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Title:
AN ALIMENTARY COMPOSITION COMPRISING DIETARY FIBRES, AS WELL AS THE USE THEREOF IN THE PREPARATION OF ALIMENTARY PRODUCTS
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2002/096211
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The present invention relates to an alimentary composition, solid at room temperature and presenting an appearance similar to that of creamy margarine/butter, comprising at least one aqueous phase comprising dietary fibres, an emulsifying system, and at least one oily phase comprising lipids. More particularly, the present invention relates to an alimentary composition comprising emulsions formed by a continuous oily phase and an aqueous phase. The present invention further relates to a process for preparing said alimentary composition, as well as to the use thereof in preparing alimentary products such as spreads.

Inventors:
Emiko Araki, Emilia (Rua Montesquieu, 371 Apto. 162, Vila Marian, -190 São Paulo SP, CEP-04116, BR)
Takahashi, Getúlio (Rua José Guernelli, 94 Jd. Chapadã, -571 Campinas SP, CEP-13066, BR)
Nery, João Adolfo (Rua Barão de Santa Eulária, 150 Apto. 32, Real Parqu, -040 São Paulo SP, CEP-05685, BR)
Application Number:
PCT/BR2002/000074
Publication Date:
December 05, 2002
Filing Date:
May 29, 2002
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
Sadia, S/a (Rua Senador Attilio F.X, Fontana 8, Concordia SC, CEP-89700, BR)
Emiko Araki, Emilia (Rua Montesquieu, 371 Apto. 162, Vila Marian, -190 São Paulo SP, CEP-04116, BR)
Takahashi, Getúlio (Rua José Guernelli, 94 Jd. Chapadã, -571 Campinas SP, CEP-13066, BR)
Nery, João Adolfo (Rua Barão de Santa Eulária, 150 Apto. 32, Real Parqu, -040 São Paulo SP, CEP-05685, BR)
International Classes:
A23D7/005; A23D7/015; (IPC1-7): A23D7/00; A23C15/12; A23D7/015
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DANNEMANN, SIEMSEN, BIGLER & IPANEMA MOREIRA (Caixa Postal 2142, Rua Marquês de Olinda 70, Botafog, -040 Rio de Janeiro RJ, CEP-22251, BR)
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Claims:
CLAIMS
1. An alimentary composition, solid at room temperature and presenting characteristics similar to those of creamy margarine/butter, characterised by comprising at least one aqueous phase comprising dietary fibres, an emulsifying system, and at least one oily phase comprising lipids.
2. The alimentary composition according to claim 1, characterised in that, in said oily phase, the lipids comprise a mixture of liquid vegetable oils and hydrogenated vegetable fats.
3. The alimentary composition according to claim 2, characterised in that said mixture of liquid vegetable oils and hydrogenated vegetable fats is selected from one of the following sources: soybean oil, sunflower oil, palm oil, palmiste oil, coconut oil, maize oil, babassu oil, olive oil, colza oil, canola oil, sesame oil, the hydrogenates thereof, fractional and/or mixture of triglycerides under interesterified form, and/or mixtures thereof, and/or mixtures of any other suitable edible oils.
4. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 1 to 3, characterised in that said oily phase has a lipid content ranging from 20.0% to 82.0% by weight of the final product.
5. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 1 to 4, characterised in that said oily phase has a lipid content ranging from 35.0% to 70.0% by weight of the final product.
6. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 1 to 5, characterised in that the oily phase further comprises natural aromas, aromas identical to the natural ones and/or mixtures thereof.
7. The alimentary composition according to claim 1, characterised in that said aqueous phase comprises an amount of dietary fibres from 3.0% to 50.0% by weight.
8. The alimentary composition according to claim 7, characterised in that said aqueous phase comprises an amount of dietary fibres from 4.0% to 25.0% by weight.
9. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 1, 7, and 8, characterised in that said dietary fibres are soluble dietary fibres.
10. The alimentary composition according to claim 1, characterised in that the final product presents a soluble dietary fibre content from 3% to 15%, by weight.
11. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 1, 7 to 10, characterised in that said dietary fibres are selected from fibres of nonamylaceous polysaccharide origin, formed by fructooligosaccharides, oligofructose and mixtures of oligofructoses, monosaccharides and polysaccharides and/or mixtures thereof, and from the group of dietary fibres constituted by polyglycoses and derivatives thereof, oligoglycoses and dextrines.
12. The alimentary composition according to claim 11, characterised in that said dietary fibres are selected from the group consisting of natural acacia gums, chemically composed of a main galactose chain with large secondary branchs composed of galactose and arabinose and/or mixtures thereof.
13. The alimentary composition according to claim 11, characterised in that the dietary fibres are selected from inulin formed by linear chains of frutose molecules linked by P (21) type bonds (mixtures of oligomers and frutose polymers), wherein the polymerisation grade of said inulin may be from 2 to 60.
14. The alimentary composition according to claim 13, characterised in that, in said insulins, almost all chains may have up to 60 units, and are endcapped by a glucose molecule.
15. The alimentary composition according to claim 1, characterised in that said oily phase comprises an emulsifying system in a proportion from 10: 1 to 1: 10 by weight.
16. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 1 and 15, characterised in that said oily phase comprises an emulsifying system in an amount of from 0.5% to 3.0% by weight.
17. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 1, 15 and 16, characterised in that said emulsifying system is selected from mono, diglycerides, and polyglycerol esters, natural lecithin, modified lecithin, and/or mixtures thereof.
18. The alimentary composition according to claim 17, characterised in that said emulsifying system is selected from monoand di glycerides and polyglycerol esters.
19. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 1, 7 to 18, characterised in that the oily phase further comprises natural aromas, aromas identical to the natural ones and/or mixtures thereof.
20. The alimentary composition according to any one of the claims 1 to 18, characterised in that further comprises vitamins A and E.
21. The alimentary composition according to claim 20, characterised in that vitamin A is present in an amount of at least 15,000 IU of vitamin A/Kg of final product, and vitamin E is present in an amount of at least 10% of the IDR (Recommended Daily Ingestion (Ingestão Diária Recomendada)) of vitamin E.
22. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 20 and 21, characterised in that said vitamin A is selected from Palmitat Vitamin A, and said vitamin E is selected from acetate Vitamin E.
23. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 1, and 7 to 21, characterised in that the aqueous phase further comprises optional ingredients and additives.
24. The alimentary composition according to claim 23, characterised in that said optional ingredients and additives are selected from refined salt, milk, antioxidants, acidulant and preservatives and/or mixtures thereof.
25. The alimentary composition according to any one of claim 23 and 24, characterised in that the source of refined salt is sodium chloride.
26. The alimentary composition according to claim 25, characterised in that said salt is present in a proportion from 0.05% to 4.0% by weight.
27. The alimentary composition according to claim 26, characterised in that said salt is present in a proportion of from 0.3% to 2.0% by weight.
28. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 23 and 24, characterised in that the source of milk is integral milk, pasteurised creamless milk, milk whey and/or mixtures thereof.
29. The alimentary composition according to claim 28, characterised in that said milk is present in a proportion of from 0.1 % to 6.0% by weight.
30. The alimentary composition according to claim 29, characterised in that said milk is in a proportion of from 0.5% to 4.0% by weight.
31. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 23 and 24, characterised in that said preservatives are selected from potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate and/or mixtures thereof.
32. The alimentary composition according to claim 31, characterised in that said preservatives are present in a proportion of from 0.02% to 0.2% by weight.
33. The alimentary composition according to claim 32, characterised in that said preservatives are present in a proportion of from 0.05% to 0.1 % by weight.
34. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 23 and 24, characterised in that said acidifiers are selected from citric acid, lactic acid and/or mixtures thereof.
35. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 1 34, characterised in that presents a pH from 3 to 6.
36. The alimentary composition according to claim 35, characterised in that it has a pH from 4 to 5.
37. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 1 and 7 to 36, characterised in that said aqueous phase further comprises natural aromas, aromas identical to the natural ones and/or mixtures thereof.
38. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 1 37, characterised in that it further comprises water as integral part of a solution of the watersoluble ingredients.
39. The alimentary composition according to claim 38, characterised in that water is present in an amount of from 16.0% to 80.0% by weight.
40. The alimentary composition according to claim 39, characterised in that water is present is present in an amount of from 30.0% to 65.0% by weight.
41. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 1 to 40, characterised by further including dyes.
42. The alimentary composition according to claim 41, characterised in that said dyes are selected from natural dyes, carotene based synthetic dyes and/or mixtures thereof.
43. The alimentary composition according to claim 42, characterised in that said dyes are selected from betacarotenes by virtue of their functions of high action on the activity of vitamin A and intense yellow orange colour.
44. The alimentary composition according to any one of claims 4143, characterised in that said dyes are present in an amount of from 0.001 % to 0.2% by weight of the final product.
45. The alimentary composition according to claim 44, characterised in that said dyes are present in an amount of from 0.01% to 0.1 % by weight of the final product.
46. An use of an alimentary composition as defined in any one of claims 1 to 45, characterised in that it is intended for preparing a functional alimentary product that aids and increases fibre digestion without occurring changes in eating habit.
47. A margarine, characterised by comprising an alimentary composition as defined in any one of claims 1 to 45, in combination with adequate adjutants.
48. A butter, characterised by comprising an alimentary composition as defined in any one of claims 1 to 45 in combination with adequate adjuvants.
Description:
Title :"AN ALIMENTARY COMPOSITION COMPRISING DIETARY FIBRES, AS WELL AS THE USE THEREOF IN THE PREPARATION OF ALIMENTARYPRODUCTS" Technical Field of the Invention The present invention relates to an alimentary composition that is solid at room temperature and has similar characteristics to creamy butter/margarine, comprising at least one aqueous phase, dietary fibres and an emulsifying system, and at least one oily phase comprising lipids. More particularly, the present invention relates to an alimentary composition comprising emulsions formed by a continuous oily phase and an aqueous phase.

Several attempts have been made at adding fibres in alimentary compositions used in alimentary composition of margarine/butters without altering their basic characteristics. Insoluble fibres, which are the commonest, did not prove to be technically feasible, because they alter the aspect of the finished product, beside greatly destabilising the emulsion.

Soluble fibres, in turn, usually present high viscosity and do not permit addition in large amounts. Low-viscosity fibres present better results, allowing one to add larger amounts.

The documents cited below serve to exemplify the knowledge disclosed in the prior art with respect to the scope of the present invention.

Document BR 9200626 discloses a fat-simulating composition containing elongated-gel particles of irregular shape, having longer axial dimension of up to 250 microns with an average volume diameter ranging from 10 to 100 microns, the particles being in a hydrated state so as to have the substantially homogeneous organoleptic nature of an in-oil emulsion.

Document BR 9803191-0 discloses an aqueous dispersion of high-fusion steroids of plants and other lipids, the process for preparing it, alimentary products, as well as the use thereof. The dispersions provide a structure for the alimentary products and their use permits minimisation or elimination of the saturated fats and trans fatty acids.

Document BR 9803195-0 discloses a fat-based alimentary

product comprising components of natural fat that present a blood- cholesterol reducing effect in sufficient amounts to achieve a blood- cholesterol reducing effect, wherein the fat comprises at least 1 % of a sterol composition comprising steroids of which at least 40% are esterified with fatty acid esters.

Document BR 9405853-9 discloses a process for producing an oil-in-water emulsion and an edible margarine-type paste composition having one third of fats of less than 80% by weight and having the approximate consistency of margarine. This document further discloses a process for producing a water-in-oil emulsion containing relatively high levels of a hydrocolloid and having the approximate consistency of margarine.

Document EP 533 147 discloses the use of edible powdered fibres, as for example cellulose fibre, actuating on a water-in-oil emulsion to increase retention of emulsion water.

Document US 5,106,644 discloses reduced-calories of alimentary products containing fibres in the form of hydrocolloids and cellulose, in addition to by-products of fat.

Document US 4,156,021 discloses simulated food products supplied by incorporating flavouring, colouring and texturing agents, with a base composition of low-calorie oleaginous fibrous food. The base composition comprises a mixture of edible gum, edible oil, water and particulate fibrous cellulose.

Document GB 2,280,196 discloses alimentary pastes with good digestibility, texture and organoleptic properties, which contain an aqueous phase that may be a composition that does not form gel. The aqueous phase comprises from 0.1 % to 30% by weight of fibre, from 0.1 % to 4% by weight of a thickening agent, especially an alginate, and from 0.01% to 10% of a protein, especially caseinate. The oily phase presents from 5% to 60%, more preferably about 20% by weight of oil, and an emulsifying system including monoglycerides and polyglicerl esters, which are preferably present in amounts approximately equal to 0.5% by weight.

Document EP 509 707 discloses alimentary pastes comprising

water from 2% to 20% by weigh of water-soluble starch, particularly a combination of hydrolyse maltodextrines having an equivalent dextrose lower than 5. A system bonded by water comprises from 0.05% to 1.5% by weight of alginate, from 0.5% to 5.0% by weight of gelatine and a material that supplies calcium, such as calcium salts or milk protein for stabilising the dispersion. From 2% to 12% by weigh of a soluble vegetable fibre may also be used as part of the water-bonded system. The dispersion may include up to 40% of added fat.

Technical Background of the Invention Dietary fibre is a generic term that embraces a wide variety of substances that are not digested by the human upper digestive tract. These substances chemically belong to the family of carbohydrates and include a wide variety of substances composed of cellulose, oligosaccharides, pectins, gums and other hydrolysis-resistant substances, which constitute the cellular wall or cytoplasm reserves of the cells.

The definition according to the AOAC (Association of Official Analytical Chemists) is as follows : a dietary fibre consists of"remains of vegetable cells resistant to hydrolysis by the alimentary enzymes of man.

They are composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, oligosaccharides, pectines, gums, waxes and lignin" (Trowell and Burkitt, 1986).

In general, fibres that may be employed in preparing the present alimentary composition are found in two classes, technically specified as insoluble fibres and soluble fibres. Soluble fibres are soluble in water at levels higher than 0. 1 g/L at 100°C, while the insoluble ones are not solubilized.

Insoluble fibres, represented by cereal bran and residues of cell walls (such as soybean, peas, etc.), actuate mainly with a mechanical action in the work time of digestive transit and affect the digestion of lipids by absorption of billiary salts used for emulsifying fat globules. Due to their hydrophobicity, insoluble fibres absorb hydrophobic carcinogens, preventing colon cancer. In addition, due to their insolubility, they are hardly fermented by the intestinal flora and, therefore, they are hardly metabolised.

Soluble fibres are characterised by being degraded by the bacteria present in the large intestine, resulting in several metabolic modifications: pH of the intestinal tract, stimulation of the endogenic flora, production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). The extent of each effect depends upon the chemical nature of the fibre under consideration.

In preparing the alimentary composition of the present invention, one preferably employs soluble dietary fibres. Particularly, soluble dietary fibres are selected from fibres of non-amylaceous polysaccharide origin, formed by fruto-oligosaccharide, oligofructose and mixtures of oligofructoses, monosaccharides and polysaccharides and/or mixtures thereof. A more preferred embodiment of the present invention is the use of soluble dietary fibres selected from natural gums selected from acacia (Structure 1 ahead), chemically composed of a main galactose chain with large secondary branches composed of galactose and arabinose and/or mixtures thereof, in the preparation of the present alimentary composition. Preferably, the soluble dietary fibres from acacia gum used in preparing the present alimentary composition will result in a functional alimentary product that aids and increases fibre ingestion without occurring changes in eating habit.

Acacia gum is a gum of natural origin widely used as an ingredient, additive or carrier in pharmaceutical and alimentary products.

Acacia gum is defined by the pharmacopeia as"a gummy exudate, that flow off naturally, obtained by making an incision in trunks and branches of trees of Acacia Senegal and other species of acacia of African origin". After the harvest, the gum is purified by means of a simple physical process (centrifugation and filtration), without any chemical or enzymatic modification, followed by a sterilising and atomising process (spray-drying), one obtains a highly water-soluble powder or granulate product.

From the chemical point of view, acacia gum is a carbohydrate composed of a main galactose chain with large secondary branches composed of galactoses and arabinoses. Considered to be a low-viscosity and high-molecular weight (MW higher than 300,000 daltons) soluble dietary fibre, it performs an important physiological function, scientifically proven and

recognised as a prebiotical agent, is fermented by the microflora colonies, carrying out an important physiological function.

From the legislative point of view, acacia gum is recognised in Europe as an additive by the junta FAO/WHO-Committee for Study of Alimentary Additives (JECFA) and by the regulation of the European Community (EC). In the EC, acacia gum may be added to food prepared with organically cultivated ingredients. In the Unites States, the FDA recognises acacia gum as GRAS, and the latter is registered in the"US Food Chemical Codex"under reference 18413330.

STRUCTURE 1: A schematic representation of a Acacia Fibre molecule. Protein moiety (1-5%) Pofissacharide moiety / (95-99%) x AVA f i A /vL-AR \ MtiGLcA-6 GAL-6 GPL OIL /AF 9A \ APA OtL 431L GI. CA-RNA ARA ARA OAL A4A AA t QAL "'QAL-* GAL-'GAL-'GAL-* QAL :" Ot.-* GAt.-*/ \ QAL ^ ARA-Gt ARAX ARA. ^ GgL'ARA X A 0¢6 % {t/ RHI A ARA GAL ri HA ^iA GAL MW->

Due to its highly-branched structure, the acacia gum occupies a very small hydrodynamic space and so, it develops very low viscosity.

Dietary fibres of non-amylaceous polysaccharide origin, formed by fructooligosaccharides, are chemically composed by sugar units with

glucose, fructose, manose, ribose, xylose, sorbitol, etc., present molecular weigh ranging from 800 to 10,000,000. The sugar units may preferably present bonds that are not degraded by the enzymes secreted by the human body, such as ß-(1-4) type bonds, bonds between two glucose units, P- (2-1) bond between two fructose units and ß-(102) bonds between glucose and fructose units.

Oligofructoses are mainly formed by ß-(2-1) type bonds, some (2-1) type of oligofructoses, preferably inulins,"irisin","lycorisin"may be of vegetable (chicory) origin, obtained by the action of microorganisms. Inulin is formed by linear chains of frutose molecules linked by p- (2-1) type bonds (mixtures of oligomers and frutose polymers), and may present a polymerisation grade varying in a main range of 2 to 60. In said insulins, almost all chains may have up to 60 units, and be endcapped by a glucose molecule. Said inulins may also be isolated form natural sources, being present in significant quantities in fruits and vegetables, as well as being extractable by extraction processes already technologically known.

Mixtures of oligofructoses and polysaccharides, preferably in used as soluble dietary fibre may contain, in addition to the fructose unit, smaller amounts of monosaccharide unites, glucose derivatives. The average molecular weight ranges from 800 to 16,000.

Polyglucoses contains mainly P- (1-4) type bonds, are considered polyglucoses with P- (1-4) type bonds, the non-digestible betaglucanes, oligoglucoses and dexgrines. They have low molecular weight from 800 to 1,000,000, and generally are composed by parts of soluble fibre and parts of insoluble fibre, in average ratios of 5: 1 to 1: 5.

Preferably, polyglucoses are celluloses, and their derivatives such as methylcellulose, hemicellulose, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose, and other careboxycelluloses, present an average molecular weigh from 1,000,000 to 10,000,000 and are generally considered 100% insoluble fibres.

Summary of the Invention The present invention has the objective of providing a product called alimentary composition comprising alimentary fibres, but which

maintains the natural characteristics of an alimentary product of this segment. In particular, this is an alimentary composition that will result in spreads, that is to say, margarines/butters with fibres.

Another objective of the invention is to provide a product that, in spite of containing fibres, maintains sensorial, physical and rheological characteristics similar to those products of the category presenting smooth texture, creamy consistency, anoitable and easy to spread at temperatures at which they are taken out of the refrigerator.

This alimentary composition has characteristics of a functional food that aids and increases fibre ingestion without occurring changes in eating habit. The present invention discloses further the process for the production of the said alimentary composition.

The processes for producing continuous emulsions, which are constituted by oil-in-water emulsions containing oil phases, emulsifying systems and aqueous phases, aids processes for producing creamy alimentary pastes called an alimentary composition in the present invention, in particular alimentary spreads.

Technically, an oil-in-water continuous emulsion may be formed when two liquids that are not miscible, such as oil and water, are subjected to an intensive stirring and end up dividing into small particles, which remain distributed"within"the other liquid. However, there is a tendency that, when the stirring is discontinued, the dispersed phase will regroup itself, returning to the initial situation. As a resource to improve the stability, one used oils in which their fusion point has been modified to render them more consistent.

The differences in consistency are, in part, results of the proportion in which the oils and fats are mixed to form an emulsion with the appearance of a homogeneous mass, and without visible particles.

In the production of the alimentary composition comprising fibres, one has introduced changes and technological innovations in the steps of the traditional process for producing continuous-phase oil-in-water emulsions with a view to rendering products with fibres. The first step of the production process comprises the formulation of the oily composition from the mixture of

liquid and hydrogenated vegetable oils with the other fat-soluble ingredients.

The second step consists in formulating the aqueous phase composed by the mixture of the water-soluble ingredients. This step involves mixing phases and formulating the emulsion, optionally followed by pasteurisation and homogenisation. The third step of the process consists in cooling the mixture from the preceding step by means of scraped-surface heat-exchangers, which are constituted by primary and secondary cooling units. In this step, one further employs a homogenisation unit, the purpose of which is to supply mechanical work to the crystals, so as to make them small, and to impart to the mass a creamy consistency. The residence times of the emulsion in the primary and secondary cooling units drive the type of crystallisation and post- crystallisation of the mass that forms the alimentary composition. Another important point during the cooling is the shearing of the mass, so that the fat crystals will present an adequate size, the aqueous-phase droplets will remain retained in the fatty medium and the fibre will remain retained in this matrix.

Some different fibres when incorporated into the emulsion may cause a certain increase in the droplet size of the mass, which may favour the fusion and release of the taste of the product. However, after cooling, they may cause destabilisation of the phase and a change in texture of the product.

The creamliness and texture of the alimentary composition are essentially related to the stability of the crystalline structure resulting from the final state of the various polymorphic shapes achieved during the process of cooling, crystallising and storing the product.

The product of the invention will be better understood if one follows the details described below.

The alimentary composition of the present invention comprises two phases, one oily and the other aqueous.

The oily phase may be composed by liquid vegetable oils and hydrogenated vegetable fats, selected from one of the following sources: soybean oil, sunflower oil, palm oil, palmiste oil, coconut oil, maize oil,

babassu oil, olive oil, colza oil, canola oil, sesame oil, the hydrogenates thereof, fractionated and/or mixture of triglycerides under interesterified form, and/or mixtures thereof, and/or mixtures of any other suitable edible oils.

The structural formulas of some fatty acids that may be present in the liquid vegetable oils and hydrogenated vegetable fats used in preparing the alimentary composition of the present invention will now be indicted as follows. Fat Acids"* . tM) . ... Lsfi""r'i t. ' Triacylglycerol , w = SATUMWQ w SATURATE -lauric w. L cn, - mirystic #"ov * r C14, 0 -palmytic * S* « t r6g0 cls ; o i VIONOINSATURATED- - oleic (ir POLYINSATURATED Q104*46 too* -orucie POLYINSATURATED' ; o. ruc ! c"" « p. *. cx : -gamma- C1833 linoieic '"'t'. t.. CtBs3 t. 6 , y » arachidonic X « r C20, 4 Uv, , l. t 5) alpha-CIA13 '3 g hno ! e<c {n-. . s-cicose-* g s*, > cno s & : c-'---- -docose- Ccb g-pentaeno! c (.. .'2. °'hexaeno ! c' (n-3, 6,9,12,15,18) f H t « H loch -00

The vegetable fats founded in the food branch are natural substances constituted by 98-99% by weight of triacylglycerols, also called triglycerides.

Triglycerides are formed from a glycerol molecule and three fatty-acid molecules. Thus, fats may be defined as being natural substances formed by fatty acids of different molecular weights, their natural esters and smaller constituents such as the phospholipids, the aromatic components and vitamins.

The differences between some fats and other lie in the different fatty acids that compose same. The various fatty acids differ in their carbon- atom chain depending upon the number of carbon atoms, double bonds and the position of the double bonds.

Fatty acids include from the simples, butyric acid from butter fat to compounds having a high number of carbon atoms, geric acid from Gedda wax.

In vegetable oils, there are usually unsaturated fatty acids, which comprise more than one double bond per molecule. These are monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (formula below).

The oil phase may present lipid contents ranging from 20% to 82% by weight of the final product, preferably from 35% to 70% by weight of the final product.

Said oil phase has a lipid content ranging from 25% to 70% by weight of the final product.

The alimentary composition of the present invention further includes an emulsifying system selected from mono-, di-glycerides, polyglycerol esters, natural lecithin, modified lecithin and mixtures thereof.

Preferably, the emulsifying system is selected from mono-and di-glycerides and polyglycerol esters. Said emulsifying system is present at a ratio of 10: 1 to 1: 10 by weight and in amounts of approximately from 0.5% to 3.0% by weigh in the formulation of the product.

The alimentary composition of the present invention may further include usual vitamins, so as to meet the legislation in force, namely, at least 15,000 IU of vitamin A/Kg of final product, and at least 10% of IDR

(Recommended Daily Ingestion (Ingestao Diaria Recomendada), to meet the nutritional needs of most individuals and groups people of a population- Decree Order of Brazilian Ministry of Health. No. 33 of January 13,1998) of vitamin E.

Vitamin A may be selected from Palmitat Vitamin A, chemically known as retinol Palminate, or all the trans-retinol ester of palmitic acid (C36H602, molar mass 524.9 g/mol), while vitamin E may be selected from acetate Vitamin E, chemically known as DL-alpha-tocopherol acetate (C3H5203, molar mass 472.8 g/mol), attending the legislation in force that governs vitamin E, at the minimum level of 10% of IDR.

The alimentary composition of the present invention may further include natural dyes, synthetic dyes based on carotene and/or mixtures thereof, preferably betacarotene-due to the its functions of high action on the activity of vitamin A and its intense yellowish orange colour in amounts from 0.001 % to 0.2% by weight, preferably from 0.01 % to 0.1 % by weight of the final product.

Natural aromas, aromatizing substances identical to natural aromas and/or mixtures thereof are also incorporated into the oil phases in amounts ranging from 0.001% to 0.05% by weigh, more preferably from 0.01 % to 0.03% by weight.

The aqueous phase comprises dietary fibres, alimentary fibres and/or mixtures thereof, the amounts of which may vary from a minimum proportion of 3.0% to 8.0% by weight up to a maximum proportion from 18.0% to 50.0% by weight, preferably from 4.0% to 25.0% by weight of soluble fibres. The final product may presents a soluble dietary fibre content from 3% to 15%, by weight.

The aqueous phase further comprises optional ingredients and additives such as salt, milk, antioxidants, acidulant and preservatives, among others.

As source of refined salt, one may use sodium chloride-with characteristics for imparting taste to the product-in a proportion from 0.05% to 4% by weight, preferably from 0.3% to 2.0% by weight.

Integral milk, pasteurized creamless milk, milk whey, and/or mixtures thereof, may be used in a proportion from 0.1% to 6.0% by weight, preferably from 0.5% to 4.0% by weight.

As source of preservatives, one may preferably use potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate and/or mixtures thereof in a proportion from 0.02% to 0.2%, preferably from 0.05% to 0.1 % by weight.

In order to achieve the desired pH, systems such as acidifiers like citric acid, lactic acid and/or mixtures thereof may be used. The pH of the alimentary composition of the present invention should vary from 3 to 6, preferably from 4 to 5.

Natural aromas, aromas identical to natural ones and/or mixtures thereof may also be incorporated into the aqueous phase.

Amounts of water from 16.0% to 80. % by weight, preferably from 30. % to 65% by weight may be present in the product. This water may be incorporated as integral part of a solution of the water-soluble ingredients.

The illustrative examples presented below will serve to describe the present invention in a better way, the values indicating the weight percentage, of each phase, in the final product.

Example 1 Aqueous Phase Formulation : Oily Phase Formulation : 73.8% of water 99. 55% of oily base 13.9% of acacia fibres 40 parts of hydrogenated vegetable fat 7.0% of reconstituted powdered milk 60 parts of liquid oil 4.8% of refined salt 0. 42% of mono-and di-glycerides 0.30% of potassium sorbate 0. 002% of natural carotenes . 013% of citric acid 0. 02% of natural aromas q.s. p(DR Vitamins Example 2 Aqueous Phase Formulation : Pity Phase Formulation : 71.7% of water 99. 1 % of oily base 18.0% of acacia fibres 35 parts of hydrogenated vegetable fat 6.0% of reconstituted powdered milk 65 parts of liquid oil 3.88% of refined salt 0.84% of emulsifiers 0.3% or preservatives 0. 004% of natural carotenes 0.12% of citric acid 0. 02% of natural aromas : s. p/IDR Vitamins Example 3 Aqueous Phase Formulation : Oily Phase Formulation : 76.2% of water 98. 0% of oily base 20.5% of acacia fibres 38 parts of hydrogenated vegetable fat 3.0% of refined salt 62 parts of liquid oil 0.2% of preservatives 1. 95% of emulsifiers 0.08% of lactic acid 0. 003% of carotenes 0.02% of natural aromas 0. 02% of natural aromas :s. p/IDR Vitamins Example 4 | I Aqueous Phase Formulation : Oily Phase Formulation : 78.4% of water 97. 1 % of oily base 13.5% of acacia fibres 70.6 parts of hydrogenated vegetable fat 5.0% of reconstituted powdered 24.5 parts of liquid oil milk 2.8% of refined salt 4. 96 parts of palm oil 0.16% of preservatives 2. 85% of emulsifiers 0.10% of citric acid 0. 006% of carotenes 0.04% of natural aromas 0. 03% of natural aromas q. s. p/IDR Vitamins

Example 5 Aqueous Phase Formulation : Oil Phase Formulation : 82. 4% of water97. 0% of oily base 12.0% of polysaccharide fibres 20.0 parts of hydrogenated vegetable fat 2.36% of refined salt 67. 5 parts of liquid oil 0.15% of preservatives 2. 5 parts of palm oil 0.05% of citric acid 2. 95% of emulsifiers 0.04% of natural aromas 0. 008% of natural carotenes 0.035% of natural aroma q. s. p/IDR Vitamins Example 6 Aqueous Phase Formulation: Oily Phase Formulation: 90.23% of water 98.96% of oily base 7.0% of polysaccharide fibres 36.1 parts of hydrogenated vegetable fat 2.5% of refined salt 60. 6 parts of liquid oil 0.16% of potassium sorbate 3. 3 parts of palm oil 0.08% of lactic acid 1. 50% of emulsifiers 0.03% of natural aromas 0. 2% of natural carotenes 0.03% of natural aromas q. s. p/IDR Vitamins The above compositions presented the following characteristics and properties : Quality characteristics: Ensured value : Colour Predominance of yellow, light yellow in balance with cream-color Absence of strange color Brightness Presence of brightness, characteristic Spreadability Very easy to spread, slidable. Creamy texture Creaminess Creaminess at room temperature Melting point Melting point in the mouth, moderately rapid; moderate freshness and low residue of fat taste in the mouth Odor Presence of characteristics odours such as butter-like, milk-like odour Absence of strange odour Taste Standard characteristic taste of product, with butter-like, cream-like and milk-like taste Salty taste Slight to moderate salty taste; absence of bitter residual taste Absence of oil, green and almonds- like taste Absence of strange taste Appearance Smooth surface, absence of bubbles and/or holes, product with moderate yellow colour, prevailing cream-colour Total count of mesophile (UFC/g) 1.0 X10E3 max. Maximum Total coliforms (NMP/g) 5. 0 X10E1 Maximum moulds and yeasts 5.0 X10E2 (UFC/g) Salmonella sp (25g) absent