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Title:
AN ANTENNA MOUNT STRUCTURE AND A MODULAR ANTENNA SYSTEM
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/153488
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The disclosure relates to an antenna mount structure (1, 1') comprising: - An attachment arrangement (2, 2') for fixing the antenna mount structure (1, 1') to a support structure, - A central rod (3, 3') fixed to the attachment arrangement (2, 2'), - An antenna carrier (4, 4') rotatably mounted relative said central rod (3, 3'), and - At least one motor (5, 5') for rotating the carrier (4, 4') relative the central rod (3, 3'). The outer carrier (4, 4') comprises at least a first and a second carrier unit (4a, 4a', 4b, 4b') arranged to rotate independently and to carry a respective antenna (6a, 6b). The disclosure further relates to an antenna carrier module (100 a-d) comprising a motor (5a) and a carrier unit (4a, 4b) for carrying an antenna. The antenna carrier module (100 a-d) is adapted to be attached to and rotated relative a central rod (3) by the motor (5a). The antenna carrier module (100 a-d) is designed such that a multitude of antenna carrier modules (100 a-d) can be stacked onto each other while each carrier modules (100 a-d) being independently rotated. The disclosure also relates to a modular system (200) for building an antenna mount structure (1). The modular system (200) comprises a carrier module (100 a-d) and a fixing module (110). The fixing module (110) is used for attachment to a support structure and adapted to fit and interact with the antenna carrier module (100 a-d) in such that the carrier module (100 a-d) is enabled to rotate relative the fixing module (110). The disclosure also relates to a line-of-sight (LOS), wireless communication link system (300) comprising a multitude of multidirectional antenna units (301) built up by antenna mount structures (1) carrying at least two antennas.

Inventors:
OLSSON, Bengt-Erik (Hallekullevägen 24, Hovås, 436 55, SE)
LIGANDER, Per (Blåsutgatan 11, Göteborg, 414 56, SE)
LARSSON, Christina (Västra Eklanda Höjd 2, Mölndal, 431 59, SE)
Application Number:
EP2017/054437
Publication Date:
August 30, 2018
Filing Date:
February 27, 2017
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
TELEFONAKTIEBOLAGET LM ERICSSON (PUBL) (164 83 Stockholm, SE-164 83, SE)
International Classes:
H01Q1/12; H01Q3/00; H01Q3/04; H01Q1/24; H01Q25/00
Foreign References:
US20160359224A12016-12-08
US5065969A1991-11-19
Other References:
None
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ERICSSON (Torshamnsgatan 21-23, Stockholm, 164 80, SE)
Download PDF:
Claims:
An antenna mount structure (1 , 1 '), having a longitudinal direction and a radial direction perpendicular to the longitudinal direction, comprising:

• An attachment arrangement (2, 2') adapted for fixing the antenna mount structure (1 , 1 ') to a support structure

• A central rod (3, 3') extending in the longitudinal direction of the antenna mount structure (1 , 1 ') and being fixed to the attachment arrangement (2, 2')

• An outer carrier (4, 4') adapted for carrying an antenna, said outer carrier being (4, 4') located radially outwards of the central rod (3, 3') and at least partly encompassing a part of the longitudinal extension of the central rod (3, 3'), said outer carrier (4, 4') being rotatably mounted relative said central rod (3, 3')

• A motor system comprising at least one motor (5, 5') that is arranged to control the outer carrier (4) to rotate relative the central rod (3, 3'), wherein

• Said outer carrier (4, 4') comprises at least a first carrier unit (4a, 4a') and a second carrier unit (4b, 4b') arranged for carrying at least one respective antenna (6a, 6b), where said motor system is arranged to rotate said first carrier unit (4a, 4a') and second carrier unit (4b, 4b') independently of each other such that the position of the respective carrier unit (4a, 4a', 4b, 4b') can be individually controlled.

An antenna mount structure (1 ) according to claim 1 , wherein said carrier units (4a, 4b) are designed to fit and be stacked onto each other, either directly or via an adaptor unit (41 ), such that a first end (42) of the carrier unit (4a, 4b) is designed to interact with a second end (43) of the carrier unit (4a, 4b) or an adaptor unit (41 ) when a first carrier unit (4a) is fitted onto a second carrier unit (4b) allowing the first carrier unit (4a) to rotate relative the second carrier unit (4b) while the carrier units (4a, 4b) are fitted onto each other.

An antenna mount structure (1 ) according to claim 2, wherein said carrier unit (4a, 4b) has a first circularly shaped end (42) having an inner radii adapted to receive and closely fit with an outer radii of its other, second circular shaped end (43) such that a first carrier unit (4a) can be fitted to a second carrier unit (4b) by allowing the first end (42) of a first carrier unit (4a) to receive a second end (43) of a second carrier unit (4b) such that a multitude of carrier units (4a, 4b) can be stacked onto each other. 4. An antenna mount structure (1 ) according to any one of the previous claims, wherein said first end (42) or second end (43) of the carrier unit (4a) is provided with a bearing or a frictional reducing material on the side intended to be in contact with the other end (43 or 42) of another carrier unit (4b) when the carrier units (4a, 4b) are stacked onto each other. 5. An antenna mount structure (1 , 1 ') according to any one of the previous claims, wherein said first carrier unit (4a, 4a') and second carrier unit (4b, 4b') are controlled by a respective first motor (5a, 5a') and a second motor (5a, 5a').

6. An antenna mount structure (1 , 1 ') according to claim 5, wherein said motor (5a, 5a') is fixed to the central rod (3, 3') and designed to power a gear wheel (51 ) adapted to engage with a threaded portion (44) on a circular segment of the carrier unit (4a, 4a', 4b, 4b') in order to control the angular position of the associated carrier unit (4a, 4a', 4b, 4b').

7. An antenna mount structure (1 , 1 ') according to any one of the previous claims, wherein the carrier unit (4a, 4a', 4b, 4b') is arranged to rotate at least 180 degrees, preferably a complete rotation of 360 degrees.

8. An antenna mount structure (1 , 1 ') according to any one of the previous claims, wherein the carrier unit (4a, 4a', 4b, 4b') is designed to be able to tilt relative the longitudinal direction of the antenna mount structure (1 ) having a tilting angle of more than 5 degrees, preferably more than 10 degrees. 9. An antenna mount structure (1 , 1 ') according to any one of the previous claims, wherein the central rod (3, 3') is hollow and comprises wiring for powering and/or transmitting information to or from the carrier unit (4a, 4a', 4b, 4b').

10. An antenna mount structure (1 , 1 ') according to any one of the previous claims, wherein the carrier unit (4a, 4a', 4b, 4b') is provided with a wireless actuator for remotely controlling the positioning of the carrier unit (4a, 4a', 4b, 4b') by a wireless input control panel.

1 1 . An antenna carrier module (100 a-d) for an antenna mount structure as disclosed in any one of the claims 1 -10, said antenna carrier module (100 a-d) comprising a motor (5a) and a carrier unit (4a, 4b) for carrying an antenna, said antenna carrier module (100 a-d) being adapted to be attached to an elongated central rod (3) and where the motor (5a) is adapted to provide a turning torque for actuating a rotational movement of the carrier unit (4a, 4b) relative the central rod (3) to which the antenna carrier module (100 a-d) is intended to be mounted, wherein

said antenna carrier module (100 a-d) is designed such that a multitude of antenna carrier modules (100 a-d) can be stacked onto each other and be attached to the common central rod (3) while the rotational position of each antenna carrier module (100 a-d) is individually controlled by its associated motor (5a).

12. An antenna carrier module (100 b-d) according to claim 1 1 , wherein said carrier module (100 b-d) comprises a central rod segment (30) which at its first end is provided with a first connector (31 ) and at its second end provided with a second connector (32), where said first connector (31 ) is adapted to fit and engage said second connector (32) such that when a first end (101 ) of a carrier module (100 b-d) is stacked onto a second end (102) of a carrier module (100 b-d), the rod segments (30) of each carrier module (100 b-d) can be connected and form part of the central rod (3).

13. A modular system (200) for an antenna mount structure (1 ) as disclosed in any one of claims 1 -10 comprising a carrier module (100 a-d) according to any of claims 1 1 -12, wherein the modular system (200) comprises a fixing module (1 10) comprising an attachment portion (2, 2') for attachment of a central rod (3, 3') to a support structure, where said fixing module (1 10) is adapted to fit and interact with the carrier module (100 a-d) in such a way that the carrier module (100 a-d) is enabled to rotate relative the fixing module (1 10).

14. A modular system (200) according to claim 13, wherein said carrier module (100 b-d) comprises a central rod segment (30) adapted to be fixed to the fixing module (1 10).

15. A line-of-sight, LOS, wireless communication link system (300), wherein it comprises a multitude of multidirectional antenna units (301 ), said multidirectional antenna units (301 ) built up by antenna mount structures (1 ) as disclosed in any one of the claims 1 -10, said antenna mount structures (1 ) carrying at least two antennas (6) each and each antenna mount structure (1 ) being located at a distance of less than 300 meters from a neighboring antenna mount structure (1 ) which are intended to communicate with each other.

Description:
TITLE

An antenna mount structure and a modular antenna system TECHNICAL FIELD

The disclosure relates to an antenna mount structure and a modular system for building an antenna mount structure. The disclosure also relates to a Line Of Sight (LOS) radio communication system using the antenna mount structure. The LOS radio communication system could be used instead of fiber communication between radio access points (RAP), e.g. in urban communication systems.

BACKGROUND

In next generation mobile access systems, there is a need for much denser deployment of radio access points (RAP) in order to provide high capacity to more users compared to in todays' macro centric networks. In order to allow cost effective densification, wireless communication between radio units is preferred since the alternative is usually to dig fiber to each RAP, which in many markets is too costly or simply impossible. Typically microwave point-to-point (PtP) links are used to facilitate backhaul or fronthaul between radio devices that offers high capacity and low deployment cost. In a high density network multiple RAPs are connected to each other in a chain. For example, a first RAP could have a physical data link to a central location and also being wireless connected to the second RAP, RAP2. RAP2 further provides a wireless data link to RAP3 and so on. However, microwave PtP links must usually operate in line-of-sight (LOS) which could limit the deployment possibility for more reliable star- or mesh network topologies that are difficult to build on low height e.g. if RAPs should be mounted on light poles or utility poles. The benefit of such serial communication is that it is possible to follow streets that allow LOS between RAPs. Currently there is a great interest in so called fixed wireless access (FWA) for providing high speed Internet connections to suburban households. In such scenario the utility poles available can be very attractive in different markets since LOS is practically guaranteed between poles connected by medium voltage power lines. In urban environment similar deployment can be obtained by mounting RAPs on light poles or traffic signs. The microwave links in such serial deployment must carry very high data capacity with a small form-factor, i.e. small antennas, why such links will probably operate at frequencies above 60 GHz where large continuous bandwidth is available.

A critical issue for the deployments outlined above is that alignment of the microwave antennas can be performed in a cost efficient manner. The microwave antennas used in ultra-high capacity links typically has an antenna beam width of only a few degrees that makes them rather difficult to align properly. In addition, the two microwave antennas can also have very different relative directions since along a road they will probably be directed approximately 180° apart but in a street corner or intersection, they may have a relative direction of e.g. 90°. In addition, there may be a desire to provide microwave antennas communicating in four directions, e.g. in a four way cross in a city environment. The entire RAP must be possible to install in very short time and by technicians not trained to install and align microwave antennas. Thus alignment of microwave antennas should preferably be done automatically or without actually going up to the RAP in the pole. In case of utility poles carrying typically 5-35 kV, there are very strict requirements on technicians working in the vicinity of such power lines.

Automatic alignment can be obtained by the use of phase array antennas where a multi-element antenna provides individual phase and amplitude control of each antenna element. The main problems with these implementations are that the very limited control of the beam angle is obtained but cost of these solutions can also be hampering. A phase array antenna can maybe provide coverage of 45 degrees or a little more but to very high cost since many controlled antenna elements are required. Typically, several hundred elements are required to obtain a beam width of a few degrees.

Hence, there is a desire to provide an antenna microwave system which in an easy and cost efficient way may be installed and connect RAPs.

SUMMARY

The present disclosure is directed to a motorized antenna mount structure. Motorized antenna mount structures which can be electronically controlled for adjusting the pointing direction of an antenna are previously known. However, existing solutions generally provides very limited change of directions and a motorized antenna can cover say up to ±45 degrees change in direction. It is thus an object of this disclosure to provide an antenna mount structure which is easy to mount and being able to be adjusted over a wide range of pointing directions in an easy manner.

Said object is obtained by an antenna mount structure as disclosed below. The antenna mount structure has a longitudinal direction and a radial direction perpendicular to the longitudinal direction. The antenna mount structure comprises:

An attachment arrangement adapted for fixing the antenna mount structure to a support structure, e.g. to a utility pole or wall.

A central rod extending in the longitudinal direction of the antenna mount structure and being fixed to the attachment arrangement.

An outer carrier adapted for carrying an antenna. The outer carrier is located radially outwards of the central rod and at least partly encompassing a part of the longitudinal extension of the central rod. The outer carrier is rotatably mounted relative said central rod. When the antenna mount structure is fixed to a support structure is the general intention that a rotational movement of the outer carrier around the central rod causes a change in the direction in the horizontal plane, the azimuth plane, also commonly referred to as azimuth adjustment in the field of telecommunication. Hence, a rotation of 90 degrees of the outer carrier relative the central rod should cause a directional adjustment of an antenna located in a city environment from pointing along a first street to switch to point along another second, street in an ordinary four way crossroad junction. The antenna mount structure further comprises:

A motor system that is arranged to control the outer carrier to rotate relative the central rod. The motor system comprises at least one motor.

The antenna mount structure is further designed such that the outer carrier comprises at least a first carrier unit and a second carrier unit arranged for carrying at least one respective antenna. The motor system is arranged to rotate said first carrier unit and second carrier unit independently of each other such that the position of the respective carrier unit can be individually controlled. For example, each carrier unit could be provided with a separate motor. Hence, the first and second carrier units could for example be positioned such that the respective antennas they carry will point in opposite directions, i.e. a difference of 180 degrees in the azimuth plane. They could also be positioned with a straight angle between them, i.e. 90 degrees, or any desired angle in order to cause the wireless data link to turn as desired. In a four way crossroad the antenna mount structure could comprise 4 antenna carrier units enabling the wireless data link to work along all the roads in the intersection.

The disclosed antenna mount structure is suitable to use for antennas that has a narrow antenna beam in the horizontal direction, say 1 -2 degrees, and a wider antenna beam in the vertical direction, e.g. 10 degrees. In a scenario where all antennas are essentially levelled, e.g. attached to poles having essentially the same height, and the vertical direction of the antenna beam is sufficiently wide, is only alignment in the horizontal plane required. The motorized antenna carrier units can be rotated in a very simple manner to a wide variety of angles. The proposed solution described herein enables multiple antennas to be mounted on top of each other and rotated independently providing a compact solution. Any small form factor antenna/radio can be motorized and automatically controlled. The proposed mechanical solution is inherently low cost due to few moving parts.

According to some aspects of the disclosure, the carrier units forming part of the antenna mount structure are designed to fit and be stacked onto each other, either directly or via an adaptor unit. This is enabled by designing a first end of the carrier unit to interact with a second end of the carrier unit, or an adaptor unit, when a first carrier unit is fitted on top of a second carrier unit. The carrier units are further designed such that the first carrier unit may rotate relative the second carrier unit while the carrier units are fitted onto each other.

Designing the carrier units such that they may be stacked onto each other as described above enables a compact design of the antenna mount structure while the carrier units still are able to rotate individually.

According to one example of the design of the stackable carrier units is the carrier unit designed such that a first circularly shaped end has an inner radii adapted to receive and closely fit with an outer radii of the other, second circular shaped end of the carrier unit. In this way, a first carrier unit can be fitted onto a second carrier unit by allowing the first end of a first carrier unit to receive a second end of a second carrier unit such that a multitude of carrier units can be stacked onto each other.

Using circular ends of the carrier unit is a beneficial design of providing a carrier unit which may be stacked while allowing rotational movement of the carrier units relative each other. According to some aspects of the disclosure, the first end or second end of the carrier unit is provided with a bearing or a frictional reducing material on the side intended to be in contact with the other end of another carrier unit when the carrier units are stacked onto each other. According to one example is the friction reducing material nylon.

The use of a bearing or frictional reducing material as disclosed above has the benefit of facilitating rotational movement of the carrier units relative each other.

According to some aspects of the invention, the first carrier unit and second carrier unit are controlled by a respective first motor and a second motor.

The use of separate motors for each carrier unit has the benefits of in an easy manner controlling each carrier unit independently without any power transmitting physical connections from a centralized motor and also facilitates the addition of further independently controlled carrier units to the antenna mount structure. However, a single motor could be used together with gearings and clutches in order to independently control each carrier unit.

According to one example of the motor design in the antenna mount structure, the motor associated with a carrier unit is fixed to the central rod. The motor is designed to power a gear wheel adapted to engage with a threaded portion on a circular segment of the carrier unit in order to control the angular position of the associated carrier unit.

The use of a rotating gear wheel on the motor engaging with a threaded portion on the carrier unit provides for a reliable and accurate control of the angular position of the carrier unit and an attached antenna.

According to some aspects of the disclosure, the carrier unit is arranged to rotate at least 180 degrees and more preferably a complete rotation of 360 degrees.

By allowing the carrier units to rotate and be positioned in a wide range of angular positions will it be able to direct the antenna in a wide variety of directions. In particular, if the carrier unit can rotate a full turn of 360 degrees, will it be possible to direct an antenna attached to the carrier unit in any direction in a plane perpendicular to the rotational axis.

According to some aspects of the disclosure, the carrier unit is designed to be able to tilt relative the longitudinal direction of the antenna mount structure and its central rod. According to an example is the tilting angle range more than 5 degrees and even more preferably more than 10 degrees.

Allowing the carrier unit to tilt relative its longitudinal axis will have the benefit of adjusting the vertical direction in which an antenna attached to the carrier unit is pointing. This adjustment possibility may be useful in case there are height differences between a pair of neighboring antennas which are intended to communicate or if the antenna mount structure has been attached somewhat askew to its support structure.

According to some aspects of the disclosure, the central rod of the antenna mount structure is hollow and comprises wiring for powering and/or transmitting information to or from the carrier unit.

Using the inner space of the central rod for wiring is beneficial since it enables the carrier unit to rotate rather freely over a wide range and reducing problems associated with twisting or contorting of the wiring in the carrier unit and the antenna mount structure.

According to some aspects of the disclosure, the carrier unit is provided with a wireless actuator for remotely controlling the positioning of the carrier unit by a wireless input control panel. For example, the motor may be provided with a wireless interface in order to control its motion.

The use of a wireless actuator has the benefit of allowing adjustment of the positioning of the carrier unit and an attached antenna without the need of being within reach of the carrier unit or being plugged in to a communication network.

The disclosure further relates to an antenna carrier module. The carrier module could suitably be used for an antenna mount structure as disclosed above or a similar antenna mount structure. The antenna carrier module comprises a motor and a carrier unit for carrying an antenna. The carrier unit could for example be designed with one or several of the features as disclosed in the different aspects of the disclosure above. The antenna carrier module is adapted to be attached to an elongated central rod and the motor is adapted to provide a turning torque for actuating a rotational movement of the carrier unit relative the central rod to which the antenna carrier module is intended to be mounted. The antenna carrier module is designed such that a multitude of antenna carrier modules can be stacked onto each other and be attached to the common central rod while the rotational position of each antenna carrier module is individually controlled by its associated motor. The carrier modules could be designed to be stacked onto each other as disclosed above how the carrier units are designed to fit onto each other.

By designing separate carrier modules which may be stacked onto each other it will be easy to design an antenna mount structure with a desired number of antennas or modify the number of antennas in an existing antenna mount structure by adding or removing a carrier module.

According to some aspects of the disclosure, the antenna carrier module comprises a central rod segment. The central rod segment is provided with a first connector at its first end and a second connector at its second end. The first connector is adapted to fit and engage with the second connector such that when a first end of a carrier module is stacked onto a second end of a carrier module can the rod segments of each module be connected and forming the central rod of an antenna mount structure. According to one example, the connectors are threaded portions on the outside respectively inside of the first end respectively second end of the rod segment adapted to fit with each other so as to be screwed together.

The inclusion of the central rod segments in the antenna carrier module has the benefit of building up and extend the antenna mount structure as each of the antenna carrier module is added and the length, and thus the number of carrier modules to be included in the antenna mount structure, is independent of having a central rod of fixed length. In addition, the motor may be attached to the central rod segment before the antenna carrier module is added to the antenna mount structure.

The disclosure also relates to a modular system for an antenna mount structure. According to one example, the modular system is used to construct an antenna mount structure as disclosed above. The modular system for the antenna mount structure comprises a carrier module as disclosed above and a fixing module. The fixing module comprises an attachment portion for attachment of a central rod to a support structure. The fixing module is adapted to fit and interact with the carrier module in such a way that the carrier module is enabled to rotate relative the fixing module. According to some aspects of the disclosure, the end of the fixing module intended to fit with the carrier module is designed as the first or second end of the carrier module such that it fits with the second or first end of the carrier module. Using a modular system as described above has the benefit of being able to pre- mount the fixing modules at desired locations before the carrier units and antennas need to be mounted. In addition, it may be easier to hold and adjust the fixing module when fixing it to a support structure if no carrier modules are attached to it.

According to some aspects of the modular system for the antenna mount structure, the carrier module comprises a central rod segment adapted to be fixed to the fixing module. According to one example, there is no central rod segment present in the fixing module and the central rod segment in the carrier unit is attached to an attachment point in the carrier module. According to another example is the central rod segment of the carrier module connected to a central rod segment present in the fixing module.

The inclusion of the central rod segments in the antenna carrier module has the benefit of building up and extend the antenna mount structure as each of the antenna carrier module is added and the length, and thus the number of carrier modules to be included in the antenna mount structure, is independent of having a central rod of fixed length. In addition, the motor may be attached to the central rod segment before the antenna carrier module is added to the antenna mount structure.

The disclosure also relates to a line-of-sight, LOS, wireless communication link system. The wireless communication link system comprises a multitude of multidirectional antenna units built up by antenna mount structures as disclosed above. According to one example, there are at least two antenna mount structures used in the system. The antenna mount structures used in the system carry at least two antennas each. The antenna mount structures are located at a distance of less than 300 meters away from a neighboring antenna mount structure which are intended to communicate with each other.

The use of antenna mount structures as disclosed herein for a LOS wireless communication system has the benefit of providing a flexible system which in an easy way adapt the number of antennas to be used in a radio access point, RAP, as well as modifying the pointing direction of the antennas at the RAP. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention will now be described more in detail with reference to the appended drawings, where: Figure 1 shows different embodiments of an antenna mount structure.

Figure 2 shows the separate parts used in an antenna mount structure.

Figure 3 shows different embodiments of an antenna carrier module

Figure 4 shows a schematic view of the motorized rotation arrangement

Figure 5 shows a modular system for an antenna mount structure

Figure 6 shows a multi antenna comprising an antenna mount structure from figure 1 a

Figure 7 shows a line of sight, LOS, wireless communication system

DETAILED DESCRIPTION In figure 1 a-b are two different embodiments of an antenna mount structure 1 , 1 ' disclosed. The antenna mount structures respectively comprises an attachment arrangement 2, 2' which is intended to be used for fixing the antenna mount structure to a support structure. The antenna mount structure 1 , 1 ' further comprises a central rod 3, 3' extending in the longitudinal direction of the antenna mount structure. In general, the antenna mount structure 1 , 1 ' is intended to be located such that the central rod 3, 3' is extending in the vertical direction. The antenna mount structures further comprise a respective outer carrier 4, 4' to which antennas may be attached by the antenna fixtures 7, 7'. The outer carrier 4, 4' is divided into a first carrier unit 4a, 4a' and second carrier unit 4b, 4b'. Each of the carrier units 4a, 4a', 4b, 4b' is provided with a first motor 5a, 5a' which is arranged to enable the carrier units 4a, 4a', 4b, 4b' to rotate around the central rod 3, 3'. This rotation will thus enable to shift the pointing direction of an antenna attached to the antenna fixtures 7, 7' in different directions in a plane perpendicular to the longitudinal extension direction of the antenna mount structure 1 , 1 '. In case the antenna mount structure 1 , 1 ' is mounted such that the central rod 3, 3 ' is vertical it will be possible to change the direction of an attached antenna in the horizontal plane, i.e. different directions along the ground surface. This directional adjustment is also commonly referred to as azimuth rotation in the field of telecommunication. The uppermost carrier units 4b, 4b' have been provided with a protective lid 8, 8'.

In figure 1 b has each one of the carrier units 4a', 4b' of the antenna mount structure V been provided with a second motor 5b' in order to adjust the elevation angle, i.e. to adjust the pointing direction relative the plane perpendicular to the longitudinal extension direction of the antenna mount structure 1 , 1 '. For example, the angle relative the horizontal plane may be adjusted if the central rod 3, 3 ' is mounted to extend vertically in its longitudinal extension direction.

To be noted, the antenna mount structure in figure 1 b could also be designed without the second motor 5b' if no adjustment in the elevation level is desired. Similarly, the antenna mount structure 1 in figure 1 a could be modified to include motorized adjustment possibilities in the elevation level even though it would only be possible to be used for the uppermost located carrier unit 4b since the carrier units 4a, 4b are stacked on and fitted onto each other.

It may further be noted that in figure 1 a is the attachment arrangement 2 including a cylinder shaped attachment base unit 21 to which brackets 23 are attached. The attachment base unit 21 further comprises an attachment plate 22 to which the central rod 3 is attached. In figure 1 b are the brackets 23' attached directly to the central rod 3'. These attachment arrangements 2, 2' could of course also be switched such that the attachment arrangement in figure 1 a could be used in figure 1 b and vice versa.

In figure 1 there are only disclosed 2 carrier units 4a, 4b, 4a', 4b' in each antenna mount structure 1 , 1 '. Further carrier units could of course be added as desired.

The central rod 3, 3' could be made hollow and allow wiring to be contained inside in order to power the motors 5a, 5a', 5b' and antennas/radios attached to the antenna mount structure as well as cables for transferring information and/or control signals to and from the motors 5a, 5a' 5b' and/or the antennas/radios.

Figure 2 shows components which are suitably used to build an antenna mount structure 1 as disclosed in figure 1 a. The attachment arrangement 2 forms the lower region of the antenna mount structure 1 in figure 1 a. The central rod 3 is attached to the attachment plate 22 and a motor 5a is attached to the central rod 3. The motor 5a powers a gear wheel 51 which is designed to fit in and engage with a threaded portion 44 on a carrier base 40. The carrier base 40 has a first end 42 and a second end 43. The second end 43 of the carrier base 40 is designed to fit onto the cylinder shaped attachment base unit 21 in the attachment arrangement 2 such that the carrier base 40 may rotate relative the attachment arrangement 2 empowered by the motor 5a. The attachment base unit 21 is provided with nylon bearings 9 on the inside in order to reduce friction forces when the carrier base 40 is rotated .

An adaptor unit 41 is designed to be placed on top of the carrier base 40 and fit onto the first end 42 of the carrier base 40. In figure 1 a, each of the carrier units 4a, 4b comprises a carrier base 40 and an adaptor unit 41 . The adaptor unit 41 is thus designed such that one of its ends is adapted to fit the first end 42 of the carrier base 40 and the other end of the adaptor unit 41 is designed to fit the second end 43 of the carrier base 40 such that the carrier units 4a, 4b in figure 1 may be stacked onto each other.

However, the carrier base 40 itself could be designed such that its first end 42 fits onto its second end 43 such that the carrier bases 40 could be stacked directly onto each other. Hence, a carrier base 40 could by itself essentially correspond to a carrier unit 4a, 4b.

The carrier base 40 could also be provided with a pivot unit 41 ' instead of an adaptor unit 41 such that an arrangement with elevation adjustment as described in figure 1 b is possible. In this case will thus a turning motion in the elevation level as well as in its orientation in the horizontal plane (azimuth) be possible. The pivot unit 41 ' is pivotally connected to the carrier base 40 by a common axle inserted through a carrier base hole 46a and a pivot unit hole 46b.

It shall be noted that if the pivot unit 41 ' is used in the antenna mount structure 1 disclosed in figure 1 a it will not be possible to stack further carrier units 4a, 4b on top of the pivot unit 41 '. Hence, the arrangement disclosed in figure 1 a enables to include only one carrier unit, the uppermost located carrier unit 4b, with adjustment possibilities in the elevation angle by the use of a pivot unit 41 ' fitted onto a carrier unit 4b. In case it is desired to have more than one carrier unit with possibility to adjust its elevation angle an arrangement as disclosed in figure 1 b should be used. The antenna mount structures 1 , 1 ' in figure 1 shows examples of how two antenna carriers 4a, 4b, 4a', 4b' are placed on top of each other and it is possible to add further carriers. The real beauty of this design is that multiple carrier units 4a, 4b, 4a', 4b' can be added and allow directional control of multiple carrier units as illustrated in figure 1 . The antenna mount structure 1 , 1 ' is designed to enable a modular build up of a multi-antenna with several independently controlled antennas. Naturally, more antenna carrier units can be stacked on top of each other, either by providing a sufficiently long inner rod from the beginning and adding further antenna carrier units and motors or by extending the inner rod as further carrier units with motors are added.

In figure 3 a-e are disclosed different antenna carrier modules 100 a-e which are suitable to be used in constructing an antenna mount structure, e.g. such an antenna mount structure 1 as disclosed in figure 1 a. The first four examples of antenna carrier modules 100 a-d disclosed in figures 3 a-d disclose different carrier modules which are made such that the first end 101 of a carrier module 100 a-d is adapted to fit onto the second end 102 of the very same carrier module. Hence, the carrier modules 100 a-d are designed to be able to be stacked onto each other as many as desired.

In figure 3a is disclosed a first example of an antenna carrier module 100a which is designed to be able to be stacked onto an identical carrier module 100a. The carrier module 100a comprises a carrier base unit 40 and is provided with a first end 101 which is designed to fit onto a second end 102. The antenna carrier module 100a is further provided with a motor 5a adapted to be fitted onto a central rod 3 (se figure 1 a) in order to provide for a rotational movement of the antenna carrier module 100a around the central rod 3 to which the motor 5 will be attached.

The antenna carrier module 100a in figure 3a is thus designed to be fitted onto an existing central rod 3 in an antenna mount structure 1 .

The antenna carrier module 100a in this case essentially corresponds to a carrier base 40 provided with a motor 5a.

In figure 3b is a second example of an antenna carrier module 100b disclosed. This antenna carrier module 100b differs from the one disclosed in figure 3a in that it also comprises a central rod segment 30. In this case the central rod 3 will thus be extended while adding an additional antenna carrier module 100b to the antenna mount structure 1 . Hence, the addition of an additional antenna carrier unit 100b will not be limited by the length of an existing central rod 3 but the central rod 3 will be extended by a central rod segment 30 having a length corresponding to the length of the antenna carrier module 100b. At the first end 101 of the carrier module 100b the central rod segment 30 is provided with a first connector 31 which is designed to fit and engage with a second connector 32 of the rod segment 30 at the second end 102 of the carrier module. In this figure, the connectors 31 , 32 are illustrated as threaded portions which are designed to be able to be joined by screwing. However, the connectors 31 , 32 could be any kind of connecting or locking arrangement such as bayonet connectors or a pin or bolt engaging in locking holes.

The antenna carrier module 100b in this case essentially corresponds to a carrier base 40 provided with a motor 5a attached to a central rod segment 30.

In figure 3c a third example of an antenna carrier module 100c is disclosed. This arrangement is similar to the one described in figure 3b but in this example is the central rod segment 30 displaced relative the carrier base 40 such that the rod segment 30 at the first end 101 of the carrier module 100c extends beyond the carrier base 40. In order to be able to stack one carrier module 100c onto another of the same kind the rod segment 30 must thus be recessed into the carrier module 100c at the second end 102. This design have the advantage that the central rod 3 will extend at the end furthest away from the attachment arrangement 2 (se figure 1 ) and could be used for attachment to a support structure in order to stabilize the antenna mount structure 1 also at its upper end in addition to its attachment by the attachment structure 2 at its lower end.

In figure 3d is disclosed a fourth example of an antenna carrier module 100d. This antenna carrier module 100d has similarity with the antenna carrier module 100b disclosed in figure 3b but differs in that an adaptor unit 41 has been added and fitted on top of the carrier base 40. The central rod segment 30 has also been extended compared to the carrier module 100b in figure 3b.

The antenna carrier module 100d in this case thus comprises an adaptor unit 41 in addition to a carrier base 40 and a motor 5a attached to a central rod segment 30. By using different adaptor units 41 , e.g. adaptor units having different lengths, when designing the antenna carrier module, the same carrier base unit 40 could easily be used for a variety of different carrier modules 100d. A difference in the length extension of the carrier module 100d could for example be desired depending on the size of the antennas mounted onto the antenna mount structure 1 (see figure 1 ), e.g. could there be a desire to allow the antennas to be able to pass each other when the antenna carrier units 4a, 4b are rotated and thus a desire to have different extensions of the antenna carrier modules added to the antenna mount structure depending on the size of the antennas mounted to the antenna carrier units.

It could of course also be possible to vary the length of the carrier base 40 in the examples in figures 3a-c in order to vary the length of the antenna carrier modules 100a-c described therein and carrier modules 100a-c of same or different lengths could be mounted on top of each other.

The antenna carrier module 100e in figure 3e differs from the antenna carrier module 100d in figure 3d in that a pivot unit 41 ' has been added to a carrier base 40. The antenna carrier module 100e differs from the carrier modules 100a-d in figures 3a-d in that it is not designed to allow another antenna carrier module to fit on top. However, the antenna carrier module 100e allows adjusting the elevation angle of an attached antenna.

Even though only one antenna carrier module 100e providing motorized elevation angle adjustment by the use of a pivot unit 41 ' may be included in an antenna mount structure 1 as described in fig. 1 a, it could be enough to be able to adjust the elevation angle of only one antenna in many cases. When there is a desire to have multiple antennas pointing in 2 or more different directions to connect neighboring radio access points (RAPs) forming part of a line of sight (LOS) wireless communication system, there is in general no need for adjusting the elevation in more than at the most one direction, at least in a city environment. This is due to the fact that in most cases there will not be a considerable change in the topography, e.g. such as at the bottom of a steep ascent or crest of a hill, in more than one direction. As long as the environment is planar, or having an essentially constant inclination degree, there will be no or small deviation in the inclination angle of the ground and there will be no need to provide for adjustment in the elevation angle in more than one direction.

It shall also be noted an antenna fixture 7 on the carrier modules 100a-e used for attaching an antenna could be designed to be fixedly adjusted in the elevation angle when an antenna is mounted to the carrier module if desired.

The central rod segment 30 of a carrier module 100b-e could be made hollow and comprise wiring for transferring electrical power or information and the wiring could be designed to easily be connected to the wiring of another central rod segment 30 such that when one carrier module 100b-e is stacked on another carrier module 100b-e may the carrier module easily be connected to an electrical grid or a wired communication system.

In figure 4 is disclosed a schematic overview of the motorized arrangement used for providing a rotation of the carrier units 4a, 4b which are comprised in the carrier modules 100a-e disclosed in figures 3a-e. The motorized system comprises a motor 5a attached to the central rod 3. The motor 5a is drivingly connected to the gearwheel 51 which is in engaging contact with the threaded circular segment 44 on the inside of the carrier base 40. The motor 5a may thus be controlled to rotate the gearwheel 51 in a desired direction which will cause the carrier base 40 to rotate around the central rod 3 so as to enable adjustment of the pointing direction of an antenna attached to a carrier unit 4a, 4b (see figure 1 )comprising the carrier base 40. In figure 5 is disclosed a modular antenna system 200 which could be used for an antenna mount structure 1 as disclosed in figure 1 a. The modular system 200 comprises a fixing module 1 10 and a carrier module 100b, i.e. the carrier module disclosed in figure 3b. The fixing module 1 10 is provided with an attachment arrangement 2 intended to be fixed to a support structure. The modular system 200 is designed such that the carrier module 100b is designed to fit on top of the fixing module 1 10 and there is a first connector 31 provided on the free end of the central rod 3 attached to the fixing module 1 10 adapted to fit to a second connector 32 on the central rod segment 30 in the carrier module 100b.

The modular system 200 is of course intended to be able to be adapted to be used for any of the carrier modules 10Oa-e in figure 3a-e by adapting the fixing module 1 10 to allow any desired carrier module 100a-e to be fitted thereto.

The antenna mount structure 1 disclosed in figure 1 could be built by using a fixing module 1 10 and adding two of the carrier modules 100d described in figure 3d and providing the carrier modules 100d with antenna fixtures 7.

In figure 6 is disclosed a multi-antenna 301 comprising two antennas 6 mounted to an outer carrier 4 of an antenna mount structure 1 as disclosed in figure 1 a. The antennas 6 are mounted to a respective carrier unit 4a, 4b such that the direction of each antenna 6 may be individually controlled. In this case, the carrier units 4a, 4b are built by the carrier modules 100d in figure 3d. If desired, further carrier modules 100d could be added and provided with an antenna 6 such that the multi-antenna 301 comprises three, four or even more antennas 6 which pointing directions could be individually controlled. The antennas 6 could of course be provided with electronic circuitry and constitute a complete radio unit including data processing and management. The multi-antenna 301 could of course also be made by the use of carrier units of a different design, e.g. by using the carrier modules 100a-c, e in figures 3a-c and 3e.

In figure 7 is disclosed a line of sight, LOS, wireless communication system 300 comprising a multitude of multi-antennas 301 in a city environment with building blocks 302 and streets 303. Each multi-antenna 301 comprises an antenna mount structure 1 to which two, three or four antennas 6 have been mounted.

A multi-antenna 301 with four antennas could for example be used as a radio access node with two antennas for the daisy chained microwave links and two radio access antennas. The multi-antenna 301 can be even more compact if the antennas 6 do not have to pass each other which could be the case in some deployments.

The multi-antennas 301 could of course be used also in other environments, e.g. being attached to light poles or utility poles in suburban areas, in order to provide a LOS wireless communication system 300.

Generally, the present disclosure is directed to an antenna mount structure 1 , 1 ', having a longitudinal direction and a radial direction perpendicular to the longitudinal direction, comprising:

· An attachment arrangement 2, 2' adapted for fixing the antenna mount structure 1 , 1 ' to a support structure

A central rod 3, 3' extending in the longitudinal direction of the antenna mount structure 1 , 1 ' and being fixed to the attachment arrangement 2, 2'

An outer carrier 4, 4' adapted for carrying an antenna, said outer carrier being 4, 4' located radially outwards of the central rod 3, 3' and at least partly encompassing a part of the longitudinal extension of the central rod 3, 3', said outer carrier 4, 4' being rotatably mounted relative said central rod 3, 3'

A motor system comprising at least one motor 5, 5' that is arranged to control the outer carrier 4 to rotate relative the central rod 3, 3',

Wherein said outer carrier 4, 4' comprises at least a first carrier unit 4a, 4a' and a second carrier unit 4b, 4b' arranged for carrying at least one respective antenna 6a, 6b, where said motor system is arranged to rotate said first carrier unit 4a, 4a' and second carrier unit 4b, 4b' independently of each other such that the position of the respective carrier unit 4a, 4a', 4b, 4b' can be individually controlled.

According to some aspects of the invention, said carrier units 4a, 4b are designed to fit and be stacked onto each other, either directly or via an adaptor unit 41 , such that a first end 42 of the carrier unit 4a, 4b is designed to interact with a second end 43 of the carrier unit 4a, 4b or an adaptor unit 41 when a first carrier unit 4a is fitted onto a second carrier unit 4b allowing the first carrier unit 4a to rotate relative the second carrier unit 4b while the carrier units 4a, 4b are fitted onto each other.

According to some aspects of the invention, said carrier unit 4a, 4b has a first circularly shaped end 42 having an inner radii adapted to receive and closely fit with an outer radii of its other, second circular shaped end 43 such that a first carrier unit 4a can be fitted to a second carrier unit 4b by allowing the first end 42 of a first carrier unit 4a to receive a second end 43 of a second carrier unit 4b such that a multitude of carrier units 4a, 4b can be stacked onto each other.

According to some aspects of the invention, said first end 42 or second end 43 of the carrier unit 4a is provided with a bearing or a frictional reducing material on the side intended to be in contact with the other end 43 or 42 of another carrier unit 4b when the carrier units 4a, 4b are stacked onto each other.

According to some aspects of the invention, said first carrier unit 4a, 4a' and second carrier unit 4b, 4b' are controlled by a respective first motor 5a, 5a' and a second motor 5a, 5a'.

According to some aspects of the invention, said motor 5a, 5a' is fixed to the central rod 3, 3' and designed to power a gear wheel 51 adapted to engage with a threaded portion 44 on a circular segment of the carrier unit 4a, 4a', 4b, 4b' in order to control the angular position of the associated carrier unit 4a, 4a', 4b, 4b'.

According to some aspects of the invention, the carrier unit 4a, 4a', 4b, 4b' is arranged to rotate at least 180 degrees, preferably a complete rotation of 360 degrees.

According to some aspects of the invention, the carrier unit 4a, 4a', 4b, 4b' is designed to be able to tilt relative the longitudinal direction of the antenna mount structure 1 having a tilting angle of more than 5 degrees, preferably more than 10 degrees. According to some aspects of the invention, the central rod 3, 3' is hollow and comprises wiring for powering and/or transmitting information to or from the carrier unit 4a, 4a', 4b, 4b'.

According to some aspects of the invention, the carrier unit 4a, 4a', 4b, 4b' is provided with a wireless actuator for remotely controlling the positioning of the carrier unit 4a, 4a', 4b, 4b' by a wireless input control panel.

The disclosure is also generally directed to an antenna carrier module 100 a-d which may be used for an antenna mount structure as disclosed above, said antenna carrier module 100 a-d comprising a motor 5a and a carrier unit 4a, 4b for carrying an antenna, said antenna carrier module 100 a-d being adapted to be attached to an elongated central rod 3 and where the motor 5a is adapted to provide a turning torque for actuating a rotational movement of the carrier unit 4a, 4b relative the central rod 3 to which the antenna carrier module 100 a-d is intended to be mounted, wherein said antenna carrier module 100 a-d is designed such that a multitude of antenna carrier modules 100 a-d can be stacked onto each other and be attached to the common central rod 3 while the rotational position of each antenna carrier module 100 a-d is individually controlled by its associated motor 5a.

According to some aspects of the antenna carrier module 100 b-d, said carrier module 100 b-d comprises a central rod segment 30 which at its first end is provided with a first connector 31 and at its second end provided with a second connector 32, where said first connector 31 is adapted to fit and engage said second connector 32 such that when a first end 101 of a carrier module 100 b-d is stacked onto a second end 102 of a carrier module 100 b-d, the rod segments 30 of each carrier module 100 b-d can be connected and form part of the central rod 3.

The disclosure is also generally directed to a modular system 200 for an antenna mount structure 1 , the modular system 200 comprising a carrier module 100 a-d as disclosed above and a fixing module 1 10 comprising an attachment portion 2, 2' for attachment of a central rod 3, 3' to a support structure, where said fixing module 1 10 is adapted to fit and interact with the carrier module 100 a-d in such a way that the carrier module 100 a-d is enabled to rotate relative the fixing module 1 10.

According to some aspects of the modular system 200, said carrier module 100 b-d comprises a central rod segment 30 adapted to be fixed to the fixing module 1 10. The disclosure is also generally directed to a line-of-sight, LOS, wireless communication link system 300, wherein the LOS wireless communication link system comprises a multitude of multidirectional antenna units 301 , said multidirectional antenna units 301 built up by antenna mount structures 1 as disclosed above, said antenna mount structures 1 carrying at least two antennas 6 each and each antenna mount structure 1 being located at a distance of less than 300 meters from a neighboring antenna mount structure 1 which are intended to communicate with each other.