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Title:
APPARATUS FOR PREVENTING SPARK PROPAGATION
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2012/177352
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Described herein is a novel method and apparatus for preventing spark propagation from a hydraulic joint (110) to a surrounding medium, such as a fuel source. The hydraulic joint (110) includes a fitting (112) and a tube (114, 116). A tip seal (122) may be placed about the edge of the hydraulic fitting (112) or a sleeve (118) may be placed about the joint (110), each resulting in an independent mechanical barrier between the joint (110) and surrounding medium, thereby preventing spark propagation to the surrounding medium.

Inventors:
RORABAUGH, Michael E. (801 SW Normandy Terrace, Seattle, Washington, 98166, US)
IRWIN, James P. (14210 W. LK. Kathleen Drive SE, Renton, Washington, 98059, US)
JOHNSON, Benjamin A. (1229 159th PL SW, Lynnwood, Washington, 98087, US)
DOWELL, Erik W. (8810 52nd PL W, Mukilteo, Washington, 98275, US)
Application Number:
US2012/039182
Publication Date:
December 27, 2012
Filing Date:
May 23, 2012
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
THE BOEING COMPANY (100 North Riverside Plaza, Chicago, Illinois, 60606-2016, US)
RORABAUGH, Michael E. (801 SW Normandy Terrace, Seattle, Washington, 98166, US)
IRWIN, James P. (14210 W. LK. Kathleen Drive SE, Renton, Washington, 98059, US)
JOHNSON, Benjamin A. (1229 159th PL SW, Lynnwood, Washington, 98087, US)
DOWELL, Erik W. (8810 52nd PL W, Mukilteo, Washington, 98275, US)
International Classes:
F16L25/03; B64D45/02; B64D37/32
Foreign References:
DE102004023656A12005-11-17
FR1009262A1952-05-27
EP0217313A21987-04-08
US4786086A1988-11-22
US4174124A1979-11-13
GB1295176A1972-11-01
EP0133337A11985-02-20
Other References:
None
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
COUSINS, Clifford G et al. (The Boeing Company, P.O. Box 2515MC 110-SD5, Seal Beach California, 90740-1515, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An apparatus for preventing sparking between a fitting (1 12) and a tube (114, 116) from propagating to a surrounding medium comprising:

a tube (114, 1 16);

a hydraulic fitting (1 12) attached to said tube (1 14, 116), the hydraulic fitting (112) including a first open end for receiving said tube (114, 116); and

a tip sea! (122) positioned on said hydraulic fitting (112) adjacent said open end, said tip seal (122) forming a mechanical barrier between said fitting (112) and said tube (114, 116).

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said tip seal (122) is applied about an exterior surface of said hydraulic fitting (112) and wherein said tip seal ( 122) is adhered to said tube (114, 1 16).

3. The apparatus of any of claims 1-2 wherein said tip seal (122) is applied about an interior surface of said hydraulic fitting (1 12).

4. The apparatus of any of claims 1-3 wherein said tip seal (122) is applied in one or more incomplete circles. 5. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein said tip seal (122) is applied in a helix.

6. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein said tip seal (122) is applied in one or more complete circles.

7. A method of preventing sparking from propagating to a surrounding medium comprising: providing a hydraulic joint (110) including a fitting (112) and a tube (114, 116), said fitting including a first end having an opening for receiving said tube (1 14, 116); and

applying a barrier between said hydraulic joint (1 10) and said surrounding medium, said barrier preventing sparking between said fitting (1 12) and said tube (114, 116) from propagating to said surrounding medium.

8. The method of claim 7 wherem said barrier is a tip seal (122) applied adjacent said first end of said fitting (112),

9. The method of claim 7 wherein said barrier comprises a heat shrink wrap applied about said hydraulic joint (1 10), said heat shrink wrap covering said fitting (112) and a portion of said tube (114, 116).

10. The method of claim 9 wherem said heat shrink wrap comprises a dielectric material.

1 1. The method of claim 9 wherem said heat shrink wrap is sufficiently electrically conductive to dissipate static charges.

12. The method of any of claims 9-1 1 wherem said barrier further comprises a wound tape.

13. The method of claim 12 further comprising the steps of winding said tape about said hydraulic joint (1 10), positioning said heat shrink wrap about said hydrauiic joint (1 10), and heating said heat shrink wrap to adhere said heat shrink wrap to said tape.

14. The apparatus for reducing a risk of ignition sources within an aircraft fuel tank in accordance with any one of the apparatus claims 1 -6 and any one of the method claims 7-13.

15. The method that provides a mechanical seal against spark propagation from within a fitting to a fuel tank in accordance with any one of the method claims 7-13 and any one of the apparatus claims 1 -6.

16. A method of preventing sparking between a hydraulic fitting (1 12) and a tube (1 14, 1 16) from propagating to a surrounding medium comprising the steps of:

applying a tip seal (122) to said hydraulic fitting (1 12), said hydraulic fitting (1 12) having a first end with an opening for receiving said tube (1 14, 1 16);

joining said hydraulic fitting (1 12) to said tube (1 14, 1 16) to form a hydraulic joint (1 10), said hydraulic tube (1 14, 1 16) having a first end with an opening for receiving said hydraulic tube (1 14, 1 16);

applying a heat shrink wrap about said hydrauiic joint ( 1 10); and

heating said heat shrink wrap to form said heat shrink wrap about said hydrauiic joint

(110).

17. The method of claim 16 wherem said heat shrink wrap is sufficiently electrically conductive to dissipate static charges.

18. The method of any of claims 16-17 wherein said tip seal (122) is applied to an inner surface of said hydraulic fitting (1 12).

19. The method of claim 18 wherein said tip seal (122) is applied in one or more incomplete circles about said inner surface of said hydraulic fitting (1 12),

20. The method of claim 18 wherem said tip seal (122) is applied in a spiral about said inner surface of said hydraulic fitting (112).

21. The method of any of cl aims 16-20 further comprising the step of winding a tape about said hydraulic joint (1 10).

22. The method of claim 21 wherein said tape is applied directly to said hydraulic joint (110) and said heat shrink wrap is applied directly to a portion of said tape.

Description:
APPARATUS FOR PREVENTING SPARK PROPAGATION

BACKGROUND

The present disclosure relates to hydraulic fitting safety devices, particularly for use in airplanes or other aircraft.

In modern commercial airplanes, fuel is traditionally stored in the wings. A number of hydraulic lines may pass through the fuel storage area to provide power and control to hydraulically powered elements, such as wing flaps. These hydraulic lines require a number of fittings to connect various lengths of hydraulic tubing to eachother, other fittings, and to bulkhead panels and direct the hydraulic fluid . During operation of the aircraft, it is possible that an electrical spark could he created between a hydraulic line and a fitting and propagate to the fuel tank, thereby causing a potential ignition source. This risk is contained or prevented in a number of ways, the present disclosure describes an alternative improved method and apparatus for inhibiting spark propagation from a fitting to the fuel tank.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has expressed concern regarding this potential ignition sources in the fuel tank of aircraft. Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) 25.981(a)(3) (14 CFR 25.981 (a)(3)) requires that any potential ignition source must be sufficiently contained by redundant ignition prevention measures. The specific language requires "that an ignition source could not result from each single failure, from each single failure in combination with each latent failure condition not shown to be extremely remote, and from all combinations of failures not shown to be extremely improbable." This regulation generally requires that the system have triple redundancy, or three safety devices which would have to independently fail, in order to cause an ignition source to result in the aircraft fuel tank. Double redundancy may be sufficient for permanent installations where the ignition prevention measures are shown to be highly reliable.

Current methods of satisfying this requirement focus on reducing the possibility of sparks between the hydraulic line and fitting. One potential source of sparks is electrical current flowing along the hydraulic lines. The electrical current may jump from a hydraulic line to a fitting, thereby causing a spark. One method in use is dissipating or directing electrical current away from the hydraulic lines so that electrical current does not pass through the fuel tank. For example, in-line static dissipaters may be used to prevent electrical current. These methods of mitigating this risk may require a large number of parts, increasing cost, complexity, and installation time. Some existing fitting designs include a polymeric liner within the fittings to protect tubes and fittings from wear in surface. Without the use of electrical dissipation this liner could exacerbate sparking problems when diel ectric breakdown occurs near the tip of the fitting if the fitting is forced to carry large amounts of electrical current due to a lightning stri ke. Hydraulic tubes in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) wings will potentially carry higher current levels than similar fittings in metal wing airplanes. Additional safety features may therefore be required to ensure safety and compliance with Federal regulations.

In-line electrical isolators that disrupt current flow may be used to prevent current flow through the hydraulic line, thereby preventing sparking due to electrical current. These in-line static dissipaters are generally electrically non-conductive tubes that are inserted in the hydraulic line. These non-conductive tubes resist current flow, thereby causing current to flow through structure other than the hydraulic line. This system may not be desirable because it adds additional weight to the system and prevents the use of hydraulic lines as a means to conduct electrical current.

Another source of sparking may be hot material that is forced out from the fitting under pressure. This hot material may be lubricant used to protect the fittings, molten metal from internal sparking, or any other material which may become heated due to pressure or resistance to electrical current and forced out from the hydraulic fitting.

With the increased desire for light weight composite or otherwise non-conductive (or low-conductivity) materials for the fuel tank and other aircraft structure, it may not be desirable or possible to transfer electrical current from the hydraulic lines to the fuel tank to eliminate the risk of sparking. Additionally, a composite or non-conductive fuel tank may build up precipitation static as the aircraft travels through the air. This precipitation static must be dissipated away from the fuel tank to prevent sparking or damage to the fuel tank. Conductive hydraulic lines may be utilized to transfer electrical current or dissipate precipitation static from the fuel tank.

Therefore, there is a recognized need in the art for a method and apparatus for increasing safety of hydraulic joints by preventing sparks from propagating from a hydraulic joint to the surrounding medium while maintaining conductive properties of the hydraulic l ine.

There is further recognized a need in the art for safety materials which are useful in dissipating precipitation static from a composite fuel tank surface while preventing spark propagation from the hydraulic line to the surrounding medium. SUMMARY

The present invention describes an apparatus that is useful in preventing sparks created between a fitting and a tube from propagating to a surrounding medium. The apparatus includes a tube, a hydraulic fitting attached to the tube, and a tip seal on the hydraulic fitting that forms a mechanical barrier between the tube and fitting. This mechanical barrier accomplishes the object of preventing spark propagation to the surrounding medium.

Also described in this application is a method for preventing sparks created in a location between a fitting and a tube from propagating to a surrounding medium. This method includes the steps of providing a hydraulic joint that includes the fitting and tube and applying a barrier between the hydraulic joint and the surrounding medium. This barrier accomplishes the object of preventing sparks from propagating from the hydraulic joint to the surrounding medium.

The barrier described may be either a tip seal about an internal or external surface of the fitting or a sleeve wrapped or otherwise applied to the hydraulic joint. This barrier provides a mechanical barrier against the undesired spark propagation.

Finally described in this application is a novel method of preventing sparking betw r een a hydraulic fitting and a tube from propagating to a surrounding medium. The method includes the steps of applying a tip seal to the hydraulic fitting, joining the fitting to the tube to form a joint, applying a heat shrink wrap about the hydraulic joint, and heating the heat shrink wrap to adhere the wrap to the hydraulic joint. The resultant apparatus forms a mechanical barrier agamst spark propagation.

The above-described method may include the further step of applying a tape about the hydraulic joint before applying the heat shrink wrap. This tape may provide an additional layer of protection and the heat shrink wrap may protect against the tape unwinding due to exposure to the surrounding medium.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of an aircraft.

Fig. 2 is a cutaway view of a portion of the aircraft wing.

Fig. 3 is a cutaway view of one embodiment of the apparatus.

Fig. 4A is a cutaway view of an alternative embodiment of the apparatus.

Fig. 4B is a cutaway view of an alternative embodiment of the apparatus.

Fig. 4C is a cutaway view of an alternative embodiment of the apparatus.

Fig. 4D is a cutaway view of an alternative embodiment of the apparatus. Fig. 5 is a cutaway view of an alternative embodiment.

DESCRIPTION

As shown in Fig, 1, a commercial aircraft 100 general!)' consists of a fuselage 102, wings 104, including hydraulic lines 106 and flaps 108. Flaps 108 are positioned on the wings 104 to provide in-flight control for the aircraft. As shown in Fig. 2, the hydraulic lines 106 may pass through the wing 104 of the aircraft and may include one or more hydraulic joints 1 10. These hydraulic lines 106 may control the flaps 108 or other control structure for the aircraft.

Fi g. 3 shows a cutaway view of one embodiment of the improved apparatus. As shown in this figure, the hydraulic joint 110 generally consists of a hydraulic fitting 112 is generally positioned around hydraulic tubes 114, 1 16. In this illustration, the hydraulic fitting 1 12 is a coupler for joining a first section 114 to a second section 116 of the hydraulic line 106. The first 114 and second 1 16 sections of the hydraulic line 106 may be secured by swaging or any other means commonly known to those having skill in the art. As further shown in this figure, the hydraulic fitting 1 12 may include internal seals or fittings (not shown) to prevent hydraulic fluid leaking from the fitting 112.

Further shown in Fig. 3 is one type of apparatus for reducing the risk of ignition sources within the aircraft fuel tank. Generally surrounding the hydraulic tubes 114, 1 16 and fitting 112 is a sleeve 118 which may be wrapped tape or a cylindrical sheath secured by heat shrinking to the hydraulic tubes 1 14, 1 16 and fitting 1 12, This sleeve 1 18 may provide a mechanical barrier preventing spark propagation from within the fitting 112 to the fuel tank.

The sleeve 1 18 may be formed of a tape wrapped around the fitting 1 12 and tubes 114, 116, or may consist of a heat-shrink material formed onto the line during assembly. Wrapped tape is preferably installed during assembly of the fitting 112 to the tubes 114, 1 16, while a heat shrink sleeve may be attached to or placed around the fitting 112 prior to assembly of the fitting 112 to the tubes 1 14, 116. Alternati vely, the sleeve 1 18 may consist of both a wrapped tape as well as a heat shrink material about the wrapped tape to prevent unwinding of the tape. This arrangement would prevent a layer of tape from losing adhesion due to exposure to the fuel stored in the tank. Such a result could compromise the safety of the protective feature.

The physical properties of the sleeve 118 may vary according to the preferred function of the sleeve 1 18. The size of the sleeve 1 18 is adjusted to the intensity of the anticipated sparking, and therefore the thickness and scope of coverage may vary. Generally the thickness of the sleeve 118 may be 0.005-0.020" and extend 0.25-1 .5" beyond the ends of the fittings. This arrangement provides sufficient resistance against spark propagation to eliminate the risk of fuel combustion.

The material of the sleeve 118 is generally selected so as to be resistant to corrosion due to exposure to fuel and hydraulic fluid and may have anywhere from moderate to no electrical conductivity. A low to moderate level of conductivity allows static charge to be drained from the surface of the sleeve. Alternatively, very low to no conductivity from a dielectric sleeve 118 may be selected according to preferred characteristics of the sleeve 118.

One example of material for the sleeve 118 is fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP). This material may serve as a dielectric and not allow static charge to be drained to the hydraulic line. Alternatively, the sleeve 1 18 may be constructed of a carbon-impregnated plastic (or other conductive material) that is electrically conductive and fuel resistant. This conductive sleeve 1 18 may be utilized to drain static buildup from the sleeve.

A further example of heat shrink material for the sleeve 118 is poiytetrafluoroethyiene (PTFE). This material has a high melting point, high toughness, and is chemically inert. Other examples are polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and polyetherketoneketone ( PEKK) that exhibits essential properties similar properties to PTFE. These materials may capture any sparks which would otherwise be expelled from the joint. Any spark that manages to escape the shrink wrap material would have a significantly reduced incendiary capacity. Other materials with similar chemical durability and operating temperature range could be used in the apparatus.

Other methods of installing heat shrink sleeving are contemplated by the present disclosure. For example, multiple pieces of sleeve tubing could be applied to specific areas of joints where metal tubes meet the fitting. These separate pieces would independently cover a portion of the fitting and metal tube, thereby reducing the amount of heat shrink material required. Multiple separate pieces of heat shrink sleeving may also be used on fittings including the joinder of more than two pipes, for example in a tee or cross fitting where three or four pipes are joined to a single fitting. Because sparks can only be expelled from the specific areas of the joints where the metal tubes and fitting come together, the use of separate, smaller pieces of heat shrink sleeving may be utilized to provide effective spark mitigation while reducing the amount of heat shrink sleeving material that must be used.

An alternative arrangement of mechanically sealing the hydraulic fitting 112 and tubes

1 14, 116 is generally shown in Figs. 4A-B. in these cutaway views, tip seals 122 or sealing material 124 is positioned on the fitting 112 to mechanically isolate sparks from interacting with the fuel. Fig. 4A shows the use of a tip seal 122 for covering the edges of the fitting 112. In this arrangement, a dielectric or nonconductive material is positioned about the outside perimeter of the fitting 1 12 where it joins with the tubes 114, 116. This tip seal 122 may cover the exposed edge of the fitting 1 12 and adhere to the tubes 114, 1 16. This arrangement provides a mechanical seal against spark propagation from within the fitting 112 to the fuel tank.

In this case, the tip seal 122 must be applied after assembly of the fitting 1 12 to the tubes 114, 116 so that a tight seal can be formed between the fitting 112 and tubes 114, 116.

Alternatively, as shown in Figs. 4B-D, a sealing material 124 may be positioned on the inside of the fitting 112 instead of or in addition to a tip seal 122 around the perimeter of the edge of the fitting 112. The sealing material 124 may be applied as one or more incomplete rings (Fig. 4B), spiral (Fig. 4C), or complete circles (Fig. 4D). The use of incomplete rings or spirals may be used to ensure that a leak in the hydraulic seal can be detected as the hydraulic fluid will leak past openings in the seal. This will further prevent leaking hydraulic fluid from building up pressure behind the tip seal which may cause the tip seal to be dislodged. The use of complete circles as shown in Fig. 4D may be sufficient to protect against spark propagation from within the fitting 112 to the fuel tank.

Unlike traditional seals or hydraulic sealing rings (such as O-Rings), the tip seal 122 or sealing material 124 is not intended to prevent pressurized fluid from escaping the fitting 112, but rather simply provides a mechanical barrier between the location where sparks tend to be created and the fuel tank.

The internal tip seal further includes characteristics which supplement or replace existing anti-fretting coatings. These coatings reduce wear at the contact point between the fitting and metal tube caused by minute relative motion, such as that caused by vibration. The tip seal is also preferably of sufficient thickness to prevent dielectric breakdown and tough enough to resist damage during installation. It is of a material selected for compatibility with fuel and hydraulic fluids and the temperature extremes of aerospace applications. Materials such as FEP, PTFE, PEEK, and silicone elastomers, are examples of materials which may be suitable for internal tip seals.

Another aspect of the apparatus shown in Fig. 5 and includes multiple EME protecti ve features to mitigate spark propagation. In this image, the hydraulic joint 110 includes fitting 112 about tubes 114 and 1 16. Tip seals 122 are applied between the fitting 1 12 and tubes 114, 1 16 and provide a barrier against spark propagation. A. sleeve 118 is applied about the fitting 112 and a portion of the tubes 1 14, 116 as described above to provide a second additional barri er against spark propagation. These multiple EME protective provide include independent failure modes, thereby ensuring that a single failure cannot result in spark propagation from a spark zone to the fuel tank. It should be appreciated that the sealing material 124 shown in Figs. 4B-D and described above may be used in addition to or in lieu of tip seals 122. Suitable shrink-wrap sleeve materials would include FEP, PTFE, PEEK, or other materials with suitable chemical and thermal properties and the ability to form a shrink-wrap tube.

The first method for preventing spark propagation is through the metal-to-metal interface between the fitting 112 and tubes 1 14, 1 16. The second is through the use of either external tip seals 122 or internal sealing material 124. The tip seals 122 or sealing material 124 provide a physical barrier between any sparking and the fuel tank. A third method for preventing spark propagation is through the use of a sleeve 1 18 or wrap that forms a mechanical barrier between the hydraulic joint 110 and the surrounding medium. Each of these methods of preventing spark propagation requires an individual failure condition, and therefore a combination of these methods satisfies the requirements of FAR 25.981.

Therefore, the proposed modified system will at least accomplish the goals as stated above by providing additional protection involving unique failure modes.

The examples presented here are single piece radial ly swaged or cryogenic fittings. It will be apparent to one trained in the art that the principles of sealing with tip seals and covering with wrap or tubular sleeving, in single or multiple pieces, may apply to multi-piece axiaily swaged fittings or other hydraulic fittings.

In accordance with Figures 1-5 and text above, an apparatus is disclosed for preventing sparking between a fitting 112 and a tube 1 14, 116 from propagating to a surrounding medium including a tube 114, 1 16; a hydraulic fitting 1 12 attached to the tube 114, 116, the hydraulic fitting 112 including a first open end for receiving the tube 1 14, 116; a tip seal 122 positioned on the hydraulic fitting 112 adjacent the open end, the tip seal 122 forming a mechanical barrier between the fitting 112 and the tube 114, 1 16. In one variant, the tip seal 122 is applied about an exterior surface of the hydraulic fitting 112 and wherein the tip seal 122 is adhered to the tube 114, 1 16. In one instance, the tip seal 122 is applied about an interior surface of the hydraulic fitting 112. In one alternative, tip seal 122 is applied in one or more incomplete circles, in one variant, tip seal 122 is applied in a helix. The tip seal 122 is applied in one or more complete circles.

In one aspect of the present disclosure, a method is disclosed of preventing sparking from propagating to a surrounding medium. The method includes providing a hydraulic joint 1 10 including a fitting 1 12 and a tube 1 14, 116, the fitting including a first end having an opening for receiving the tube 1 14, 116; and applying a barrier between the hydraulic joint 110 and the surrounding medium, the barrier preventing sparking between the fitting 112 and the tube 114, 1 16 from propagating to the surrounding medium. In one instance, the barrier is a tip seal 122 applied adjacent the first end of the fitting 112. In one variant, the barrier comprises a heat shrink wrap applied about the hydraulic joint 110, the heat shrink wrap covering the fitting 1 12 and a portion of the tube 114, 116. In one instance, the heat shrink wrap includes a dielectric material. In one alternative, the heat shrink wrap is sufficiently electrically conductive to dissipate static charges. In yet another variant, the barrier further includes a wound tape. In one variant, the method includes the steps of winding the tape about the hydraulic joint 1 10, positioning the heat shrink wrap about the hydraulic joint 110, and heating the heat shrink wrap to adhere the heat shrink wrap to the tape.

In another aspect of the present disclosure, a method is disclosed of preventing sparking between a hydraulic fitting 112 and a tube 114, 1 16 from propagating to a surrounding medium including the steps of: applying a tip seal 122 to the hydraulic fitting 1 12, the hydraulic fitting 112 having a first end with an opening for receiving the tube 114, 116; joining the hydraulic fitting 1 12 to the tube 1 14, 116 to form a hydraulic joint, the hydraulic tube 1 14, 116 having a first end with an opening for receiving the tube 114, 116; applying a heat shrink wrap about the hydraulic joint 110; and heating the heat shrink wrap to form the heat shrink wrap about the hydraulic joint 110. In one instance, the heat shrink wrap is sufficiently electrically conductive to dissipate static ch arges. In one variant, the tip seal 122 is applied to an inner surface of the hydraulic fitting 1 12. In yet another variant, the tip seal 122 is applied in one or more incomplete circles about the inner surface of the hydraulic fitting 112. In another instance, the tip seal 122 is applied in a spiral about the inner surface of the hydraulic fitting 112. In one example, the method may include the step of winding a tape about the hydraulic joint 110. In one alternative, the tape is applied directly to the hydraulic joint 110 and the heat shrink wrap is applied directly to a portion of the tape.

The various embodiments described above are intended to be illustrative in nature and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention. Any limitations to the invention will appear in the claims as allowed.




 
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