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Title:
ARTICLE INCORPORATING AN ILLUMINATION DEVICE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2016/205034
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An article of footwear may have an upper and a sole system secured to the upper. The sole system includes a bladder member with an illumination device. The bladder member is formed from at least a partially transparent or colored outer polymer layer that encloses a fluid. The illumination device is located within the sole system. Light from the illumination device may pass out the sole system by passing through the bladder member, thereby imparting the configuration of an illuminable fluid-filled bladder member.

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Inventors:
WILKEN, Doug, D. (Inc.One Bowerman Driv, Beaverton OR, 97005-6453, US)
SIAGIAN, Parluhutan (Inc.One Bowerman Driv, Beaverton OR, 97005-6453, US)
Application Number:
US2016/036391
Publication Date:
December 22, 2016
Filing Date:
June 08, 2016
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
NIKE INNOVATE C.V. (Dutch Partnership, One Bowerman DriveBeaverton, OR, 97005-6453, US)
NIKE, INC. (One Bowerman Drive, Beaverton, OR, 97005-6453, US)
International Classes:
A43B3/00; F21V33/00; A43B13/20
Foreign References:
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Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SZALACH, Matthew, H. et al. (Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn LLP, 350 E. Michigan Avenue Suite 30, Kalamazoo Michigan, 49007-3800, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:

1. An illumination device for an article, comprising a housing portion having a first portion with a first illuminable element and a second illuminable element, the housing portion having a second portion with a third illuminable element and a fourth illuminable element;

the housing portion having a longitudinal direction extending along a length of the housing portion, and wherein at least one of the first illuminable element and the second illuminable element is oriented at an angle to the longitudinal direction;

wherein the illumination device can be programmed to emit light in at least a first illumination mode and a second illumination mode, wherein the first illumination mode and the second illumination mode are different;

wherein the illumination device is configured to receive information about a condition-responsive parameter from at least one sensor;

wherein the illumination device emits light in the first illumination mode when the condition-responsive parameter has a first value and wherein the illumination device emits light in the second illumination mode when the condition-responsive parameter has a second value; and

wherein the first value is different from the second value.

2. The illumination device according to claim 1 , wherein the first illuminable element, the second illuminable element, the third illuminable element, and the fourth illuminable element are light emitting diodes.

3. The illumination device according to claim 1 , wherein the first illumination mode is a fade illumination effect in a first light color.

4. The illumination device according to claim 1 , wherein the condition-responsive parameter is a step rate.

5. The illumination device according to claim 3, wherein the second illumination mode is a point illumination effect in a second light color.

8. The illumination device according to claim 1 , wherein the condition-responsive parameter is an ambient light condition.

7. An article of footwear having an upper, a forefoot region, a midfoot region, a heel region, a lateral side, a medial side, and a sole system secured to the upper, the sole system comprising:

a bladder member including an outer polymer layer that encloses a fluid;

wherein the bladder member comprises a first surface oriented towards the upper, wherein the bladder member comprises a second surface opposite first surface , and wherein the bladder member comprises a third surface exposed to an exterior of the footwear, the third surface extending between the first surface and the second surface:

wherein the bladder member further includes a cavity located on the first surface; a midsole member adapted to confront the bladder member, wherein the midsole member is disposed closer to the upper than is the bladder member;

wherein the midsole member comprises a chamber portion configured to be received by the cavity of the bladder member when assembled, wherein at least the chamber portion is substantially transparent;

an illumination device configured to be received by the chamber portion of the midsole member; and

wherein the iiiumination device can be programmed to emit light in at least a first iiiumination mode and a second iiiumination mode, wherein the first illumination mode and the second iiiumination mode are different.

8. The article of footwear according to claim 7, wherein the first illumination mode illuminates a first illumination zone of the bladder member in a first light color.

9. The article of footwear according to claim 8, wherein the second illumination mode illuminates a second illumination zone of the bladder member in a second light color,

10. The article of footwear according to claim 9, wherein the first illumination mode is a flash illumination effect from the heel region to the forefoot region in the first light color,

1 1. The article of footwear according to claim 10, wherein the second illumination mode is a pulse illumination effect from the lateral side to the medial side in the second light color.

12. The article of footwear according to claim 1 1 , wherein the illumination device changes between the first illumination mode and the second illumination mode according to a condition-responsive parameter, the condition-responsive parameter being determined from information received from at least one sensor.

13. The article of footwear according to claim 12, wherein the condition-responsive parameter is a step rate.

14. An article of footwear having an upper, a forefoot region, a midfoot region, a heel region, a lateral side, a medial side, and a sole system secured to the upper, the sole system comprising:

a bladder member including an outer polymer layer that encloses a fluid;

wherein the bladder member comprises a first surface oriented towards the upper, wherein the bladder member comprises a second surface opposite the first surface, and wherein the bladder member comprises a third surface exposed to an exterior of the footwear, the third surface extending between the first surface and the second surface;

wherein the bladder member further includes a cavity located on the first surface; a midsole member adapted to confront the bladder member, wherein the midsole member is disposed closer to the upper than is the bladder member;

wherein the midsole member comprises a chamber portion configured to be received by the cavity of the bladder member when assembled, wherein at least the chamber portion is substantially transparent;

an illumination device configured to be received by the chamber portion of the midsole member;

wherein the illumination device can be programmed to emit light in at least a first illumination mode and a second illumination mode, wherein the first illumination mode and the second illumination mode are different;

wherein the illumination device is configured to receive information about a condition-responsive parameter from at least one sensor;

wherein the illumination device emits light in the first illumination mode when the condition-responsive parameter has a first value and wherein the illumination device emits light in the second illumination mode when the condition-responsive parameter has a second value; and

wherein the first value is different from the second value.

15. The article of footwear according to claim 14, wherein the first illumination mode is a pulse illumination effect in a first light color in a first illumination zone.

18. The article of footwear according to claim 15, wherein the second illumination mode is a flash illumination effect in a second light color in a second illumination zone,

17. The article of footwear according to claim 18, wherein the condition-responsive parameter is a time of day condition,

18. The article of footwear according to claim 17, wherein the first value is before 6:00 PM and the second value is after 8:00 PM.

19. The article of footwear according to claim 14, wherein the first illumination zone comprises the lateral side and the medial side.

20. The article of footwear according to claim 19, wherein the second illumination zone comprises of the lateral side, the medial side, the forefoot region, the midfoot region, and the heel region.

Description:
ARTICLE INCORPORATING AN ILLUMINATION DEVICE

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

[0001] This application is related to co-pending U.S. Patent Application Number 14/744,180, filed June 19, 2015, and titled "Method of Illuminating Colored Air Bladder to Achieve Different Effects" the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND

[0002] The present embodiments relate generally to articles of apparel, and in particular to articles of footwear with an illumination device.

[0003] Articles of footwear generally include two primary elements, an upper and a sole system. The upper may be formed from a variety of material elements (e.g., textiles, polymer sheets, foam layers, leather, synthetic leather) that are stitched or bonded together to form a void for comfortably and securely receiving a foot. More particularly, the upper generaily extends over the instep and toe areas of the foot, along the medial and lateral sides of the foot, under the foot, and around the heel area of the foot, in some articles of footwear, such as basketball shoes and boots, the upper may extend upward and around the ankle to provide support or protection for the ankle. Access to the void within the upper is generally provided by an ankle opening in a heel region of the footwear. A lacing system is often incorporated into the upper to adjust the fit of the upper, as well as permitting entry and removal of the foot from the void within the upper. In addition, the upper may include a tongue that extends under the lacing system to enhance adjustability and comfort of the footwear.

[0004] The sole system is secured to a lower portion of the upper and is generally positioned between the foot and the ground, in some articles of footwear, including athletic footwear, the sole system incorporates a sockliner, a midsole, and an outsole. The sockliner is a thin, compressible member located within the void (i.e., under the foot) to enhance footwear comfort. The midsole extends downward from the upper and forms a middle layer of the sole system. In addition to attenuating ground reaction forces (i.e., providing cushioning for the foot), the midsole may limit foot motions or impart stability, for example. Although the midsole of athletic footwear may be primarily formed from a foamed polymer material, the midsole may include a variety of additional footwear elements that enhance the comfort or performance of the footwear, including plates, moderators, fluid-filled chambers, lasting elements, or motion control members. The outsole is secured to a lower surface of the midsole and forms a ground-contacting portion of the footwear. Additionally, the outsole may be formed from a durable and wear-resistant material that includes texturing to improve traction.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

[0005] The embodiments can be better understood with reference to the following drawings and descriptions. The components in the figures are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead being placed upon illustrating the principles of the embodiments. Moreover, in the figures, like reference numerals designate corresponding parts throughout the different views.

[0006] FIG. 1 is schematic top view of an embodiment of an illumination device.

[0007] FIG. 2 is schematic diagram of an embodiment of an electronic circuit of an illumination device.

[0008] FIG. 3 is schematic isometric view of an embodiment of a bladder member.

[0009] FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view of an embodiment of an article of footwear.

[0010] FIGS. 5-7 are schematic top views of an embodiment of a bladder member in different states of illumination.

[0011] FIGS. 8-10 are schematic top views of an embodiment of an article of footwear showing the bladder member in different states of illumination.

[0012] FIG. 1 1 is a schematic isometric view of an embodiment of a bladder member in a state of illumination.

[0013] FIG. 12 is a schematic view of a user programming an embodiment of the illumination device, where the illumination device is in electronic

communication with a computer.

[0014] FIGS. 13-15 are schematic views of a user wearing an embodiment of an article of footwear with an illumination device.

[0015] FIG. 16 is an embodiment of a process for controlling the

illumination of a bladder member.

[0016] FIG. 17 is an embodiment of a process for controlling the

illumination of a bladder member. [0017] FIG. 18 is a schematic view of a user programming an embodiment of the illumination device, where the illumination device is in electronic

communication with a computer.

[0018] FIG. 19 is a schematic view of a user wearing an embodiment of an article of footwear with an illumination device.

[0019] FIG. 20 is an embodiment of a process for controlling the illumination of a bladder member.

[0020] FIG. 21 is a schematic view of an embodiment of a user

programming an embodiment of an illumination device for an article of footwear, where the illumination device is in electronic communication with a mobile device.

[0021] FIG. 22 is a schematic view of a user wearing an embodiment of an article of footwear with an illumination device.

[0022] FIG. 23 is an embodiment of a process for controlling the illumination of a bladder member.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

[0023] In one aspect, the embodiment provides an illumination device for an article. The illumination device comprises of a housing portion having a first portion with a first iiiuminable element and a second i!luminable element. The housing portion having a second portion with a third il!uminable element and a fourth iiiuminable element. The housing portion having a longitudinal direction extending along a length of the housing portion, and where at least one of the first iiiuminable element and the second iiiuminable element is oriented at an angle to the

longitudinal direction. The illumination device can be programmed to emit light in at least a first illumination mode and a second illumination mode, where the first illumination mode and the second illumination mode are different. The illumination device is configured to receive information about a condition-responsive parameter from at least one sensor. The illumination device emits light in the first illumination mode when the condition-responsive parameter has a first value, and emits light in the second illumination mode when the condition-responsive parameter has a second value, and the first value is different from the second value.

[0024] In another aspect, the embodiment provides for an article of footwear having an upper, a forefoot region, a midfoot region, a heel region, a lateral side, a medial side, and a sole system secured to the upper. The sole system comprising a bladder member including an outer polymer layer that encloses a fluid. The bladder member comprises a first surface oriented towards the upper, wherein the bladder member comprises a second surface opposite first surface, and wherein the bladder member comprises a third surface exposed to an exterior of the footwear, the third surface extending between the first surface and the second surface. The bladder member further includes a cavity located on the first surface, a midsoie member adapted to confront bladder member, where the midsoie member is disposed closer to the upper than the bladder member. The midsoie member comprises a chamber portion configured to be received by the cavity of the bladder member when assembled, where the chamber portion is substantially transparent. The sole system includes an illumination device configured to be received by the chamber portion of the midso!e member, where the illumination device can be programmed to emit light in at least a first illumination mode and a second

illumination mode, where the first illumination and the second illumination mode are different.

[0025] In another aspect, the embodiment provides for an article of footwear having an upper, a forefoot region, a midfoot region, a heel region, a lateral side, a medial side, and a sole system secured to the upper. The sole system comprising a bladder member including an outer polymer layer that encloses a fluid. The bladder member comprises a first surface oriented towards the upper, wherein the bladder member comprises a second surface opposite first surface, and wherein the bladder member comprises a third surface exposed to an exterior of the footwear, the third surface extending between the first surface and the second surface. The bladder member further includes a cavity located on the first surface, a midsole member adapted to confront bladder member, where the midsole member is disposed closer to the upper than the bladder member. The midsole member comprises a chamber portion configured to be received by the cavity of the bladder member when assembled, where the chamber portion is substantially transparent. The sole system includes an illumination device configured to be received by the chamber portion of the midsole member, where the illumination device can be programmed to emit light in at least a first illumination mode and a second

illumination mode, where the first illumination and the second illumination mode are different. The illumination device is configured to receive information about a condition-responsive parameter from at least one sensor. The illumination device emits light in the first illumination mode when the condition-responsive parameter has a first value, and emits light in the second illumination mode when the condition- responsive parameter has a second value, and the first value is different from the second value.

[0026] Other systems, methods, features and advantages of the

embodiments will be, or will become, apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art upon examination of the following figures and detailed description. It is intended that ail such additional systems, methods, features and advantages be included within this description and this summary, be within the scope of the embodiments, and be protected by the following claims.

[0027] The embodiments can be better understood with reference to the following drawings and descriptions. The components in the figures are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead being placed upon illustrating the principles of the embodiments. Moreover, in the figures, like reference numerals designate corresponding parts throughout the different views.

[0028] FIG. 1 illustrates a schematic top view of an exemplary illumination device 100. The term "illumination device" as used throughout this detailed description and in the claims refers to any device capable of emitting light in one or more colors. Further, "iiiumination device" as used throughout this detailed description and in the claims may refer to any device capable of emitting light in one or more colors in a desired location with a desired illumination effect.

[0029] In some embodiments, illumination device 100 may include a housing portion 1 10. In some cases, housing portion 1 10 may be constructed from any suitable material known in the art. In some other embodiments, housing portion 1 10 may include a forward or first portion 1 16, and a rearward or second portion 1 18. In other embodiments, housing portion 1 10 may include a right side portion 1 17, and a left side portion 1 19.

[0030] As indicated in FIG. 1 , housing portion 1 10 may also be

characterized by a thickness (not visible in FIG.1 ) extending in a direction perpendicular to both a longitudinal length 1 12 and a lateral width 1 14. In at least some embodiments, the thickness of housing portion 1 10 may be substantively less than longitudinal length 1 12 and lateral width 1 14.

[0031] In some embodiments, housing portion 1 10 may include provisions for powering illumination device 100. In some other embodiments, housing portion 1 10 may include provisions for providing light to illumination device 100. in still some other embodiments, housing portion 1 10 may include provisions for programming illumination device 100, In some embodiments, housing portion 1 10 may include provisions for powering, providing light, and/or programming illumination device 100. Each of these provisions shall be discussed in detail below.

[0032] In some embodiments, housing portion 1 10 may include a power supply 120 (see FIG. 2) for powering illumination device 100. In some cases, illumination device 100 can be turned on and off by pressing down on housing portion 1 10. In some cases, power supply 120 may be any device capable of storing power for illumination device 100. In some embodiments, power supply 120 may be any oscillating electrical potential source, including but not limited to, an alternating current source, a direct current to alternating converter output (i.e., the output of a battery and an inverter), or an electric oscillator (i.e., a sine wave generator, square wave generator, or a tuned LC oscillator), in one embodiment, power supply 120 may be a battery such as a rechargeable polymer lithium-ion battery having an output of 240 miiliampere hours. In some embodiments, power supply 120 may be a disposable battery. Examples of different types of disposable batteries include, but are not limited to: zinc-carbon, zinc-chloride, alkaline, silver-oxide, lithium disulfide, lithium-thionyl chloride, mercury, zinc-air, thermal, water-activated, nickel

oxhydroxide, and paper batteries. In another embodiment, power supply 120 could be a rechargeable battery of some kind. Examples of rechargeable batteries include, but are not limited to nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride and

rechargeable alkaline batteries. In still other embodiments, power supply 120 could be another type of device capable of generating and storing electricity. For example, in one embodiment, power supply 120 could be a piezoelectric device capable of generating and storing electricity.

[0033] In some embodiments, housing portion 1 10 may include provisions for producing light from illumination device 100. in some cases, these provisions may be in the form of one or more iiluminabie elements 130. For purposes of clarity, iliuminable elements 130, and its variants thereof, may refer to any elements capable of emitting different types of light. For example, in some embodiments, iliuminable elements 130 may be capable of emitting electroluminescent light. However, it is to be understood that i!iuminabie elements 130 are not limited to any specific type of light emitting technology.

[0034] In some embodiments, illuminable elements 130 may be in the form of light emitting diodes (LEDs). In an exemplary embodiment, illumination device 100 may use red, green, and blue (RGB) LEDs to disperse light in one or more colors.

[0035] As shown in FIG 1 , illumination device 100 may comprise of three LEDs in the first portion 1 18, and three LEDs in the second portion 1 18. For example, LEDs in the first portion 1 16 of illumination device 100 may comprise of first LED 132, second LED 134, and third LED 136 oriented horizontally from the left side to the right side. LEDs in the second portion 1 18 of illumination device 100 may comprise of fourth LED 138, fifth LED 140, and sixth LED 142 oriented horizontally from the left side to the right side.

[0036] In some embodiments, illuminable elements 130 may be disposed in housing portion 1 10 so that the propagation of light is directed at an angle relative to a horizontal or vertical direction. As used herein, the orientation of an illuminable element is defined by a normal axis that generally extends outwardly from a base of the illuminable element (e.g., from the surface where the illuminable element attaches to housing portion 1 10). Thus, for example, first LED 132 has an

orientation 133 characterized by an axis (or ray) that is directed normally from a base portion 131 of first LED 132. in some embodiments, the orientation of an illuminable element may be characterized relative to longitudinal length 1 12 or lateral width 1 14 of illumination device 100. As shown in FIG. 1 , first LED 132, third LED 138, fourth LED 138, and sixth LED 142 may be angled with respect to, or oriented away from, a longitudinal direction (indicated schematically by longitudinal axis 1 13) that extends along length 1 12 of housing portion 1 10. For example, orientation 133 of first LED 132 forms a non-zero angle 139 with longitudinal axis 1 13. Likewise, each of third LED 138, fourth LED 138 and sixth LED 142 are oriented at non-zero angles with longitudinal axis 1 13. More specifically, first LED 132 is oriented towards a forward-left direction, third LED 126 is oriented towards a forward-right direction, fourth LED 138 is oriented towards a rearward-!eft direction and sixth LED 142 is oriented towards a rearward-right direction. Further, second LED 134 is oriented in a forward direction, while fifth LED 140 is oriented in a rearward direction.

[0037] Of course, light emitted from an iiiuminabie element may be dispersed over a wide range of angles, and need not be emitted along a particular angular direction. However, the orientations of iiiuminabie elements as defined above may still correspond with light emitted generally in some direction (e.g., forward, backwards, to the left or to the right). Further, in cases where illumination device 100 is disposed within an object (such as a bladder), the differently oriented iiiuminabie elements may tend to light up different regions of the object, as discussed in further detail below.

[0038] Other configurations for iiiuminabie elements on housing portion 1 10 are also possible. Specificaiiy, the number and/or orientation of various iiiuminabie elements can vary. In some other embodiments, only two LEDs may be present on first portion 1 16 and two LEDs may be present on second portion 1 18. Alternatively, in other embodiments, more than three LEDs can be disposed on first portion 1 16 and more than three LEDs can be disposed on second portion 1 18.

[0039] Still in some other embodiments, illumination device 100 may comprise of a large iiiuminabie element in the first portion 1 16, and/or a large iiiuminabie element in the second portion 1 18. Further in some embodiments, iiiuminabie elements 130 may be disposed on the right side portion 1 17 and/or the left side portion 1 19. Further still in some other embodiments, iiiuminabie elements 130 may be oriented vertically, in other words, the thickness of the illumination device 100 may be able to accommodate iiiuminabie elements 130 oriented from the bottom surface to the top surface of illumination device 100. Further still, the thickness may be able to accommodate a plurality of rows of iiiuminabie elements 130 oriented both vertically and horizontally. The number of iiiuminabie elements, their relative sizes, placement and/or their respective orientations may be selected according to desired lighting effects, manufacturing considerations, component geometry (e.g., housing geometry and/or bladder geometry) as well as possibly other factors.

[0040] In another embodiment, illuminable elements 130 can be associated with one or more of organic thin film transistor technologies, organic light emitting diode (OLED) technologies, flexible OLED technologies, as well as other electroluminescent elements. Examples are disclosed in any of the following: U.S. Patent Application Publication Number 2010/0032680, U.S. Patent Application Publication Number 2009/0278449, U.S. Patent Application Publication Number 2007/0222370, U.S. Patent Number 7,075,226, and U.S. Patent Number 6,969,291 , the entirety of each being hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

[0041] In some embodiments, a width of the light emanating from illuminable elements 130, also known as beam angle, may vary. For purposes of clarity, beam angle and its variants thereof, may refer to the angular size of a beam of light emitted from one or more illuminable elements 130. For purposes of clarity, the exemplary embodiment discusses a beam angle as confined generally to the horizontal direction, however a beam angle could alternatively be characterized as a solid angle when the vertical dispersion of light is also considered. For example, in some embodiments, the beam angle may be very narrow, between 7 and 15 degrees. In some other embodiments, the beam angle may be very wide, between 60 and 160 degrees. Still further, the beam angle could range between 160 degrees to 300 degrees. In some cases, the beam angle could be close to 360 degrees. A wide beam angle may flood an area with illumination, whereas a very narrow beam angle may propagate a coliimated beam or spot of light with minimal dispersion at a specific location. The type of Illuminable elements 130 utilized by those skilled in the art for illumination device 100 may vary depending on the type of beam angle desired.

[0042] In some cases, illumination device 100 may be capable of projecting light at a specific location or illumination zone using one illuminable element 130, or at several locations using a plurality of illuminable elements 130. For example the first portion 1 16 may be illuminated by illuminating first LED 132, second LED 134, and third LED 136. Still in some other embodiments, illumination device 100 may be capable of dispersing light from the right side portion 1 17 for example by illuminating only third LED 136 and sixth LED 142, or the left side portion 1 19 by illuminating only first LED 132 and fourth LED 138,

[0043] Housing portion 1 10 may include provisions for programming illumination device 100 to emit light in a variety of illumination modes which are different from each other. As used in this detailed description and in the claims, illumination mode and its variants thereof may refer to dispersing light based on a light color or based on various illumination effects, discussed in further detail below. Furthermore, illumination mode may also refer to illuminating different illumination zones or regions by emitting light from one or more iliuminable elements 130.

Further it is to be understood that illumination mode may refer to emitting light from illumination device 100 using a combination of light color, illumination effects, and/or illumination zones. For purposes of clarity, light color, and its variants thereof, may refer to one or more colors of light emitted by one or more iliuminable elements 130. Therefore, as used in this detailed description and in the claims, illumination modes may be different as light may be dispersed based on an illumination effect, or based on illuminating a region, or based on a combination of light color, illumination effects, and or illuminating regions.

[0044] In some cases, because illumination device 100 can emit light with a very wide beam angle or narrow beam angle depending on the type of iliuminable elements 130 used, illumination device 100 can be programmed with functionalities to disperse light at specific different locations (i.e., illumination zones) sequentially. In some other embodiments, illumination device 100 may be capable of dispersing light based on various condition-responsive parameters such as motion, or ambient light conditions, in an exemplary embodiment, provisions located within housing portion 1 10 may include a circuit (e.g., a circuit board) having a control unit and sensors for programming illumination device 100 with different functionalities.

[0045] FIG, 2 illustrates a schematic diagram of an example of circuit 150 with power supply 120, control unit 160, sensors 170, and iliuminable elements 130. In some embodiments, control unit 160 and sensors 170 can be programmed to receive, transmit, and store data relating to when illuminabie elements 130 are engaged, for example, emitting light in a certain illumination effect. In another example, control unit 160 may be programmed to emit light based on movement detected by sensors 170, in another embodiment, control unit 160 may be programmed to emit several colors of light in combination with different illumination effects, and responsive conditions received by sensors 170,

[0046] Other inputs from sensors may be used to influence the

performance or operation of the system. Some embodiments may use one or more of the sensors, features, methods, systems and/or components disclosed in the following documents, each of which is hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety: Case et al., U.S. Patent Number 8,1 12,251 , issued February 7,2012; Riley et al., U.S. Patent Number 7,771 ,320, issued August 10, 2010; Darley et al., U.S. Patent Number 7,428,471 , issued September 23, 2008: Amos et al., U.S. Patent Application Publication Number 2012/0291564, published November 22, 2012;

Schrock et al., U.S. Patent Application Publication Number 2012/0291563, published November 22, 2012; Meschter et al., U.S. Patent Application Publication Number 2012/0251079, published October 4, 2012; Molyneux et al., U.S. Patent Application Publication Number 2012/02341 1 1 , published September 20, 2012; Case et al., U.S. Patent Application Publication Number 2012/0078396, published March 29, 2012; Nurse et al., U.S. Patent Application Publication Number 201 1/0199393, published August 18, 201 1 ; Hoffman et al., U.S. Patent Application Publication Number 201 1/0032105, published February 10, 201 1 ; Schrock et al., U.S. Patent Application Publication Number 2010/0063778, published March 1 1 , 2010; Shum, U.S. Patent Application Publication Number 2007/0021269, published January 25, 2007; Schrock et al,, U.S. Patent Application Publication Number 2013/0213147, now U.S. Patent Application Number 13/401918, filed February 22, 2012, titled "Footwear Having Sensor System"; Schrock et al., U.S. Patent Application

Publication Number 2013/0213144, now U.S. Patent Application Number 13/401910, filed February 22, 2012, titled "Footwear Having Sensor System." [0047] In some cases, illumination device 100 may disperse light based on a desired temporal interval, or illumination effect. Examples of various illumination effects include, but are not limited to: point effect, blink effect, fade effect, flicker effect, flash effect, or pulse effect. For purposes of clarity, "point" illumination effect may refer to light emitting in equal brightness in all directions. "Blink" illumination effect may refer to an emission of light that alternates on and off, "Fade" illumination effect may refer to an emission of light that fades from full brightness to dark, or dark to full brightness. "Flicker illumination effect may refer to an emission of light that switches off for a brief period at random intervals. "Flash" illumination effect may refer to an emission of light that switches on for a brief period at random intervals. "Pulse" illumination effect may refer to an emission of light that fades in and out at regular intervals.

[0048] The following discussion and accompanying figures disclose various configurations of an article of footwear that incorporates illumination device 100. Concepts related to illumination device 100 are disclosed with reference to footwear that is suitable for running or walking. However, illumination device 100 is not limited to articles of footwear designed for these activities alone, nor is illumination device 100 limited to articles of footwear in general. The concepts disclosed herein may, therefore, apply to a wide variety of articles of apparel, in addition to the specific styles discussed in the following material and depicted in the accompanying figures.

[0049] FIGS. 3 and 4 illustrate schematic isometric and exploded views of an embodiment of bladder member (bladder) 200 for article of footwear 300 and sole system 302. For purposes of illustration, FIG. 3 shows bladder member 200 in isolation from other components of an article of footwear 300. However, it will be understood that bladder member 200 may be utilized in various different kinds of footwear including, but not limited to: hiking boots, soccer shoes, football shoes, sneakers, running shoes, cross-training shoes, rugby shoes, basketball shoes, baseball shoes as well as other kinds of shoes. Moreover, in some embodiments, bladder member 200 may be configured for use with various kinds of non-sports related footwear, including, but not limited to: slippers, sandals, high-heeled footwear, loafers, as well as other kinds of footwear.

[0050] Referring to FIG. 3, for purpose of reference, bladder member 200 may be divided into forefoot portion 202, midfoot portion 204, and heel portion 206. As shown, bladder member 200 may be associated with the right foot; however, it should be understood that the following discussion may equally apply to a mirror image of bladder member 200 that is intended for use with a left foot. Forefoot portion 202 may be generally associated with the toes and joints connecting the metatarsals with the phalanges. Midfoot portion 204 may be generally associated with the arch of a foot. Likewise, heel portion 206 may be generally associated with the heel of a foot, including the calcaneus bone. In addition, bladder member 200 may include lateral side 208 and medial side 210. in particular, lateral side 208 and medial side 210 may be opposing sides of bladder member 200. In general, lateral side 208 may be associated with the outside parts of a foot while medial side 210 may be associated with the inside part of a foot. Furthermore, lateral side 208 and medial side 210 may extend through forefoot portion 202, midfoot portion 204, and heel portion 206.

[0051] It will be understood that forefoot portion 202, midfoot portion 204, and heel portion 206 are only intended for purposes of description and are not intended to demarcate precise regions of bladder member 200. Likewise, lateral side 208 and medial side 210 are intended to represent generally two sides rather than precisely demarcating bladder member 200 into two halves.

[0052] In some embodiments, bladder member 200 may comprise of an upper or first surface 212, an opposite lower or second surface 214 and a peripheral or third surface 216. in some embodiments, these surfaces may be joined to form and enclose an interior cavity, in some embodiments, the interior cavity may be filled with a fluid, including a liquid, or gas. First surface 212, second surface 214, and third surface 216 may be substantially impermeable to the fluid. In an exemplary embodiment, the interior cavity may be filled with air. With this exemplary embodiment, bladder member 200 may act as a cushioning element to increase the comfort, flexibility, and support of a sole system,

[0053] In some embodiments, bladder member 200 may include

provisions for accommodating illumination device 100. In some cases, bladder member 200 may comprise of a void 218 that is dimensioned and shaped to accept the shape of illumination device 100, An exemplary embodiment configured this way may enable illumination device 100 to disperse light throughout the bladder member 200 and sole system 302.

[0054] Referring to FIG. 4, in some embodiments, article of footwear (footwear) 300 may be configured with a sole system 302, and an upper 304. As shown, footwear 300 may be associated with the right foot; however, it should be understood that the following discussion may equally apply to a mirror image of footwear 300 that is intended for use with a left foot.

[0055] In general, illumination device 100 may be used to illuminate portions of footwear 300. In addition to imparting a unique aesthetic to footwear 300 and enhancing enjoyment of the wearer of footwear 300, illuminated portions of footwear 300 may increase the visibility of the wearer, thereby making the wearer more visible to others in low light or darkened conditions. Further, illuminated portions of footwear 300 may make obstacles more visible to a wearer under these conditions. Illumination device 100 with its programmable functionalities and features may allow illuminated portions of footwear 300 to enhance the visibility of areas of footwear 300 that are subject to tensile, compression, bending, or twisting forces. Moreover, illuminating areas of footwear 300 may improve the degree to which the areas of footwear 300 are visible on high-speed film or other mediums that visually capture performance data during biomechanical or other forms of testing.

[0056] Similar to the bladder member 200 descriptions above, footwear 300 may be divided into three general regions, a forefoot region 306, a midfoot region 308, and a heel region 310. Footwear 300 may also include a lateral side 312 and a medial side 314. [0057] For consistency and convenience, directional adjective are employed throughout this detailed description corresponding to the illustrated embodiments. The term "longitudinal" as used throughout this detailed description and in the claims may refer to a direction extending a length of the footwear. In some cases, the longitudinal direction may extend from a forefoot region to a heel region of the article of footwear. Also, the term lateral" as used throughout this detailed description and in the claims may refer to a direction extending along a width of the article of footwear, in other words, the lateral direction may extend between a lateral side and a medial side of the article of footwear. Furthermore, the term "vertical" as used throughout this detailed description and in the claims may refer to a direction generally perpendicular to a lateral and longitudinal direction. For example, in some cases where an article of footwear is planted fiat on a ground surface, the vertical direction may extend from the ground surface upward, in addition, the term "proximal" may refer to a portion of an article of footwear that is closer to portions of a foot, for example, when the article of footwear is worn.

Similarly, the term "distal" may refer to a portion of an article of footwear that is further from a portion of a foot when the article of footwear is worn. If will be understood that each of these directional adjectives may be used in describing individual components of article of footwear, such as outsole member, midsole member, bladder member, as well as other components of an article of footwear.

[0058] In some embodiments, upper 304 may incorporate a plurality of material elements (e.g. textiles, polymer sheets, foam layers, leather, synthetic leather) that are stitched or bonded together to form an interior void for securely and comfortable receiving a foot. In some cases, the material elements may be selected to impart properties of durability, air-permeability, wear resistance, flexibility, and comfort, for example, to specific areas of upper 304. An ankle opening 316 in a heel region 310 provides access to the interior void. In addition, in some embodiments, upper 304 may include a lace 318 that is utilized in a conventional manner to modify the dimensions of the interior void, thereby securing the foot within the interior void and facilitating entry and removal of the foot from the interior void. Lace 318 may extend through apertures in the upper 304 and a tongue 320 of upper 304 may extend between the interior void and lace 318, Although upper 304 provides an example of a suitable configuration for footwear 300, a variety of other upper configurations may be utilized with footwear 300.

[0059] Some articles of footwear may have provisions to enhance the comfort or performance of an article of footwear. In some embodiments, a sole member or sole system may include different components including a sockliner, an insole, a midsole member, and an outsoie member. In some other embodiments, one or more elements may be optional.

[0060] As seen in FIG. 4, some embodiments may have sole system 302 secured to upper 304 and extend between upper 304 and the ground. In some cases, sole system 302 may impart cushioning for the foot (i.e. attenuating ground reaction forces), in some other cases, sole system 302 may provide traction, impart stability, and limit various foot motions, such as pronation. In some other embodiments, sole system 302 may be assembled in a stacked configuration as shown. The following discusses some components of an exemplary embodiment of sole system 302.

[0061] In some embodiments, sole system 302 may include a midsole member 322. In some cases, midsole member 322 may include an upper midsole surface 324 oriented towards the upper 304 and a lower midsole surface 326, opposite the upper midsole surface 324, and oriented towards the ground, in some cases, midsole member 322 may be secured to a lower area of upper 304. In some cases, midsole member 322 may comprise of a chamber portion 328 for accepting illumination device 100. Chamber portion 328 may be dimensioned and configured to fit within void 218 of bladder member 200 when sole system 302 is assembled. In some embodiments, midsole member may be absent from sole system 302, therefore illumination device may be placed directly into void 218.

[0062] In some cases, midsole member 322 may be made of any materia! known in the art for making midsoles. In some other cases, midsole member 322 may be formed from various polymer foam materials (e.g. polyurethane or ethyiviny!acetate foam) thai extends through forefoot region 306, midfoot region 308, heel region 310, lateral side 312 and medial side 314, In some embodiments, material used for making midsole member 322 may be opaque. In an exemplary embodiment, midsole member 322 is constructed from a transparent material, thereby allowing light emitted from illumination device 100 to pass through midsole member 322 and into bladder member 200.

[0063] In some sole systems 302, an outsoie member 330 may be present, in some embodiments, outsoie member 330 may include an inner surface 332 oriented towards the bladder member 200. In some other embodiments, outsoie member 330 may include an outer surface 334 oriented towards a ground surface. In some embodiments, outsoie member 330 may be secured to a lower area of bladder member 200. in some other embodiment outsoie member 330 may be formed from a textured durable and wear-resistant material, for example rubber, that forms the ground contacting portion when footwear 300 is in use. Still in some other embodiments, outsoie member 330 could be made of any material known in the art for making outsoles.

[0064] In some embodiments, sole system 302 may include sockliner 336. In some cases, sockliner 336 may be located within a lower portion of the void in the upper 304. In some other embodiments, sockliner 336 may have an upper surface 338 positioned to contact a lower surface of the foot and an opposite lower surface 340 confronting upper midsole surface 324. in some other cases, sockliner 336 may be used to enhance the comfort of footwear 300.

[0065] Materials used for sockliner 336 could vary, in some embodiments, sockliner 336 could be made of any materials known in the art for use in making sockiiners, including, but not limited to: rubbers, plastics, foams, textiles, as well as possibly other materials, in still some other cases, sockliner 336 could be made from opaque or transparent materials.

[0066] Some embodiments may include provisions for engaging

illumination device 100 through sole system 302. In some embodiments, sole system 302 may use sockliner 336. in some cases, sockliner 336 may comprise of a logo portion 342 located above chamber portion 328 of midsole member 322. Logo portion 342 may be used to engage illumination device 100 located in chamber portion 328 of midsole member 322 by pressing down on logo portion 342 of sockliner 336, and thereby turning illumination device 100 on and off. In some other embodiments, illumination device 100 may automatically turn off or go into a low energy or dormant state after a certain period of time when not in use. in other words, in some embodiments a user may not have to manually engage illumination device 100 to turn illumination device 100 on and off.

[0067] In some cases, sole system 302 may include bladder member 200 previously discussed. In some embodiments, upper or first surface 212 may be adjacent to midsole member 322. in some other embodiments, lower or second surface 214 may be adjacent to an outsole member 330. in some other

embodiments, peripheral or third surface 216 is disposed between first surface 212 and second surface 214.

[0068] In some embodiments, sole system 302 may comprise of a bladder member 200 made of any material or combination of materials. Materials that may be useful for forming one or more surfaces of a bladder member 200 can vary, in some cases, bladder member 200 may be made of a rigid to semi-rigid material. In other cases, bladder member 200 may be made of a substantially flexible material. In some other cases, bladder member 200 may be made of various materials in different embodiments. For example, bladder member 200 may be formed from at least partially or wholly transparent polymer material that encloses a fluid (e.g. gas, liquid, gel). Although the fluid within the bladder member 200 may be pressurized, the fluid may also be at a substantially ambient pressure, in some embodiments, when bladder member 200 is pressurized, bonds may be formed between opposite sides of bladder member 200 to prevent expansion and retain an intended shape of bladder member 200.

[0069] In some embodiments, a range of polymer materials may be utilized for bladder member 200, disclosed in the following references, each of which is hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety. Specifically a wide range of materials may be selected for first surface 212, second surface 214, and third surface 216. in selecting materials for bladder member 200, engineering properties of the material (e.g., tensile strength, stretch properties, fatigue characteristics, dynamic modulus, and loss tangent) as well as the ability of the material to prevent the diffusion of the fluid enclosed by bladder member 200 may be considered.

When formed of thermoplastic urefhane, for example, bladder member 200 may have a thickness of approximately 1 .0 millimeter, but the thickness may range from 0.2 to 4.0 millimeters or more, for example, in addition to thermoplastic urethane, examples of polymer materials that may be suitable for bladder member 200 include polyurethane, polyester, polyester polyurethane, and polyether polyurethane. In some other embodiments, bladder member 200 may also be formed from a material that includes alternating layers of thermoplastic polyurethane and ethylene-vinyi alcohol copolymer, as disclosed in U.S. Patent Numbers 5,713,141 and 5,952,065 to Mitchell, et al. A variation upon this material may also be utilized, wherein layers include ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer, thermoplastic polyurethane, and a regrind material of the ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer and thermoplastic polyurethane. In some cases, another suitable material for bladder member 200 is a flexible microlayer membrane that includes alternating layers of a gas barrier material and an elastomeric material, as disclosed in U.S. Patent Numbers 6,082,025 and 6,127,026 to Bonk, et al. Additional suitable materials are disclosed in U.S. Patent Numbers 4,183,156 and 4,219,945 to Rudy. Further suitable materials include thermoplastic films comprised of a crystalline material, as disclosed in U.S. Patent Numbers 4,936,029 and 5,042,176 to Rudy, and polyurethane including a polyester polyoi, as disclosed in U.S. Patent Numbers 6,013,340; 6,203,868; and 6,321 ,465 to Bonk, et al. Further disclosures are found in U.S. Patent Application Publication Number 2013024722 to Holt et al.

[0070] In some embodiments, bladder member 200 may have a shape that fits within a perimeter of sole system 302 of footwear 300, extending from forefoot region 306, midfoot region 308, heel region 310, and between lateral side 312 and medial side 314. Therefore, in some cases, when the foot is located within the upper 304, bladder member 200 extends under substantially all of the foot. In some embodiments, while first surface 212 is positioned adjacent and secured to midsole member 322 or sockiiner 336, and second surface 214 is positioned adjacent and secured to outsole member 330, peripheral or third surface 216 may be exposed to an exterior of footwear 300 in forefoot region 306, midfoot region 308, heel region 310, and on lateral side 312 and medial side 314. In another

embodiment, bladder member 200 may have a shape that fits partially within sole system 302, for example, bladder member 200 may have a shape configured to fit only within the heel region 310 of footwear 300.

[0071] Some articles of footwear 300 may include provisions for illuminating sole system 302 having bladder member 200. in some other

embodiments, where bladder member 200 is formed from a partially or wholly transparent material, and outsole member 330 is formed from at least a partially or wholly opaque material, light from illumination device 100 may be capable of passing into and out of bladder member 200 through exposed portions of peripheral or third surface 216. In some other embodiments, where outsole member 330, and/or midsole member 322 and/or sockiiner 336 are constructed from at least a partially or wholly transparent material, light from illumination device 100 may be capable of passing through portions of first surface 212 and/or second surface 214.

[0072] Some sole systems include provisions for illuminating different portions, target areas, illumination zones, or regions of a sole system in an arrangement. In some embodiments, the sole system may emit light, from a programmed illumination device, at an illumination zone, for example the forefoot region of an article of footwear, in some cases, the sole system may emit light at a second illumination zone, for example the heel region. In some other embodiments, the sole system may emit light in an arrangement continuously through various illumination zones, in other words, light may originally be dispersed towards at least a first illumination zone, and then transition dispersing light towards other

illumination zones. [0073] FIGS. 5 through 7 depict schematic top views of an exemplary transparent bladder member 200 for a sole system 302 with an illumination device 100 in a sequential illuminated state. For purposes of illustration, bladder member 200 and midsoie member 322 are shown in isolation from other components of sole system 302 or footwear 300. Here, midsoie member 322 is disposed over bladder member 200, with both members being transparent. Furthermore, the location of illumination device 100 in bladder member 200 and midsoie member 322 in all the figures is meant to be illustrative, and not meant to show the exact location of illumination device 100 when sole system 302 and footwear 300 are assembled.

[0074] As shown in FIG. 5, light emitted from illumination device 100 passes longitudinally through the interior of bladder member 200, illuminating forefoot portion 202 and exiting bladder member 200 and sole system 302 that are exposed to an exterior of footwear 300. As previously discussed, illumination device 100 can disperse light at different locations continuously, depending on the orientation and type of illuminable elements 130 used by those skilled in the art. In an exemplary embodiment, illumination device 100 illuminates forefoot portion 202 by illuminating first LED 132, second LED 134, and third LED 136 and turning off fourth LED 138, fifth LED 140, and sixth LED 142.

[0075] In FIG. 8 after light has been projected towards the forefoot portion 202 of bladder, illumination device 100 may transition towards midfoot portion 204 by illuminating first LED 132, third LED 136, fourth LED 138, and sixth LED 142 and turning the remaining illuminable elements 130 off. Finally in FIG. 7, illumination device 100 illuminates heel portion 206 of bladder member 200 by illuminating fourth LED 138, fifth LED 140, and sixth LED 142 and turning the illuminable elements 130 in the first portion 1 16 off. in some embodiments, illumination device 100 can then start the sequence over again and begin emitting light towards forefoot portion 202. In some other embodiments, illumination device 100 can be programmed to reverse the sequence instead, in other words, it illuminates bladder member 200 starting from heel portion 206 and ending at forefoot portion 202. [0076] In some embodiments, illumination device 100 can be programmed in combination with functionalities relating to movement, in other words, illumination device 100 can emit light continuously from one region to another region of sole system 302 corresponding to the movement of footwear 300 striking the ground surface. As an example, as a jogger's heel strikes the ground, illumination device 100 may emit light in the heel region 310 of footwear 300 and continuously emit light towards the jogger's foes or forefoot region 306 of footwear 300, as the jogger completes his or her step.

[0077] FIGS. 8 through 10 depict schematic top views of an exemplary bladder member 200 in a sequential illuminated state from lateral side 208 to medial side 210. In some embodiments, illumination device 100 can be programmed to emit light sequentially beginning at the lateral side 208 and ending at the medial side 210. In some other embodiments, the sequence can be reversed.

[0078] As shown in FIG. 8, light emitted from illumination device 100 passes through the inferior of bladder member 200, illuminating lateral side 208 and exiting bladder member 200 and sole system 302 that are exposed to an exterior of footwear 300. In this exemplary embodiment, illumination device 100 illuminates lateral side 208 by illuminating third LED 136 and sixth LED 142 and turning off first LED 132, second LED 134, fourth LED 138, and fifth LED 140.

[0079] In FIG. 9, after light has been projected towards lateral side 208, illumination device 100 may transition towards medial side 210 by illuminating second LED 134, and fifth LED 140, while turning off the other illuminable elements 130. Finally in FIG. 10, illumination device 100 illuminates medial side 210 by illuminating first LED 132 and fourth LED 138 and turning the remaining illuminable elements 130. In some embodiments, illumination device 100 can then start the sequence over again and begin emitting light towards lateral side 208. In some other embodiments, illumination device 100 can be programmed to reverse the sequence instead, in other words, it illuminates biadder member 200 starting from medial side 210 and ending at lateral side 208. [0080] FIG. 1 1 depicts an exemplary embodiment of transparent bladder member 200 and midsole member 322, in isolation, being illuminated with

illumination device 100. Illumination device 100, as shown, is programmed to emit an illumination effect with a point illumination effect, in which light is emitted in equal brightness in ail directions. In some embodiments, illumination device 100 can be programmed to emit only a single color, in some other embodiments, illumination device 100 can emit multiple light colors through bladder member 200.

[0081] In some other embodiments, an illumination device having illuminable elements such as RGB LEDs, can program iiluminabie elements, individually or grouped, to emit light in one or more colors. In still some other embodiments, the illumination device can be programmed to display a rotating set of desired colors. With a bladder member made from transparent materials, the illuminable elements will display a desired light color as it passes through the exposed surface of the sole system 302. In some other embodiments, where a bladder member is made from material dyed in either a single or multiple color, the illuminated or output light color being displayed through sole system 302 may be the same or different from the light color emitted by the illuminable elements.

[0082] Some articles of footwear may include provisions for illuminating sole systems having a multi-colored bladder member. In some embodiments, a sole system can have a multi-colored design, pattern, or visual appearance in which different portions of a bladder member have different colors. In some other embodiments, a sole system may include a multi-colored bladder member where a transition may be visible between two or more different portions having two or more different colors.

[0083] A bladder member may be colored using one or more dyes.

Embodiments may use various different methods, process and systems for dyeing a bladder member or any other components of a sole system. Methods, processes, systems and dyeing materials are disclosed in the following documents, each of which is hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety: U.S. Patent Number 7,61 1 ,547 to Bracken et ai.; U.S. Patent Application Publication Number 2014/0250610, now U.S. Patent Application Number 13/791 ,643, filed March 8, 2013 and titled "System and Method for Coloring Articles," to Schoborg; U.S. Patent Publication Number 2014/0250720, now U.S. Patent Application Number

13/791 ,612, filed March 8, 2013 and titled "Multicolor Sole System," to Miner et a!.; and U.S. Patent Application Publication Number 2014/0250735, now U.S. Patent Application Number 14/199,422, filed March 6, 2014 and titled "Method of Making Multi-Colored Objects," to Edwards.

[0084] In some embodiments, a different illuminated or light color may be displayed when a bladder member is dyed with either a single color or multiple colors. For example, in some embodiments, if a bladder member is dyed in a red color, and the wearer of an article of footwear desires to have a color purple displayed, an illumination device may be programmed to take into account the bladder member color. Thus, for example, the illumination device may emit a light color of blue, through a bladder member dyed red, in order to display a sole system illuminated with the light color of purple. Therefore, the illumination device can be programmed any number of different ways in order for user to display a desired color or colors with a colored or multi-colored bladder member. Furthermore, as previously discussed, the illumination device can be programmed to additionally display any number of different illumination effects, or emit light based on other functionalities.

[0085] In some embodiments, different illumination modes may be programmed into an illumination device for lighting an article of footwear. Some articles of footwear having an illumination device may include provisions for changing the color of light to indicate certain functionalities. In some embodiments, an article of footwear may display an illuminated sole system based on

functionalities programmed by a wearer, in some cases, a user may wish to program an illumination device to display one or more colors of light based on functionalities corresponding or related to movement, in some other cases, user may program an illumination device to display one or more colors of light based on a condition-responsive parameter that reaches a predetermined level. [0086] In some embodiments, one or more condition-responsive parameters could be selected by a user. Such parameters may be referred to throughout this detailed description and in the claims as "user selected condition- responsive parameters" or simply "user selected parameters." Examples of user selected parameters can include illumination modes, lighting colors, illumination effects, illumination zones, as well as other parameters that could be variable and selected by a user via a computer system, mobile computing device or other provisions, it will be understood that in some embodiments, some parameters (e.g., illumination effect and color) could be selectable by a user, while in other

embodiments these parameters may not be selectable by a user. In other words, some parameters could be predetermined by a system and not a user in some embodiments.

[0087] FIGS. 12 through 15 illustrate an exemplary embodiment of a user 1000 programming an illumination device 100 by computer 1002 for various functionalities for article of footwear 300 having transparent bladder member 200. Generally, computer 1002 could be any type of computing device including, but not limited to: desktop computers, or laptop computers. In addition, the term computer can also include any other device that includes a display and a processor.

Examples of such devices include, but are not limited to: PDA's, cell phones, smart phones, tablets, as well as other types of devices.

[0088] In some embodiments, illumination device 100 may be connected to computer 1002 using any types of connection known in the art. Examples of such connections include, but are not limited to: wired connections, wireless connections, or any other types of suitable connections.

[0089] Wired connections can be any cable or collection of wires that can be used to exchange information between an illumination device and a computer, for example, a Universal Serial Bus (USB). Furthermore, the wired connection could be associated with any type of connection, for example an IEEE 13394 interface (fire wire) could be used for data transfer. In addition, wired connections may be configured to transfer power between an illumination device and a computer. In some embodiments, a wired connection could be used to charge a power supply of an illumination device. In other embodiments, any other type of wired connection could be used.

[0090] In some cases, illumination device 100 may be connected to computer 1002 using a wireless connection 1004. Generally, wireless connection 1004 could be any type of connection known in the art that supports any type of wireless communication. In some cases, computer 1002 and illumination device 100 may communicate using a wireless network. Examples of such networks include, but are not limited to: personal area networks, local area networks, wide area networks, client-server networks, peer-to-peer networks, as well as other types of networks, in other cases, wireless connection 1004 could utilize the blue tooth wireless protocol, in still some other cases, wireless connection 1004 may use short range wireless technologies such as wireless USB.

[0091] For purposes of illustration, illumination device 100 and computer 1002 are shown within close proximity of one another in the current embodiment shown in FIG. 12. However, other embodiments may have illumination device 100 remotely connected to computer 1002 using a wireless network. Furthermore, in some cases, illumination device 100 could be connected to computer 1002 using a packet-switched communication system such as the Internet.

[0092] In some embodiments, illumination device 100 is programmed in association with a software interface that may be downloaded and/or run on computer 1002. The term "software interface" refers to any computer program, or collection of computer programs, that may be used as an interface for inputting information to, or receiving information from, illumination device 100. in some cases, software for interfacing with illumination device 100 could be stored on computer 1002. In other cases, software for interfacing with illumination device 100 could be associated with a control unit for an illumination device 100 that is accessed through computer 1002 when illumination device 100 is connected. This association allows software for interfacing with illumination device 100 to be used with any other computer that is capable of connecting with illumination device 100. Furthermore, software for interfacing may be updated thereby allowing user to download other illumination modes for programming illumination device 100.

[0093] In some embodiments, user can program illumination device 100 to illuminate a sole system in a variety illumination modes. As previously stated, illumination device 100 can be programmed to illuminate specific regions or illumination zones. Further, illumination device 100 can be programmed to illuminate a sole system based on different types of illumination effects: pulse, fade, etc. In some other embodiments, illumination device 100 can be programmed to emit light in different colors or a combination of colors depending on the type of iliuminable elements 130 utilized. Further still, in some embodiments, illumination device 100 can be programmed to emit a desired output illuminated light color for a colored or multi-colored bladder member. Still in some other embodiments, illumination device 100 can be programmed by a user to illuminate a sole system based on a condition-responsive parameter: time of day, ambient light, velocity, etc. Therefore, a first illumination mode, for example, may be pulsing blue light in all direction of a bladder member and sole system. In some other embodiments, a second illumination mode could be fading red light from the heel region to the forefoot region, or the lateral side to the medial side.

[0094] In some embodiments, using the concepts described above, user 1000 may program illumination device 100 by wireless connection 1004 with computer 1002 as shown in FIG. 12. User 1000 may first determine a type of illumination effect previously discussed. In some cases, user 1000 may select one illumination effect or multiple illumination effects, in this exemplary example, an enlarged view of the terminal screen of computer 1002 depicts user 1000 selecting two (2) illumination effects. The first effect having the pulse illumination effect, and the second or final effect having the point illumination effect. In some other cases, user 1000 may designate various illumination zones or regions of sole system 302 for illumination, for example, a heel region to a forefoot region, a lateral side to a medial side, or in this exemplary embodiment ail regions of sole system 302 of article of footwear 300. in another embodiment, user 1000 may program illumination device 100 to illuminate sole system 302 in response to certain condition-responsive parameters, in another embodiment, illumination device 100 may illuminate sole system 302 with an illumination effect based on a condition-responsive parameter, as programmed by user 1000. in still another embodiment, illumination device can illuminate sole system 302 with an illumination effect without needing a condition- responsive parameter, in this exemplary example, user 1000 programs illumination device 100 to emit light based on a condition-responsive parameter corresponding or related to motion or movement. In some other embodiments, user 1000 may select a quantity of light colors to display, in this exemplary embodiment, user 1000 selects two (2) light colors for illumination device 100 to display; the first

programmed light color associated with the color red, and the second or final programmed light color associated with the color blue.

[0095] For purposes of illustration, FIGS. 13 through 15 as well as other figures in this detailed description make use of different shading, cross hatching, or stippling to indicate exemplary variations in color of a bladder member or light color from an illumination device across a sole system. Thus, for example, portions or regions of similar shading/stippling may be associated with a common color.

Likewise, portions or regions with different shading/stippling may be associated with different color. In addition, FIGS. 13 through 15 as well as other figures in this detailed description make use of enlarged views of footwear undergoing various illuminated states in sequence.

[0096] FIG. 13 illustrates an exemplary embodiment of a user 1000 as he begins to walk wearing footwear 300 with illumination device 100. Illumination device 100 as programmed in FIG. 12, and in response to the movement, emits first programmed light color 1006 having the color red. Moreover, illumination device 100 emits first programmed light color 1006 with a pulse illumination effect, in other words, illumination device 100 emits a red color light, through ail zones of the exposed surfaces of transparent bladder member 200 of sole system 302, fading in and out at regular intervals. [0097] In some cases, as user 1000 gradually increases the intensity of motion from a walking motion to a jogging motion, illumination device 100 will begin to gradually emit second programmed light color 1008 having the color blue as illustrated in FIG. 14. Therefore, both a red light and a blue light will fade in and out at increasing intervals throughout ail regions of bladder member 200 and sole system 302 in response to user's rapid movement. In other words, as illumination device 100 senses faster motion, the intervals at which first programmed light color 1006 and/or second programmed light color 1008 are emitted corresponds to the user's movement.

[0098] In some other embodiments, as user 1000 continues to increase speed, illumination device 100 will detect the increasing rapid movement and gradually increase the emission of second programmed light color 1008 while gradually decreasing the emission of first programmed light color 1006. in other words, as illustrated in FIG. 15, illumination device 100 in bladder member 200 will display more blue light throughout all regions of the bladder 200 as user 1000 becomes fully engaged in running, until illumination device 100 emits second programmed light color 1008 in equal brightness in all directions in all regions of sole system 302 of footwear 300. In other words, the second illumination effect, the point illumination effect, is now projected by illumination device 100. Thus, in this exemplary embodiment, the emission of second programmed light color 1008 or blue light from illumination device 100 in all directions and regions of sole system 302 signifies user 1000 is fully engaged in running and no longer walking.

[0099] FIG. 16 illustrates an embodiment of a generic process for controlling an illumination device to emit light, in this embodiment, the following steps may be performed by a control unit located in the illumination device, in some other embodiments, these steps may be performed by additional systems or devices associated with the illumination device. For example, in some cases, including sensors or devices for measuring various parameters, one or more steps could be performed by sensors or other components. In addition, where the illumination device, located in a bladder member of a sole system for an article of footwear, is in electronic communication with a computer, as previously stated, one or more steps could be performed by the computer. In addition, it will be understood that in other embodiments, one or more of the following steps may be optional, or additional steps may be added,

[0100] During step 1602, the control unit may determine a condition- responsive parameter. The term "condition-responsive parameter" as used throughout this detailed description and in the claims refers to any parameter associated with a state of a user and/or article worn by the user as well as a state of an environment where the article is worn. The condition-responsive parameter could be any parameter including, but not limited to: the number of heel strikes, the number of steps taken, the number of jumps performed, the temperature of a region of an article of footwear, the moisture of a region of the footwear, ambient temperature, ambient lighting conditions, as well as any other condition-responsive parameter. In some embodiments, the control unit for the illumination device couid be configured to determine whether a user is moving faster or slower by sensing pressure placed upon the illumination device during a certain time frame. In some other embodiments, the illumination device can be programmed to determine whether a user is moving faster or slower by the determining the velocity of the runner. Moreover, the condition-responsive parameter can be determined from any information received from one or more sensors, including both sensors internal to the illumination device (e.g., within the housing the illumination device) or sensors external to the illumination device.

[0101] Next, during step 1604 the control unit may store the condition- responsive parameter, in some cases, the condition-responsive parameter couid be stored in memory associated with the control unit, in other cases, the condition- responsive parameter could be stored in memory associated with a sensor or other component of the illumination device.

[0102] Following step 1604, the control unit may proceed to step 1606. During step 1606, the control unit may determine an illumination effect according to the condition-responsive parameter stored, in some cases, the control unit may assign a continuous illumination effect to each condition-responsive parameter. In other cases, the control unit may assign different illumination effects to discrete ranges of the condition-responsive parameter. For example, in the embodiment discussed with FIGS. 12 through 15, the control unit may emit light using a pulse illumination effect when a velocity is less than three (3) miles per hour (mph). In addition, the control unit may emit a point illumination effect when the velocity is greater than eight (8) miles per hour, in other embodiments, the control unit could determine a light color to display according to other condition-responsive

parameters.

[0103] Next, in step 1608, the control unit may control the emission of light according to the illumination effect determined during step 1606. For example, if during step 1606 the control unit determined that the emission of light should be a point illumination effect based on a velocity of 8 mph or more, the control unit may control the illumination device to emit light in equal intensity in all directions as shown in FIG. 1 1. On the other hand, as the velocity decreases from 8 mph to less than 8 mph, the control unit may change the mode to a pulse illumination effect and control the illumination device to emit light by fading the light on and off at certain intervals.

[0104] It will be understood that the control unit may be programmed to control the emission of light of the illumination device using active or passive methods, in some cases, the control unit may actively maintain an emission of light for illumination device by continuously sending electric signals (in the forms of currents or voltages) to the iliuminable elements of the illumination device, in other cases, the control portion may passively control an emission of light when a change is needed. The use of either passive or active control methods may vary according to the type of light emitting technology used, in addition, some technologies could make use of a combination of active or passive control methods.

[0105] FIG. 17 illustrates an embodiment of a specific method for controlling an illumination device to emit light, in particular, FIG, 17 illustrates a method that could be used to emit light in the manner illustrated in FIGS. 12 through 15. in this embodiment, the following steps may be performed by a control unit of the illumination device. However, in some embodiments these steps may be performed by additional systems or devices associated with the illumination device. For example, in some cases, including sensors or devices for measuring various parameters, one or more steps could be performed by sensors or other components. In addition, where the illumination device, located in a bladder member of a sole system for an article of footwear, is in electronic communication with a computer, as previously stated, one or more steps could be performed by the computer, in addition, it will be understood that in other embodiments, one or more of the following steps may be optional, or additional steps may be added.

[0106] During step 1702, the control unit may receive information corresponding or related to movement or motion. In particular, the control unit could receive information corresponding related to a step rate event. In some

embodiments, step rate information can be received from a sensor located in the illumination device. In other cases, step rate information can be received from other devices capable of measuring motion that may be disposed externally to an illumination device (e.g., sensors disposed within a sole member or an upper). For purposes of clarify, step rate may refer to the number of steps a user takes during a certain time frame while performing an activity such as walking, jogging, or running.

[0107] Following step 1702, during step 1704, the control unit may update step rate information, which is a variable that keeps track of the number of steps taken within a certain time frame (e.g. minute, hours, etc.). Next, during step 1708, the control unit may determine if the step rate is greater than 100 steps per minute (SPM). if the step rate is less than 100 steps per minute, the illumination device 100 emits an illumination effect with a pulse illumination effect in a light color of red as shown in step 1708. if, however, the step rate is greater than 100, the control unit may proceed to step 1712 and begin to emit a light color in red and a light color in blue with a slow pulse illumination effect. During step 1712, the control unit may determine if the step rate is greater than 250 steps per minute, if no, the control unit may proceed to step 1714 where the illumination device maintains emitting a red light color and a blue light color with a slow pulse illumination effect, Otherwise, the control unit may proceed to step 1718,

[0108] During step 1718, the control unit determines if the step rate is greater than 350 steps per minute. If the step rate is less than 350 steps per minute, the control unit may proceed to step 1720 where the illumination device maintains emitting a blue light color and red light color with a faster pulse illumination effect. Otherwise, the control unit proceeds to step 1722 and emits a blue light color without a pulse illumination effect and instead displays the point illumination effect. In other words, the bladder member of the sole system is fully illuminated in a blue light color in all regions or illumination zones.

[0109] It will be understood that in other embodiments, different threshold values could be selected. As discussed above, the exemplary embodiment uses a step rate threshold of 100, 250, and 350 steps per minute, corresponding

approximately to the number of steps taken in different types of physical activities such as walking, jogging, and running. In other embodiments, the control unit of illumination device 100 may emit light according to other threshold values. In some other embodiments, the threshold values will correspond with or be related to what a user programs initially.

[0110] Some illumination devices can include provisions for calculating a desired color of light based on other information received. In some embodiments, a bladder member may be transparent or may comprise of portions having one or more different colors as previously described. In some other embodiments, a user may program an illumination device to illuminate a bladder member that has one or more colored portions, in still some other embodiments, a user can select a desired output illuminated light color for a colored or multi-colored bladder member by having the illumination device take into account the color or colors of the bladder member, in order to achieve the desired output illuminated light color displayed through the bladder member and sole system.

[0111] In FIG. 18, an exemplary embodiment may have user 2000 communicate to illumination device 100 that bladder member 2006 comprises a color portion with the color red. In some embodiments, bladder member 2008 may comprise of additional color portions arranged in any number of different ways. As previously stated, user 2000 may also select which area or illumination zone of bladder member 2008 will be designated for illumination. Finally, user 2000 may select the desired output light color for bladder member 2008 of sole system 2010. In this exemplary embodiment, user 2000 selected red for the output light color for bladder member 2006. However, as stated previously, in some embodiments, a different illuminated or light color may be programmed into illumination device 100 and displayed when a bladder member is dyed with either a single color or multiple colors.

[0112] In some embodiments, user 2000 may program illumination device 100 by wired connection 2004 with computer 2002, as shown in FIG. 18. In some cases, user 2000 may select the quantity and type of illumination effect, in this exemplary embodiment, user 2000 selects illumination device 100 to emit the flash illumination effect. Therefore, with this illumination effect, the illumination device 100 will proceed to emit light on and off at random intervals. User 2000 then selects which regions of a bladder member 2006 of sole system 2010 for an article of footwear 2012 will be illuminated. In this exemplary embodiment, user 2000 selects all regions for illumination, in other words, illumination device 100 will emit light in all zones of bladder member 2008.

[0113] FIG. 19 illustrates an exemplary embodiment of user 2000, wearing article 2012 with sole system 2010 having a colored bladder member 2006 with programmed illumination device 100. In this exemplary embodiment, illumination device 100 will illuminate bladder member with programmed output light color 2024. Additionally, based on the desired programmed flash illumination effect, illumination device 100 emits the desired output light color 2024 on and off at random intervals at the selected illumination zones. Thus, the sole system 2010 is illuminated in all regions of sole system 2010 of article 2012. Specifically, in the exemplary

embodiment, output light color 2024 is not visible in sole system 2010 in the first configuration 2200 of article 2012 but is visible in sole system 2010 in the second configuration 2300 of article 2012 shown in FIG. 19 because of the flash illumination effect. Finally, output light color 2024 is not visible in the third configuration 2400 of sole system 2010 shown in FIG. 19. Here, first configuration 2200, second configuration 2300 and third configuration 2400 occur in sequence according to the flash illumination effect.

[0114] For purposes of illustration and clarity, colored portions are only labeled on bladder member 2008 and sole system 2010 in the figures. However, as described above, both an outsole member and a midsoie member may also have colored portions corresponding to colored portions of bladder member 2006. In other words, a midsole member may have a colored midsoie portion. Likewise, the outsole member may have a colored outsole portion.

[0115] FIG. 20 illustrates an exemplary embodiment of a specific method for controlling an illumination device in an article of footwear to emit light based on a colored or multi-colored bladder. In particular, FIG. 20 illustrates a method that could be used to control an illumination device in a manner illustrated in FIGS. 18 and 19. In this embodiment, the following steps may be performed by a control unit; however in some embodiments these steps may be performed by additional systems or devices associated with the illumination device. For example, in some cases, including sensors or devices for measuring various parameters, one or more steps could be performed by sensors or components. In addition, where the illumination device, located in a bladder member of a sole system for an article of footwear, is in electronic communication with a computer, as previously stated, on or more steps could be performed by the computer, in addition, it will be understood that in other embodiments, one or more of the following steps may be optional, or additional steps could be added.

[0116] Referring to FIG. 20, user 2000 may wish to illuminate colored bladder member 2006 with illumination device 100. illumination device 100 may receive an illumination mode information from user 2000. In some embodiments, illumination mode information corresponds or is related to illuminating colored bladder member 2006 with a specified illumination effect, such as the flash illumination effect, as shown in step 2500. Next, in step 2510, illumination device 100 may receive illumination mode information from user 2000 corresponding or related to emitting light in a specified illumination zone. Next, in step 2520, illumination device may receive information from user 2000 corresponding or related to a color of bladder member 2008. in step 2530, illumination device 100 may receive illumination mode information from user 2000 related to output light color from iiiuminable elements 130, such as the type of light color and quantity of light colors to emit. As stated previously, an illumination device having iiiuminable elements such as RGB LEDs, can be programmed, individually or grouped, to emit light in one or more colors. Finally, in step 2540, illumination device 100 illuminates colored bladder member 2006 and sole system 2010 of article of footwear 2012 by controlling iiiuminable elements according to the different illumination modes:

illumination effect, illumination zone, and output light color, provided by user 2000.

[0117] In some embodiments, depending on the type of iiiuminable elements used by those skilled in the art, a user may be able to program illumination device 100 to illuminate a colored bladder member to achieve different effects. As stated previously, illumination device can be programmed to display a rotating set of desired colors using iiiuminable elements such as RGB LEDs. Therefore, when combined with a colored bladder member, a user may be able to illuminate colored bladder member with a different color when combined with the bladder member's external color.

[0118] An illumination device may include provisions to program an emission of light based on changing ambient light conditions, in some

embodiments, a user may be outside wearing an article with an illuminated device emitting light based on a previously programmed mode. In some cases, based on changing conditions such as the weather or the time of day, a user may use a mobile device, such as a phone, to program the illumination device by changing the programmed illumination device to emit light with a different configuration.

[0119] Referring to FIGS. 21 and 22, in an exemplary embodiment, user 3000 may be outside with an article of footwear 3002 with an illumination device 100 in bladder member 3004 of sole system 3006. In some cases, illumination device 100 may be emitting light based on a previously inputted illumination mode. For example, user 3000 may have programmed illumination device 100 to illuminate article 3002 for a physical activity such as walking, during a certain time of day such as in the afternoon. Furthermore, while performing the physical activity, the time of day may change such as when afternoon changes into evening.

[0120] Referring to FIG. 21 , in some embodiments, user 3000 may decide to change the type of light emitting from illumination device 100 to correspond with the time of day 3008. As used herein, the "time of day" could be determined according to a clock, for example, or alternatively could be determined by ambient lighting conditions. Thus, illumination device 100 may change an illumination mode according to either a time determined from a clock, or from sensing ambient lighting conditions. As previously explained, in some embodiments, user 3000 may use a mobile device 3010 to communicate wirelessly 3012 with illumination device 100. In an exemplary embodiment, mobile device 3010 is a smart phone. In some other embodiments, user 3000 may program illumination device 100 to illuminate sole system 3006 as the time of day conditions change from afternoon to evening, in FIG. 21 , user 3000 programs illumination device 100 to illuminate sole system 3006 of article 3002 for evening. Furthermore, user 3000 selects an illumination effect and illumination zones. Therefore, as illustrated, illumination device 100 will emit light from the heel region to the forefoot region, using the fade illumination effect with a light color of yellow. In FIG. 22, as time of day 3008 changes from afternoon to sunset to evening, an enlarged view of article 3002 sequentially illustrates illumination device 100 illuminating bladder member 3004 of sole system 3006 from the heel region to the forefoot region with a fade illumination effect.

[0121] FIG. 23 illustrates an exemplary embodiment of a specific method for controlling an illumination device in an article of footwear to emit light based on changing conditions, in particular, FIG, 23 illustrates a method that could be used to control an illumination device in a manner illustrated in FIGS. 21 and 22. in this embodiment, the following steps may be performed by a control unit; however in some embodiments these steps may be performed by additional systems or devices associated with the illumination device. For example, in some cases, including sensors or devices for measuring various parameters, one or more steps could be performed by sensors or other components. In addition, where the illumination device, located in a bladder member of a sole system for an article of footwear, is in electronic communication with a computer, as previously stated, one or more steps could be performed by the computer, in addition, it will be understood that in other embodiments, one or more of the following steps may be optional, or additional steps could be added.

[0122] During step 2302, the control unit may receive information corresponding or related to a condition-responsive parameter. In particular, the control unit could receive information related to a time of day conditions (e.g.

morning, afternoon, evening, or night), in some embodiments, time of day information can be received from an internal time keeping device (e.g., clock), or from remote information received wirelessly. Moreover, in an alternative

embodiment, time of day information could be determined based on ambient light conditions. Such ambient light conditions could be determined by a sensor located in, or externally to, the illumination device. In other cases, time of day information can be received from other devices.

[0123] Following step 2302, during step 2304, the control unit may update the time of day information, which is a variable that keeps track of the time. Next, during step 2306, the control unit may determine if the time is before 6:00 P.M. which may signify when evening begins and thus signaling illumination device to engage in the illumination mode programmed by a user. If the time of day is after 6:00 P.M., the illumination device begins to fade light from the heel region to the forefoot region as shown in step 2308. if, however, the time is before 6:00 P.M., the control unit may proceed to step 2310, in which case the illumination device may remain dormant, or if the user desires to keep a previously programmed illumination mode, then the illumination device remains in that illumination mode. [0124] Ιί will be understood that in other embodiments, different threshold values could be selected. This exemplary embodiment uses a 6:00 P.M. as a threshold value, in other embodiments, the control unit of the illumination device may emit light according to other threshold values, including, for example, real time lighting conditions instead of using a threshold time (e.g., 6 p.m.).

[0125] While various embodiments have been described, the description is intended to be exemplary, rather than limiting and it will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art that many more embodiments and implementations are possible that are within the scope of the embodiments. Any feature of any embodiment may be used in combination with or substituted for any other feature or element in any other embodiment unless specifically restricted. Accordingly, the embodiments are not to be restricted except in light of the attached claims and their equivalents. Also, various modifications and changes may be made within the scope of the attached claims.