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Title:
ANTIDIABETIC BICYCLIC COMPOUNDS
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2007/136572
Kind Code:
A2
Abstract:
Tricyclic compounds containing a cyclopropyl carboxylic acid or carboxylic acid derivative (e.g. amide) fused to a bicyclic ring, including pharmaceutically acceptable salts and prodrugs thereof, are agonists of G-protein coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) and are useful as therapeutic compounds, particularly in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, and of conditions that are often associated with this disease, including obesity and lipid disorders, such as mixed or diabetic dyslipidemia, hyperlipidemia, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertriglyceridemia.

Inventors:
GE, Min (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
HE, Jiafang (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
LAU, Fiona Wai Yu (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
LIANG, Gui-Bai (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
LIN, Songnian (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
LIU, Weiguo (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
WALSH, Shawn, P. (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
YANG, Lihu (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
Application Number:
US2007/011369
Publication Date:
November 29, 2007
Filing Date:
May 11, 2007
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
MERCK & CO., INC. (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
GE, Min (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
HE, Jiafang (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
LAU, Fiona Wai Yu (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
LIANG, Gui-Bai (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
LIN, Songnian (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
LIU, Weiguo (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
WALSH, Shawn, P. (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
YANG, Lihu (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
International Classes:
C07D213/64; C07C62/34; C07D307/93; C07D333/78; C07D405/04; C07D407/12; C07D413/12; C07D417/12
Domestic Patent References:
2005-07-21
2003-03-13
Foreign References:
US3514491A1970-05-26
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MERCK & CO., INC. (126 East Lincoln Avenue, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065-0907, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:

WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:

1. A compound of formula I, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof:

I wherein Ar is selected from the group consisting of phenyl, naphthyl, quinolyl, pyridyl, and thiazolyl, wherein Ar is optionally substituted with one aromatic group selected from phenyl, phenoxy, and oxadiazolyl, and is optionally substituted with 1-3 groups independently selected from halogen, -CN, -Nθ2, Ci-4alkyl, -OCi-2alkyl, and -OC3-6cycloalkyl, wherein Ci-4alkyl and -OCi_2alkyl are optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens, and the substituents phenyl, phenoxy, and oxadiazolyl are optionally substituted with 1-3 groups independently selected from halogen, -CN, -NO2, -OH, -C(=O)OH, Ci_4alkyl, -OCi-4alkyl, and -O(CH2)q(4-6-membered cyclic ether), wherein Ci-4alkyl in all instances is optionally substituted with 1 -5 halogens and is optionally substituted with 1 group selected from -OH and -OCi_3alkyl optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens, and the 4-6 membered cyclic ether is optionally substituted with 1-2 groups independently selected from halogen, CH3, and CF3;

X is selected from the group consisting of -O-, -S-, -S(O)-, -S(O)2-, -NR.5-, -OCRlORlI-, -SCRlORlI-, -NRSCRI ORI I-, -CRIORI IO-, -CRIORI IS-, -CR10R11NR5-, and -CR6R7CR8R9O-;

Y is selected from the group consisting of -O-, -S-, -S(O)-, -S(O)2-, -NR5-, -C(O)-, -CR6R7-, -OCR6R7-, -SCR6R7., and -CR6R7CR8R9_ ;

Z is selected from the group consisting of -C(=O)ORl2, -C(=O)NR13R14, and 5- tetrazolyl;

Rl, R2, and R3 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H, halogen, Ci-3alkyl, and -OCi-3alkyl, wherein Ci_3alkyl, and -OCi_3alkyl are each optionally substituted with 1-3 halogens;

R.4 is selected from the group consisting of halogen, -CN 5 -NO2, -OH, -CC=O)H, -CC=O)OH, Ci_6alkyl 5 -OCi-βalkyl, -SCi_6alkyl, -C(=O)Ci-6alkyl, -OC(=O)Ci-6alkyl 3 -C(=O)OCi_6alkyl, -S(O)2Ci-6alkyl, -NR13R14, -C(=O)N(R1 3 )(R14) 5 and -S(O)2NR 13 R 14 , wherein Cl-βalkyl in all instances is optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens;

R5, Rl 3 and Rl 4 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H, Ci-5alkyl, -C(^=O)Ci -5 alkyl, and -S(O)2Ci-5alkyl, wherein Ci_5alkyl in all instances is optionally substituted with 1 -5 halogens;

R6, RV, R8, R9 5 RlO 3 and Rl 1 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H, halogen, -OH, and Ci_3alkyl which is optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens;

Rl 2 is selected from the group consisting of H and Cj.γalkyl which is optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens;

p is an integer from 0-3; and q is 0 or 1.

2. The compound of Claim 1, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein

Z is selected from the group consisting and 5-tetrazolyl;

Rl, R2, and R3 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H, F, Cl, Ci_3alkyU and CF3;

R4 is selected from the group consisting of halogen, -CN, -NO2, -OH, -C(=O)H, -C(=O)OH, Ci-4alkyl, -0Ci-4alkyl, -CC=O)Ci _4alkyl, and -NR13R14, wherein Ci-4alkyl in all instances is optionally substituted with 1 -5 halogens;

R 5 is selected from the group consisting of H, Ci_3alkyl, and -C(=O)Ci-3alkyl, wherein Ci_3alkyl and -CC=O)C i_3alkyl are optionally substituted with 1-5 F;

R6, R8, and RlO are each independently selected from the group consisting of H, -OH, and CH3;

R7, R9 S and Rl 1 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H and CH3;

Rl 3 and Rl 4 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H 5 Ci-5alkyl, and -S(O)2Ci-5alkyl; p is 0 or 1 ; and q is O or 1.

3. The compound of Claim 1 , or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein X is selected from the group consisting of -O-, -S-, -S(O)-, -S(O)2-,

-CHRl lo, -CH2NH-, -OCH2-, and -CH2CH2O-;

Y is selected from the group consisting of -S-, -S(O)-, -S(O)2-, -O-, -OCH2-, -C(=O)-, -CHR6-, -NR5-, and -CH2CH2-;

Z is selected from the group consisting of -C(=O)ORl2, -C(^O)NRI SRM, and 5-tetrazolyl;

Rl, R2 5 and R3 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H, CH3, and CF3;

R4 is selected from the group consisting of halogen, CH3, and CF3; R5 is selected from the group consisting of H and CH3; R6 is selected from the group consisting of H and -OH;

Rl 1 is selected from H and CH3; Rl2 is selected from the group consisting of H and Ci-5alkyl which is optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens;

Rl3 is selected from the group consisting of H, Ci-3alkyl, and -S(O)2Ci_3alkyl; Rl4 is H; p is 0 or 1 ; and q is 0 or 1.

4. The compound of Claim 3, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein Ar is selected from the group consisting of phenyl, naphthyl, pyridyl, and thiazolyl, wherein Ar is optionally substituted with one aromatic group selected from phenyl, phenoxy, and oxadiazolyl, and is optionally substituted with 1 -3 groups independently selected from halogen, -CN 3 -NO2, Cl-4alkyl, -OCi_2alkyl, and -OC3_6cycloalkyl, wherein Cl-4alkyl and -OCi_2alkyl are optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens, and the substituents phenyl, phenoxy, and oxadiazolyl are optionally substituted with 1-3 groups independently selected from halogen, -CN. -NO2, -OH 5 Ci-3alkyl, -OCi-3alkyl, and -O(CH2)q(4-6 membered cyclic ether), wherein Ci_3alkyl is optionally substituted with 1-3 halogens, and -OCl-3alkyl is optionally

substituted with 1-3 halogens and is optionally substituted with 1 group selected from -OH and -OCl-3alkyl optionally substituted with 1-3 halogens, and the 4-6 membered cyclic ether is optionally substituted with 1-2 groups independently selected from halogen, CH3, and CF3;

X is selected from the group consisting of -O-, -CHRl IO-, -CH2NH-, -OCH2-, and -CH2CH2O-;

Y is selected from the group consisting of -S-, -S(O)2- 5 -O-, -OCH2-, -C-C=O)-, -CHR6-, and -CH2CH2-;

Z is selected from the group consisting of -C(=O)OR12 5 -C(=O)NR13R14 3 and 5- tetrazolyl; Rl, R2, and R3 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H and CH3;

R6 is selected from the group consisting of H and -OH; Rl 1 is selected from H and CH3;

Rl2 is H; Rl 3 is selected from the group consisting of H, Ci_3alkyl, and -S(O)2Cl_3alkyl;

Rl4 is H; p is 0; and q is 0 or 1.

5. The compound of Claim 1, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein p is 0; and Ar is substituted with 1-3 substituent groups.

6. The compound of Claim 5, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein Ar is selected from the group consisting of

Ca) phenyl, which is optionally substituted with 1-3 groups independently selected from halogen, -CN, -NO2, Ci_4alkyl, -OCi^alkyl, and -OC3_6cycloalkyl, wherein Ci_4alkyl and -OCi_2alkyl are optionally substituted with 1-3 halogens; and is optionally substituted with one group selected from (i) phenyl, which is optionally substituted with 1-3 substituents independently selected from halogen, -CN, -NO2, CH3, -OCH3, CF3, -OCF3, -OCHF2, -OCH2CH2θCi-2alkyl, and -OCCH2)qC4-6 membered cyclic ether selected from oxetane and tetrahydropyran), wherein the 4-6 membered cyclic ether is optionally substituted with 1 group selected from halogen, CH3, and CF3; Cϋ) phenoxy, which is optionally substituted with 1-3 groups independently selected from CH3, CF3, and halogen; and (ϊϊi) l,2,4-oxadiazol-3~yl, which is optionally substituted with 1-2 CH3 groups;

Cb) naphthyl, which is optionally substituted with 1-2 groups independently selected from CH3, CF3, halogen, and -CN;

(c) pyridyl, which is optionally substituted with 1-2 groups independently selected from CH3, CF3, and halogen; and

(d) l,3-thiazol-5-yl, which is optionally substituted with 1-2 substituents independently selected from phenyl, CH3, and halogen; X is selected from the group consisting of -O-, -CH2O-, -CH(CH3)O-,

-CH2CH2O-, -CH2NH-, and -OCH2-;

Y is selected from the group consisting of -S-, -S(O)2-, -O-, -OCH2-, -C(=O)-, -CH(OH)-, -CH2-, and -CH2CH2-;

Z is selected from the group consisting of -C(=O)OH, -C(=O)NR13R14 } and 5- tetrazolyl;

Rl, R2, and R3 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H and CH3;

Rl 3 is selected from the group consisting of H, Ci-3alkyl 3 and -S(O)2Ci_3alkyl; Rl 4 is H; p is 0; and q is 0 or 1.

7. The compound of Claim 6, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein Ar is phenyl, which is optionally substituted with 1-3 groups independently selected from halogen, -CN, -NO2, Ci_4alkyl, CF3, -OCF3, -OCHF2, -OCi_2alkyl, and

-O-cyclopropyl; and is optionally substituted with one group selected from (i) phenyl, which is optionally substituted with 1 -3 substituents independently selected from halogen, -CN, -NO2, CH3, -OCH3, CF3, -OCF3, -OCH2CH2θCi_2alkyl, and -O(CH2)q(4-6 membered cyclic ether selected from oxetane and tetrahydropyran), wherein the 4-6 membered cyclic ether is optionally substituted with 1 group selected from CH3, and CF3; (ii) phenoxy, which is optionally substituted with 1-3 groups independently selected from CH3, CF3, and halogen; and (iii) l,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl, which is optionally substituted with 1-2 CH3 groups; X is selected from the group consisting of -O- and -CH2O-; Y is O;

Z is selected from the group consisting of -C(K))OH and -C(=O)NRl3Rl4 ; Rl 3 is selected from the group consisting of H, CH3, and -S(O)2CH3; and Rl4 is H.

8. The compound of Claim 6, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, selected from the group consisting of compounds having the following structures:

9. A pharmaceutical composition comprising the compound of Claim I 5 or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier.

10. The use of the compound of Claim 1 or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof for the manufacture of a medicament for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

11. A method of treating type 2 diabetes mellitus in a patient in need of treatment comprising the administration to the patient of a therapeutically effective amount of the compound of Claim 1 , or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

12. A pharmaceutical composition comprising

(1) the compound of Claim 1 or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof; (2) one or more compounds selected from the group consisting of :

(a) PPAR gamma agonists and partial agonists;

(b) biguanides;

(c) protein tyrosine phosphatase- IB (PTP-IB) inhibitors;

(d) dipeptidyl peptidase TV (DP-TV) inhibitors; (e) insulin or an insulin mimetic;

(f) sulfonylureas;

(g) α-glucosidase inhibitors;

(h) agents which improve a patient's lipid profile, said agents being selected from the group consisting of (i) HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, (ii) bile acid sequestrants, (iii) nicotinyl alcohol, nicotinic acid or a salt thereof, (iv) PP ARa agonists, (v) cholesterol

absorption inhibitors, (vi) acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitors, (vii) CETP inhibitors, and (viii) phenolic anti-oxidants;

(i) PPARα/ydual agonists,

(j) PP ARδ agonists, (k) antiobesity compounds,

(1) ileal bile acid transporter inhibitors;

(m) anti-inflammatory agents;

(n) glucagon receptor antagonists;

(o) GLP-I; (p) GIP-I;

(q) GLP-I analogs; and

(r) HSD-I inhibitors; and (3) a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier.

Description:

TITLE OF THE INVENTION ANTIDIABETIC BICYCLIC COMPOUNDS

FIELD OF THE INVENTION The instant invention is concerned with tricyclic compounds containing a cyclopropyl carboxylic acid or carboxylic acid derivative fϊised to a bicyclic ring, including pharmaceutically acceptable salts and prodrugs thereof, which are agonists of G-protein coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) and are useful as therapeutic compounds, particularly in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, and of conditions that are often associated with this disease, including obesity and lipid disorders.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Diabetes is a disease derived from multiple causative factors and characterized by elevated levels of plasma glucose (hyperglycemia) in the fasting state or after administration of glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test. There are two generally recognized forms of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), patients produce little or no insulin, the hormone which regulates glucose utilization. In type 2 diabetes, or noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), insulin is still produced in the body. Patients having type 2 diabetes have a resistance to the effects of insulin in stimulating glucose and lipid metabolism in the main insulin-sensitive tissues, which are muscle, liver and adipose tissues. These patients often have normal levels of insulin, and may have hyperinsulinernia (elevated plasma insulin levels), as they compensate for the reduced effectiveness of insulin by secreting increased amounts of insulin. Insulin resistance is not primarily caused by a diminished number of insulin receptors but rather by a post-insulin receptor binding defect that is not yet completely understood. This lack of responsiveness to insulin results in insufficient insulin-mediated activation of uptake, oxidation and storage of glucose in muscle, and inadequate insulin- mediated repression of lipolysis in adipose tissue and of glucose production and secretion in the liver.

Persistent or uncontrolled hyperglycemia that occurs with diabetes is associated with increased and premature morbidity and mortality. Often abnormal glucose homeostasis is associated both directly and indirectly with obesity, hypertension, and alterations of the lipid, lipoprotein and apolipoprotein metabolism, as well as other metabolic and hemodynamic disease. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a significantly increased risk of microvascular and microvascular complications, including atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, hypertension, nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Therefore, therapeutic control of glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism, obesity, and hypertension are critically important in the clinical management and treatment of diabetes mellitus.

Patients who have insulin resistance often have several symptoms that together are referred to as syndrome X, or the metabolic syndrome. According to one widely used definition, a patient having metabolic syndrome is characterized as having three or more symptoms selected from the following group of five symptoms: (1) abdominal obesity; (2) hypertriglyceridemia; (3) low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL); (4) high blood pressure; and (5) elevated fasting glucose, which may be in the range characteristic of Type 2 diabetes if the patient is also diabetic. Each of these symptoms is defined clinically in the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III, or ATP III), National Institutes of Health, 2001, NIH Publication No. 01-3670. Patients with metabolic syndrome, whether or not they have or develop overt diabetes mellitus, have an increased risk of developing the macrovascular and microvascular complications that occur with type 2 diabetes, such as atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease.

There are several available treatments for type 2 diabetes, each of which has its own limitations and potential risks. Physical exercise and a reduction in dietary intake of calories often dramatically improve the diabetic condition and are the usual recommended first- line treatment of type 2 diabetes and of pre-diabetic conditions associated with insulin resistance. Compliance with this treatment is very poor because of well-entrenched sedentary lifestyles and excess food consumption, especially of foods containing high amounts of fat and carbohydrates. Pharmacologic treatments have focused on three areas of pathophysiology: (1) Hepatic glucose production (biguanides), (2) insulin resistance (PPAR agonists), and (3) insulin secretion.

The biguanides are a class of drugs that are widely used to treat type 2 diabetes. The two best known biguanides, phenformin and metformin, cause some correction of hyperglycemia. The biguanides act primarily by inhibiting hepatic glucose production, and they also are believed to modestly improve insulin sensitivity. The biguanides can be used as monotherapy or in combination with other anti-diabetic drugs, such as insulin or an insulin secretagogue, without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia. However, phenformin and metformin can induce lactic acidosis and nausea/diarrhea. Metformin has a lower risk of side effects than phenformin and is widely prescribed for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. The glitazones (i.e. 5-benzylthiazolidine-2,4-diones) are a newer class of compounds that can ameliorate hyperglycemia and other symptoms of type 2 diabetes. The glitazones that are currently marketed (rosiglitazone and pioglitazone) are agonists of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) gamma subtype. The PPAR-gamma agonists substantially increase insulin sensitivity in muscle, liver and adipose tissue in several animal models of type 2 diabetes, resulting in partial or complete correction of elevated plasma glucose levels without the occurrence of hypoglycemia. PPAR-gamma agonism is believed to be responsible for the improved insulin sensititization that is observed in human patients who are

treated with the glitazones. New PPAR agonists are currently being developed. Many of the newer PPAR compounds are agonists of one or more of the PPAR alpha, gamma and delta subtypes. Compounds that are agonists of both the PPAR alpha and PPAR gamma subtypes (PPAR alpha/gamma dual agonists) have been made and tested, but so far none have been approved by the regulatory authorities. The currently marketed PPAR gamma agonists are modestly effective in reducing plasma glucose and HemoglobinAlC. The currently marketed compounds do not greatly improve lipid metabolism and may actually have a negative effect on the lipid profile. Selective PPAR Gamma Partial Agonists (SPPARM' s) are currently being developed and may be equally effective, with fewer side effects, such as weight gain and edema. Thus, the PPAR compounds represent an important advance in diabetic therapy.

Another widely used drug treatment involves the administration of insulin secretagogues, such as the sulfonylureas (e.g. tolbutamide and glipizide). These drugs increase the plasma level of insulin by stimulating the pancreatic β— cells to secrete more insulin. Insulin secretion in the pancreatic β-cell is under strict regulation by glucose and an array of metabolic, neural and hormonal signals. Glucose stimulates insulin production and secretion through its metabolism to generate ATP and other signaling molecules, whereas other extracellular signals act as potentiators or inhibitors of insulin secretion through GPCR's present on the plasma membrane. Sulfonylureas and related insulin secretagogues act by blocking the ATP-dependent K+ channel in β-cells, which causes depolarization of the cell and the opening of the voltage- dependent Ca2+ channels with stimulation of insulin release. This mechanism is non-glucose dependent, and hence insulin secretion can occur regardless of the ambient glucose levels. This can cause insulin secretion even if the glucose level is low, resulting in hypoglycemia, which can be fatal in severe cases. The administration of insulin secretagogues must therefore be carefully controlled. The insulin secretagogues are often used as a first-line drug treatment for Type 2 diabetes.

Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) inhibitors (e.g., sitagliptin. vildagliptin, alogliptin, denagliptin, and saxagliptin) provide a new route for increasing insulin secretion in response to food consumption. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) is a cell surface protein with broad tissue distribution that has been implicated in a wide range of biological functions. DPP-4 is identical to the T cell activation marker CD26 and can cleave a number of immunoregulatory, endocrine, and neurological peptides in vitro. It is well established that the incretins GLP-I (glucagon-like peptide- 1) and GIP (glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide; also known as gastric inhibitory peptide) stimulate insulin secretion and are rapidly inactivated in vivo by DPP- 4. These peptidyl hormones are secreted by endocrine cells that are located in the epithelium of the small intestine. When these endocrine cells sense an increase in the concentration of glucose in the lumen of the digestive tract, they act as the trigger for incretin release. Incretins are carried through the circulation to beta cells in the pancreas and cause the beta cells to secrete more

insulin in anticipation of an increase of blood glucose resulting from the digesting meal. Studies with DPP-4(-/-)-deficient mice and clinical trials with DPP-4 inhibitors indicate that DPP-4 inhibition increases the steady state concentrations of GLP-I and GIP, resulting in improved glucose tolerance. Inactivation of these peptides by DPP-4 may also play a role in glucose homeostasis. DPP-4 inhibitors therefore have utility in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and in the treatment and prevention of the numerous conditions that often accompany type 2 diabetes, including metabolic syndrome, reactive hypoglycemia, and diabetic dyslipidemia. GLP-I has other effects that help to lower blood glucose and contribute to glucose homeostasis. GLP-I inhibits glucagon secretion from the liver. Glucagon is a hormone that increases blood glucose levels by stimulating glucose production from glycogen stores in the liver. GLP-I also delays stomach emptying, which helps to spread glucose absorption out over time, and thus limit hyperglycemia. Also, studies in animals have shown that GLP-I can increase the number of beta cells, either through promoting growth or by inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, potentiation of GLP-I action by preventing its degradation offers several mechanisms to attenuate hyperglycemia associated with type 2 diabetes.

There has been a renewed focus on pancreatic islet-based insulin secretion that is controlled by glucose-dependent insulin secretion. This approach has the potential for stabilization and restoration of β-cell function. In this regard, several orphan G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR's) have recently been identified that are preferentially expressed in the β-cell and that are implicated in glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). GPR40 is a cell-surface GPCR that is highly expressed in human (and rodent) islets as well as in insulin-secreting cell lines. Several naturally-occurring medium to long-chain fatty acids (FA's) as well as synthetic compounds, including several members of the thiazolidinedione class of PPARγ agonists, have recently been identified as ligands for GPR40 (Itoh, Y. et al., Nature. 422: 173 [2003]; Briscoe, CP. et al., J. Biol. Chem. 278: 11303 [2003]; Kotarsky, K. et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Comm. 301 : 406 [2003]. Under hyperglycemic conditions, GPR40 agonists are capable of augmenting the release of insulin from islet cells. The specificity of this response is suggested by results showing that the inhibition of GPR40 activity by siRNA attenuates FA-induced amplification of GSIS. These findings indicate that, in addition to the intracellular generation of lipid-derivatives of FA's that are thought to promote insulin release, FA's (and other synthetic GPR40 agonists) may also act as extracellular ligands that bind to GPR40 in mediating FA- induced insulin secretion. There are several potential advantages of GPR40 as a potential target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. First, since GPR40-mediated insulin secretion is glucose dependent, there is little or no risk of hypoglycemia. Second, the limited tissue distribution of GPR40 (mainly in islets) suggests that there would be less chance for side effects associated with GPR40 activity in other tissues. Third, GPR40 agonists that are active in the islets may have the potential to restore or preserve islet function. This would be highly advantageous, because long

term diabetes therapy often leads to the gradual diminution of islet activity, so that after extended periods of treatment, it is often necessary to treat type 2 diabetic patients with daily insulin injections. By restoring or preserving islet function, GPR40 agonists may delay or prevent the diminution and loss of islet function in a type 2 diabetic patient.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The class of compounds described herein is a new class of GPR40 agonists. The compounds are useful in the treatment of diseases that are modulated by GPR40 agonists, including type 2 diabetes, hyperglycemia that may be associated with type 2 diabetes or pre- diabetic insulin resistance, and also obesity.

The present invention is directed to a compound of formula I, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, including individual diastereomers and enantiomers thereof, and mixtures of diastereomers and/or enantiomers thereof:

I

In Formula I, Ar is selected from the group consisting of phenyl, naphthyl, a 5-6 membered monocyclic heteroaromatic ring having 1-3 heteroatoms independently selected from N, O 5 and S, and a benzoheteroaromatic group comprising a phenyl ring fused to a 5-6 membered heteroaromatic ring having 1-3 heteroatoms independently selected from N, O and S.

Ar in Formula I is optionally substituted with 1-2 aromatic groups independently selected from phenyl, phenoxy, benzyl, and a 5-6 membered heteroaromatic ring having 1-3 heteroatoms independently selected from N, O and S and is optionally substituted with 1-5 substituents independently selected from halogen, -CN, -NO2, -OH, -C(=O)H, -C(=O)OH, Ci- όalkyl, -Cs-βcycloalkyl, -OCi_6alkyl, -SCi-βalkyl, -C(=O)Ci_6alkyl, -OC(=O)Ci_6alkyl,

-C(=O)OC i_6alkyl, -S(O)2Ci_6alkyl, -NR13R14, -C(=O)N(R13)(RH) 3 -S(O)2NR13R14, and -OCs-όcycloalkyl, wherein (a) Ci-6alkyl in all instances is optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens and optionally 1 group selected from -OH and -OCi_4alkyl optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens, (b) -C3-6cycloalkyl in all instances is optionally substituted with 1-2 substituents independently selected from halogen and CH3, and (c) the aromatic substituent groups phenyl, phenoxy, benzyl, and the 5-6 membered heteroaromatic ring having 1-3 heteroatoms independently selected from N, O and S are optionally substituted with 1-5 groups

independently selected from halogen, -CN, -Nθ2, -OH 5 -C(=O)H, -C(=O)OH, Ci_6alkyl, -OCi- 6alkyl 3 -SCi-6alkyl, -C(=O)Ci_6alkyl, -OC(=O)Ci_6alkyl, -C(=O)OCi_6alkyl. -S(O)2Ci_ 6alkyl, NR13R14, -CC=O)N(R 13 XR 14 ), -S(O)2NR13R14, and -O(CH2)q(4-6 membered heterocycle having 1-2 heteroatoms independently selected from O, S and N), wherein Ci_6alkyl in all instances is optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens and optionally 1 group selected from -OH and -0Cl-4alkyl optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens, and the 4-6 membered heterocycle having 1-2 heteroatoms independently selected from O, S and N is optionally substituted with 1-2 groups independently selected from halogen, CH3, and CF3;

X is selected from the group consisting of -O-, -S-, -S(O)-, -S(O)2-, -NR5-,

-OCRl ORI 1-, -SCRlORl 1-, -NRSCRIORI 1-, -CRIORI IO, -CRI ORI I S-, -CRlORl 1NR5-, and -CR6R7CR8R9O-;

Y is selected from the group consisting of -O-, -S-, -S(O)-, -S(O)2-, -NR5-, - C(O)-, -CR6R7-, -OCR6R7-, -SCR6R7-, and -CR6R7CR8R9 S

Z is selected from the group consisting of -C(=O)ORl2, C(=O)NR13R14 5 and 5-tetrazolyl;

Rl, R2, and R3 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H, halogen, Ci_3alkyl, and -OCi_3alkyl, wherein Ci_3alkyl, and -OCi_3alkyl are each optionally substituted with 1-3 halogens;

R4 is selected from the group consisting of halogen, -CN, -NO2, -OH, -C(=O)H, -C(=O)OH, Ci-6alkyl, -OCi-6alkyl, -SCi-6alkyl 5 -C(=O)Ci_6alkyl, -OC(=O)Ci_6alkyl,

-C(K))OC l-6alkyl, -S(O)2Ci_6alkyl, -NR13R14, -C(=O)N(R1 3 )(R14), and -S(O)2NR13R14, wherein Ci-6alkyl in all instances is optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens;

R5, Rl3 and Rl4 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H, Ci_5alkyl, -C(=O)Ci_5alkyl, and -S(O)2Ci-5alkyl, wherein Ci-5alkyl in all instances is optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens;

R6, R7 5 R8, R9 9 Rl O 5 and Rl 1 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H, halogen, -OH, and Ci_3alkyl which is optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens;

Rl2 is selected from the group consisting of H and Ci_7alkyl which is optionally substituted with 1 -5 halogens;

p is an integer from 0-3; and q is 0 or 1.

Alkyl groups, including the alkyl portion of other substituent groups, such as alkoxy, are linear or branched, unless otherewise defined.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The invention has numerous embodiments, which are summarized below. The invention includes the compounds as shown, and also includes individual diastereomers, enantiomers, and epimers of the compounds, and mixtures of diastereomers and/or enantiomers thereof including racemic mixtures. The invention also includes pharmaceutically acceptable salts of the compounds, and pharmaceutical compositions comprising the compounds and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. The compounds are especially useful in treating insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia that is associated with type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance.

One embodiment relates to the compound of Formula I, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein Ar is selected from the group consisting of phenyl, naphthyl, and a 5-6 membered monocyclic heteroaromatic ring having 1-3 heteroatoms independently selected from N, O, and S 5 wherein Ar is optionally substituted with one aromatic group selected from phenyl, phenoxy, and a 5-6 membered heteroaromatic ring having 1-3 heteroatoms independently selected from N, O and S and is optionally substituted with 1-3 substituents independently selected from halogen, -CN, -NO2, -OH, -C(O)H, -C(=O)0H, Ci-5alkyl, -C3_6cycloalkyl,

-OCi-3alkyl, -SCi-3alkyl, -C(O)Ci-3alkyl, -OC(O)C i_3alkyl, -C(O)OCi -3alkyl, -S(O)2Ci_ 3alkyl, -NR13R14, -C(=O)N(R 13 )(R 14 ), -S(O)2NR13R14, and -OC3-6cycloalkyl, wherein (a) C 1-3 alkyl in all instances is optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens and optionally 1 group selected from -OH and -OCi_3alkyl optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens, (b) Ci_5alkyl is optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens, (c) -C3-6cycloalkyl in all instances is optionally substituted with 1-2 substituents independently selected from halogen and CH3, and (d) the aromatic substituent group selected from phenyl, phenoxy, and the 5-6 membered heteroaromatic ring having 1-3 heteroatoms independently selected from N, O and S is optionally substituted with 1 -3 groups independently selected from halogen, -CN, -N02, -OH, - C(O)H, -C(O)OH, Ci-salkyl, -OCi_3alkyl, -SCi-3alkyl, -C(O)Ci_3 alkyl, -OC(O)Ci-

3alkyl, -C(O)OC i_3alkyl, -S(O)2Ci-3alkyl, NR13R14, -C(O)N(R 1 S)(RM) 5 -S(O)2NR13R14, and -O(CH2)q(4-6 membered heterocycle having 1-2 heteroatoms independently selected from

O, S and N) 3 wherein Ci-3alkyl in all instances is optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens and optionally 1 group selected from -OH and -OCi_3alkyl optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens, Ci-5alkyl is optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens, and the 4-6 membered heterocycle having

1-2 heteroatoms independently selected from O, S and N is optionally substituted with 1-2 groups independently selected from halogen, CH3, and CF3.

Another embodiment relates to the compound of Formula I, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein Ar is selected from the group consisting of phenyl, naphthyl, quinolyl, pyridyl, and thiazolyl, which is optionally substituted with one aromatic group selected from phenyl, phenoxy, and oxadiazolyl, and is optionally substituted with 1-3 groups independently selected from halogen, -CN, -NO2, Ci-4alkyl, -0Ci-2alkyl, and -OCs-όcycloalkyl, wherein Ci_4alkyl and -OCl-2alkyl are optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens, and the substituents phenyl, phenoxy, and oxadiazolyl are optionally substituted with 1-3 groups independently selected from halogen, -CN, -NO2, -OH, -C(=O)OH, Ci-4alkyl, -OCi- 4alkyl, and -O(CH2)q(4-6 membered cyclic ether), wherein Ci_4alkyl in all instances is optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens and is optionally substituted with 1 group selected from -OH and -OCi_3alkyl optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens, and the 4-6 membered cyclic ether is optionally substituted with 1-2 groups independently selected from halogen, CH3, and CF3. A 4-6-membered cyclic ether means a monoether. Examples are oxetane., tetrahydrofuran, and tetrahydropyran.

In subgroups of the compound as described above, Rl, R2, and R3 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H, F, Cl, Cl-3alkyl., and CF3.

In subgroups of the compound as described above, R4 is selected from the group consisting of halogen, -CN 5 -NO2, -OH, -C(=O)H, -C(=O)OH, Ci-4alkyl, -OCi-4alkyl, -C(=O)Ci_4alkyl s and -NRl 3 Rl 4., wherein Ci-4alkyl in all instances is optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens.

In subgroups of the compound as described above, R5 is selected from the group consisting of H, Ci-3alkyl, and -C(=O)Ci_3alkyl, wherein Ci_3alkyl and -C(=O)Ci_3alkyl are optionally substituted with 1-5 F.

In subgroups of the compound as described above, R6, R8 3 and RlO are each independently selected from the group consisting of H, -OH, and CH3.

In subgroups of the compound as described above, R7, R9, and Rl 1 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H and CH3.

In subgroups of the compound as described above, Rl 3 and Rl 4 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H, Ci_5alkyl, and -S(O)2Cl-5alkyl.

In subgroups of the compound as described above, p is 0 or 1.

In subgroups of the compound of Formula I, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, X is selected from the group consisting of -O-, -S-, -S(O)-, -S(O)2-, -CHRl lO-, -CH2NH-, and -CH2CH2O-. In subgroups as decribed above, Y is selected from the group consisting of -S-,

-S(O)-, -S(O)2-, -O-, -OCH2-, -C(=O)-, -CHR6-, -NR5-, and -CH2CH2-.

In subgroups as decribed above, Z is selected from the group consisting of - C(=O)ORl2 and -C(=O)NR13R14.

In subgroups as decribed above, Rl, R2, and R3 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H, CH3, and CF3.

In subgroups as decribed above, R4 is selected from the group consisting of halogen, CH3, and CF3.

In subgroups as decribed above, R5 is selected from the group consisting of H and CH3. In subgroups as decribed above, R6 is selected from the group consisting of H and

-OH.

In subgroups as decribed above, Rl 1 is selected from H and CH3.

In subgroups as decribed above, Rl 2 ϊs selected from the group consisting of H and Cl_5alkyl which is optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens. In subgroups as decribed above, Rl 3 Js selected from the group consisting of H,

Ci_3alkyl, and -S(O)2Ci-3alkyl.

Tn subgroups as decribed above, Rl4 is H. In subgroups as described above, p is 0.

A preferred subgroup comprises compounds of Formula I, wherein Ar is selected from the group consisting of phenyl, naphthyl, pyridyl, and thiazolyl, and Ar is optionally substituted with one aromatic group selected from phenyl, phenoxy, and oxadiazolyl, and is optionally substituted with 1-3 groups independently selected from halogen, -CN 5 -NO2, Ci_4alkyl, -OCi_2alkyl, and -OC3-6cycloalkyl, wherein Ci_4alkyl and -OCi_2alkyl are optionally substituted with 1-5 halogens, and the substituents phenyl, phenoxy, and oxadiazolyl are optionally substituted with 1 -3 groups independently selected from halogen, -CN, -NO2, -OH, Ci_3alkyl, -OCi-3alkyl, and -O(CH2)q(4-6 membered cyclic ether), wherein Ci_3alkyl is

optionally substituted with 1-3 halogens, and -OCi_3alkyl is optionally substituted with 1-3 halogens and is optionally substituted with 1 group selected from -OH and -OCi_3alkyl optionally substituted with 1-3 halogens, and the 4-6 membered cyclic ether is optionally substituted with 1-2 groups independently selected from halogen, CH3, and CF3; X is selected from the group consisting of -O-, -CHRl IO-, -CH2NH-, and

-CH2CH2O-;

Y is selected from the group consisting of -S-, -S(O)2- 5 -O-, -OCH2-, -C(=O)-, -CHR6-, and -CH2CH2-;

Z is selected from the group consisting of -C(=O)ORl2, -C(=O)NR13R14 3 and 5- tetrazolyl;

Rl, R2 3 and R3 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H and CH3;

R6 is selected from the group consisting of H and -OH; Rl 1 is selected from H and CH3; Rl2 is H;

Rl 3 is selected from the group consisting of H, Ci_3alkyl, and -S(O)2Ci_3alkyl;

Rl 4 is H; p is 0; and q is O or 1.

In subgroups of the compounds described herein, Z is selected from the group consisting of -C(=O)ORl2 and -C(O)NRl 3R14.

Ih preferred subgroups of compounds, Ar is substituted with 1-3 substituent groups. In preferred subgroups of compounds, p is 0.

In subgroups of the compounds described herein, Ar is selected from the group consisting of

(a) phenyl, which is optionally substituted with 1-3 groups independently selected from halogen, -CN, -NO2, Cl-4alkyl, -OCl-2alkyl, and -OC3-6cycloalkyl, wherein Ci-4alkyl and -OCi_2alkyl are optionally substituted with 1-3 halogens; and is optionally substituted with one group selected from (i) phenyl, which is optionally substituted with 1-3 substituents independently selected from halogen, -CN, -NO2, CH3, -OCH3, CF3, -OCF3, -OCHF2, -OCH2CH2θCi-2alkyl, and -O(CH2)q(4-6 membered cyclic ether selected from oxetane and tetrahydropyran), wherein the 4-6 membered cyclic ether is optionally substituted with 1 group selected from halogen, CH3, and CF3; (ii) phenoxy, which is optionally substituted

with 1-3 groups independently selected from CH3, CF3, and halogen; and (iii) l,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl, which is optionally substituted with 1-2 CH3 groups;

(b) naphthyl, which is optionally substituted with 1-2 groups independently selected from CH3, CF3, halogen, and -CN; (c) pyridyl, which is optionally substituted with 1-2 groups independently selected from CH3, CF3, and halogen; and

(d) l,3-thiazol-5-yl, which is optionally substituted with 1-2 substituents independently selected from phenyl, CH3, and halogen.

In subgroups of the compounds described herein, X is selected from the group consisting of -O 5 -CH2O-, -CH(CH3)O-, -CH2CH2O-, -CH2NH-. and -OCH2-.

In subgroups of the compounds described herein, Y is selected from the group consisting of -S-, -S(O)2~, -O-. -OCH2-, -C(=O)-, -CH(OH)-, -CH2-, and -CH2CH2-.

In subgroups of the compounds described herein, Z is selected from the group consisting of -C(=O)OH, -C(=O)NR13R14 } and 5-tetrazolyl. In subgroups of the compounds described herein, Z is selected from the group consisting of -C(=0)0H and -C(=O)NR13R14.

In subgroups of the compounds described herein, Rl, R2, and R3 are each independently selected from the group consisting of H and CH3.

In subgroups of the compounds described herein, Rl 3 is selected from the group consisting of H, Ci_3alkyl, and -S(O)2Ci-3alkyl.

In subgroups of the compounds described herein, Rl4 is H. In subgroups of the compounds described herein, p is O.

In a subgroup of the compounds described herein, Ar is phenyl, which is optionally substituted with 1 -3 groups independently selected from halogen, -CN, -NO2, Ci_4alkyl, CF3, -OCF3, -OCHF2, -0Ci_2alkyl, and -O-cyclopropyl; and is optionally substituted with one group selected from (i) phenyl, which is optionally substituted with 1-3 substituents independently selected from halogen, -CN, -NO2, CH3, -OCH3, CF3, -OCF3, -OCH2CH2θCi_2alkyl, and -O(CH2)q(4-6 membered cyclic ether selected from oxetane and tetrahydropyran), wherein the 4-6 membered cyclic ether is optionally substituted with 1 group selected from CH3, and CF3; (ii) phenoxy, which is optionally substituted with 1-3 groups independently selected from CH3, CF3, and halogen; and (iii) l,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl, which is ' optionally substituted with 1-2 CH3 groups.

In subgroups of the compounds described herein, X is selected from the group consisting of -O- and -CH2O-.

In subgroups of the compounds described herein, Y is O.

In subgroups of the compounds described herein, Z is selected from the group consisting of -C(=O)OH and -C(O)NRl 3R14.

In subgroups of the compounds described herein, Rl 3 is selected from the group consisting of H, CH3 , and -S(O)2CH3. In subgroups of the compounds described herein, Rl 4 j s H.

Although the specific stereochemistries described above are preferred, other stereoisomers, including diastereomers, enantiomers, epimers, and mixtures of these may also have utility in treating GPR40 mediated diseases. Inactive or less active diastereoisomers and enantiomers are useful for scientific studies relating to the receptor and the mechanism of activation.

Structures of specific compounds and synthetic methods and Schemes for making the compounds are disclosed in the following Examples. Where synthetic details are not provided in the examples, the compounds are readily made by a person of ordinary skill in the art of medicinal chemistry or synthetic organic chemistry by applying the Schemes and synthetic information provided herein. Where a stereochemical center is not defined, the structure represents a mixture of stereoisomers at that center. For such compounds, the individual stereoisomers, including enantiomers, diastereomers, and mixtures of these are also compounds of the invention. The compounds of the invention include pharmaceutically acceptable salts. The compounds of this invention may be used in pharmaceutical compositions comprising (a) the compound(s) or pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof, and (b) a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. The compounds of this invention may be used in pharmaceutical compositions that include one or more other active pharmaceutical ingredients. The compounds of this invention may also be used in pharmaceutical compositions in which the compound of Formula I or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof is the only active ingredient.

A compound of Formula I, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, may be used in the manufacture of a medicament for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a human or other mammalian patient. A method of treating type 2 diabetes comprises the administration of a therapeutically effective amount of a compound of Formula T, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, or a pharmaceutical composition comprising the compound, to a patient in need of treatment. Other medical uses of the compounds of Formula I are described hereinafter.

Definitions

"Ac" is acetyl ' , which is CH3C(=O)-.

"Alkyl" means saturated carbon chains which may be linear or branched or combinations thereof, unless the carbon chain is defined otherwise. Other groups having the prefix "alk", such as alkoxy and alkanoyl, also may be linear or branched, or combinations thereof, unless the carbon chain is defined otherwise. Examples of alkyl groups include methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, butyl, sec- and tert-butyl, pentyl, hexyl, heptyl, octyl, nonyl, and the like.

"Alkenyl" means carbon chains which contain at least one carbon-carbon double bond, and which may be linear or branched, or combinations thereof, unless otherwise defined. Examples of alkenyl include vinyl, allyl, isopropenyl, pentenyl, hexenyl. heptenyl, 1-ρropenyl, 2- butenyl, 2-rnethyl-2-butenyl, and the like. "Alkynyl" means carbon chains which contain at least one carbon-carbon triple bond, and which may be linear or branched, or combinations thereof, unless otherwise defined. Examples of alkynyl include ethynyl, propargyl, 3-methyl-l-pentynyl. 2-heptynyl and the like. "Cycloalkyl" means a saturated carbocyclic ring, having a specified number of carbon atoms. The term may also be used to describe a carbocyclic ring fused to an aryl group. Examples of cycloalkyl include cyclopropyl, cyclopentyl, cyclohexyl, cycloheptyl, and the like. Cycloalkenyl rings comprise a double bond in the ring.

"Aryl" is commonly used to refer to carbocyclic aromatic structures. The most common aryl groups are phenyl and naphthyl. Phenyl is generally the most preferred aryl group.

"Heterocycle" means a saturated or partly unsaturated ring or ring system containing at least one heteroatom selected from N, S and O, wherein the number of heteroatoms and the ring size and the degree of unsaturation (if any) are defined herein. Examples of heterocycles include tetrahydrofuran, piperazine, piperidine, morpholine, oxetane (4-membered cyclic ether), and tetrahydropyran (6-memberered cyclic ether).

"Heteroaryl" means a heteroaromatic ring containing at least one ring heteroatom selected from N, O and S (including SO and SO2), as defined more specifically herein.

Examples of heteroaryl include pyrrolyl, isoxazolyl, isothiazolyl, pyrazolyl, pyridyl, oxazolyl, oxadiazolyl, thiadiazolyl, thiazolyl, imidazolyl, triazolyl, tetrazolyl, furanyl, triazinyl, thienyl, pyrimidyl, pyridazinyl, pyrazinyl, benzisoxazolyl, benzoxazolyl, benzothiazolyl, benzimidazolyl, benzofuranyl, benzothiophenyl (including S-oxide and dioxide), furo(2,3-b)pyridyl 5 quinolyl, indolyl, isoquinolyl, quinazolinyl, dibenzofuranyl, and the like.

"Halogen" includes fluorine, chlorine, bromine and iodine.

"Me" represents methyl.

The phrase "pharmaceutically acceptable" is employed herein to refer to those compounds, materials, compositions, salts and/or dosage forms which are, using sound medical judgment, and following all applicable government regulations, safe and suitable for administration to a human being or an animal.

The term "composition," as in pharmaceutical composition, is intended to encompass a product comprising the active ingredient(s), and the inert ingredient(s) that make up the carrier, as well as any product which results, directly or indirectly, from combination, complexation or aggregation of any two or more of the ingredients, or from dissociation of one or more of the ingredients, or from other types of reactions or interactions of one or more of the ingredients. Accordingly, the pharmaceutical compositions of the present invention encompass any composition made by admixing a compound of the present invention and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier.

The substituent "tetrazole" means, a 2H-tetrazol-5-yl substituent group and tautomers thereof.

Optical Isomers - Diastereomers - Geometric Isomers - Tautomers

Compounds of Formula I may contain one or more asymmetric centers and can thus occur as racemates, racemic mixtures, single enantiomers, individual diastereomers, and mixtures of diastereomers and/or enantiomers. The invention is meant to comprehend all such isomeric forms of the compounds of Formula I. Specifically, the compounds of the instant invention have at least three asymmetric centers. Additional asymmetric centers may be present depending upon the nature of the various substituents on the molecule. It is intended that all of the possible optical isomers, stereoisomers, and diastereomers in mixtures and as pure or partially purified compounds are included within the scope of this invention (i.e. all possible combinations of the asymmetric centers as pure compounds or in mixtures).

Some of the compounds described herein may contain olefinic double bonds, and unless specified otherwise, are meant to include both E and Z geometric isomers.

Some of the compounds described herein may exist with different points of attachment of hydrogen, referred to as tautomers. An example is a ketone and its enol form, known as keto-enol tautomers. The individual tautomers as well as mixtures thereof are encompassed with compounds of Formula I.

Compounds of Formula I having one or more asymmetric centers may be separated into diastereoisomers, enantiomers, and the like by methods well known in the art. Alternatively, enantiomers and other compounds with chiral centers may be synthesized by stereospecific synthesis using optically pure starting materials and/or reagents of known configuration.

Salts The term "pharmaceutically acceptable salts" refers to salts prepared from pharmaceutically acceptable non-toxic bases or acids including inorganic or organic bases and inorganic or organic acids. Salts derived from inorganic bases include aluminum, ammonium,

calcium, copper, ferric, ferrous, lithium, magnesium, manganic salts, manganous, potassium, sodium, zinc, and the like. Particularly preferred are the ammonium, calcium, magnesium- potassium, and sodium salts. Salts in the solid form may exist in more than one crystal structure, and may also be in the form of hydrates. Salts derived from pharmaceutically acceptable organic non-toxic bases include salts of primary, secondary, and tertiary amines, substituted amines including naturally occurring substituted amines, cyclic amines, and basic ion exchange resins, such as arginine, betaine, caffeine, choline, N,N'-dibenzylethylenediamine, diethylamine, 2- diethylaminoethanol, 2-dimethylaminoethanol, ethanolamine, ethylenediamine, N-ethyl- morpholine, N-ethylpiperidine, glucamine, glucosamine, histidine, hydrabamine, isopropylamine, lysine, methyl glucamine, morpholine. piperazine, piperidine, polyamine resins, procaine, purines, theobromine, triethylamine, trimethylamine, tripropylamine, tromethamine, and the like.

When the compound of the present invention is basic, or when it has a basic substiruent group in its structure, salts may be prepared from pharmaceutically acceptable nontoxic acids, including inorganic and organic acids. Such acids include acetic, benzenesulfonic, benzoic, camphorsulfonic, citric, ethanesulfonic, fumaric, gluconic, glutamic, hydrobromic, hydrochloric, isethionic, lactic, maleic, malic, mandelic, methanesulfonic, mucic, nitric, pamoic, pantothenic, phosphoric, succinic, sulfuric, tartaric, p-toluenesulfonic acid, and the like. Particularly preferred are citric, hydrobromic, hydrochloric, maleic, phosphoric, sulfuric, and tartaric acids. It will be understood that, as used herein, references to the compounds of Formula

I are meant to also include the pharmaceutically acceptable salts.

Metabolites — Prodrugs

The invention includes therapeutically active metabolites, where the metabolites themselves fall within the scope of the claims. The invention also includes prodrugs, which are compounds that are converted to the claimed compounds as they are being administered to a patient or after they have been administered to a patient. The claimed chemical structures of this application in some cases may themselves be prodrugs.

Utilities

The compounds described herein are potent agonists of the GPR40 receptor. The compounds, and pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof, may be efficacious in the treatment of diseases that are modulated by GPR40 ligands, which are generally agonists. Many of these diseases are summarized below. One or more of the following diseases may be treated by the administration of a therapeutically effective amount of a compound of Formula I, or a pharmaceutically acceptable

salt thereof, to a patient in need of treatment. Also, the compounds of Formula I may be used for the manufacture of a medicament for treating one or more of these diseases:

(1) non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (type 2 diabetes);

(2) hyperglycemia; (3) the metabolic syndrome;

(4) obesity;

(5) hypercholesterolemia;

(6) hypertriglyceridemia (elevated levels of triglyceride-rich-lipoproteins);

(7) mixed or diabetic dyslipidemia; ' (8) low HDL cholesterol;

(9) high LDL cholesterol;

(10) hyperapoBliproteinemia; and

(11) atherosclerosis.

Preferred uses of the compounds are for the treatment of one or more of the following diseases by administering a therapeutically effective amount to a patient in need of treatment. The compounds may be used for manufacturing a medicament for the treatment of one or more of these diseases:

(1) Type 2 diabetes, and specifically hyperglycemia associated with type 2 diabetes; (2) Metabolic syndrome;

(3) Obesity; and

(4) Hypercholesterolemia.

The compounds are expected to be effective in lowering glucose and lipids in diabetic patients and in non-diabetic patients who have impaired glucose tolerance and/or are in a pre-diabetic condition. The compounds may ameliorate hyperinsulinemia, which often occurs in diabetic or pre-diabetic patients, by modulating the swings in the level of serum glucose that often occurs in these patients. The compounds may also be effective in treating or reducing insulin resistance. The compounds may be effective in treating or preventing gestational diabetes. The compounds of this invention may also have utility in improving or restoring β-cell function, so that they may be useful in treating type 1 diabetes or in delaying or preventing a patient with type 2 diabetes from needing insulin therapy.

Administration and Dose Ranges Any suitable route of administration may be employed for providing a mammal, especially a human, with an effective dose of a compound of the present invention. For example, oral, rectal, topical, parenteral, ocular, pulmonary, nasal, and the like may be employed. Dosage

forms include tablets, troches, dispersions, suspensions, solutions, capsules, creams, ointments, aerosols, and the like. Preferably compounds of Formula I are administered orally.

The effective dosage of active ingredient employed may vary depending on the particular compound employed, the mode of administration, the condition being treated and the severity of the condition being treated. Such dosage may be ascertained readily by a person skilled in the art.

When treating or controlling diabetes mellitus and/or hyperglycemia or hypertriglyceridemia or other diseases for which compounds of Formula I are indicated, generally satisfactory results are obtained when the compounds of the present invention are administered at a daily dosage of from about 0.1 milligram to about 100 milligram per kilogram of animal body weight, preferably given as a single daily dose or in divided doses two to three times a day, or in sustained release.form. In the case of a 70 kg adult human, the total daily dose will generally be from about 1 milligram to about 500 milligrams. The dosage regimen may be adjusted within this range or even outside of this range to provide the optimal therapeutic response. Oral administration will usually be carried out using tablets or capsules.

Examples of doses in tablets and capsules are 0.1 mg, 0.25 rag, 0.5 mg, 1 mg, 2 mg, 5 mg, 10 mg, 25 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 300 mg, 400 mg, 500 mg, and 750 mg. Other oral forms may also have the same or similar dosages.

Pharmaceutical Compositions

Another aspect of the present invention provides pharmaceutical compositions which comprise a compound of Formula I and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. The pharmaceutical compositions of the present invention comprise a compound of Formula I or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt as an active ingredient, as well as a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier and optionally other therapeutic ingredients. The term "pharmaceutically acceptable salts" refers to salts prepared from pharmaceutically acceptable non-toxic bases or acids including inorganic bases or acids and organic bases or acids. A pharmaceutical composition may also comprise a prodrug, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, if a prodrug is administered. Because of their ease of administration, tablets and capsules represent the most advantageous oral dosage unit form in which case solid pharmaceutical carriers are employed. If desired, tablets may be coated by standard aqueous or nonaqueous techniques. Such compositions and preparations should contain at least 0.1 percent of active compound. The percentage of active compound in these compositions may be varied and may conveniently be between about 2 percent to about 60 percent of the weight of the unit. The amount of active compound in such therapeutically useful compositions is such that an effective dosage will be obtained.

The tablets, pills, capsules, and the like may also contain a binder such as gum tragacanth, acacia, corn starch or gelatin; excipients such as dicalcium phosphate; a disintegrating agent such as corn starch, potato starch, alginic acid; a lubricant such as magnesium stearate; and a sweetening agent such as sucrose, lactose or saccharin. When a dosage unit form is a capsule, it may contain, in addition to materials of the above type, a liquid carrier such as a fatty oil, a solvent, and/or one or more surfactants to enhance solubility.

Combination Therapy

Compounds of Formula I may be used in combination with other drugs that may also be useful in the treatment or amelioration of the diseases or conditions for which compounds of Formula I are useful. Such other drugs may be administered, by a route and in an amount commonly used therefor, contemporaneously or sequentially with a compound of Formula I. In the treatment of patients who have type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and co-morbidities that accompany these diseases, more than one drug is commonly administered. The compounds of this invention may generally be administered to a patient who is already taking one or more other drugs for these conditions. Often the compounds will be administered to a patient who is already being treated with one or more antidiabetic compound, such as metformin, sulfonylureas, and/or PPAR agonists, when the patient's glycemic levels are not adequately responding to treatment. When a compound of Formula I is used contemporaneously with one or more other drugs, a pharmaceutical composition in unit dosage form containing such other drugs and the compound of Formula I is preferred. However, the combination therapy also includes therapies in which the compound of Formula I and one or more other drugs are administered on different overlapping schedules. It is also contemplated that when used in combination with one or more other active ingredients, the compound of the present invention and the other active ingredients may be used in lower doses than when each is used singly. Accordingly, the pharmaceutical compositions of the present invention include those that contain one or more other active ingredients, in addition to a compound of Formula I.

Examples of other active ingredients that may be administered in combination with a compound of Formula I, and either administered separately or in the same pharmaceutical composition, include, but are not limited to:

(a) PPAR gamma agonists and partial agonists, including both glitazones and non- glitazones (e.g. pioglitazone, MCC-555, rosiglitazone, netoglitazone, T-131, and compounds disclosed in WO02/08188, WO2004/020408, WO2004/020409, and WO2006/096564; (b) biguanides such as metformin and phenformin;

(c) protein tyrosine phosphatase- IB (PTP-IB) inhibitors;

(d) dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DP-IV) inhibitors, such as sitagliptin, saxagliptin, and vildagliptin;

(e) insulin or insulin mimetics;

(f) sulfonylureas such as tolbutamide, glimepiride, glipizide, and related materials; (g) α-glucosidase inhibitors (such as acarbose);

(h) agents which improve a patient's lipid profile, such as (i) HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (lovastatin, simvastatin, rosuvastatin, pravastatin, fiuvastatin, atorvastatin, rivastatin, itavastatin, and other statins), (ii) bile acid sequestrants (cholestyramine, colestipol, and dialkylaminoalkyl derivatives of a cross-linked dextran), (iii) niacin receptor agonists, nicotinyl alcohol, nicotinic acid, or a salt thereof, (iv) PP ARa agonists such as fenofibric acid derivatives (gemfibrozil, clofibrate, fenofibrate and bezafibrate), (v) cholesterol absorption inhibitors, such as for example ezetimibe, (vi) acyl CoArcholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitors, such as avasimibe, (vii) CETP inhibitors, such as the compounds disclosed in WO2006/014357, WO2005/100298, and WO2006/014413, and (viii) phenolic anti-oxidants, such as probucol;

(i) PPARα/γ dual agonists;

(j) PPARδ agonists such as GW501516 and those disclosed in WO97/28149;

(k) antiobesity compounds such as fenfluramine, dexfenfluramine, phentiramine, subitramine, orlistat, neuropeptide Y5 inhibitors, Mc4r agonists, caπnabinoid receptor 1 (CB-I) antagonists/inverse agonists, and β3 adrenergic receptor agonists;

(1) ileal bile acid transporter inhibitors;

(m) agents intended for use in inflammatory conditions such as aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucocorticoids, azulfidine, and cyclo-oxygenase 2 selective inhibitors; (n) glucagon receptor antagonists;

(o) GLP-I; (P) GIP-I;

(q) GLP-I analogs, such as exendins, for example exenatide (Byetta); and (r) Hydroxysterol dehydrogenase- 1 (HSD-I) inhibitors. The above combinations include combinations of a compound of the present invention not only with one other active compound, but also with two or more other active compounds. Non-limiting examples include combinations of compounds having Formula I with two or more active compounds selected from biguanides, sulfonylureas, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, other PPAR agonists, PTP-IB inhibitors, DP-IV inhibitors, and anti-obesity compounds.

BIOLOGICAL ASSAYS

Generation of GPR40-Expressing Cells

Human and mouse GPR40 stable cell-lines were generated in CHO cells stably expressing NFAT BLA (Beta-lactamase). A human GPR40 stable cell-line was generated in HEK cells stably expressing the aequorin expressing reporter. The expression plasmids were transfected using lipofectamine (Life Technologies) following manufacturer's instructions. Stable cell-lines were generated following drug selection.

FLIPR Assays

FLIPR (Fluorimetric Imaging Plate Reader, Molecular Devices) assays were performed to measure agonist-induced calcium mobilization of the stable clones. For the FLIPR assay, one day before assay, GPR40/CHO NFAT BLA cells were seeded into black- wall-clear- bottom 384-well plates (Costar) at 1.4 x 10e4 cells / 20 μl medium / well. The cells were incubated with 20 μl / well of the assay buffer (HBSS, 0.1 % BSA, 20 mM HEPES, 2.5 mM probenecid, pH 7.4) containing 8μM fluo-4,AM, 0.08 % pluronic acid at room temperature for 100 minutes. Fluorescence output was measured using FLIPR. Compounds were dissolved in DMSO and diluted to desired concentrations with assay buffer. 13.3 μl/well of compound solution was added.

Inositol Phosphate Turnover Assay

The assay is performed in 96-well format. HEK cells stably expressing human GPR40 are plated to be 60-80% confluent within 72 hours. After 72 hours, the plates are aspirated and the cells washed with inositol-free DMEM (ICN). The wash media is replaced with 15OuL of 3H-inositol labeling media (inositol-free media containing 0.4% human albumin or 0.4% mouse albumin, IX pen/strep antibiotics, glutamine, 25mM HEPES to which is added 3H- myo-inositol NEN #NET114A lmCi/mL, 25Ci/mmol diluted 1 :150 in loading media with a final specific radioactivity of 1uCi/l50uL). Alternatively, the human and mouse albumin can be added after the overnight labeling step before the addition of LiCl.

The assay is typically run the next day after 18 hours labeling. On the day of the assay, 5uL of 30OmM LiCl is added to all wells and incubated at 37 degrees for 20 mins. 0.75uL of 200X compounds are added and incubated with the cells for 60 minutes at 37 degrees. The media is then aspirated off and the assay terminated with the addition of 6OuL 1OmM formic acid. The cells are lysed for 60 mins at room temperature. 15-3OuL of lysate is mixed with 70uL/lmg YSi SPA beads (Amersham) in clear bottom Isoplates. The plates are shaken for 2 hours at room temperature. Beads are allowed to settle and the plates are counted in the Wallac Microbeta.

In Vivo Studies

Male C57BL/6N mice (7-12 weeks of age) are housed 10 per cage and given access to normal diet rodent chow and water ad libitum. Mice are randomly assigned to treatment groups and fasted 4 to 6 hours. Baseline blood glucose concentrations are determined by glucometer from tail nick blood. Animals are then treated orally with vehicle (0.25% methylcellulose) or test compound. Blood glucose concentration is measured at a set time point after treatment (t = 0 min) and mice are then intraperitoneally-challenged with dextrose (2 g/kg). One group of vehicle-treated mice is challenged with saline as a negative control. Blood glucose levels are determined from tail bleeds taken at 20, 40, 60 minutes after dextrose challenge. The blood glucose excursion profile from t = 0 to t = 60 min is used to integrate an area under the curve (AUC) for each treatment. Percent inhibition values for each treatment are generated from the AUC data normalized to the saline-challenged controls.

EXAMPLES

The following Examples are provided to illustrate the invention and are not to be construed as limiting the invention in any manner. The scope of the invention is defined by the appended claims.

The compounds in these examples all have IC50 values in the range of InM to 4μM using the binding assay described above. Preferred compounds have IC50 values in the range of InM to 10OnM.

Several methods for preparing the compounds of this invention are illustrated in the following Schemes and Examples. Starting materials are either commercially available or made by known procedures in the literature or as illustrated. The present invention further provides processes for the preparation of compounds of formula I as defined above. In some cases the order of carrying out the foregoing reaction schemes may be varied to facilitate the reaction or to avoid unwanted reaction products. The following examples are provided for the purpose of illustration only and are not to be construed as limitations on the disclosed invention.

General Procedures for Tricyclic Acid GPR40 Agoinsts

Scheme 1 : Biaryl Ethers

Synthesis of l-Benzofuran-6-ol Intermediate

Step 1. 6-tert-Butyldimethylsilyloxy- 1 -benzofuran-3(2HVone To a stirred solution of

6-hydroxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-3-one (30 g, 0.2 mol) in DMF (375 mL) was added tert- butyldimethylsilyl chlroride (39.2 g, 0.26 mol) and triethylamine (42 mL, 0.3 mol). The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 2h. It was then diluted with diethyl ether (1.5 L), washed with ammonium chloride (750 mL, aq. sat.) and brine (450 mL), dired over magnesium sulfate, filtered and concentrated. The crude product was purified on a Biotage 65i silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate and hexanes (3 : 7). The final product was collected as yellow solid.

Step 2. 6-tert-ButyIdimethylsilyloxy-2.3-dihvdro- 1 -benzofuran-3-ol To a stirred solution of 6-tert-Butyldimethylsilyloxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-3-one (42 g, 158 mmol) in dichloromethane (1.4 L) at -78C under nitrogen was slowly added a solution of DIBAL-H (238 mL, 1.0 M, 238 mmol) in dichloromethane. The reaction was stirred at -78C for Ih 3 and then

was quenched carefully with ethyl acetate (1.0 L). Cold bath was removed, and a solution of Rochelle's salt (400 mL, 10%) was added continuously with stirring over a period of 2h. The mixture was then diluted with MTBE (4.0 L) 5 washed with brine, dried with magnesium sulfate, filtered and concentrated to yield the final product as yellow oil.

Step 3. 1 -Benzofuran-6-ol To a stirred solution of 6-hydroxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-3- ol (35.2 g, 0.2 mol) in THF (1.3 L) was added hydrochloric acid (323 mL, 1.0 N). The mixture was stirred at 65C for 2h. After cooling to room temperature, it was diluted with brine (2.0 L), extracted with ethyl acetate (4.0 L) 3 dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered and concentrated. The crude product was purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (1 — 30%) in heptane. The final product was collected as light brown solid.

Alternate Synthesis of 1 -Benzofuran-6-ol

1 -Benzofuran-6-ol is also made using the following 3 -step procedure using commercially available materials or materials easily obtained by known methods.

Step 1. 2-chloro- 1 -(2.4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethanone 2

A IOOL round bottomed flask (RBF) containing 34.0 L of 1 ,4-dioxane was charged with 5.0 kg of HCl gas through a subsurface line. Resorcinol (10.0 kg) was then added as a solid, followed by addition of solid ZnCl2 (6.20 kg). A slight exotherm from 21 to 29 0 C occurred after the ZnCl2 addition. The mixture was cooled with an ice/water bath, and chloroacetonitrile (7.50 kg) was added in portions over 2h while maintaining the temperature at <40 0 C. The reaction mixture was aged 9h at room temperature, and then water (34 L) was charged over 0.5h. An exotherm to 40 0 C occurred at the beginning of the water addition, and the reaction eventually cooled to 27 0 C by the end of the addition. The resulting slurry was aged for 1 Ih at room temperature. More water (14L) was added, and the slurry was cooled to 0 0 C.

The slurry was filtered, washed with water (4 x 20L) 5 and then dried under a fast flow of nitrogen. After 5 days of drying, the chloroketone 2 was isolated as a light pink solid.

Step 2. Cvclization of 2 to 6-hydroxy-l-benzofuran-3(2Hyone 3

Solid NaOMe (6134 g) was added to a O 0 C solution of the chloroketone 2 (7062 g) in 49 L of methanol (MeOH) in portions over 2h while maintaining the temperature at <20 0 C. The slurry was aged at room temperature for Ih 3 at which time cyclization was determined to be complete by HPLC. The mixture was cooled to 0 0 C, and 2N HCl (49 L) was added while maintaining the temperature at <20 0 C. The slurry was cooled to 5-10 0 C, filtered, and washed first with cold 1:1 MeOHλvater (5 L), and then with water (16 L). The wet filter cake was slurry washed with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) (18 L), and then was finally washed with heptane. The filter cake was then dried under a fast stream of nitrogen. Ketone 3 was isolated as a white solid.

Step 3. Ketone reduction/elimination to l-Benzofuran-6-ol 4

Acetic acid (HOAc) (3.11 L, 3 equivalents) was added to a slurry OfNaBH 4 (1368 g) in 41.0 L of tetrahydrofuran (THF) at 23 0 C over 6h. Vigorous gas evolution occurred, and an ice/water bath was used to maintain the temperature at <30 0 C. The mixture was maintained for at least 8h at ambient temperature. Ketone 3 (2715 g, 1 equivalent) was added as a solid in portions over Ih to minimize gas evolution, and an ice/water bath was used to keep the temperature at <30 0 C. The resulting mixture was aged at room temperature for 6h. Water (6 L) was added over 2h with cooling so that the temperature was maintained at <30 0 C. Vigorous gas evolution occurred, especially early in the water addition. The slurry became thick during the water addition. To the slurry was added 5N HCl (5 L) over Ih, and the mixture was aged for 0.5h. Elimination was assayed as complete by HPLC. The reaction mixture was transferred to a

IOOL extraction vessel, and 26 L of methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE) and 17 L of water were added. Then ION NaOH (5 L) was added, and the mixture was mixed vigorously. The dark aqueous layer (pH ~9) was separated. The organic layer was washed with 10 wt.% Na 2 CO 3 (5 L). The pH of the aqueous wash was ~10. The organic layer was then washed with 20% brine (5 L). The organic layer was concentrated on a rotary evaporator, and was then rinsed from the flask with toluene (6 L). Toluene (4 L) was then added, and the resulting thin slurry was filtered to remove impurities. The filtrate was concentrated on a rotary evaporator to an oil that eventually solidified to l-benzofuran-6-ol 4 as a pale orange solid.

Example 1

Step 1. 6-[2-Chloro-4-ftrifluoromethyDphenoxy1-l-benzofuran To a stirred solution of l-benzofuran-6-ol (418.5mg, 3.1 mmol) in 6 ml of DMF was added 3-Chloro-4- fluorobenzotrifluoride (681.4 mg, 3.4 mmol) and cesium carbonate (1.5 g, 4.7 mmol). The reaction mixture was heated at 80°C for 2 hours. After cooling to room temperature, it was diluted with ethyl acetate, washed with water (2x) and brine, dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered and concentrated. The crude product was purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (0 — 30%) in hexane. The final product was collected as colorless oil. lH NMR (CDCI3, δ ppm): 6.8 (s, IH), 7.0 (two d, 2H), 7.2 (s, IH), 7.4 (d, IH), 7.6 (d, IH), 7.7 (s, IH),

7.8 (s, IH).

Step 2. Ethyl 4-[2-chloro-4-(trifluorornethyl)phenoxy]-l a,6b-dihydro-l H- cyclopropa [b " | \ 1 " Ibenzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylate To a stirred solution of the above phenoxybenzofuran (250 mg, 0.80 mmol) in dichloromethane (4.5 ml) was added rhodium acetate dimer (42 rng, 0.1 mmol), followed by a slow addition of a solution ethyl diazoacetate (0.50 mL, 4.8 mmol) in dichloromethane (4.5 ml) through syringe pump over a period of 5.5h. After the addition, the reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature overnight. Precipitates were filtered off and solvent was evaporated. The residue was purified by preparative TLC on silica gel plates to give the trans (or exo-) diastereomer, along with the cis (or endo-) diastereomer, as a minor product. lHNMR (CDCI3, δ ppm) of trans (exo) diastereomer: 1.3 (t,

3H), 1.4 (m, IH) 5 3.3 (m, IH), 4.2 (q, 2H) 5 5.2 (m, IH) 5 6.6 (m, 2H), 7.0 (d, IH), 7.4 (d, IH) 5 7.5 (d, IH), 7.8 (S 5 IH). lH NMR (CDCI3, δ ppm) of cis (or endo-) diastereomer,: 1.1 (t, 3H), 1.9

(m, IH) 5 3.3 (m, IH), 4.0 (q, 2H), 5.2 (m, IH), 6.6 (m, 2H) 5 7.0 (d, IH), 7.4 (d, IH), 7.5 (d, IH), 7.8 (S 5 IH).

Step 3. (IR. 1 aR. 6bS)-4-r2-Chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl > )phenoxy1-l a.6b-dihvdro-l H- cyclopropafbi [ 1 ]benzofuran- 1 -carboxylic acid To a stirred solution of the above trans ester (44 mg, 0.11 mmol) in THF-MeOH (1.6 ml-0.8ml) was added LiOH (0.83 mL, 2N aq.). The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 1.5h 5 and then was concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue was acidified with HCl (0.5N) and was extracted with ethyl acetate. The combined extracts were dried and concentrated to give a crude product, which was purified on ChiralPak AD-H semi-preparative column, eluting with 4-7% ethanol in heptane. The desired enantϊomer shown above was isolated. lH NMR (CDC13, δ ppm): 1.4 (m, IH), 3.4 (m,

IH) 5 5.2 (m 5 IH), 6.6 (m, 2H), 7.0 (d, IH), 7.4 (d, IH), 7.5 (d, IH), 7.8 (s, IH). The other enantiomer was also isolated: lHNMR (CDC13, δ ppm): 1.9 (m, IH), 3.4 (m, IH), 5.2 (m, IH),

6.6 (m, 2H) 5 6.8 (d, IH) 5 7.4 (d, IH), 7.5 (d, IH), 7.8 (s, IH). MS: 369-1 (M-I).

Scheme 2: Copper Coupling

Example 2

Step 1. [2-Memyl-4-(trifluoromethyDphenoxy]-l-benzofuran To a stirred solution of 1 - benzofuran-6-ol (309 mg, 2.3 mmol) in dioxane (6 mL) and DMF (12 mL) was added 2-methyl- 4-trifluoromethylphenyl iodide (600 mg, 2.3 mmol), copper iodide (108 mg, 0.57 mmol), dimethylglycine hydrochloride (243 mg, 1.7 mmol), and cesium carbonate (1.88 g, 5.8 mmol). The reaction was stirred at 110 0 C for 22 h. After cooling to room temperature, solvents were removed in vacuo. The residue was dissolved in ethyl acetate, washed with water and brine, dried and concentrated. The crude product was purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (0-10%) in hexanes. The final product was collected as a slightly yellow oil.

Step 2. 4-r2-Methyl-4-(trifluoromethvDphenoxy1- 1 a.6b-dihvdro- 1 H- cyclopropa[bl [1 ]benzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 1, Steps 2 and 3. MS: 349.2 (M-I).

Scheme 3: Asymmetric Cyclopropanation

Ethyl Diazoacetate 1) LiOH (aq) CuOTf THF, MeOH

Oxazoline Ligand 2) C ' hiral LC CH 2 CI 2 , rt. Separation

Example 3

Step 1. 2-(T ) ifluoromethoxyV 1 -fluoro-4-trifluoromethylbenzene To a stirred solution of

2-fiuoro-5-trifiuoromethyl-l -phenol (9.9 g, 54.9 mmol) in 100 ml of DMF (100 mL) and water (10 mL) was added sodium chlorodifluoroacetate (20.9 g, 137.2 mmol) and cesium carbonate (26.8 g, 82.3 mmol). The reaction mixture was stirred at 100°C for 2 hours. After it cooled to room temperature, it was diluted with ethyl acetate (700 ml), washed with water (3x) and brine, dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered and concentrated. The crude product (colorless oil,

volatile) was used for the next step without further treatment. lHNMR (CDCI3, δ ppm): 6.6 (t, IH) 3 7.3 (m, IH), 7.6 (m, 2H).

Step 2. 6-r2-fDifluoromethoxyV4-rtrifluoromethyπphenoxy1-l-benzofur an To a stirred solution of l-benzofuran-6-ol (13.4 g, 100 mmol) and 2-(difluoromethoxy)-l-fluoro-4- trifluoromethylbenzene (29.9 g, 130 mmol) in DMF (300 mL) was added cesium carbonate (65.2 g, 200 mmol). The reaction mixture was stirred at 75°C for 16 hours (or at 110°C for 2 hours). After cooling to room temperature, it was diluted with ethyl acetate, washed with water (2x) and brine, dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered and concentrated. The crude product was purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (0 - 20%). in hexanes. The final product was collected as a colorless oil. lH NMR (CDCI3, δ ppm): 6.7 (t, IH 5 J = 74 Hz), 6.8 (s 5 IH), 7.0

(m, 2H), 7.2 (s, IH), 7.4 (d 3 IH), 7.6 (m, 3H).

Step 3. Ethyl 4-r2-(difluoromemoxyV4-(trifluoromethyDphenoxy]-l a.6b-dihydro- 1 H- cyclopropafbl [11 benzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylate A solution of Cu(I) triflate (toluene complex, Aldrich, 25 mg, 0.05 mol ) and (R 3 R)-2,2'-isopropylidene-bis(4-tert-butyl-2-oxazoline) (DL Chiral, 35 mg, 0.12 mol) in dichloromethane (10 mL) was stirred at room temperature for 2h. Ethyl diazoacetate (neat, 1 drop) was added, and the solution turned brown temporarily. A solution of the benzofuran from the previous step (1.0 g, 2.9 mmol) in dichloromethane (~5 mL) was added, followed by a slow addition of a solution of ethyl diazoacetate (1.25 mL, 14.3 mmol) in dichloromethane (5 mL) over a period of 8h. The reaction was stirred at room temperature overnight after the completion of the addition. Precipitates were filtered off and solvent was evaporated. The residue was purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (5-40%) in hexanes, to yield the desired trans (or exo-) diastereomer as a slightly yellow oil. *H NMR

(CDC13, δ ppm): 1.3 (t, 3H 5 J = 7.1 Hz), 1.4 (m, IH), 3.3 (m, IH), 4.2 (q, 2H 3 J = 7.1 Hz), 5.2 (m, IH), 6.6 (t, IH 5 J = 74 Hz) 5 6.6 (m 5 IH), 7.0 (d, IH), 7.4 (d, IH) 5 7.45 (d, IH) 5 7.6 (s 5 IH).

Step 4. π R. 1 aR. 6bSV4-r2-(DifluoromethoxyV4-rtrifluoromethvnDhenoxyl - 1 a.6b- dihvdro- 1 H-cyclopropa[b " l [ 1 ]benzofuran- 1 -carboxylic acid Td a stirred solution of the above ester (0.7 g, 1.6 mmol) in THF (30 mL) and MeOH (10 mL) was added lithium hydroxide (16 mL, 1.0 N 5 16 mmol). The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 2h 5 and then was concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue was acidified with HCl (2N aq) and extracted with EtOAc. The combined extracts were washed with brine, dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered and concentrated to yield the desired acid (70% ee) as a white crystalline solid. The final product was purified on ChiralPak AD-H semi-preparative column, eluting with 4-7% ethanol in heptane, yielding the desired enantiomer. The crystalline solid has a melting endotherm measured by differential scanning calorimetry at 121.0 °C (onset) and 122.8 0 C (peak). lH NMR (CDC13, δ ppm): 1.4 (m, IH) 5 3.4 (m, IH) 5 5.2 (m, IH) 5 6.6 (t, IH, J = 74 Hz), 6.6 (d, IH),

7.0 (d, IH), 7.4 (d, IH) 5 7.5 (d, IH) 5 7.6 (s, IH). MS: 401.1 (M-I).

Example 4

Step 1. A typical procedure is as follows: l-bromo-4-fluoronaphthalene (1 eq.) 5 CuI (25.0 mol %) 5 racemic trans-N,N' -dimethyl cyclohexane-l,2-diamine (50 mol %), and NaI (2.5 equivalents)

were added to a sealed tube, degassed, and dioxane was then added. The reaction mixture was again degassed, flushed with nitrogen and heated at 110 0 C for 24 hours. The reaction mixture was cooled to room temperature, diluted with ethyl acetate and the solid reagents were filtered off. The filtrate was concentrated to afford a residue which was purified by column chromatography (10% ethyl acetate/hexanes) to provide the desired product.

Step 2. In a typical experiment, 1 -iodo-4-fluoronaphthalene (1 eq.), CuI (1.5-2.5 equiv), MFSDA (7-10 equiv), DIEA (7-10 equiv.) were added to a sealed tube, degassed, and DMF was then added. The reaction mixture was then degassed again and flushed with nitrogen and heated at 75 0 C for 12 hours. The reaction mixture was then diluted with ethyl acetate and filtered. The filtrate was washed with water, and the aqueous phase was extracted with ethyl acetate (3 X). The combined organic layer was washed with sodium bicarbonate and water, dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated to obtain the crude product which was purified by column chromatography (10% ethyl acetate/hexanes) to obtain the desired product.

Step 3. 4- ( r4-fTrifluoromethylV 1 -naphthyli oxyl - 1 a.6b-dihvdro- 1 H- cyclopropa[b][l ]benzofuran-l -exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 1. The final product was purified on a ChiralPak AD-H semi-preparative column, eluting with 4-7% ethanol in heptane. MS: 385.1 (M-I).

Example 5

4-(4-Cvano-2-methylphenoxyVl a,6b-dihydro- 1 H-cvclopropa[b1 Fl lbenzofuran-1 -carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 3. The final product was purified on ChiralPak AD-H semi- preparative column, eluting with 4-7% ethanol in heptane. MS: 308.3 (M+l).

Example 6

4-f 2-Methoxy-4-ftrifluoromethv0phenoxyl - 1 a,6b-dihydro- 1 H-cyclopropafbT f 1 Ibenzofuran- 1 - exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 3. The final product was purified on ChiralPak AD-H semi-preparative column, eluting with 4-7% ethanol in heptane. MS: 365.1 (M-I).

Example 7

Step 1. 2-Chloro-3-brpmo-6-fluorotoluene (670 mg, 3 mmol), CuI (143 mg, 0.75 mmol), racemic trans-NN'-dirnethylcyclohexane-l^-diamine (213 mg, 1.5 mmol), and NaI (1.12 g, 7.5 mmol) were added to a sealed tube, degassed and dioxane (6 mL) was then added. The reaction mixture was again degassed, flushed with nitrogen and heated at 110 0 C for 72 hours. The reaction mixture was cooled to room temperature, diluted with ethyl acetate and the solid reagents were filtered off. The filtrate was concentrated to afford a residue which was passed through a short silica gel column to provide the desired product.

Step 2. The material obtained in Step 1 (600 mg, 2.2 mmol), CuI (628 mg, 3.3 mraol), MFSDA (2.96 g, 15.4 mmol), and DIEA (2.7 mL, 15.4 mmol) were added to a sealed tube, degassed, and DMF (2 mL) was then added. The reaction mixture was then degassed again and flushed with nitrogen and heated at 75 0 C for 16 hours. The reaction mixture was then diluted with ethyl acetate and filtered- The filtrate was washed with water, and the aqueous phase was extracted with ethyl acetate (3 X). The combined organic layer was washed with sodium bicarbonate and water, dried over MgSθ4 and concentrated to obtain the crude product which was used in the next step without further purification.

Step 3. 4-[3-Chloro-2-methyl-4-etrifluoromethvπphenoxy]-la.6b-dihvd ro-lH- cyclopropa[b] \ 1 " |benzofuran-l -exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 1, or Example 3. MS: 385.0 (M+l).

Example 8

Step 1. To a solution of 2-fluoro-5-trifluoromethyl phenol (1080 mg, 6 mmol) in AcOH (12 mL) was added triflic acid (0.265 mL, 3 mmol) and NCS (881 mg, 6.6 mmol), and the mixture was heated to 60 0 C for 20 hours. AcOH was removed and the residue was diluted with ethyl acetate, washed with water and brine, and concentrated. The crude products were then separated by reversed-phase HPLC with MeCN/0.5%TFA in water (20-70%) as the eluent to afford the desired products.

Step 2. Sodium chlorodifluoroacetate (178 mg, 1.17 mmol) and cesium carbonate (228 mg, 0.7 mmol) were added to a solution of 6-fluoro-2-chloro-3-trifluoromethylphenol in DMF containing 10 volume % water (1 mL), and the reaction mixture was heated for 1 h at 100 0 C. After cooling to room temperature, the reaction mixture was diluted with ethyl acetate and washed with water (3X), brine (IX). The organic layer was dried over MgSθ4 and concentrated to obtain the crude product which was used in the next step without further purification.

Step 3. 4-[3-Chloro-2-rdifluoromethoxy')-4-(trifluoromethyl')phenoxy 1-la.6b-dihydro-lH- cyclopropafb " ) [llbenzofuran-l -exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 1 or Example 3. MS: 437.0 (M+l).

Example 9

Step 1. To a solution of 3-iodo-phenylboronic acid (991 mg, 4 mmol) and l-benzofuran-6-ol (269 mg, 2 mmol) in dichloromethane (8 mL) was added copper acetate (363 mg, 2 mmol), pyridine (0.8 mL, 10 mmol) and 4 A molecular sieves (300 mg). The reaction mixture was degassed and stirred under an oxygen balloon overnight. It was then filtered and concentrated. The crude product was purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (0-10%) in hexanes, to yield the desired product.

Step 2. 6-[(4'-Methoxy-2'-methylbiphenyl-3-vDoxy ' |-l-benzofuran To a solution of the above phenyl iodide (318 mg, 0.95 mmol) and the corresponding boronic acid (188 mg, 1.13 mmol) in DMF (4 mL) was added PdCl2dppf (77 mg, 0.9 mmol) and K3PO4 (502 mg, 2.36 mmol). The reaction mixture was heated at 100°C for 20hr. After cooling to room temperature and normal aqueous workup, the crude product was purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (0-10%) in hexanes, to yield the desired product as colorless oil.

Step 3. 4-[r4'-Methoxy-2'-methylbiphenyl-3-vnoxyl-la.6b-dihvdro-lH- cyclopropa[b1 f 1 ]benzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid See Example 1, or Example 3. MS: 387.3 (M-I).

Example 10

Step 1. To a solution of 2-fluoro-5-trifluoromethyl phenol in DMF (2 mL) was added cyclopropyl bromide (2 eq.), NaT (10 mol%) and cesium carbonate (3 eq.). The reaction mixture was heated in a pressure tube at 150 0 C overnight. The completion of the reaction was confirmed by LCMS. The reaction mixture was then diluted with ethyl acetate, washed with water and extracted with ethyl acetate (3X). The combined organic layer was dried over sodium sulfate, filtered, and concentrated to yield the crude product which was used in the next step without further purification.

Step 2. 4- r2-fCvclopropyloxy')-4-(trifluoromethyl * )phenoxyl - 1 a, 6b-dihydro- 1 H- cycloproparb " )[l]benzofuran-l-exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 1 or Example 3. MS: 393.0 (M+l).

Example 11

Step 1. To a solution of 3-(tert-butyl)phenol (3 g, 20 mmol) in methanol (40 mL) was added iodine (5.58 g, 22 mmol) in portions, and the mixture was stirred for 48 hours at room temperature. Solvent was removed and the residue was dissolved in ethyl acetate (200 mL). The solution was washed with Na2SO3 (3X) and brine, dried over MgSO4 and concentrated. The residue was purified with a silica gel column chromatography with ethyl acetate/hexanes (10- 20%) as the eluant to afford the desired product.

Step 2. Sodium chlorodifluoroacetate (4 g, 26.17 mmol) and cesium carbonate (5.1 g, 15.7 mmol) were added to a solution of 5-(tert-butyl)-2-iodo-l -phenol (2.89 g, 10.47 mmol) in DMF containing 10 volume % water (22 mL), and the reaction mixture was heated for 3 days at 100 0 C in a sealed tube. After cooling to room temperature, the reaction mixture was diluted with ethyl acetate and washed with water (3X) and brine (IX). The organic layer was dried over MgSO4 and concentrated. The residue was purified with a silica gel column chromatography with ethyl acetate/hexanes (0-10%) as the eluant to afford the desired product.

Step 3. 4-[4-tert-Butyl-2-fdifluoromethoxy)phenoxyl-la,6b-dihvdro-lH - cvclopropaf b] [ 1 Ibenzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 2. MS: 391.0 (M+l).

Example 12

Step 1. l-Bromo-2-chloro-4-(difluoromethoxy)benzene Follows the method of Example 3, Step l

Step 2. 4-[2-Chloro-4-(difluoromethoxy)phenoxy1-la,6b-dihydro-lH- cvcloproρa[b1 [1 " lbenzofuran-1 -exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 2. MS: 369.2 (M+l).

Example 13

Step 1. To a solution of 2-fluoro-5-trifluoromethyl phenol in DMF (2 mL) was added iodoethane (2 eq.) and cesium carbonate (3 eq.). The reaction mixture was heated at 75 0 C overnight. The completion of the reaction was confimed by LCMS. The reaction mixture was then diluted with ethyl acetate, washed with water and extracted with ethyl acetate (3X). The combined organic layer was dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated to yield the crude product which was used in the next step without further purification.

Step 2. 4- [2-ethoxy-4-ftrifluoromethyl\phenoxy] - 1 a,6b-dihydro- 1 H- cyclopropaf b] [ 1 ]benzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 1 or

Example 3. MS: 381.0 (M+l).

Example 14

4-f3,5-BisCtrifluoromethyl')phenoxy]-la.6b-dihvdro-lH-cvclop ropa| ' biri1benzofuran-l-exo- carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 2. MS: 403.9 (M+l).

Example 15

Step 1. 2-Bromo-5-chloroanisole (461 mg, 2.08 mmol) was dissolved in anhydrous dichloromethane (5 mL) and cooled to 0 0 C. To the cooled solution was added boron tribromide solution (IM in dichloromethane, 2eq). The reaction mixture was stirred at 0 0 C for 5 minutes- warmed to room temperature and stirred at room temperature for 2 hours. The reaction mixture was then poured into ice-water and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 X). The combined organic layer was then dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated to get the crude phenol which was used in the next step without further purification.

Step 2. Sodium chlorodifluoroacetate (2.5 eq.) and cesium carbonate (1.5 eq.) were added to a solution of 2-bromo-5-chlorophenol in DMF containing 10 volume % water, and the reaction mixture was heated for 3h at 100 0 C. After cooling to room temperature, the reaction mixture was diluted with ethyl acetate and washed with water (3X), then with brine (IX). The organic layer was dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated to obtain the crude product which was used in the next step without further purification.

Step 3. 4-r4-Chloro-2-f difl uoromethoxylphenoxy] - 1 a,6b-dihvdro- 1 H- cvclopropafb " iri1benzofuran-l-exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 2. MS: 369.2 (M+l).

Example 16

Step 1. Sodium chlorodifluoroacetate (692 mg, 4.54 mmol) and cesium carbonate (888 mg, 2.73 mmol) were added to a solution of 6-fluoro-3-trifluoromethyl-4-chlorophenol in DMF containing 10 volume % water (3 mL), and the reaction mixture was heated for 1 h at 100 0 C. After cooling to room temperature, the reaction mixture was diluted with ethyl acetate and washed with water (3X), brine (IX). The organic layer was dried over MgSθ4 and concentrated to obtain the crude product which was used in the next step without further purification.

Step 2. 4- [5 -Chloro-2-f difluoromethoxyV 4-f trifluoromethyl)r>henoxyl - 1 a.6b-dihvdro- 1 H- cyclopropafb] f 1 ] benzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 1 or Example 3. MS: 437.1 (M+l).

Example 17

Step 1. 4-fluoro-3-methoxybenzonitrile (Ig, 6.62 mmols) was dissolved in anhydrous dichloromethane (1OmL) and cooled to 0 °C (ice-bath). To the cooled solution was added boron tribromide solution in dichloromethane (1 M 3 2 eq.). The reaction mixture was stirred at 0 0 C for 5 minutes, warmed to room temperature and stirred at room temperature overnight. LCMS of the reaction mixture showed some starting material was still present. Two more equivalents of boron tribromide solution was added and the reaction was stirred at RT overnight. LCMS showed that the reaction had progressed, but some starting material was still present. The reaction mixture was then heated at 45 0 C overnight to complete the reaction, as confirmed by LCMS. The reaction mixture was then poured into ice-water, warmed to RT, and extracted with ethyl acetate (3X). The combined organic layer was dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated to give the crude phenol which was used in the next step without further purification.

Step 2. Sodium chlorodifluoroacetate (2.5 eq.) and cesium carbonate (1.5 eq.) were added to a solution of 2-fluoro-5-cyanophenol in DMF containing 10 volume % water, and the reaction mixture was heated for 3 h at 100 0 C. After cooling to room temperature, the reaction mixture was diluted with ethyl acetate and washed with water (3X), then with brine (IX). The organic layer was dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated to obtain the crude product which was used in the next step without further purification.

Step 3. 4-[4-Cyano-2-(difluoromethoxy)phenoxy]-la,6b-dihydro-lH- cyclopropafb] [ 1 ] benzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 1 or

Example 3. MS: 359.9 (M+l).

Example 18

4- |Y4-Cyano- 1 -naphthyl)oxy]- 1 a.6b-dihydro- 1 H-cyclopropa[b] [ 1 ]benzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic add Follows the method of Example 1. MS: 344.0 (M+l).

Example 19

Step 1. 6-[2-(T)ifluoromethoxyV5-methyl-4-ftrifluoromethvπphenoxy]- l-benzofuran To a solution of the material obtained from step 2 of Example 16 ( 50 mg, 0.132 mmol) in DMF (1 mL) were added methyl boronic acid (12 mg, 0.2 mmol), cesium carbonate (129 mg, 0.4 mmol), and Pd(PPh3)4 (30.5 mg, 0.026 mmol). The mixture was degassed, flushed with nitrogen, and heated to 120 0 C for 5 hours. Solvent was removed and the residue was purified with silica gel cloumn chromatography using hexanes/ethyl acetate as the eluant (10/1) to afford the desired compound.

Step 2. 4-[2-rDifluoromethoxyV5-methyl-4-(trifluoromethvDphenoxy]-la .6b-dihvdro-lH- cyclopropaF. b] F 1 Ibenzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid Follows the methods of Example 1 , steps 2 and 3, and Example 3, steps 3 and 4. MS: 417.0 (M-H).

Example 20

( 1 R, 1 aR,6bS V4-[2-fdifluoromethoxyV4-(trifluoromethyl')phenoxy1 -N-f methylsulfonylV 1 a.6b- dihydro-lH-cyclopropafbiFlibenzofuran-l-carboxamide To a stirred solution of the corresponding acid (Example 3, 30 mg, 0.075 mmol) in acetonitrile (1.5 mL) was added N- hydroxysuccinimide (9.5 mg, 0.082 mmol) and EDC (15.7 mg, 0.081 mmol). The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 3 days, and the N-hydroxysuccinimide ester intermediate (30 mg) was isolated. It was dissolved in dichloromethane (1 mL) and treated with DMAP (catalytic amount) and methanesulfonamide (11.4 mg, 0.12 mg). The reaction was stirred at 50°C overnight. The final product was isolated by reverse phase LC on a Cl 8 column, followed by preparative TLC on silica gel plates, which were developed in 10% MeOH in dichloromethane. MS: 480.1 (M+l).

Example 21

Cl R.1 aR,6bSV4-r2-(DifluoromethoxyV4-rtrifluoromethvnphenoxy1- la.6b-dihvdro-l H- cyclopropafbi F 1 Ibenzofuran- 1 -carboxamide To a stirred solution of the corresponding acid (Example 3, 402 mg, 1.0 mmol) in acetonitrile (15 mL) was added N-hydroxysuccinimide (126.6 mg, 1.1 mmol) and EDC (210.9 mg, 1.1 mmol). The mixture was stirred at room

011369

temperature for 16h, and then ammonium hydroxide (0.2 mL, 3 mmol) was added. The reaction was stirred at room temperature for 3h. After precipitates were filtered off, the crude product was purified on a silica gel column, eluting with methanol (0-10%) in dichloromethane. The final product was collected as white solid. MS: 402.3 (M+l).

Example 22

Step 1. 5-((lS.laR.,6bSV 4-r2-rdifluoromethoxyV4-ftrifluoromethvnphenoxyl-la,6b-dihvd ro- 1 H-cyclopropaf bi [ 1 ]benzofuran- 1 -carbonitri Ie To a stirred solution of the corresponding amide (Example 21, 386 mg, 0.96 mmol) in DMF (5 mL) was added cyanuric chloride (89 mg, 0.48 mmol). The reaction was stirred at room temperature for 2h. After aqueous workup, the crude product was purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (0-30%) in hexanes. The final product was collected as colorless oil.

Step 2. S-(ClS JaR.6bSV4-r2-( ' DifluoromethoxyV4-( ' trifluoromethyl'>phenoxyl-la.6b-dihvdro- 1 H-cvclopropafb] f l]benzofuran-l -yl \ -2H-tetrazole To a stirred solution of the above nitrile (82.8 mg, 0.216 mmol) in 2-propanol (1.25 mL) and water (2.5 mL) was added sodium azide (70.2 mg, 1.08 mmol) and zinc bromide (73 mg, 0.32 mmol). The reaction was stirred at 100 0 C overnight. The crude product was collected by filtration as yellowish precipitates. The pure product was isolated by reverse phase LC on a C18 column as white solid.

Scheme 4: 2-Methyl Benzofuran Derivatives

Example 23

Step 1. 6-Hvdroxy-2-methyl- 1 -benzofuran-3 (2HVone To a stirred solution of resorcinol (5.5 g, 50 mmol) in methanesulfonic acid (75 mL) was added 2-bromopropionic acid (4.7 mL, 50 mmol) and P2O5 (4.0 g, 28 mmol). The resulting mixture was stirred for 30 min at 80°C. After cooling to room temperature, the reaction mixture was poured onto ice and extracted with chloroform (2x). The combined organic extracts were washed with brine, dried with sodium sulfate, and concentrated. The orange colored crude product (-12 g) was carefully taken up into aqueous sodium hydroxide (2N, 245 mL) at 0-5 "C, and the resulting mixture was stirred at room temperature overnight. The dark brown solution was cooled to 0°C, and carefully acidified to

with concentrated HCl to pH ~3. It was then extracted with ethyl acetate (3x). The combined organic extracts were washed with brine, dried with sodium sulfate, and concentrated. The crude material was purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (20-75%) in hexanes. The final product was obtained as a crystalline solid upon standing at room temperature. The NMR showed a mixture of tautomers (mostly the enol form).

Step 2. 6-tert-Butyldimethylsiloxy-2-methyl- 1 -benzofuran-3f 2HVone To a stirred solution of the above ketone (3.6 g, 21 mmol) in acetonitrile (40 mL) was added tert-butyldimethylsilyl chlroride (3.4 g, 22.5 mmol) and triethylamine (3.5 mL, 25 mmol). The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 18h. After normal aqueous workup, the crude product was purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (10-50%) in hexanes. The final product was collected as colorless oil.

Step 3. 2-Methyl-l -benzofuran-6-ol To a stirred solution of the above ketone (250 mg, 0.9 mmol) in ethanol (5 mL) was added sodium borohydride (100 mg, 2.6 mmol). The mixture was stirred at room temperature overnight. Hydrochloric acid (5 mL, 3N) was carefully added, and the reaction was stirred at room temperature for another day. After normal aqueous workup, the crude product was purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (5-45%) in hexanes. The final product was collected as crystalline solid.

Step 4. 4-f 2-f DifluoromethoxyV4-f trifluoromethvDphenoxyi- 1 a-methyl- 1 a,6b-dihydro- 1 H- cvclopropaf bi \ 1 ]benzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 3. The

final product was purified on a ChiralPak AD-H semi-preparative column, eluting with 4-7% ethanol in heptane. MS: 417.3 (M+l).

Scheme 5: 3 -Methyl Benzofuran Derivatives

Example 24

Step 1. 1 -[3-(benzyloxy)phenoxy| acetone Follows the method of Example 1, step 1.

Step 2. 3-MethvI-l-benzofuran-6-ol To a stirred solution of the above ketone (1.6 g, 6.2 mmol) in dichloromethane (250 mL) was slowly added a solution of boron trifluride etherate (0.95 mL, 7.5 mmol) in dichloromethane (50 mL) over a period of Ih. The resulting dark blue

solution was stirred at room temperature for another hour. The reaction was carefully quenched with sodium bicarbonate (aq, sat.)- After normal aqueous workup, the crude product was purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (5-25%) in hexanes. The final product was collected as white solid.

Step 3. 4-[2-(DifluoromethoxyV4-(trifluoromethyl ' )phenoxyl-6b-methyl-la,6b-dihvdro-lH- CVclopropafbl Fl] benzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 3. The final product was purified on ChiralPak AD-H semi-preparative column, eluting with 4-7% ethanol in heptane. MS: 417.2 (M+l).

Example 25

4-| " (3-Phenoxybenzyl')oxy1- 1 a,6b-dihydro-lH-cvclopropafb1 [ 1 ~ |benzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 1. MS: 375.3 (M+l).

Example 26

4-[f2'.6'-Dimethylbiphenyl-4-vDoxyl-la.6b-dihydro-lH-cycl opropafblfl]benzofuran-l-exo- carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 1. The final product was purified on ChiralPak AD-H semi-preparative column, eluting with 4-7% ethanol in heptane. MS: 387.2 (M+l).

Example 27

4- ( r4'-(2-EthoxycthoxyV2'.6'-dimethylbiphenyl-3 -yl]methoxy> - 1 a.6b-dihvdro-l H- cyclopropafbi [ 1 " |benzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 3. The final product was purified on ChiralPak AD-H semi-preparative column, eluting with 4-7% ethanol in heptane. MS: 473.3 (M-I).

Scheme 6: Benzyl Phenyl Ethers

Step 1. 6- [(3 -iodobenzvDoxyi - 1 -benzofuran To a stirred solution of l-benzofuran-6-ol (1.0 g, 7.5 mmol) and 3-iodobenzylbromide (2.7 g, 9.0 mmol) in DMF (10 mL) was added potassium carbonate (1.5 g, 11.0 mmol). The reaction mixture was stirred under nitrogen at room temperature for 3 days. The reaction was diluted with ethyl acetate, washed with water (2x) and brine, dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered and concentrated. The crude product was purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (10-50%) in hexane. The final product was collected as a slightly yellow viscous oil.

Step 2. Ethyl ^[Q-iodoben^loxyl-la ^ όb-dihydro-lH-cyclopropafbjfllbenzofuran-l-exo- carboxylate (Intermediate A) Follows the method of Example 3, Step 3. The desired trans (or exo-) diastereomer was obtained as slightly yellow crystalline solid.

Step 3. 4-[Y 3-Iodobenzy0oxy " |- 1 a.6b-dihvdro- 1 H-cyclopropafbi [ 1 " jbenzofuran-1 -exo-carboxylic acid Follows the method of Example 1, Step 3. The final product was obtained as a slightly colored solid. MS: 409.1 (M+l).

Example 29

(IR. IaR. 6bSV4-r(4'-methoxy-2'.6'-dimethylbiphenyl-3-vnmethoxy1-la.6b -dihvdro-lH- cvclopropafbl f 1 " jbenzofuran- 1 -carboxylic acid To a solution of the ethyl ester from Step 2, Example 28 (Intermediate A) (50 mg, 0.11 mmol) in dioxane (2 mL) was added dppf (10 mg, 0.011 mmol) and 2 3 6-dimethyl-4-methoxybenzene boronic acid (20 mg, 0.12 mmol), followed by LiOH (0.6 mL, 2 N, 0.12 mmol). The reaction was sealed and stirred at 80°C overnight. After cooling to room temperature, the reaction was quenched with ammonium chloride (aq. sat.). Organic layer was separated and injected directly onto a Cl 8 reverse phase column, eluting with acetonitrile and 0.1% TFA in water. The desired product was isolated as a light blue solid after lyophilization. MS: 417.3 (M+l).

Alternate Synthesis of 2-fDifluoromethoxyV 1 -fluoro-4-trifluoromethylbenzene

A 100-L round bottom flask equipped with overhead stirrer, thermocouple, nitrogen inlet, condenser and steam bath was charged with 2-fluoro-5-(trifluoromethyl)phenol (5.50 kg), sodium chlorodifluoroacetate (9.31 kg), and DMF (4 L). There was an exotherm to 46.7°C when the 4 L of DMF was charged to the flask. The temperature of the reaction was immediately reduced to 19°C by rapid cooling with an ice/water bath. An additional 37.3 L of DMF (total DMF, 41.3 L) was then slowly charged, maintaining the internal temperature below 30 0 C. After cooling to ambient temperature, water (5.5 L) was charged, resulting in a 10 0 C exotherm. Potassium carbonate (5.28 kg) was then added. The ice water bath was removed and the batch was heated to 97°C using a steam bath. The reaction was complete after aging for 2h at 97 0 C, as evidenced by HPLC assay, with <1% starting material remaining. The reaction was cooled to ambient temperature, and water (42 L) was slowly added. The batch was transferred to a 170-L extractor and extracted with MTBE (2 x 18 L). The organic layers were combined and washed with water (1 x 11 L) and brine (l x l l L). The MTBE solution was pumped into a 22-L flask equipped with a thermocouple, distillation apparatus, and a heating mantle. The MTBE was distilled off at 55-118°C and atmospheric pressure. The desired product was purified by distillation at 120-157 0 C and atmospheric pressure, and was isolated as a clear oil.

Alternate Synthesis of 6-r2-(DifluoromethoxyV4-f trifluoromethvDphenoxyi - 1 -benzofuran

2-(Difluoromethoxy)-l-fluoro-4-trifluoromethylbenzene (5207 g), 1-benzofuran- 6-ol (2767 g), and Cs 2 CO 3 (13:44 kg) in 13:8L of N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP) were charged to a IOOL RBF. An exotherm to 40 0 C occurred after they were mixed. The mixture was warmed to 105 0 C and aged for 7h at that temperature. The mixture was cooled to ambient temperature, and then toluene (34 L) and water (34 L) were added. The organic layer was washed first with IN NaOH (7.5 L) and then with 15wt.% brine (6 L). The organic layer was concentrated to ~28 L. The amount of water by Karl-Fischer titration was < 200 ug/mL. The toluene solution was filtered through a plug OfSiO 2 (5.0 kg). The silica was washed with toluene (14.2 L). The filtrate was concentrated on a rotary evaporator to yield 6-[2-(difluoromethoxy)-4- (trifiuoromethyl)phenoxy]- 1 -benzofuran biaryl ether as a light orange oil.

Alternate Synthesis of (IR, laR,6bSV4-[2-(difluoromethoxyV4-(trifluoromethyDphenoxy]-la, 6b- dihydro- 1 H-cyclopropa[b] \ 1 ]benzofuran- 1 -carboxylic acid

Step 1. Asymmetric Cyclopropanation to give Ethyl (lRJaR.6bSV4-[2-(difluorornethoxyV4- (trifluoromethvQphenoxy ' l- 1 a,6b-dihvdro- 1 H-cvcloproparbl f 1 " lbenzofuran- 1 -carboxvlate

Dichloromethane (18 L) 5 the ligand (R)-(+)-2,2'-isopropylidene-bis-(4R>4- phenyl-2-oxazoline (66.8 g), and (CuOTf)2 » toluene complex (41.3 g) were charged to a 100 L cylinder, which was equipped with an overhead stirrer, thermocouple, dropping funnel, and

nitrogen inlet. The reaction mixture was aged at 23 °C until it became an almost homogeneous green solution with a small amount of solid on the bottom (typically 2-6 h is needed). The phenoxybenzofuran (6.031 kg, 91.35 wt%, 92.0 Assay% purity, 26.9 ppm water by Karl Fischer titration) was rinsed into the reactor with dichloromethane (4 L). The reaction mixture was aged at rt for 0.5 h, and was then cooled to -9 to -12 0 C. Ethyl diazoacetate in dichloromethane (85 wt%, 5.64 kg, 2.63 equiv) was slowly added to the reaction mixture at -9 0 C to -12 0 C over 30 h, resulting in 96A% conversion to the desired product with a ratio of exorendo of about 29.3:1. The reaction mixture was slowly warmed to ambient temperature, and aged for 0.5 h. EDTA disodium salt solution (0.05M, 18 L) was added, and the reaction mixture was aged for 1 h at 20 0 C. The phases were separated, and the organic layer was washed with additional 0.05 M EDTA sodium salt solution (8 L). The desired exo product in the organic layer was assayed to be 6.17 kg (90% yield, 92.1% ee). The solution was concentrated and the solvent was switched to methanol (25 L, total volume) for the next step.

Step 2. Ester Hydrolysis, Isolation as a cis-Aminoindanol (CAP salt

THF (30 L), water (15 L), and LiOH (5 equiv.) were added to a IOOL RBF containing the solution of the ester from the previous step in MeOH. The mixture immediately became dark and exothermed to 38 0 C. The reaction was aged for 3h at ambient temperature and was then transferred to a cylindrical reaction vessel. Toluene (30L) and 5N HCl (1.1 equiv.) were added, and the layers were separated. The organic layer was washed with water (2 x 30 L). The organic layer was then concentrated to ~29L with azeotropic removal of water. LiCl precipitate formed during the concentration. Ecosorb C905 (50 wt%, 2.89 kg) was added to the thin slurry, and the mixture was then aged at ambient temperature for 2h, filtered through solka floe, and rinsed with toluene (23 L). The filtrate was concentrated to 29 L 5 and (R 5 S)-CAI, (R,S)-cis-aminoindanol (0.96 equivalents compared with the assayed amount of hydrolyzed ester) was added. The mixture was warmed to 85 0 C to dissolve all solids. The mixture was then cooled to 75 0 C, and the CAI salt began to crystallize. The mixture was aged 15 min at 75 0 C 5 and then heptane (13.5 L) was added over Ih. The mixture was allowed to slowly cool to rt. The

mixture was filtered. The solid product was washed with 2:1 toluene/heptane (18 L), and was then dried under nitrogen for 5 days. The isolated product was 98.6% pure solid, 98.0%ee.

The CAI salt (590Og of 98.6 wt.% product from above) was dissolved in toluene (53 L) at 85 0 C and was then cooled to 70 0 C to give a thin slurry. Heptane (18L) was added over Ih while maintaining the temperature at 65-70 0 C. The mixture was allowed to cool to rt over 3h and was then filtered. The filter cake was dried under nitrogen for 2 days. The isolated product purity was >99A% and 98.8%ee.

Step 3. ( 1 R J aR,6bSV4-[2-f difluoromemoxyV4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy] - 1 a,6b-dihvdro- 1 H- cyclopropalbi f llbenzofuran-l -carboxylic acid

The CAI salt from the previous step (5463g) was added to a IOOL cylindrical vessel which contained a mixture of MTBE (27.3 L) and 10.9 L of 1 N HCl (1.1 equiv.). After being stirred vigorously for 15min, the aqueous layer was allowed to settle, and the layers were separated. The organic layer was washed with 11.8 L of water. The organic layer was then solvent switched to IPA (16 L). Water (8 L) was added in one portion, and then 1% seed (obtained from earlier batches) was added. (The product crystallizes without seed if none is available.) After 15min, water (32 L) was added over Ih. The mixture was aged 14h, and then was filtered, washed with 2:3 IP A/water (15 L), and dried under nitrogen for 20 h. The product purity was 99.78 A%, 98.6%ee. The crystalline product has the same crystal morphology as the product isolated in Example 3.

Example 30

4-[(4-Iodoben2yπoxy]-la.6b-dihvdro-lH-cyclopropa[b][llbe nzofurcin-l-exo-carboxyHc acid See Example 28. MS: 409.2 (M+l).

Example 31

4-[(4'-Methoxy-2'-methylbiphenyl-4-y1)methoxy]-la.6b-dihv dro-lH- cyclopropafb]fl1benzofuran-l-exo-carboxylic acid See Example 29. MS: 403.1 (M+l)

Example 32

4-(r2',6'-Dimethyl-4'-( ' tetrahvdro-2H-pyran-2-yloxy ' )biphenyl-3-vHmethoxy>-la,6b-dihvdro-lH- cyclopropaf b] f 1 Ibenzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid See Example 3, step 3 and 4. The final product was purified on ChiralPak AD-H semi-preparative column, eluting with 4-7% ethanol in heptane. MS: 485.4 (M-I).

Example 33

4- { f 4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]|oχy \ - 1 a.6b-dihydro- 1 H-cycloproparb] [ 1 " ]benzofuran- 1 -exo- carboxylic acid See Example 28. MS: 351.2 (M+l).

Example 34

4- ( D-fTrifluoromethyflbenzyl ' loxy } - 1 a.6b-dihydro- 1 H-cvclopropa[b1 F 1 " Ibenzofυran- 1 -exo- carboxylic acid See Example 28. MS: 351.3 (M+ 1).

Example 35

4-({2'.6'-Dimethyl-4'-f(3-methyloxetan-3-vπmethoxy]biphenyl -3-yUmethoxyVla,6b-dihvdro- 1 H-cvclopropa| " bl [1 Ibenzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid See Example 3, step 3 and 4. The final product was purified on ChiralPak AD-H semi -preparative column, eluting with 4-7% ethanol in heptane. MS: 487.3 (M+l).

Example 36

4-[2-(4-Methyl-2-phenyl-l,3-thiazol-5-yl)ethoxy]-la,6b-di hydro-lH- cyclopropa[b][l]benzofuran-l-exo-carboxylic acid See Example 3. MS: 394.0 (M+l).

Example 37

^(r^Fluoro-B-drifluoroniethvπbenzvnoxyl-la ^ βb-dihvdro-lH-cvcIoproparbirilbenzofuran-l- exo-carboxylic acid See Example 28. MS: 369.0 (M+l).

Example 38

4- ( f4-Methyl-3-(trifluoromethyl')benzyll oxyl -1 a.6b-dihydro- 1 H-cvclopropafbi [ 1 ]benzofuran- 1 - exo-carboxylic acid See Example 28. MS: 365.0 (M+l).

Example 39

4- { r3-Fluoro-4-(triflυoromethvπben2^1] oxy) - 1 a,6b-dihydro- 1 H-cyclopropaf b] f 1 Ibenzofuran- 1 - exo-carboxylic acid See Example 28. MS: 369.3 (M+l).

Example 40

4-{ r2-Fluoro-4-ftrifluoroniethyl)ben2yl1oxyl-l a.όb-dihvdro-lH-cycloproparbiriibenzofuran-l ■ exo-carboxylic acid See Example 28. MS: 369.3 (M+l).

Example 41

4-{ [2-Fluoro-3 -(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]oxy \ - 1 a.6b-dihydro- 1 H-cyclopropa[b] [ 1 " Ibenzofυran- 1 - exo-carboxylic acid See Example 28. MS: 369.3 (M+l).

Example 42

4- { [3 -(trifluoromethyr)benzyl " |oxy} - 1 a,6b-dihydro- 1 H-cyclopropafb] [ 1 ]benzofuran- 1 -exo- carboxylic acid See Example 28. MS: 351.3 (M+l).

Example 43

4-[(3-Nitroben2ryl ' )oxy1-la..6b-dihvdro-lH-cvcloproparbirnbenzofuran-l -exo-carboxylic acid See Example 28. MS: 328.3 (M+l).

Example 44

4- { [3-C5-Methyl- 1.2.4-oxadiazol-3-vDbenzyl1oxy} - 1 a.6b-dihydro- 1 H- cvclopropafbl [ 1 Ibenzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid See Example 28. MS: 365.1 (M+l).

Example 45

4-r(3-Cvanoben2vπoxyl-la,6b-dihvdro-lH-cvclopropa[biri1b enzofuran-l-exo-carboxylic acid See Example 28. MS: 308.1 (M+l).

Example 46

Step 1

6-f 1 -(3-PhenoxyphenvOethoxy]- 1 -benzofuran See Example 62, Step 2.

Step 2

4-F 1 -f 3-PhenoxyphenvOethoxy] - 1 a.6b-dihydro- 1 H-cycloproparbl F 1 Ibenzofυran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid See Example 3, step 3 and 4. MS: 389.1 (M+l).

Example 47

4- { 1 -[S-CTrifluoromethvπphenyllethoxy > - 1 a.6b-dihydro- 1 H-cyclopropaf b] \ 1 " |benzofiiran- 1 -exo- carboxylic acid See Example 46. MS: 365.0

Example 48

4-( 1 -r4'-(2-EthoxyethoxyV2'.6'-dimethylbiphenyl-3-yllethoxy)-l a,6b-dihydro-lH- CVclopropafbi \ 1 Ibenzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid See Example 46. MS: 489.1 (M+l).

Scheme 7: Indane Derivatives

Example 49

Step 1

5-f2-Chloro-4-(trifluoromethyDphenoxy1indan- 1 -one See Example 1 , Step 1.

Step 2

5-f2-Chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl ' )phenoxy]indan-l-oI To a stirred solution of the above indanone (2.0 g, 6 mmol) was added sodium borohydride in several portions. After 30 min, the reaction was quenched carefully with hydrochlorid acid (2N). The crude product was extracted with ethyl acetate, and purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (0-40%) in hexanes to yield the final product as colorless oil.

Step 3

2-Chloro-4-(trifluoromethvDphenyl lH-inden-6-yl ether To a stirred solution of the above indanol (1.05 g, 3.2 mmol) in dichloromethane (30 mL) at 0 0 C was added methanesulphonyl choride (0.3 mL, 3.8 mmol) and triehtylamine (1.1 mL, 8.0 mmol). The reaction was warmed up

to room temperature over a course of 2 h, and stirred overnight. After usual aqueous workup, the crude product was purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (0 — 30%) in hexane. The final product was collected as slight yellowed oil.

Step 4

The final product was obtained from the indenyl ether from Step 3, using the method of Example 1, step 2 and step 3. MS: 367.1 (M-I).

4-[2-fdifluoromethoxy)-4-( ' trifluoromethyl ' )phenoxy]- 1.1 a.ό.όa-tetrahvdrocycloproparalindene- 1 - exo-carboxylic acid See Example 3 and 49. The final product was purified on ChiralPak AD-H semi-preparative column, eluting with 4-7% ethanol in heptane. MS: 401.3 (M+l).

Example 51

4-{ r3-Chloro-5-rtrifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-ylloxy>- 1 a.6b-dihvdro-l H- cycl opropa [b] [ 1 jbenzofuran- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid See Example 3 and 49. The final product was purified on ChiralPak AD-H semi-preparative column, eluting with 4-7% ethanol in heptane. MS: 370.1 (M-I).

Scheme 8: Biaryl Indanones

Example 52

Step 1

θ-t∑-Chloro^-Ctrifluoromethyπphenoxylindan- 1 -one To a stirred solution of 6-hydroxyindan- 1-one (1.48 g, 10 mmol) in 30 ml of DMF was added 3-chloro-4-fluorobenzotrifluoride (2.46 g, 12 mmol) and cesium carbonate (8.40 g, 25 mmol). The reaction mixture was heated at 80 0 C for 12 h. After cooling to room temperature, the reaction mixture was diluted with ethyl acetate, washed with water (2x) and brine, dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated. The crude product was purified by silica gel chromatography, eluting with ethyl acetate (2 - 40%) in hexane. The final product was collected as brownish yellow oil.

Step 2

6-[2-Chloro-4-f1rifluoromethyl)phenoxy1-lH-inden-l-one To a stirred solution of 6-[2-chloro- 4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]indan-l-one (200 mg, 0.612 mmol) in toluene (5.0 mL) at 0 0 C under nitrogen was added triethylamine (0.104 mL, 0.734 mmol) followed by trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate (0.140 g, 0.612 mmol). The reaction warmed to room temperature and stirred for 10 min, then was diluted with diethyl ether and saturated sodium bicarbonate. The aqueous layer was extracted with diethyl ether and the combined organic layers were washed with brine, dried with magnesium sulfate, filtered and concentrated. The resulting residue was dissolved in dichloromethane (1.0 mL) and added via canula at room temperature in the dark to a suspension of Pd(OAc)2 (134 mg, 0.60 mmol) in acetonitrile (4.0 mL). The resulting reaction mixture stirred 1.25 h, then was diluted with diethyl ether, filtered through celite and concentrated to provide the final product as yellow oil which was carried forward without further purification.

Step 3

Ethyl 4-[2-chloro-4-ftrifluoromethyDphenoxy]-6-oxo- 1.1 a.ό.όa-tetrahydrocyclopropafajindene- 1 - exo-carboxylate To a stirred suspension of ethyl (dimethylsulfuranylidene)acetate (J. Med. Chem. 1997, 40, 528, 168 mg, 0.73 mmol) in toluene (2.0 mL) was added DBU (0.111 g, 0.73 mmol) at room temperature. The mixture was stirred for Ih 5 after which a solution of 6-[2- chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-lH-inden-l-one (0.188 g, 0.58 mmol) in toluene (0.5 mL) was added in the dark. The reaction mixture stirred 12 h at room temperature, then was quenched with saturated ammonium chloride and extracted with ethyl acetate. The combined organic layers were washed with brine, dried with sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated. The resulting residue was purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (4 - 60%) in hexane. The product was collected as clear oil.

Step 4

4- r2-ChIoro-4-( tr ifluoromethvPphenoxyi -6-oxo- 1 , 1 a,6.6a-tetrahydrocyclopropa| ' a ' 1 indene- 1 -exo- carboxylic acid See Example 1. Purification by reverse phase HPLC (0.1% TFA / H2O / Acetonitrile gradient) provided product as white solid. MS: 383.0 (M+l).

Example 53

4-| ~ 2-(Difl uoromethoxyV4-(trifluoτomethvπphenoxy]-6-oxo- 1 , 1 a,6,6a- tetrahvdrocvclopropaf a] indene- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid See Example 52. MS: 414.0 (M+l).

Example 54

Step 1

Ethyl 4-r2-rdifluoromethoxyV4-(trifluoromethvπphenoxy1-6-hvdroxy- Lla,6.6a- tetrahvdrocvcloproparalindene-l-exo-carboxylate To a stirred solution of corresponding keto

ester (24 mg, 0.054 mmol) in THF (0.5 mL) was added lithium borohydride solution in THF (2.0 M, 0.065 mL) at 0 C. After 1 h, the reaction was quenched with saturated sodium bicarbonate and extracted with ethyl acetate. The combined organics were washed with brine, dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated. Silica gel chromatography eluting with ethyl acetate (4% - 60%) in hexane provided product (4:1 mixture of diastereomers) as colorless oil.

Step 2

4-[2-(difluoromethoxy>4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-6-hy droxy- 1 , 1 a,6,6a- tetrahydrocyclopropaFai indene- 1 -exo-carboxylic acid See Example 1. Final product (4:1 mixture of diastereomers) was collected as white solid. MS: 416.1 (M+l).

Scheme 9: Aminoindane Derivatives

Example 55

Step 1

5- Arninoindan- 1 -ol To a stirred solution of 5-hydroxyindane-l -one (4 g, 0.27 mol) in THF (100 mL) was added IM solution of lithium aluminum hydride in THF (20 ml, 0.2 mol) dropwise in about 20 min. with ice bath cooling. The mixture was then stirred at room temperature for 2-4 h. It was then quenched with LO N NaOH solution until no more gas evolves, and left stir at room temperature for 30 minutes. The suspension was filtered, residue washed with ethyl acetate. The organic phase was combined, dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered and concentrated to obtain the product as an oil. The crude product was used in the next step without further purification.

Step 2

1 H-inden-6-amine To a stirred solution of 5-amino-l-hydroxyindane (4.2 g, 0.26 mol) in methanol (100 mL) was added hydrochloric acid (100 mL, 1.0 N). The mixture was stirred at 40oC for 2h, and then was concentrated to dryness under vacuum to the product as gray powder.

Step 3

N- 1 H-inden-6-yl-2',6'-dimethylbiphenyl-4-amine See Example I, Step 1. The final product was collected as colorless oil.

Step 4

N-(2'.6'-dimethylbiphenyl-4-ylV2,2,2-trifluoro-N-lH-inden-6- ylacetamide To a stirred solution of 4-[(2',6'-dimethylbiphenyl-3-yl)methylamino]-indene (170 mg, 0.52 mmol) in dichloromethane (4.0 ml) was added trifluoroacetic anhydride (lOOmg, 5.3 mmol) in an ice bath. The mixture was stirred at 0 0 C for 4 hours, concentrated to dryness and purified on a silica gel column, eluting with ethyl acetate (0 - 30%) in hexane. The final product was collected as colorless oil.

Step 5

4-[Y2'.6'-dimethylbiphenyl-4-yl ' )amino1- 1.1 a,6.6a-tetrahvdrocyclopropa[ a]indene- 1 -exo- carboxylic acid See Example 1, Step 2 and 3. Cyclopropanation was carried out in dichloroethane at 80 0 C. MS: 384.2 (M+l).

Example 56

S-fQ' ^ ό'-Dimethylbiphenyl-S-yπmethoxyi-la^^^b-tetrahydro-lH-cycl oproparainaphthalene-l- exo-carboxylic acid See Example 55. MS: 398.2 (M+l).

Scheme 10: Benzothiophene Derivatives

Example 57

Step 1

To a suspension of 3, 3'-dihydroxydiphenyl disulfide (1.01 g, 4.03 mmol) and CS2CO3 (3.3 g, 10 mmol) in DMF (20 mL) was added 3-chloro-4-fluorobenzotrifluoride (2 g, 10 mmol). The reaction was heated at 100 0 C overnight. The mixture was then cooled and partitioned between ether (200 mL) and water (200 mL). The aqueous layer was further extracted with ether (2 x 100 mL). The organic layers were combined, washed with water (1 x 100 mL), Brine (1 x 100 mL), dried with anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated. The resulting oil was used in the next step directly.

Step 2

A solution of the product from Step 1 (~3.6 mmol) in THF (30 mL) was degassed by bubbling through nitrogen for 30 minutes. n-Bu3P (896 μL, 3.6 mmol) was then added. The reaction was stirred at room temperature for 1 hour. The completed reaction was partitioned between EtOAc (200 mL) and water (150 mL). The aqueous layer was further extracted with EtOAc (2 x 100 mL). The organic layers were combined, washed with water (1 x 100 mL), Brine (1 x 100 mL), dried with anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated. The mixture was then purified by flash chromatography ( 0% to 50% EtOAc/hexanes) to give the desired thiol.

Step 3

To the product from Step 2 (2.4 g, 8 mmol) in DMF (40 mL) was added NaH (60% in mineral oil, 345 mg). After being stirred for 30 minutes at room temperature, a clear solution was obtained. Bromoacetaldehyde ditheyl acetal (10 mmol, 1.55 mL) was then added to the reaction. The reaction was completed after 1 hour at room temperature. The completed reaction was partitioned between MTBE (200 mL) and water (150 mL). The aqueous layer was further extracted with MTBE (2 x 100 mL). The organic layers were combined, washed with water (1 x 100 mL), Brine (1 x 100 mL), dried with anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated. The mixture was then purified by flash chromatography ( 0% to 15% EtOAc/hexanes) to give the desired product.

Step 4

To a stirred solution of BF3.Et2θ (3.55 mmol, 0.45 mL) in CH2CI2 (40 mL) was added a solution of the product from Step 3 (1.36 g, 3.32 mmol) in CH2CI2 (15 mL) slowly over 1 hour at room temperature. After addition, the reaction was stirred at room temperature overnight before quenching with saturated aqueous NaHCO3 solution (100 mL). The organic layer was separated and the aqueous layer was further extracted with CH2CI2 (2 x 50 mL). The organic layers were combined, washed with water (1 x 100 mL), Brine (1 x 100 mL), dried with anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated. The mixture was then purified by flash chromatography (0% to 15% EtOAc/hexanes) to give the desired product.

Step 5

4- | ~ 2-Chloro-4-(trifluoromethvDphenoxy| - 1 a,6b-dihydro- 1 H-cyclopropafb] F 1 Ibenzothiophene- 1 - exo-carboxylic acid See Example 1, Step 2 and 3. Cyclopropanation was carried out in dichloroethane at 80 0 C. MS: 387.0 (M+l).

4-[2-Chloro-4-(trifluorornethyl ' )phenoxy]-l a,6b-dihydro-lH-cyclopropa[b][l ]benzothiophene-l - exo-carboxylic acid 2,2-dioxide To a solution of Example 57 (3 mg) in CH2CI2 (0.5 mL) was added m-CPBA (10 mg). After 1 hour at room temperature, the organic solvent was removed in vacuo and the residue was purified by reverse phase HPLC (C 18, 5 micron, 20% to 80%

CH3CN/H2θ/0.1%TFA). The combined pure fractions were lyophilized overnight to give the desired product. MS: 418.7 (M+l).

Example 59

4-| " 2-fDifluoromethoxyV4-(trifluoromethyl > )phenoxy1-la,6b-dihydro-lH- • cyclopropa[b1[llbenzothiophene-l-exo-carboxylic acid See Example 57. The final product was purified on ChiralPak AD-H semi-preparative column, eluting with 4-7% ethanol in heptane. MS: 418.9 (M+l).

Example 60

(lS,laR,7bS)-5-[2-Chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-la,2,3 5 7b-tetrahydro-lH- cyclopropa[a]naphthaleπe-l-carboxylic acid See Example 49. The final product was purified on ChiralPak AD-H semi-preparative column, eluting with 4-7% ethanol in heptane. MS: 363.3 (M+l).

Example 61

(1 R.1 aR.7bS V5 -r2-Chloro-4-f trifluoromethvnphenoxyl -1.1 a.2.7b- tetrahvdrocyclopropa[c1chromene-l -carboxylic acid See Example 49. The final product was purified on ChiralPak AD-H semi-preparative column, eluting with 4-7% ethanol in heptane. MS: 385.1 (M+l).

Scheme 11 : Reverse Benzyl Ethers

Example 62

Step l

1 -Benzofuran-6-ylmethanol A solution of methyl l-benzofuran-6-carboxylate (J. Med. Chem. 1995, 38, 3094; 142 mg, 0.8 mmol) in THF (5ml) was added dropwise to a stirred suspension of lithium aluminum hydride (92 mg, 2.4 mmol) in THF (2 mL) at -10 0 C. The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 30 min, cooled to 0 0 C and treated slowly with water (1 mL). The mix was brought to pH 1 with 2N HCl and extracted with ethyl acetate (3x). The combined extracts were washed with water, brine, dried (MgSO4) and concentrated to give the final product.

Step 2

6-{ [3-TrifluoromethvDphenoxy ' |methyl)- 1 -benzofuran l,l'-[(E)-diazene-l,2- diyldicarbonyljdiperidine, (304 mg, 1.2 mmol) was added to a stirred solution of 1-benzofuran- 6-ylmethanol (119 mg, 0.8 mmol), tri-n-butylphosphine (0.3 mL, 1.2 mmol) and 3- (trifluoromethyl)phenol (0.1 mL, 0.8 mmol) in toluene (11 mL) at 0 0 C. The mix was stirred at room temp for 18 h, diluted with hexane (6 mL) and filtered. The filtrate was concentrated and the residue purified on a silica gel column eluting with a 1-4% EtOAc/hexane gradient to give the final product as white solid.

Step 3

4- [(3 -tert-butylphenoxy)methyl] - 1 a,6b-dihydro- 1 H-cyclopropafb] [ 1 " |benzofuran- 1 -exo- carboxylic acid See Example 3, step 3 and 4.

Example 63

Scheme 11 : Methylation of Benzofuran Derivatives

Step 1

Methylation to Yield ClR. IaR. όbSVEthyl 4-r2-chloro-4-ftrifluorornethvDphenoxy]-la.6b- dihydro-lH-cyclopropafbirilbenzofuran-l-methyl-l-carboxylate and (IS. IaR, βbSVEthyl 4-[2- chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl * )phenoxy]- 1 a.6b-dihvdro- 1 H-cvclopropaf b " | f 1 ~ |benzofuran- 1 -methyl- 1 - carboxylate. Iodomethane (61.4 mg, 0.43 mmol) was added to a stirred solution of the cyclopropyl carboxylic ester in Scheme 11 (115 mg, 0.29 mmol) in THF (4 ml) at -78 0 C under nitrogen, followed by a solution of LDA (0.23 mL, 1.5 M, 0.35 mmol) in cyclohexane. After the addition, the dark brown reaction solution was stirred at -78 Q C for 2h. The reaction was then quenched with aq. sat. ammonium chloride, and the resulting mixture was extracted with ethyl acetate. The combined organic solution was washed with brine, dried with magnesium sulfate, and concentrated. The residue was purified by preparative TLC on silica gel plates to give the IR- (or exo-) diastereomer (in a mixture with the starting material), MS: 413.2 (M+l); and JS- (or endo-) diastereomer (in a mixture with the starting material), MS: 413.1 (M+l).

Step 2A

( 1 R. 1 aR. 6bSV4-r2-Chloro-4-ftrifluoromethvnphenoxy ' |- 1 a.6b-dihvdro-l H- cyclopropaf b] F 1 ]benzofuran-l -methyl- 1 -carboxylic acid. To a stirred solution of the above IR ester (10 mg, 0.024 mmol) in THF-MeOH (1.5 ml-0.5ml) was added LiOH (1 mL, IN aq.). The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature overnight. The reaction was quenched with formic acid (~40%). The resulting weakly acidic aqueous solution was purified on a preparative HPLC reverse phase (C-18) column, eluting with acetonitrile/water + 0.1% formic acid, to give the desired product. 1 H NMR (CDCl 3 , δ ppm): 0.9 (s, 3H), 3.5 (d, IH) 5 5.2 (d, IH) 3 6.6 (m, 2H), 7.0 (d, IH), 7.3 (m, IH), 7.5 (m, IH), 7.8 (s, IH).

Step 2B

(1 S, 1 aR. 6bSV442-Chloro-4-(trifluorornethyl)phenoxy1- 1 a.6b-dihvdro-l H- cyclopropaf b] | ~ 1 ] benzofuran- 1 -methyl- 1 -carboxylic acid. To a stirred solution of the above 75 ester (20 mg, 0.048 mmol) in THF-MeOH (1.5 ml-0.5ml) was added LiOH (1 mL 5 IN aq.). The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature overnight. The reaction was quenched with formic acid (~40%). The resulting weakly acidic aqueous solution was purified on a preparative HPLC reverse phase (C-18) column, eluting with acetonitrile/water + 0.1% formic acid, to give the desired product. 1 H NMR (CDCl 3 , δ ppm): 1.4 (s, 3H), 3.1 (m, IH) 5 4.9 (m, IH), 6.6 (m, 2H), 6.9 (d, IH), 7.4 (d, IH), 7.5 (m, IH), 7.8 (m, IH).