)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS:

1. A luminaire (10) comprising:

a housing (12);

at least one light source (16) arranged within the housing;

a mechanically adjustable component (22, 21, 18, 46) for configuring an operation of the luminaire as a function of the orientation or position of said mechanically adjustable component;

an NFC (near- field communication) receiver (28);

a power harvesting device (30) adapted to convert NFC signals received by the NFC receiver into energy and to temporarily store said energy; and

at least one actuator (24), driven by said stored energy, and adapted to change the orientation or position of said mechanically adjustable component.

2. A luminaire (10) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the adjustable component (22, 21, 18, 46) is angularly adjustable.

3. A luminaire (10) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the adjustable component (22, 21, 18, 46) comprises the at least one light source (16).

4. A luminaire (10) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the adjustable component (22, 21, 18, 46) comprises an optical element (22, 21) for adjusting a luminous output of the at least one light source (16).

5. A luminaire (10) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the adjustable component (22, 21, 18, 46) comprises a sensor element (52) for controlling the operation of the luminaire.

6. A luminaire (10) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the luminaire comprises a sensor element (52) for controlling an operation of the luminaire, said sensor being responsive to an external stimulus, and wherein the mechanically adjustable component (22, 21, 18, 46) comprises a deflecting element for deflecting said stimulus.

7. The luminaire of claim 6, wherein the stimulus is an optical stimulus.

8. The luminaire of claim 6, wherein the stimulus is an acoustic stimulus.

9. A luminaire (10) as claimed in claim 1, further comprising an NFC interface unit (32), operatively coupled to the NFC receiver (28) and the actuator (24), and being adapted to change an actuation mode of the actuator in response to receipt by the NFC receiver of one or more predetermined NFC signals.

10. A luminaire (10) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the housing (12) is hermetically sealed.

11. A luminaire (10) as claimed in claim 1, wherein the actuator (24) is a piezoelectric actuator.

12. A luminaire (10) as claimed in claim 11, wherein the actuator (24) is a squiggle motor. 13. An adjustment method for a luminaire (10), the luminaire comprising:

at least one light source (16),

a mechanically adjustable component (22, 21, 18, 46) for configuring an operation of the luminaire as a function of the relative orientation or position of said mechanically adjustable component,

an NFC (near- field communication) receiver (28),

a power harvesting device (30) adapted to convert NFC signals received by the NFC receiver into energy and to temporarily store said energy, and

at least one actuator (24),

the method comprising:

receiving NFC signals using the NFC receiver;

converting said NFC signals into energy by means of the power harvesting device and storing said energy; and

driving an actuator, by means of said stored energy, to change an orientation or position of the adjustable component.

14. A control method for controlling adjustment of a luminaire (10), the luminaire comprising:

at least one light source (16);

a mechanically adjustable component (22, 21, 18, 46) for configuring an operation of the luminaire as a function of the relative orientation or position of said component;

an NFC receiver (28);

a power harvesting device (30) adapted to convert NFC signals received by the NFC receiver into energy and to temporarily store said energy; and

at least one actuator (24), driven by said stored energy, and adapted to change the orientation or position of said component using said stored energy,

the method comprising:

transmitting, by means of an NFC transmitter, a pattern of one or more NFC signals to the NFC receiver of the luminaire, each signal in the pattern having a duration corresponding to a desired duration of activation of the actuator.

15. A computer program product for controlling adjustment of a luminaire (10), the computer program product comprising a computer readable storage medium having program instructions embodied therewith, the program instructions executable by a processor to cause the processor to perform the steps of claim 14.

Description:
Adjustable Luminaire and method using harvested NFC signals

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a luminaire having adjustable internal components, and adjustment methods for luminaires. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

For many lighting applications, in particular for urban and street lighting, it is desirable to provide flexibility in the operation of the luminaire, for example to enable adjustment of direction or shape of the luminous output, or to enable adjustment in the sensitivity of the luminaire to certain input signals.

Traditionally, such flexibility has been enabled by providing mechanically adjustable internal components, which allow configuration of optical or sensing

functionalities. This typically requires manual physical manipulation of internal parts.

US2013/0250590 shows a motor-driven luminaire that can be oriented acording to the command send by a remote control. The luminaire needs to be powered for using the motor.

Such solutions however are far from optimal. In particular, to enable physical manipulation of internal parts, luminaires must feature accessible inner components, typically through providing a housing which is removable or which features an releasable access window. This causes problems both for security and for physical integrity: a removable housing opens the possibility of tampering by unauthorised persons, and removable housing parts may compromise external sealing of the housing, which may leave the device vulnerable to ingress of water, dirt or other contaminants. These may affect performance or lifetime of the device.

WO2015/025267 shows a programmable lighting device that can be set for adjusting some parameter using Near Field Communication (NFC). The use of NFC enables to set some parameter in a chip that can be powered by the communication field. So it is possible to set some parameter inside a lighting device before connecting it to power main. As it is also disclosed in ISO 14443 standard, such NFC is used for powering one or few integrated circuits which do not consum a lot of energy. One solution might be to provide a lockable housing. However, where there is a large network of lighting units to be overseen, managing a large number of different physical keys may be difficult or impractical, particularly if these must be carried by mobile engineering teams. Conversely, providing one single master key which can unlock all luminaires may undermine any security advantage gained by implementing locks.

To circumvent the above described issues, it would desirable to provide a luminaire having remotely configurable internal parts, thereby enabling adjustability but without necessarily requiring direct physical access to internal components.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention is defined by the claims.

It has been recognised by the inventors that an apparent solution to the above- described problem might be to provide mechatronically adjustable internal components within a sealed luminaire housing for example, to enable adjustment of luminaire operations without requiring direct physical access. However, it has further been recognised by the inventors that such a solution carries significant potential difficulties. In particular, there are potential issues surrounding effective powering of mechatronic adjustable components.

It is very often impractical, or undesirable for instance, to power actuation components (for driving adjustment) using a mains power supply of the device. This is particularly the case where adjustment is to be performed during installation or otherwise while an engineer is in close proximity to the luminaire. For reasons of safety, the mains power must often be switched off at these times. Also, it may simply be undesirable in many cases to power micro-actuation circuits from a high-power mains source. It may risk damaging the circuits, and the necessary step-down electronics may increase bulk, weight and cost of the device.

Although a potential solution might be to provide means for manually connecting a dedicated external (low-energy) power source to the device when adjustment is being performed, the inventors have recognised that this solution would have implications for physical integrity of the luminaire. In particular, to provide electrical connectors extending through a housing of the device to an accessible outer surface may undermine the hermeticity of a sealed housing.

There is desired therefore an improved means for providing a luminaire having adjustable internal parts to enable configuration of an operation of the luminaire, without requiring physical access to the adjustable parts, and which do not require any connection with a mains power source.

Accordingly, in accordance with an aspect of the invention, there is provided a luminaire comprising:

a housing;

at least one light source arranged within the housing;

a mechanically adjustable component for configuring an operation of the luminaire as a function of the orientation or position of said mechanically adjustable component;

a NFC (near- field communication) receiver;

a power harvesting device adapted to convert NFC signals received by the NFC receiver into energy and to temporarily store said energy; and

at least one actuator, driven by said estored, and adapted to change the orientation or position of said mechanically adjustable component.

Embodiments of the invention thus make use of Near Field Communication

(NFC) technology to provide a wireless and contactless power supply for driving internal adjustment electronics. In particular, embodiments comprise means for capturing and processing NFC transmissions, and converting these into a usable form of low-power electrical energy. This harvested electrical energy signal may then be used to drive at least one actuator provided within the luminaire to adjust an orientation or position of at least one adjustable component within the device. Intuitively, the skilled person might not consider using NFC as a remote power source due to the low intensity of such signals, which typically are too weak to actuate many actuated components. However, the present inventors have realized that certain components may be effectively actuated by power harvested from NFC signals. The energy harvesting can be done during few additionnal second that enables to accumulate sufficient energy for driving a mechanical actuator. The actuator should also be a very low power actuator in such a way that sufficient energy can be drawn from a portable device used as a NFC reader like a smartphone.

Embodiments thus enable contactless adjustment of internal luminaire components, without the need for direct physical access. Luminaires may be provided which are fully hermetically sealed, and without the need for hinged or removable parts to be built into the housing. NFC signals may be transmitted wirelessly through a solid housing.

Additionally, by using harvested wireless signals, direct electrical contact with internal components is not required. This thus avoids the need to provide electrical connectors extending through the luminaire housing to an accessible outer surface. This again allows for a high-integrity hermetic sealing.

Furthermore, use of wireless communication signals allows for direct independent powering of adjustment electronics in isolation from any mains power supply feeding the luminaire. Use of NFC technology in particular enables powering to be achieved by a wide range of extensively distributed and readily available mobile communication and computing devices (e.g. smartphones and tablets). NFC enabled devices are already commonplace among ordinary consumers and hence this technology allows powering to be achieved by users immediately, and without the burden of additional costs (in order to acquire a dedicated wireless transmitter for example).

NFC protocols are universally recognised and widely implemented across a range of technologies and applications. Solutions of the present invention hence take advantage of a highly well-understood, off-the-shelf technology.

Use of NFC furthermore enables easy integration into embodiments of data transfer functionality, to enable capturing of data from the luminaire by an NFC enabled device. In examples, this data may relate to a wide range of aspects of luminaire

performance, status, usage and condition for instance. It may, in certain examples, provide real-time feedback related to the adjustment of internal components itself.

As stated above, embodiments of the provided luminaire include at least one adjustable component for configuring an operation of the luminaire as a function of the orientation or position of said component. The orientation or position of the component is adjusted by means of at least one provided actuator.

According to at least one set of embodiments, the adjustable component may be angularly adjustable. The adjustable component may for example have an intrinsic directionality which is adjustable as a function of an orientation of the component. The component may in examples have an intrinsic input or output angle or directionality for example, which is adjustable as a function of an orientation of that component.

According to at least one subset of embodiments, the adjustable component may be for configuring a luminous output of the luminaire. For example, the adjustable component may be for configuring an angular direction of said luminous output of the luminaire.

In particular examples, the adjustable component may comprise the at least one light source. The adjustable component may for instance consist of a carrier of the light sources, wherein a luminous output direction is adjusted by adjusting a tilt angle of said carrier, so as to direct or point the at least one light source in different directions.

In further examples, the adjustable component may comprise an optical element for adjusting a luminous output of the at least one light source.

There may be provided for instance a lens or other optical processing or manipulating element, arranged for example in optical communication with the at least one light source. Alternatively there may be provided a physical beam-directing element, such as a directional collimator for instance.

The optical element may be for manipulating the propagation of an optical wave out of the device. The optical element may for instance be an optical steering element, adapted to alter an angle of propagation of the wave out of the device. Alternatively, the optical element may comprise a baffle arrangement adapted to change a direction of propagation and/or change a shape or profile of the wave. The optical element may in particular examples comprise a lens, or other steering element, such as a collimator or a refractive plate.

The 'angular direction' of the luminous output may in examples be a solid angular direction. In this sense, it may refer to a range or spread of angular directions defining or constituting some solid angle, or may refer to a single 'average' or central direction defined by a central axis of the solid angle covered by the luminous output. The angular direction may refer to a direction of a central axis of an overall luminous output profile for example.

According to further examples, the adjustable component may be configuring a different property of the luminous output. This might be for instance a shape or profile of the luminous output. The adjustable component may be beam-shaping element, for instance a collimator, lens, or physical slit, grating or baffle.

The adjustable component may be for configuring any of a range of further properties of the luminous output, for instance spectral composition (e.g. visible colour), polarisation, luminous intensity, and/or temporal pattern (e.g. flashing or otherwise non- constant illumination). These may be achieved by components having for example filters or baffles which variably impede the luminous output of the light source to provide the required functionality.

According to at least one set of embodiments, the luminaire may comprise a sensor element, said sensor being responsive to an external stimulus. The sensor element may be for controlling an operation of the luminaire, for example for controlling a luminous operation of the luminaire or for controlling a different operation or aspect of an operation of the luminaire. The sensor element may be for controlling or configuring the driving of the at least one light source for instance.

In the case that the luminaire comprises such a sensor element, the adjustable component may be for configuring an angular direction of receptivity of the sensor element to said external stimulus. 'Angular direction' is to be interpreted in the same manner as was explained above in relation to a luminous output of the luminaire.

The external stimulus may in examples be an optical stimulus. Alternatively, the external stimulus may be an acoustic stimulus.

The sensing element may for example be an optical sensor, an acoustic sensor, or a sensor adapted to detect any other form of wireless signal, transmission or emission. An optical sensor may include a light sensor. A light sensor may be adapted to be responsive or receptive to a particular range of spectral frequencies of light for example. The optical sensor may be a sensor adapted to be responsive to a different part of the electromagnetic spectrum, for example infra-red radiation.

An acoustic sensor may be a microphone or other form of sensing device adapted to detect auditory, acoustic or other sound signals, transmissions or waves. Acoustic signals may include signals audible to humans, or may include ultrasonic or other high or low frequency auditory waves.

In particular examples, the adjustable component may comprise the sensor element. The orientation of the sensing element itself may in examples be adjusted by means of the at least one actuator in order thereby to adjust an angular direction of sensitivity of the device to one or more external stimuli. Alternatively, the adjustable component may comprise a carrier carrying the sensing element, wherein adjustment of a tilt angle of the carrier adjusts an angular direction of sensitivity of the device.

In further examples, the adjustable component may comprise a deflecting element for deflecting said external stimulus.

The adjustable component may for example be an optical element for manipulating the propagation of an optical wave into the device. The optical element may for instance be an optical steering element, adapted to alter an angle of propagation of the wave into the device. Alternatively, the optical element may comprise a baffle arrangement adapted to change a direction of propagation and/or change a shape or profile of the wave. The optical element may in particular examples comprise a lens, or other steering element, such as a collimator or a refractive plate. In further examples, the adjustable component may be an acoustic steering element for adjusting a direction of propagation of an acoustic wave into the luminaire. The acoustic steering element may include acoustically reflective surfaces or components adjusted to manipulate a direction of travel of the acoustic wave into the luminaire. The acoustic steering element may comprise one or more baffles or solid wave-shaping elements adapted to change a propagation shape or pattern of the acoustic wave. For example, the adjustable component may be adapted to induce an adjustable degree or angle or shape of diffraction of the wave, in order thereby to steer the wave in one or more directions. This may enable acoustic waves propagating in one set of directions to be re-directed or guided toward the sensor element (where this is an acoustic sensor).

According to further examples, the adjustable component may be for configuring a different property or aspect of a sensing operation of the device, for example propagation shape or profile. This may be achieved by means of a physical baffling component or acoustic collimating component.

In accordance with at least one subset of embodiments, the luminaire may further comprise an NFC interface unit, operatively coupled to the NFC receiver and the actuator, and being adapted to change an actuation mode of the actuator in response to receipt by the NFC receiver of one or more predetermined NFC signals. An interface unit enables data communication to take place between the luminaire and an NFC-enabled device, such as a smart-phone or a tablet. The interface unit may enable more sophisticated control of the adjustable component to take place. The actuator may be operable in a number of modes, and the NFC interface may be adapted to switch between these modes in response to signals received by the NFC receiver. The modes might include speeds, directions or patterns of motion. They may correspond to pre-programmed or determined actuation routines, for instance moving the adjustable component between a number of pre-set configurations or positions.

The NFC interface unit may comprise a memory.

In certain examples, the NFC interface unit may be configured to store in said memory one or more secure access keys or authentication codes. The interface unit may further be configured to perform an authentication or security procedure, wherein an NFC- enabled device (such as a smartphone) must transmit to the interface unit a security key or code in order to control actuation of the device. The interface unit may be adapted to compare the transmitted key or code with a stored set of keys or codes, and, on the basis of the results of this comparison, switch the actuator between an active mode (if the codes/keys match) or an inactive/locked mode (if the codes/keys do not match).

The interface unit may enable data concerning performance, maintenance status, health, or usage to be transferred to an NFC-enabled device (such as a smartphone or tablet).

In accordance with any embodiment of the luminaire, the housing may be hermetically sealed.

According to any embodiment, the actuator may be a piezoelectric actuator. In particular, the actuator may be a MEMS squiggle motor. Such an actuator is very small in size, allowing easy integration into a range of different luminaires, and without significantly increasing bulk or weight. Additionally, the squiggle motor has low power consumption, making it ideal for powering by NFC harvested signals. Additionally, for a linear squiggle motor, the extent of movement or actuation is a direct function of the actuation time, making the actuator very easy to precisely control, without the need for any feedback. Feedback can however be implemented in example embodiments as an additional, optional feature.

Examples in accordance with another aspect of the invention provide an adjustment method for a luminaire, the luminaire comprising

at least one light source,

a mechanically adjustable component for configuring an operation of the luminaire as a function of the relative orientation or position of said component,

an NFC (near- field communication) receiver, and

a power harvesting device adapted to convert NFC signals received by the NFC receiver into energy and to temporarily store said energy,

the method comprising:

receiving NFC signals using the NFC receiver;

converting said NFC signals into energy by means of the power harvesting device and storing said energy; and

driving an actuator, by means of said stored energy, to change a relative orientation or position of the adjustable component.

In accordance with another aspect of the invention, there is further provided a control method for controlling adjustment of a luminaire, the luminaire comprising:

at least one light source;

a mechanically adjustable component for configuring an operation of the luminaire as a function of the relative orientation or position of said component; an NFC receiver;

a power harvesting device adapted to convert NFC signals received by the NFC receiver into energy and to temporarily stor said energy; and

at least one actuator adapted to change the relative orientation or position of said component using said stored energy,

the method comprising:

transmitting, by means of an NFC transmitter, a pattern of one or more NFC signals to the NFC receiver of the luminaire, each signal in the pattern having a duration corresponding to a desired duration of activation of the actuator.

Each signal in the pattern is received by the NFC receiver and converted into a power signal lasting for a period commensurate with the duration of the transmitted NFC signal. This provides a simple, straightforward, precise means for driving the at least one actuator and controlling the configuration of the adjustable component. In particular, no feedback is required from the actuator to determine the position or extent of actuation or movement of the actuator, since its motion is a linear function of the duration of each transmitted NFC signal.

Embodiments of this method may be advantageously implemented in particular for luminaires comprising a MEMS linear squiggle motor, as described above.

In accordance with a further aspect of the invention, there is provided a computer program product for controlling adjustment of a luminaire, the computer program product comprising a computer readable storage medium having program instructions embodied therewith, the program instructions executable by a processor to cause the processor to perform the steps of the adjustment control method described in the preceding paragraphs.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Examples of the invention will now be described in detail with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig 1 schematically depicts a cross-section of a first example luminaire in accordance with embodiments of the invention;

Fig 2 schematically depicts an exploded view of the first example luminaire; Fig 3 schematically depicts an adjustment operation of the first example luminaire; Fig 4 schematically depicts a further adjustment operation of the first example luminaire;

Fig 5 schematically depicts an exploded view of a second example luminaire in accordance with embodiments of the invention;

Fig 6 schematically depicts an exploded view of a third example luminaire in accordance with embodiments of the invention;

Fig 7 schematically depicts an exploded view of a fourth example luminaire in accordance with embodiments of the invention;

Fig 8 schematically depicts an exploded view of a fifth example luminaire in accordance with embodiments of the invention;

Fig 9 schematically depicts an exploded view of a sixth example luminaire in accordance with embodiments of the invention;

Fig 10 schematically depicts optical components of a seventh example luminaire in accordance with embodiments of the invention;

Fig 11 schematically depicts a cross-section view of the seventh example luminaire in accordance with embodiments of the invention; and

Fig 12 shows a block diagram illustrating an example method in accordance with one or more embodiments of the invention. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS

The invention provides a luminaire having an adjustable illumination and/or sensing operation. The luminaire comprises at least one adjustable component, configured to adjust an illumination or sensing operation as a function of a position or orientation of that component. The adjustable component is configured by means of one or more actuators, being driven by a power signal generated by harvesting NFC wireless signals. In particular embodiments, a luminous output direction of the luminaire may be adjustable by means of the adjustable component and/or a direction of sensitivity of the luminaire to one or more input signals may be adjustable by means of the adjustable component.

Figs. 1 and 2 show cross-sectional and exploded views respectively of a first example luminaire 10 in accordance with one or more embodiments of the invention. The luminaire comprises a plurality of light sources 16 mounted on a PCB 18, and arranged within a housing 12. The housing in certain examples may be a hermetically sealed housing. Arranged above the plurality of light sources is an optical plate 22, supported above the light sources by a plurality of actuators 24. As shown in the exploded view of Fig. 2, the optical plate may, in accordance with one advantageous example, be supported by a set of four actuators, one positioned at each corner of the optical plate.

The actuators 22 are electrically connected with a power harvesting unit 30, which in turn is electrically connected with an NFC receiver 28. The NFC receiver is adapted to receive NFC wireless transmissions or signals, and to transfer these to the power harvesting unit 30. The power harvesting unit is adapted to process the received NFC signals so as to generate an electrical drive signal for driving the one or more actuators 24. The harvesting unit may generate from the NFC signals either an AC or a DC signal, depending upon the requirements of the actuators 24. Upon processing the NFC signals, the electrical drive signal of the harvesting unit 30 is supplied to the actuators 24, to drive adjustment of the adjustable optical plate.

Each of the actuators, for the example shown, comprises a moveable head portion which may be driven to move linearly 'up' or 'down' a central axle or spindle in order thereby to adjust the optical plate. The optical plate rests on the head portions of each of the actuators, such that adjustment of the actuators 'up' or 'down' (from the perspective of Figs. 1 and 2) induces a corresponding positional adjustment of the respective corner of the optical plate.

In the exemplary embodiment of Figs. 1 and 2, the adjustable plate 22 extends over the arrangement of light sources 16, supported by the four actuators 24. The four actuators may be independently addressed and adjusted. By raising or lowering different combinations of the four actuators, the orientation of the optical plate may be precisely controlled.

In examples, each of the four actuators 24 may be provided with an independently addressable power supply running from the power harvesting unit 30. Each power supply may be independently switched for example between an inactive and active state. It may also be switched in examples between at least a forward direction and reverse direction of current to enable forwards and backwards driving of each actuator. This configuration enables fully independently addressable and controllable actuators 24, and enables thereby full adjustability of the optical plate orientation.

In examples, independent control and addressability of the four independent power supplies may be achieved by suitable switches or other driving apparatus included within the power harvesting unit 30. Implementation of suitable control regimes may in examples be achieved by use of encoded NFC control signals, transmitted by a controlling NFC transmitter, and decoded and interpreted by means of a suitably adapted, and operatively coupled, NFC interface unit 32.

Accordingly, as shown in Fig. 2, there may further be provided an NFC interface unit 32 operatively coupled with the NFC receiver 28, and adapted to decode information contained in NFC signals received by the receiver. The NFC interface unit may comprise a microprocessor for example.

The NFC interface unit is further operatively coupled with the power harvesting unit 30 and may be adapted to change a mode of operation of the actuators 24 in response to receipt of particular NFC signals. For example, the NFC interface unit 32 may be adapted to switch the actuators between an active and inactive mode (by means of a suitable switch within the power harvesting unit for example), in response to receipt at the NFC receiver 28 of specific associated NFC signals.

The NFC interface unit 32 may for example comprise a memory, storing a set of particular NFC control signals, and associated actions or responses for each. Upon decoding of each received NFC signal, the interface unit may compare the decoded signal with the stored set of pre-assigned signals to determine whether a response is required.

The NFC interface unit 32 may be configured to change the mode of operation of the actuators 24 in any number of ways. For example, the interface unit may be adapted to implement or control one or more pre-determined actuation routines, for example moving the adjustable optical plate 22 to, or between, a number of pre-set positions or configurations.

Additionally or alternatively, the NFC interface 32 unit may be configured to selectively switch a different one or more of the actuators 24 between an active and an inactive mode depending upon the received NFC signal. Different signals may be associated with or pre-assigned to a different one or more of the actuators, and the interface unit configured to respond by activating or deactivating the appropriate actuators (by means of one or more switches within the NFC harvesting unit for example).

The NFC interface unit may also be adapted to perform a secure access or authentication function, limiting access to control of the actuators to only users authorised to do so. A memory included in the interface unit may store one or more authentication codes or keys for instance, and may be adapted to sustain the actuators in an 'inactive' mode so long as a correct one of the stored keys or codes is not received within an encoded NFC signal.

For instance, each NFC signal may be required to contain an appropriate key or code, such that upon receipt of any NFC control signal at the NFC receiver 28, the NFC interface unit 32 is adapted to decode the signal and determine whether it contains a key or code which matches one of the keys or codes stored in the interface unit memory.

Access attempts may, in accordance with examples, be logged (including unsuccessful access attempts), in order to provide information to an administrator concerning potential tampering/hacking attempts. The interface unit may also be configured to record and store usage data including for instance information on times and duration of activity and/or the identity (e.g. via the IP address) of the counterfeiter.

The NFC interface unit 32 may, according to at least one set of examples, include an NFC transmitter chip, adapted to enable transmission, by means of NFC signals sent via the NFC receiver, of small quantities of data. Data, for example in the range of 64 bytes to 8 kB, might be transmitted in NFC signals generated by the transmitter chip. This would enable, for example, usage data collected by the NFC interface unit 32 to be communication wirelessly to a host or server device.

Additionally or alternatively to the above examples, the NFC interface unit may comprise an integrated passive NFC tag adapted to enable identification (by the transmitting/connecting device) of the luminaire, and to control access to actuation circuits/sy stems of the luminaire.

While an NFC interface unit 32 is provided in accordance with the example of Fig. 1, inclusion of such a unit is not essential. In further examples, implementation of suitable control regimes of the four actuators 24 may be achieved by means which do not require transmission or receipt of control signals.

The power harvesting unit 30 may for example comprise dedicated control circuitry (or a microprocessor) being adapted to implement one or more pre-programmed control regimes. The harvesting unit may be configured for instance to cycle the actuators through a pre-determined adjustment routine, which moves the optical plate 22 through a continuous cyclic set of orientation positions. A particular required configuration of the plate 22 may be achieved by a user by cycling through the pre-programmed routine until the desired orientation is reached.

An exemplary adjustment operation of the optical plate 22 is schematically illustrated by Figs. 3 and 4, which show different exemplary configurations of the optical plate, achieved by raising and/or lowering an appropriate combination of the actuators 24. Fig. 3 shows adjustment of the optical plate to realise a first tilting angle. As shown in Fig. 3, the first tilting position is achieved by raising the position of the right-most actuator (from the perspective of the figure), and slightly lowering the position of the left-most actuator. Although only two actuators are visible in Fig. 3, it is assumed that a corresponding movement of 'left' and 'right' rear actuators is also realised in parallel with the actuators shown.

Fig. 4 shows adjustment of the optical plate to realise a second (opposite) tilting angle. This is achieved by raising the 'left-hand' actuator (from the perspective of Fig. 4) and slightly lowering the 'right-hand actuator'.

Depending upon the optical properties of the optical plate 22, tilting of the optical component may achieve different optical effects. According to at least one set of embodiments, tilting of the optical plate may achieve an adjustment of the luminous output angle of the luminaire. The optical plate may have lens-like properties, enabling collection of light incident at different angles, in order to focus the light into an outgoing beam or profile having an optical axis normal with its exit surface. Adjustment of the angle at which the optical plate is disposed relative to the light sources 16 may change the final output angle at which light is transmitted from the plate. Adjustment of a distance between the plate and the light sources may also adjust a luminous output angle of the plate, and hence the luminaire.

Alternatively, the optical plate may be adapted to achieve different optical effects as a function of its orientation. These might include for instance adjustment of the shape of the outgoing luminous output. Tilting of the optical plate may also be adapted to achieve effects on glare generated by the luminaire, for instance changing a cut-off angle for direct visibility of the light sources.

Tilting of the plate may adjust an intensity of the output light. It may in examples adjust the intensity inhomogeneously, such that tilting may enable adjustment of an overall luminous output profile or pattern.

In accordance with examples, the NFC receiver may comprise an antenna and an NFC reader. The NFC receiver is configured to receive NFC signals transmitted by any suitable NFC enabled device, such as for example an NFC enabled mobile communication or computing device (e.g. a smartphone or tablet).

Typical properties for a suitable NFC system for use in embodiments of the invention would enable power in the range of 13-20 mW to be scavenged (harvested) from transmitted NFC signals. Typical NFC transmitters built into for example mobile devices have an output power of approximately 100-200 mW. These figures are provided by way of one advantageous non-limiting example only, and it will be immediately appreciated by the skilled person that other suitable specifications may also be used. The harvesting of electrical power from NFC signals is well-known in the art per se, and the mechanisms for achieving it will not therefore be described in in any further detail in this document. It will be immediately apparent to the skilled person how to incorporate the principles of the known technology into embodiments of the present invention.

In accordance with examples, the actuators 24 may each be a piezoelectric actuator, and in particular may be a MEMS linear squiggle motor. A linear squiggle motor is formed of two components: a moving head portion (or nut) and static central lead screw. The nut includes a plurality of piezoelectric ceramic elements, bonded orthogonally to the interior of the nut. Electrical stimulation of the piezoelectric elements generates ultrasonic vibrations. These ultrasonic vibrations rotate the central lead screw and translate the nut along its length. Alternatively, the nut may be clamped in a fixed position, leading to a linear translation instead of the central lead screw. This creates a smooth bi-directional linear motion having high-resolution. Thread friction drives the nut (or screw), directly converting rotary motion into linear motion without the need for a gearbox. Both the speed and position of the lead screw (or nut) can be precisely controlled.

Although in preferred embodiments, linear motion is utilised to drive adjustment of adjustable components in the luminaire, in alternative embodiments, rotatory motion may also be employed. Rotary motion is achievable by means of a rotary squiggle motor.

A linear squiggle motor typically requires drive power of 100-200mW, and a drive voltage of 3V for its operation. As noted above, this power is readily achievable using harvested NFC signals, which typically have an output power of approximately 100-200mW.

Linear squiggle motors combine small size, with high performance. A typical squiggle motor may have maximal outer dimensions in the order of 1.8 x 1.8 x 6 mm.

The advantage of a linear squiggle motor is that the extent of actuation changes in direct proportion to the duration of the electrical drive signal provided to the actuator. This makes precise control of the optical plate 22 possible, without the requirement for feedback from the actuator, since the position of the actuator can be determined purely as a function of its activation time.

A linear squiggle motor is mentioned by way of one advantageous example only, and other types of actuators may also be considered. These may include for example alternative types of piezoelectric motors, or electrostatic actuators, thermal actuators, or magnetic actuators. Suitable examples of appropriate actuators will be immediately apparent to the skilled person, and any motor capable of achieving (preferably) linear motion, or rotary motion, with small form factor and with low power usage may be considered.

The power harvesting unit may comprise electronics to enable a degree of control over the operation of the actuators 24. The harvesting unit in particular may be adapted to operate the actuators in accordance with one of two primary anticipated modes (described below). The harvesting unit may operate the actuators in accordance with only one of these modes, or may be switchable (for example by means of user commands) between the two modes.

The power harvesting unit may, in accordance with a first mode, be adapted to control the actuators to operate in a continuous manner, wherein energy harvested from received NFC signals is directly and immediately supplied to the actuators as it is generated.

According to this example, activation of the actuators occurs (almost) simultaneously with the transmission of NFC signals, and continues uninterrupted until the transmission ceases.

Movement of the actuators is directly proportional to the duration of the NFC transmission, and of the energy flux of the NFC waves transmitted, (i.e. of energy flux x duration of transmission).

The energy flux of the received NFC waves will naturally depend both upon the transmission intensity of an NFC transmitter, and upon the distance of the transmitter from the NFC receiver 28. It may be desirable in examples to regulate the power directly supplied to the actuators so as to ensure that, regardless of any fluctuation in received energy flux, the actuators move always at a particular desired known speed. This may make control of the adjustable component(s) simpler, since speed of motion is predicable.

In examples, regulation of power supplied to the actuators may be achieved by means of suitable regulation circuitry. This might for instance be adapted to implement a step-down in the current of any control signal exceeding the current required to achieve the desired uniform speed of motion (or a step-up in any current not meeting the required level).

Additionally or alternatively, there may be applied to a user-accessible surface of the luminaire a dedicated physical indicator or marker to indicate an ideal application or contact point on which the user's NFC transmitting device should be rested when powering and controlling the luminaire. The marker or indicator can be positioned appropriately so as to ensure that a user's transmitting device is always at a desired uniform distance from the NFC receiver 28. This may assist in regulating the magnitude of the energy flux received at the receiver. Alternatively, the power harvesting unit 30 may be adapted to control the actuators to operate in accordance with a delayed energy storage mode. According to this mode, energy harvested from received NFC signals is first stored (for example using a suitable capacitor), for example over a period of 5-10s, and only later released, providing the necessary power signal to drive the actuators 24. With such an harvesting it becomes possibles to drive a device that needs more instaneous power than the intantaneous power carried by the electromagnetic field of the NFC communication.

This mode may be necessary in some cases, in particular where the power of the received NFC signals is less than that required (or desired) for driving the actuators 24. Here, energy may be stored until sufficient energy to drive the actuator at the correct power for a desired time is obtained. This may also be necessary for instance in the case of intermittent NFC transmissions, where the duration of each transmission is not on its own long enough to move the actuator to a desired end location. Here, energy from multiple signals may be stored over a period of time, and later released in a continuous drive signal of an appropriate power and voltage.

Although a plurality of light sources 16 is provided in the example of Figs. 1 and 2, this constitutes merely a particular design choice, and does not limit the invention to the use of a multiplicity of light sources. A single light source may instead be employed.

Furthermore, although only a single optical plate 22 is provided in the particular example of Figs. 1-4, in further variations, multiple optical plates or elements may be provided. The multiple optical plates may each be arranged to receive light from a different set of one or more of the light sources 16 for instance. Each optical plate may be provided with a separate set of one or more independently controllable actuators 24, to enable independent adjustment of a tilt angle or position of each optical plate relative to the light sources. Alternatively, only a subset of a plurality of provided optical plates may be provided with actuators, such that one or more optical plates provide a fixed luminous output profile or angle, whilst others enable an adjustable output.

Any of the particular features, variations or adaptation options described above in relation to the example of Figs. 1-4 are to be understood as being equally applicable to any other example or embodiment described in this document. It is anticipated that features of any embodiment of the present invention may, where applicable, be advantageously combined with any other described embodiment.

The concept of the invention is not limited to the use of harvested NFC transmissions to drive adjustment of components related only to a luminous output of the luminaire. The concept may also be applied to the adjustment of components related to a sensing functionality of the luminaire.

An example of an embodiment having a sensing functionality and including a component being adjustable in order to configure this functionality is shown schematically in Fig 5. The example of Fig 5 is similar in all respects to the embodiments of Figs. 1-4, except for the additional inclusion of an optical sensor 52, provided mounted to the PCB 28 adjacent to the plurality of light sources 16.

Arranged above the optical sensor is a first optical plate 21, supported on a set of four actuators 24, and arranged above the light sources is a second optical plate, supported on a second set of four actuators 24. For clarity, the exploded view of Fig 5 shows the optical plates 21, 22 being laterally displaced from the sensor element 52 and light sources 16 respectively. However, in practice, the optical plates would be arranged extending directly over the sensor and light sources.

As in the previously described embodiment, each of the actuators 24 may comprise a moveable head portion which may be driven to move linearly 'up' or 'down' a central axle or spindle in order thereby to adjust the optical plate. The optical plates 21, 22 each rest on the head portions of each of their respective sets of actuators 24, such that adjustment of the actuators 'up' or 'down' (from the perspective of Fig 5) induces a corresponding positional adjustment of the respective corner of the optical plate.

The four actuators 24 supporting each optical plate 21, 22 may be independently addressed and adjusted. By raising or lowering different combinations of the four actuators, the orientation of each optical plate may be precisely (and independently) controlled.

Adjustment of the optical plate 21 positioned above the optical sensor 52, may adjust an angle of sensitivity or receptivity of the sensor to optical signals. The plate 21 may therefore provide effectively the opposite or inverse function to the plate 22 positioned above the light sources. Optical signals entering the luminaire and falling incident at the optical plate 21 may be processed by the plate and transmitted in the direction of the optical sensor 52. By adjusting the orientation, or tilt angle, of the optical plate (by means of the four actuators 24), optical signals or waves entering the luminaire from different sets of directions, may be captured and directed onto the sensor.

Adjustment of the first optical plate 21 may hence enable adjustment in an angle of receptivity of the luminaire (i.e. the optical sensor) to incident optical signals. Such functionality may be useful in a number of circumstances, for example, where it is known that useful signals will be incident at the luminaire only from a particular range of directions or angles. This may enable better responsiveness of the luminaire to transmitted signals, or better reliability in receiving transmitted signals.

The optical sensor 52 may be responsive to a range of different spectral frequencies of optical transmission, or may be receptive only to a particular spectral range of frequencies. The sensor may be sensitive only to visible light, or may be receptive only to infra-red light for instance. An output of the sensor may, in examples, be used to inform changes in a mode of operation of one or both of the light sources and the actuators 24. The sensor may for example be a 'sunrise/sunset' sensor, configured to enable detection of the start and end of daylight hours.

According to further examples, the sensor may be a presence detector, and/or a PIR sensor, to enable detection of presence and/or movement of persons. The sensor may be a light level senor, adapted to detect an intensity of incident light. The sensor may be a position sensor adapted to detect and/or track the location of one or more objects or persons within its 'line of sight' (direction of receptivity).

Image sensors may furthermore be included in certain examples, for example a CCD or CMOS sensor. These may enable capturing of images, or may enable capturing of certain characterising features or aspects of images or objects. The optical plate 21 in this case may be adjusted in accordance with the layout of the room, space, or street lying beneath the luminaire, to ensure capturing of image data corresponding to a most useful ground or floor location.

The sensor may be operatively coupled with a driver of the light sources (not shown), such that an output of the sensor may drive changes in the driving of the light sources. Sensor outputs may inform switching of the light sources on and off, or may inform changes for instance in the output intensity of the light sources. The sensor might also inform changes in an output pattern, for instance triggering, or deactivating, flashing or other non- constant patterns of light.

In further examples, the sensor may be operatively coupled with the NFC interface unit, and its outputs utilised by the interface unit in controlling a mode of operation of the actuators. For example, it may inform switching between an active or inactive mode, or may be used to trigger initiation of cessation of particular actuation routines. Additionally or alternatively, outputs of the sensor 52 may be stored in a log within a memory of the NFC interface unit. This information may then be communicated to a host or server device by means of transmitted NFC signals (as explained above) or by means of some other data transfer mechanism (e.g. Wi-Fi, wired data connection, cellular network connection).

Although an optical sensor 52 is shown by way of example in Fig 5, in further examples, alternative or additional sensors may be advantageously incorporated into luminaires in a similar manner. These may include for example acoustic sensors, responsive to acoustic signals, or responsive to environmental noise, and operatively coupled to one or both of a driver of the plurality of light sources 16 and/or an NFC interface unit 32. The acoustic sensor may in examples be a sound sensor, for example a microphone, or may be a sensor or microphone adapted to detect acoustic signals outside of a normal range of human hearing (for example ultrasonic signals).

The luminaire may in these examples comprise an adjustable acoustic steering element in place of the optical plate 21. Sound-directing elements for example are well- known within the field of directional microphones, and any suitable such steering component may be incorporated within embodiments to achieve acoustic steering functionality.

It may be advantageous in many cases to enable a directionality of a provided microphone to be adjusted. This may allow filtering of sounds from sources which are not of interest. It may also help in optimising signal to noise ratio. The directionality of the microphone may be trained in the direction of a particular area or section of interest of the room or street within which the luminaire is installed. In the case of street lighting, it may be adjusted in the direction of a road or pavement. It may enable greater sensitivity either to road noise or to sounds emanating from passing persons. Such sounds may in certain cases for instance provide an indication that a person is in distress or in need of medical or police assistance. The power harvesting unit 30 may in certain examples be adapted to adjust a pattern of the light output of the light sources 16 in response to certain sounds, for example to provide an alert or warning to pedestrians or road users.

In examples, the housing 12 of the luminaire may be provided with an acoustic membrane interface to enable better transmission of sound through the housing. This membrane may be adapted so as not to compromise any hermetic sealing of the luminaire.

Although in the particular example of Fig. 5, a sensing element 52 is provided mounted to the same static PCB 28 as the plurality of light sources 16, in further alternative examples, the sensing element may be provided on a separate dedicated PCB. One or both of these PCBs may in examples have an (independently) adjustable orientation, and may be provided with a set of one or more actuators to enable adjustment of the orientation angle. This may provide further or alternative means for adjusting an angle of sensitivity of the sensor to input signals or stimuli. By suitably controlling the orientation of the sensor- carrying PCB, the directionality of the sensor element may be directly adjusted in some cases.

Such an embodiment may provide benefits in terms of achievable precision of adjustment and achievable range of sensitivity angles.

Furthermore, as will be appreciated by the skilled person, embodiments of the invention are not limited to sensor elements provided mounted to PCBs or other carriers. In further examples, a sensor element may be provided inside the luminaire unattached to a PCB. The sensor element may be independently moveable or adjustable to alter an orientation of the element, and thereby alter an angle of sensitivity for instance to external stimuli. In particular examples, the sensor element may be adapted to pivot, hinge or tilt about a central lower pivot point for example. The sensor element itself may be provided with a set of one or more actuators to effect adjustment of its orientation angle. This may provide a further or alternate means for adjusting an angle of sensitivity of the sensor to external stimuli which does not require providing the sensor element mounted to a PCB.

An adjustable PCB, or independently adjustable sensor element, may in examples be provided in addition to, or as an alternative to, the adjustable optical plate 21. In the case that an acoustic sensor is provided instead of the optical sensor 52 of Fig. 5, only the adjustable PCB or adjustable sensor element may be provided. Alternatively, the adjustable PCB or sensor element may be provided in combination with one or more acoustic steering elements.

Although in the particular example of Fig. 5, only one sensing element 52 is provided, in further examples a plurality of sensing elements may be provided. The plurality may be comprised of sensors all of a uniform variety (i.e. acoustic or optical etc.), or may include one or more sensors of different varieties.

Furthermore, it is emphasised that principles or concepts of adjustment applied in any described embodiment in relation only to adjustment of a luminous output are to be understood in all cases as equally applicable mutatis mutandis to adjustment of sensing elements.

Any particular embodiments described as comprising only light sources are to be understood as fully compatible with further inclusion of one or more sensing elements. Examples comprising only light sources are presented for purposes of brevity only, and it is to be understood that in each case the embodiment is compatible with inclusion of sensing elements adjustable in accordance with similar principles of adjustment. Sensing elements may in each case be provided independently adjustable to the light sources, and/or provided on one or more separate dedicated PCBs.

Furthermore, adjustment methods and modes described in relation to different embodiments in this text may in advantageous examples be combined together to enable more than one mode of adjustment of the luminous output and/or one or more included sensing elements. The angle of receptivity of sensing elements to external stimuli may in any embodiment be adjusted in accordance with a different mode or principle of adjustment to the adjustment of the luminous output. They may also be adjusted according to the same mode of adjustment.

Fig. 6 shows a third example luminaire in accordance with one or more embodiments of the luminaire. The illustrated example is similar to the example of Figs. 1-4, but differs in the construction and operation of its adjustable optical parts.

The luminaire comprises a parallel arrangement of optical plates 22, 23, separated by a small air gap, and suspended above a plural arrangement of light sources 16. The arrangement of optical plates includes a first, adjustable optical plate 22, which is in mechanical contact with two actuators 24, and which is configured to be linearly moveable with respect to a second, static optical plate 23 arranged above it. The actuators 24 are electrically connected to the power harvesting unit 30, and are adapted to effect lateral translation of the adjustable optical plate relative to the static optical plate 23, to thereby realise an adjustment between a spectrum of different optical (luminous) output patterns.

Adjustment of the optical plate 22 may for example enable adjustment of a degree or angle of glare generated by the luminaire. It may adjust a directional output of the luminaire, or change an output pattern or profile.

In accordance with alternative examples, the static optical plate 23 might be omitted. This may reduce weight, bulk or cost for instance. Lateral adjustment of the first optical plate 22 may still achieve the same optical effects, since its position relative to the light sources 16 is the primary driver of optical adjustment of the luminaire.

In accordance with this or any other embodiment of the invention, the light sources 16 may be individually addressable, and may have an individually adjustable light output intensity (achieved for example by adjusting a drive current or voltage supplied to each light source). This may be achieved by suitable driving electronics.

By controlling the light sources 16 in accordance with different particular patterns or configurations, further adjustability and adaptability in the achieved luminous output profile is achievable. Fig. 7 illustrates an exploded view of a fourth example luminaire in

accordance with one or more embodiments of the invention. The fourth example represents a variation on the example of Figs. 1-4. The luminaire comprises a plurality of light sources 16 mounted to a carrier 18. The carrier and light sources are supported on the apex of a pivot support 42, which enables the carrier and light sources to be tilted at different angles. In mechanical contact with the board are four actuators 24, positioned at each corner of the carrier and configured to enable precise adjustment of a tilt angle of the board through appropriate raising or lowering of different combinations of the actuators. Suspended above the light sources is a static optical plate 23 through which the luminous output generated by the light sources is transmitted on exiting the luminaire.

By adjusting the tilt angle of the carrier 18 by means of the actuators 24, the direction of the luminous output of the luminaire may be precisely adjusted.

The static optical plate may provide focussing of outgoing light, or may collimate light or otherwise reduce a level of glare of the luminaire. In certain examples, the static optical plate may be omitted, reducing weight, bulk and cost.

In alternative configurations, the plurality of light sources 16 may be divided amongst two or more carriers 18, each being provided with a separate pivot support and a respective set of actuators, and being independently adjustable between different tilt angles. This may improve flexibility in achievable luminous output patterns, effectively providing two independently adjustable directional light sources from a single luminaire unit.

Fig. 8 shows a variation on the example depicted in Fig. 7, comprising a plurality of light sources 16 mounted on a carrier 18, the carrier being supported by a central spindle 44 extended through its length. An actuator 24 is arranged making mechanical contact with one end of the spindle and operable to effect a rotation of the spindle in either direction about its central axis. The spindle may be mounted fixed within the body of the carrier (for example embedded), such that revolution of the spindle about its central axis induces a resultant tilting of the carrier (and therefore the light sources) said central axis.

The actuator is electrically coupled with the power harvesting unit 30. By driving the actuator 24 to turn the spindle 44 about its central axis by differing amounts, an orientation, or tilt angle, of the carrier 18 may be precisely adjusted. In this way, precise adjustment of an output angle of the luminous output of the luminaire may be achieved.

In the particular example shown in Fig. 8, the actuator 24 is a linear actuator having a head portion which makes orthogonal contact with a circumferential outer surface of the spindle 44, such that linear motion of the actuator directly drives rotational motion of the spindle. In further alternative examples however, a rotary actuator may instead be used, provided making parallel contact with the spindle, and adapted thereby to directly drive rotary motion of the spindle.

The embodiment of Fig. 8 may be controlled by use of only a single of actuator 24. This may simplify control of adjustment of the optical output of the luminaire, since the power harvesting unit 30 need only supply and control a single independent power feed to the single actuator 24. This may in examples (as illustrated in Fig. 8) obviate the need to provide any NFC interface unit 32 to interpret NFC control signals transmitted by a user, since there is only one actuator to control. In examples for instance, even the

forward/backward directional control may be implemented without an interface unit, by means of including driving electronics configured to reverse the direction of current when the end of the actuator spindle thread is reached. This could be detected by a spike in resistance (drop in circuit current) for example.

A further, similar simple example is illustrated in Fig. 9 which shows an example luminaire comprising an optical plate 22 having an orientation which is adjustable by means of a single actuator 24 only. The arrangement is similar to that of the embodiment of Fig. 8, wherein an orientation of the adjustable component is tilted about a supporting axle or spindle 44. In this case however, the spindle is provided running through the body of an optical plate 22, parallel and adjacent with one edge of the optical plate.

A single actuator 24 supports the optical plate 22 at an opposite edge, and by selective actuation up or down is operable to effect a tilting or rotation of the plate about the supporting spindle 44. The optical plate has optical properties such that adjustment of the orientation angle in this manner effects a corresponding adjustment of an output angle or a shape or profile of a luminous output of the luminaire. The optical plate is adapted for instance to manipulate the propagation of a luminous output generated by the light sources 16 to achieve a desired output beam profile or shape for example.

The actuator 24 is electrically coupled with the power harvesting unit 30. As in the case of the example of Fig 8 above, the adjustable component in this case is adjustable by means of single actuator 24 only. This may in examples enable simplification of control of adjustment, since only a single power supply feed need be addressed and controlled by the power harvesting unit 30. This may again obviate the need to provide any NFC interface unit to interpret NFC control signals transmitted by a user, since there is only one actuator to control. Forwards/backwards control may be implemented in the manner described above in relation to the example of Fig. 8. Although in the schematic illustration of Fig. 9, the optical plate 22 is shown laterally displaced with respect to the carrier 18 and light sources 16, this is by way of illustration only. In practice, the optical plate is arranged directly above the carrier and light sources.

Figs. 10 and 11 schematically illustrate a seventh example luminaire in accordance with one or more embodiments of the luminaire. Fig. 10 illustrates the configuration and operation of the adjustable optical parts of the luminaire. Fig. 11 shows a wider section of the interior of the luminaire, comprising a plurality of the optical arrangements shown in Fig. 10.

The luminaire comprises a plurality of light sources 16, each arranged beneath a respective collimating element 46, having reflective internal surfaces. The collimator 46 is adapted to receive light from the light source through a light entry window at its base. The light is collimated by the side surfaces of the collimator a collimated output is generated at a light exit window, having an optical axis parallel with a central axis 48 of the collimator.

Positioned beneath the collimator 46, at an extreme peripheral point of its base is an actuator 24, adapted to apply a force to a single peripheral contact point in order thereby to induce a tilting of the collimator about a pivot support (not shown). By raising or lowering the actuator 24, a tilt angle of the collimator may be precisely adjusted, and hence an output angle of the collimated beam precisely controlled.

As shown in Fig. 11 , each light source may be provided with a respective collimator 46, each collimator being independently adjustable by means of a respective actuator 24. The angular configuration of the plurality of collimators 46 may be jointly coordinated or synchronised to provide a combined or overall luminous output having a particular desired luminous profile. An overall beam having a particular outer shape or profile may be formed for instance, and a particular spread of ray angles incorporated within said beam, for achieving an optimal luminous effect for the given application.

It is noted that the optical configurations described in relation to the examples of Figs. 6 to 11 above, may, in further embodiments, each be additionally be applied to the provision of adjustable optical sensing functionality within example luminaires.

In accordance with a second aspect of the invention, there is provided a method of adjusting a luminaire having the features of any of the example luminaires described above. A block diagram of the method is shown in Fig. 12. The method comprises the steps of receiving 62 an NFC signal using an NFC receiver of the luminaire, and subsequently converting 64 the NFC signals into an electrical signal by means of a power harvesting device. An electrical signal having been generated, the method finally comprises the step of driving one or more actuators, by means of the electrical signal, to change a position or orientation of an adjustable component of the luminaire.

The adjustable component may, in accordance with one or more examples, be an adjustable optical element for adjusting a luminous output angle or adjusting an angle of receptivity of the luminaire to one or more optical input signals. The adjustable component may alternatively be an acoustic steering element for changing an angle of receptivity to one or more acoustic signals. These represent just two examples and are not intended to limit the range of applications of the method.

According to a further aspect of the invention, there is provided a method of controlling adjustment of a luminaire, the luminaire having the features of any of the above described example luminaires. In accordance with at least one embodiment, the method comprises the step of transmitting, by means of an NFC transmitter of a suitable NFC enabled device (for example a mobile communication or computing device) a pattern of one or more NFC signals to the NFC receiver of the luminaire. Each signal in the pattern is transmitted having a duration corresponding to a desired duration of activation of one or more actuators within the luminaire.

The method may be advantageously applied in the case that actuators 24 of the luminaire in question are being operated according to a continuous mode, wherein received NFC signals are converted into a power signal and directly supplied to one or more of the actuators 24 to drive adjustment of the respective adjustable component. By sending signals having duration matching the desired actuation time, the adjustment of the adjustable component may be precisely controlled.

In accordance with a further aspect, there may be provided a computer program product comprising a computer readable storage medium having program instructions embodied therewith, the program instructions executable by a processor to cause the processor to perform the steps of the above method. The computer program product may in particular be advantageously incorporated within a suitable NFC enabled mobile device (such as a smartphone or tablet). The program instructions may take the form of an app installed on the mobile device for example.

The app may provide a user with a selection of pre-programed actuation 'recipes' which they can choose to transmit to the luminaire. Each 'recipe', may consist in a set pattern of NFC signals of particular duration, configured to cause the actuators to perform a particular adjustment routine. Each 'recipe' or routine may correspond to a particular adjustment configuration of the adjustable component of the luminaire.

In particular embodiments, the method may include the steps of transmitting data or control commands in combination with the NFC driving signals. These may for example provide instructions to an NFC interface unit 32 of the luminaire regarding which of the actuators to activate for a given received NFC signal and/or which of a range of activation modes to operate the actuator in.

The method may also include a step of transmitting by means of an encoded NFC signal, a particular security key or code to the luminaire. This key or code may in examples be transmitted in combination with each and every NFC drive signal sent.

Where the luminaire being controlled comprises a plurality of adjustable components, each having an effect on a luminous output (for example in the embodiment of Fig. 11), the method of the computer program product above may include steps of providing to a user, via graphical user interface, a selection of pre-programmed global 'moods' or optical configurations for the luminaire. The user may select one option, wherein a corresponding pattern or routine of NFC signals is transmitted to the luminaire, to effect appropriate adjustment of each of the adjustable components in order to realise said mood or configuration.

Applications of embodiments of the luminaire are wide and varied.

Particularly advantageous applications include use within street lighting, wherein precisely adjustable luminous output angle may enable particular regions or section of roads and paths lying beneath the luminaire to be illuminated, to the exclusion of other areas. This may improve efficiency for example, by enabling light otherwise wasted on areas which do not require illumination, to be conserved.

Outdoor illumination represents just one advantageous application of the invention. Embodiments may also be employed in any other type of setting or application, including indoor spaces, such as (by way of example only) in offices, retail spaces, industrial spaces, hotel rooms and/or indoor recreation spaces (e.g. sports halls, gymnasiums).

Although in this document, the term 'luminaire' is used, this is to be interpreted as including a range of lighting products, including for example lamps, retrofit light modules, neo-fit light modules, light products and light systems.

Other variations to the disclosed embodiments can be understood and effected by those skilled in the art in practicing the claimed invention, from a study of the drawings, the disclosure, and the appended claims. In the claims, the word "comprising" does not exclude other elements or steps, and the indefinite article "a" or "an" does not exclude a plurality. The mere fact that certain measures are recited in mutually different dependent claims does not indicate that a combination of these measures cannot be used to advantage. Any reference signs in the claims should not be construed as limiting the scope.