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Title:
AUTOMOTIVE STARTER SECURITY MODULE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/1998/031575
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An automative anti-theft and anti-carjacking device (1) includes several generally cylindrical metal container housings (3) containing a printed wiring board (111), switching element (188), digital code reader microcontroller (72) wherein the metal housing (3) is attached to the electrical terminals (139) of an automative starter solenoid (44) or starter motor (29). The device (1) prevents hot wiring of the ignition circuit at the starter solenoid electrical terminals (139) or at the battery power stud of the starter motor (29). The device (1) uses a small low power RF digital signal code transponder (100), an antenna (102) and a reader (182) to decode the transponded digital codes. Automatic anti-carjacking operation is responsive to the electrical contact positioning of a door switch (85).

Inventors:
Hillard, John (251 Mountain Trail Avenue, Sierra Madre, CA, 91024, US)
Mcdougall, Alan c/o John, Hillard (251 Mountain Trail Avenue Sierra Madre, CA, 91024, US)
Application Number:
PCT/US1997/000560
Publication Date:
July 23, 1998
Filing Date:
January 20, 1997
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
JAMES COOPER FOR ULTIMATE SECURITY SYSTEMS, CORP. (Suite 320, 2361 Campus Drive Irvine, CA, 92612, US)
Hillard, John (251 Mountain Trail Avenue, Sierra Madre, CA, 91024, US)
Mcdougall, Alan c/o John, Hillard (251 Mountain Trail Avenue Sierra Madre, CA, 91024, US)
International Classes:
B60R25/04; B60R25/045; (IPC1-7): B60R25/04
Foreign References:
US4189708A
US4209709A
US4689603A
US5449957A
US5532522A
US5539260A
US5548164A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Gluck, Peter J. (26892 Preciados Drive, Mission Viejo, CA, 92691, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
What is claimed is:
1. A vehicle antitheft system for a vehicle, said vehicle having an engine, a plurality of doors, a set of interior lights a starter, a ignition coil, a starter solenoid coupled to the starter, and a battery having a positive terminal and a negative terminal, with the negative terminal coupled to a ground, and an audible horn having a first terminal coupled to the ground and a second terminal coupled to a horn relay, the vehicle antitheft system comprising: a hand held low power R.F. digital code transmitting means, and a passenger cab mounted housing arrangement, and a printed wiring board, and a microprocessor or microcontroller, and a controlling computer program, and a clock source, and a input voltage supply and regulating source, and a input voltage safety fusing element, and a R.F. signal antenna, and a low power output R.F. transponder digital code receiving means, and a ignition coil current switching means, and a horn relay current switching means, and a control wiring cable output means, and a plurality of vehicle door switches, and a door relay, and a vehicle hood switch, and a anticarjacking signal input means.
2. A starter solenoid mountable antitheft module housing comprising: a generally cylindrical metal housing module arrangement, and a printed wiring board, and a metal serrated retainer lock ring, and a digital code receiving integrated circuit, and a normally closed switch element wired in parallel with the starter solenoid start conductor selected from the group comprising mechanical relays, mechanical switches, and semiconductor switches, and a control wiring cable input means, and a ignition switch input conductor protected by a series protection device selected from the group comprising fuses, manually reset circuit breakers and automatically reset circuit breakers.
3. The antitheft module of claim 2, wherein the metal module housing arrangement is that of a generally cylindrical inner and outer metal housing module arrangement with an air space between to provide thermal insulation comprising: a printed wiring board, and a metal serrated retainer lock ring, and a digital code receiving integrated circuit, and a normally closed switch element wired in parallel with the starter solenoid start conductor selected from the group comprising mechanical relays, mechanical switches, and semiconductor switches, and a control wiring cable input means, and a ignition switch input conductor protected by a series protection device selected from the group comprising fuses, manually reset circuit breakers and automatically reset circuit breakers.
4. The antitheft module of claim 2, wherein the metal module housing arrangement is generally cylindrical in shape comprising: a printed wiring board, and a digital code receiving integrated circuit, and a normally closed switch element wired in parallel with the starter solenoid start conductor selected from the group comprising mechanical relays, mechanical switches, and semiconductor switches, and a control wiring cable input means, and a ignition switch input conductor protected by a series protection device selected from the group comprising fuses, manually reset circuit breakers and automatically reset circuit breakers.
5. The antitheft module of claim 2, wherein the metal module housing arrangement is generally that of two truncated conical sections with the base diameters joined at the equator with a starter motor locking mounting arrangement comprising: a printed wiring board, and a digital code receiving integrated circuit, and a switch element selected from the group comprising mechanical relays, mechanical switches, and semiconductor switches, and a control wiring cable input means, and a high current starter relay switch AMENDED CLAIMS [received by the International Bureau on 12 September 1997 (12.09.97); new claims 620 added; original claims unchanged (2 pages)].
6. An automotive adaptive security system apparatus. comprising, in combination: at least two protective module housings, each defined by an inner and outer wall having a spaced area between them; each said protective module housing is disposed 90 as to entirely cover at least one canister type solenoid; a first means for insulating the canister type solenoid, and a second means for insulating the canister type solenoid; wherein said first and said second means prevents access by an undesired user to the at least one canister type solenoid.
7. Apparatus, as defined by claim 6, said first means including a means for maintaining an ambient temperature and pressure at which electronic circuitry housed within said at least one solenoid is held harmless from damaging thermodynamic effects.
8. Apparatus, as defined by claim 7, wherein said means for maintaining further comprises at least a double walled cap for housing each of said at least one canister type solenoid.
9. Apparatus, as defined by claim 8 wherein said first means completely covers said at least one canister type solenoid. preventing access of same for bypassing by an undesired user attempting to make an electrical connection.
10. Apparatus, as defined by claim 9, said double walled cap providing substantially tamper proof protection.
11. Apparatus, as defined by claim 10, wherein said second means for insulating further comprises at least a disabling relay ignition switch.
12. Apparatus. as defined by claim 11, wherein said second means for insulating further comprises at least a single input cable passing through said at least a double walled cap, communicatingly connected to a printed wire board having a microcontroller. a code reader and an isolated disabling switching element placed in parallel with said at least one canister type solenoid.
13. Apparatus, as defined by claim 12, said isolated ignition switch receives information from at least one of a microcontroller component and a code reader for indicating validity of codes upon a predetermined basis.
14. Apparatus, as defined by claim 13, said predetermined basis being derived from a plurality of codes carried through said at least one double walled cap to the printed wire board where the codes are received by a digital code receiver and authenticated by said microcontroller.
15. Apparatus, as defined by claim 14, further comprising software means for arraying and processing code, to selectively enable and prevent actuation of a starter motor connected to said apparatus.
16. Apparatus, as defined by claim 15, wherein said air gap functions as an effective thermodynamic insulator.
17. Apparatus, as defined by claim 16, whereby thermal conduction of ambient and radiant heat exposure from an external engine compartment is significantly reduced.
18. Apparatus, as defined by claim 6, wherein said system is effective for use with a gear reduction starter motor, by using a threaded starter motor terminal and a shear off security fastener for permanent attachment.
19. Apparatus, as defined by claim 17, further comprising software functioning in conjunction with firmware effective for initializing predetermined code selections.
20. Apparatus, as defined by claim 19. said system is effective for use with remote controller transmitters, responders. and transponding units.
Description:
AUTOMOTIVE STARTER SECURITY MODULE AND ANTI-CARJACKING VEHICLE DISABLING SYSTEM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention is a continuation-in-part of United States Serial Number 07/957,707 filed on 10/07/92, which is currently United States Letters Patent No. 5,548,164 which issued in August of 1996.

By way of background, attention is called to the following publication: Motorola publication MC68HC705K1/D, 1991.

This invention relates to a device for disabling the electrical starter motor of an internal combustion engine, against unauthorized activation. More particularly the invention relates to an improved combination locking method for the starter motor solenoid coil circuit and associated security device apparatus, to defeat attempts to enable the electrical starter motor. The invention further relates to the present crime of vehicle jacking, and electromechanical methods in which to disable a victim's vehicle function, in an automatic computer program controlled manner.

In the past, key actuated or combination type lock switch systems have been used to prevent unauthorized activation of various electrical circuits, such as the ignition circuit and the like in motor vehicle engines to prevent theft. These have included electrically coded keys, mechanically coded keys, electro-optically coded key, bar code keys, digital entry keypads and various combinations thereof.

Disadvantages attending the prior art devices are their failure to prevent known methods of defeating the system, by bypassing the system of the theft practice of hot wiring, or jump started, ignition or other electrical circuits, or illegally capturing and broadcasting digital security input codes in a practice known as scanning remote control code.

The security system of the present invention, is suited for use with any of the known code entry structures, however in recent years, European car thief have been using an electronic security code circumvention tool, known as "the grabber". The grabber is an electronic device capable of receiving transmitted codes from a common RF (denoted hereinafter as "radio frequency") remote control transmitter. These are the same RF remote transmitters that are used on most anti-theft and alarm security products. Once the thief has captured the unknowing victims RF remote control unit codes, the thief deciphers the RF code, follows the potential victim home, then re-broadcasts the captured RF codes, which naturally disables the alarm and re-enables interrupted starter, ignition and other electrical components of the victim' s vehicle.

Once this has been performed by the car thief, the car theft becomes a routine procedure of hot wiring the starter system, and consequential car theft. With high speed RFcode broadcasting or scanning used as a method by the car thief, and the introduction of the code grabber device, broadcasting RF digital codes by common RF remote control device, becomes risky for the vehicle owners, even though the vehicle is quite disabled from normal operation.

Texas Instruments Company, a United States electronics corporation, has invented a low power RF code transmitter, composed of a small RF transponder component meant to be attached to the owner's key ring, and where, when the transponder constantly transmitting digital codes, broadcasts to an accompanying code reader semiconductor chip and antenna.

The transponder component only transmit a total distance of approximately 8 inches, which disallows a car thief perched relatively further than the 8" required broadcasting range of the transponder, from the vehicle, and being able to receive the transmitted RF codes transmitted by the low output RF transponder attached to the authorized operator's key ring. This type of input device, makes a code capturing electronic device not capable of receiving the low power RF signal output from the Texas Instruments TIRIS brand transponder, thus nullifying that particular practice / technique of tampering with the anti-theft device or alarm device, to which it may be electrically connected to.

The Texas Instruments Companyis currently marketing the RF component pair under the trademark TIRIS brand brand Automatic Radio Frequency Identification System, a sub component product. It is the intention of the current invention, to integrate the TIRIS brand RF

digital code device with the anti-theft device described herein, and as a means in which to allow the current invention to successfully disallow car thieves from stealing cars by "grabbing" (deciphering the RF broadcast codes), re-broadcasting the same codes and stealing cars with this theft method. The code grabbing theft method described above, is currently being used as a theft method here in the United States and is a present threat to current anti-theft RF code transmitting remote control devices common to the anti-theft industry, of which these devices are common, and widely used throughout this country. Features which distinguish the invention over known prior art include compatibility with the TIRIS brand code input structure, as the present invention is suitable for use in connection with any of the anti-theft embodiments described herein.

OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of this invention to enable authorized operator of vehicle a passive safe means in which to exit cracked vehicle, without the carjacker realizing that there are anti- carjacking programmed circuits timed to shutdown vehicle engine function in a prescribed period of time, internal to software control of electrical primary coil and engine functions.

It is an object of this invention to provide a means of disabling an internal combustion engine starter motor.

Another object of the invention is to provide a security system impervious to known methods of tampering.

Yet another object of the invention is to enable an alarm system, if vehicle doors or hood are opened, and disables vehicle ignition primary coil circuit and activates vehicle horn alarm during carjacking attempt, while engine is running.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a low current RF output signal code entry means, utilizing embedded/unreadable digital security codes for said purpose of vehicle electrical system re-enablement, by authorized operator of said theft protected vehicle.

Breifly stated, there is provided an electronic automotive anti-theft and anti-carjacking device, controlled by a computer microcontroller element and internal computer software program routine. The invention comprises of several generally cylindrical metal container housings, for containment of a printer wire board, a switching element and a digital code reader

microcontroller, to internally switch voltage to vehicle ignition circuit, where said metal housing is attached to the electrical terminals of a automotive starter solenoid or a starter motor, a second electronic control housing arrangement containing electronic control circuits and primary decision making microcontroller, to manipulate said switching of vital ignition circuit, internal to said metal enclosure housing described herein, for the prevention of an automobiles theft, and in particular the theft practice of hot wiring the ignition circuit, at the starter solenoid electrical terminals or the battery power stud of the starter motor. The device described herein makes authorized operation of a vehicles electrical circuits, via a small low power output RF digital signal code transponder device, an antenna, and a semiconductor reader component to decode said transponded digital codes. The invention further relates to the automatic control of vital vehicle operation electrical circuits during the crime event of an automobile being carjacked, where the automatic anti-carjacking operation is software controlled, relative to the electrical contact position of an auxiliary door switch, mounted on the vehicles doorjamb. The anti- carjacking device further incorporates safety control embedded in the software routine operation, as it relates to the device automatically shutting down the carjacked vehicles motor functions.

The security system of the present invention, provides security against tampering of a digital input code operated system. Said TIRIS brand RF input device, provides a complex digital code for the electronic security system. A decision making element determines whether the input codes matches the present code stored in an inaccessible, tamper proof memory. If said codes match, the decision making element operates the circuit interruption electrical switching element and enables the started solenoid circuit in the preferred embodiment and enables the battery power circuit to the starter motor in other embodiments of this anti-theft invention.

Other features of the invention, which includes multiple microprocessor decision making elements; a computer program storage means which is configured by an electrical or electronic means; a controllable high current electrical circuit interruption element; a controllable electrical / mechanical high current circuit interruption element; a unique circuit housing structure and mounting means; an anti-carjacking vehicle engine disabling device; a means to monitor door and vehicle hood positions, during a carjacking crime, and respond with engine primary coil electrical disruption and subsequent engine shutdown; and a means in which to reset anti-theft

starter system functions following carjacking engine shutdown procedure, by a digital coded key and receptacle structure.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Fig. 1 is an partially exploded cross-sectional view of a typical automotive starter motor and starter solenoid, depicting the double metal anti-circumvention housings, a printed wire board, security fastener and housing for same with solenoid attachment.

Fig. 2 is an external view of a printed wire board attached to s modified starter solenoid having a low profile bakelite terminal insulator furhter depicting the reduction of the overall length of the stqarter soenoid with housings bolted to the solenoid according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 3 shows a serrated retainer lock ring fastener for securing a printed wire board to an inner top surface of an inner metal housing according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 4 shows a printed wire board depicitng a field effect transistor with stud bolt drill apertures allowing same to mount in a small space within an inner metal housing according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 5 illustrates a combination of two metal protective housings in alignment with a plurality of drill holes (apertures) according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 6 shows a layout of system hardware housing depicting a vehicle battery connected to solenoid electrical terminals at protective housings, wherein the housings and internal circuits attached to solenoid, and solenoid connected to starter motor with anti-theft circuit control cable and multi pin connector according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 7 depicts an arrangement of an anti-theft housing, control and sensor apparatus housing illustrating system processing modue containing printed wire board controller with multi-connector ports, code receiver antenna, ignition relay switch IC and program code storage, other control cable for the anti-theft system for door sensor, alarm function flashing LED and separate anti-car jacking control housing and control circuits, conductors and multi pin connector according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 8 shows a general code input means effective for use with semi-truck anti-theft systems housing embodied in an ignition key ring with security code transponder component according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Fig, 8b is a detailed cross-s sectional view of a method of attaching a self-locking anti-theft module housing to the battery stud of a flat blade FORD brand battery stud according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 9 shows an anti-car jacking system responsive to the opening of a vehicle housing who alternate preferred embodiment constitutes an anti-carjacking processor control housing and internal components according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 10 shows a method of attaching a self-locking anti-theft module housing to the battery stud of a flat blade FORD brand battery stud components according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 11 shows a method of attaching a self-locking tamper proof anti-theft module housing to the battery stud of a flat blade FORD brand battery stud components according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 12 is an external view of an anti-theft modue housing where throughout holes (apertures) appear at the housing fastener notch according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 13 shows another embodiment of a high current starter motor battery current disabling device with a second means of attachment according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 14 depicts a side view of a disabling module device an illustrated with the alignment shown demonstrating it mounting position on a threaded FORD brand starter battery stud according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 15 depicts an alternate embodiment of the present invention wherein battery current is interrupted directly at a starter solenoid battery terminal stud by a high current relay switch internal to a metal or steel protective switch.

Fig 16 depicts a FORD brand starter motor and disabling device attached and secured to same according to an alternate embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 17 depicts the FORD brand starter motor and disabling device attached and secured to same as the previous figure, according to an alternate embodiment of the present invention, Fig. 18 shows an embodiment of the present invention suited for electronically disabling the ignition switch circuit of a typical reduction gear type starter according to an additional alternate embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 19 depicts a module housing permanently mounted to that of a starter motor case by means of a single non counter ratable security fastener according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 20 is an illustration of a typical commercial diesel truck starter solenoid switch and starter motor.

Fig. 21 illustrates a set of three views of an anti-theft protective housing to control the truck engineers starter solenoid ignition circuit via a disabling relay switch according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 22 is an ilustration of an anti-theft housing attached to a commercial truck starter system and control cable and multi pin connector with a tamper proof security fastener for permanent attachment of starter solenoid to a starter motor mounting flange according to preferred embodiment of the present invention attached to a starter solenoid.

Fig. 23 a is a block diagram schematically depicting the operations of a microcontroller according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention including known circuits.

Fig. 23 b is a block diagram schematically depicting a sequence of operations of a device for controlling the disabling circuits of the present invention through response from input and other hood and cab sensors according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 23 c is a block diagram schematically depicting a sequence of operations of a device including control circuits for anti-theft protection of commercial vehicles unattended by the driver with the diesel engine running according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

Detailed Description of the Preferred Embodiment

The preferred embodiment of this anti-theft invention, relates to disabling of the starter solenoid and starter motor and vehicle primary electrical functions to vehicle engine, in a controlled manner, by means of secret digital input code entry from a low power / low signal output radio frequency transponder and digital code reader device, and response to correctly read codes by a microcontroller, controlling disabling circuits to the vehicles' engine and starter system.

The invention also relates to the physical actions of a carjacker criminal, opening the victims door during a carjacking crime, where a response from a primary microcontroller that monitors the vehicles electrical door circuit will cause second anti-carjacking microcontroller to signal a disabling component, where said disabling component electrically disables said victims primary electrical circuit by means of an electric switching component, to disable the engine running function in a timed engine shutdown routine, once the door has been opened by the carjacker.

Other embodiments described in this document, depict other types of motor operated starter systems that are disabled as in the preferred embodiment, however the electrical power to the battery stud of the Ford Motor Company starter systems, is shunted, disallowing the ignition circuit and starter relay switch, to energize the starter motor to engage the starter motor function to the vehicles motor. Other starter motors can be disabled in a similar fashion using this current flow disruption technique to the vehicles starter motor. This anti-theft invention also relates to the starter system disablement of other types of motorized vehicles such as marine craft, aircraft, mechanized farm equipment and various arrangements of commercial and industrial equipment that are subject to theft.

Turning now to the figures, in Fig 1 the primary focus of this anti-theft device in it's preferred embodiment, is shown as used to disable the starter solenoid ignition circuit, in such a way that will disallow an auto thief from electrically starting victims engine in a theft attempt.

The general function of the starter solenoid 1 may be described as follows. When a signal current is received at ignition switch circuit 28, via the ignition switch of the vehicle, 12 volts is applied to the solenoid's coil, which allows solenoid coil 44 to pull coil plunger 45 in at connector linkage 46 inwardly, thus allowing solenoid lever shaft 48 at hinge 47 to push starter

motor shaft and pinion gear assembly at 49 forward to allow pinion gear 51 to travel along starter motor shaft 41 and to have pinion gear 51 to engage to that of flywheel ring gear so that vehicle engine will turn over and consequential start vehicle engine..

Normally in the past, with conventional systems, if a motor vehicle in a car theft situation were equipped with a starter circuit disruption relay, commonly used in most vehicle alarm systems to disrupt the ignition circuit in the electrical path from the vehicles ignition switch to the starter solenoid, the thief would leave the ignition switch in the run position and electrically cross connect starter solenoid terminals 28 to 24 at the electrical terrninal end of a typical starter solenoid.

By crossing starter solenoid battery terminal 24 to that of ignition switch connector 28 on the starter solenoid, the starter solenoid coil would energize, and the starter function will be enabled, thus allowing the car thief unauthorized engagement of the starter system. What the inventors have done to prevent the illegal electrical crossing of starter solenoid terminals 24 to 28, is to attach two permanently mounted metal protective housings 3 and 224, over the terminal ends of a typical canister type starter solenoid 1, so to physically isolate ignition switch circuit terminal 28 from allowing the auto thief from crossing 24 to 28, since the ignition switch terminal circuit is to the interior of protective housing 224 and where 24 is internal to 3, 3 completely covers ignition terminal 28.

The purpose for two metal protective housings to circuit board 7, is to place the printed wire board internal to the inner module 224, and then to place inner module 224 inside of outer protective metal module 3, with an air gap between the outer surface of 224 and the inner surface of 3, as a thermal design requirement, in order to reduce the ambient and radiant heat exposure to the heat sensitive component internal to said inner metal module 224.

Utilizing the two metal modules in combination with an air gap between the two components, significantly reduces engine heat from damaging electronic and other components internal to metal module 224. It is a primary concern to the inventors to allow the authorized operator of the vehicle equipped with this device to completely control the ignition circuit at will, and to be able to disable the starter system functions, merely by turning the vehicles engine off at the ignition switch and yet re-enable the starter system function by the coded input device, that

when the correct plurality of complex codes were transmitted by the input device and deciphered by the reader component, the starter solenoid ignition circuit would become functional. The device's starter solenoid disabling circuits internal to 3 are of digital code receiver 26 of printed wire board 7, where when a plurality of correct complex digital codes are received by 26 through a coded handshaking, originating from said coded input/read device, component 26 would signal a starter circuit disabling switch, electrically connected to 26 to switch said ignition circuit, with good current flow to allow starting of theft protected vehicle.

Referring also to Fig. 6 - 7, transmitted digital codes originate from human positioned input transponder 100, to TIRIS brand code reader antenna 102, to Texas Instruments brand code reader component 94 of primary printed wire board assembly 89, internal to component enclosure 64. Once input codes are received by primary decision making microcontroller 72, and 72 determined received codes as "good codes", 72 further outputs coded signal through connector receptacle 63 of enclosure 64 and adjoining system cable plug 77 through system cable 18 and cable bushing 16 to the interior of 3, and 224, to printed wire board 7 and digital code receiver 26 internal to 224, where if a plurality of correct codes are read by 26, 26 will signal field effect transistor disable switch 11 or other switching component of printed wire board 7, to re-enable ignition switch circuit to starter solenoid ignition switch terminal 28, via disabling switch 11 output conductor and lug connector 27 to 28.

If an incorrect mismatch of codes are transmitted by an unauthorized user, code reader 94 will not respond favorably to primary microcontroller 72, as 72 will not respond favorably to TIRIS brand code reader chip 94. All codes passed from component to component must be identical, in order for the chain of response from component to component to occur. The starter system will be disabled internal to 3 and 224, controlling 28, until a matched plurality of correct codes are received by microcontroller components, 72, via reader 94 and lock chip 26 to ultimately switch 28 by means of disabling switch 11 or other disabling switches.

Such other disabling switches are shown, for example in Figs. 3, 4 and 5, and may be used such as 53 or 95, to re-enable starter solenoid and starter motor system. An exploded and cut-away view of two metal protective modules 3 and 224 at 32, that covers automotive starter solenoid electrical terminals 24 and 33 and Backbite insulator material 2, and houses electronic

prin.er wire board 7, where 7 is positioned and held permanently in place inside housing 224, by means of serrated metal retainer lock ring 6. Terminal extenders 5a and 5b, are rotated and torqued clockwise onto solenoid battery terminal 24 and 33, to enable said metal modules 3, 224 and circuit board 7 to be permanently mounted to starter solenoid case 1.

This makes housing 3, 224 and internal printed wire board 7, computer switching element 11 or other disabling switches used like contact solenoid 53 or mechanical relay 95 and decision making digital code receiver 26, permanently attached to 1, as a non-removable and non-tamperproof anti-theft device, impervious for a car thief to access disabling switching circuits of electronic switch 11, or solenoid switch 53 or mechanical relay 95, or to access starter solenoid switch terminal 28 in a tampering attempt to cross solenoid switch terminal 28 to that of solenoid battery terminal 24 for energizing of starter solenoid coil and consequential activation of starter motor mechanical functions, allowing starting of victims engine in a vehicle theft attempt. Electrically energized / enabled or de-energized / disabled, computer output circuit wire and connector lug 27 attaches to solenoid switch lug 28 from output conductor of electronic disabling field effect transistor switch 11 of PWA 7. Conductor output wire and lug attaches to 28, prior to metal modules 3 and 224 mounting to starter solenoid case 1 in the assembly operation.

Printed wire board 7 and vital system electronic components are positioned inside of module 224 near the inner top plate of metal module 224. 224 is internal to 3. Printed wire board 7 through holes (apertures) 35 and 36 are aligned with external and internally threaded terminal extenders 5a and 5b, so that the threaded terminal ends of 5a and 5b may pass through printed wire board through holes 14 and 15, and Metal module through holes 35 and 36, and insulated shoulder washers 8a and 8b, then to have metal modules 3, 224 and internal components of printed wire board 7 mounted permanently to that of starter solenoid 1, by rotated shear off hex security fasteners 9a and 9b.

Metal module enclosure is positioned and held onto starter solenoid outer case 1 at metal module 3 flared lip 32, so that said metal module 3 at flared lip 32, will not be able to be moved from solenoid outer case 1. Once security nuts 9a and 9b are rotated and affixed to that of top surface of 3, and holding down insulator shoulder washers 8a and 8b, and metal module 3,

torque wrench tool 10a rotates 9a and 9b and shears the hex of 9a and 9b off of threaded terminal extenders 5a and Sb, leaving remainder of threaded conical security fastener member of which auto thief cannot place a gripping tool to that of conical members and counter rotate fastener members off of threaded terminal extenders 5a and 5b.

Referring also to Figs. 6 and 7, input codes from remote control input device, transfer digital secret codes through system input cable 17, through liquid tight cable bushing 16, or a molded cable, into steel module enclosure 3, and are electrically attached to printed wire board 7. Ignition switch circuit connector 18, is reconnected to vehicles solenoid ignition wire and lug, when device's installation is complete. (vehicles ignition wire and connector lug, not shown in figure).

Starter motor 29 solenoid mounting bracket 21, holds the starter solenoid 1 in it's mounting position, by means of generally two threaded machine screws, that are removed, so that shear off hex security fasteners 22/25, may replace them when the device is installed on the starter motor. The security fastener 22/25, has a thread bonding agent on the male threads, in order for security fasteners 22 to not be counter rotated by a car thief from the keeper threads 32 in an attempt to remove solenoid 1, from that of 21 of the starter motors mounting bracket 21 at 23 and opposing starter solenoid mounting holes 32. Common torque tool 10b, rotates security fastener hex ends 25 clockwise to that of conical threaded fastener member 22, when 1 is being mounting to 21. Once the torque pressure has reached specified torque value, the hex end 25, shears off, and the conical threaded member 22 remains, ids-allowing any gripping tool to counter rotate conical member 22 in an attempt for a car thief to remove and replace the equipped anti-theft device apparatus on the starter solenoid, from that of the starter motor mounting bracket 21.

Once the device and starter solenoid have been installed on the starter motor, the vehicles battery cable 55 as shown in Fig 6, are cabled to battery terminal extended 5a and secured by a common hex fastener. Auxiliary power cable 12, is re-connected to that of terminal extender 5b and is fasten to 5b, by a common hex fastener. Starter 29 is bolted to the engines bell housing, generally at mounting bracket 31 by mounting bolt 30.

Now returning to Fig. 2, inter alia, modern vehicles and their space constraining engine configurations and compartments, often leave little free space near the starter motor and components. Extraneous engine hardware near the starter solenoid terminals, disallow to ability to add an additional anti-theft component apparatus to the started solenoid terminal area. In order to adapt this anti-theft metal protective module and it's enclosed disabling circuits on many vehicle types, it becomes necessary to lessen the starter solenoid length, especially at the electrical terminal ends.

Starter solenoid insulator material (Bakelite) normally found on common starter solenoids as a protruding structure from that of the starter solenoid housing at the terminal end of the solenoid. It is the intent and adaptation of this anti-theft device in this embodiment, to lower the high profile insulator material normally like that of the figures as discussed above,to a generally flat surface 19 keeping the insulator cap flush to that of the starter solenoid housing terminal end. Provided by the starter solenoid manufacturing process.

It is also the intent of the starter solenoid design re-configuration, to allow the manufacturers of the starter solenoid, to increase the length of the electrical terminals normally 24 and 33 to a longer threaded member depicted as 4 the solenoid battery terminal and 13 the auxiliary solenoid electrical terminal to the starter motor.

By lowering solenoid protective housing 83 and inner heat resistant metal module (not shwon in the figures) contain circuit board 7, may be used to cover and protect tamper proof electronic anti-theft disabling circuits of printed wire board 26b to that of starter solenoid ignition switch circuit 34, internal to that of two metal protective housings 83 (83 shown).

Printed wire board 26, used to disable starter solenoid ignition switch circuit 39 from unauthorized starting of victims vehicle engine through the starter system, is held in place by fastener of ignition input circuit terminal stud and mounting fastener 34 of printed wire board 7.

System control cable 17, used as electrical conductor to input secret digital codes transmitted by code input device (input device not shown in the figures) is connected to printed wire board 7, internal to that of inner metal module of 83 and in electrically connected to 7 by cable input connector 42. Ignition switch wire and connector lug 18, wire of 18 passes into 42 at liquid tight strain relief bushing 16b, and electrically connects vehicle ignition switch circuit to

that of 2 at input connector and fastener 34, for electrical disabling of ignition switch circuit conductor 18, by 26 of printed wire board 7, where output of digital code receiver 26 switches normally closed field effect transistor switching element 11 or solenoid switch 53 or mechanical relay 95, wired in parallel with starter solenoid 1, disabling output circuit 39 electrically connected to that of starter solenoid switch terminal at 39 by providing direct electrical short to ground. Vehicle wiring harness is protected by fuse 228.

Metal protective housing, 83, and inner metal module are permanently held and mounted to that of starter solenoid 20 outer steel surface, by means of non-removable security hex fasteners, that when hex members shears off at center section, by rotational force from torquing tool 10, tool 10 will shear off hex upper member at a pre-determined torque value, leaving low threaded fastener member to that of top place of protective steel housing 83. Once lower threaded conical shaped fastening members are torqued to place of protective housing 83, and insulator shoulder washers 8, steel protective housing 83 will be permanently affixed to that of threaded solenoid terminal members 4 and 13.

Once 83 is fastened to starter solenoid 20, 83 cannot be removed by any known tool, and starter solenoid disabling switching circuits internal to 83 are impervious to ingress, in an unauthorized operation of vehicle starter system. Digital code input connector 62 is routed through vehicle firewall to the vehicle cab interior, and is electrically connected to code input receiver unit of Figure drawing 6, at receptacle connector 63. A disabled starter solenoid by this anti-theft device, disallows starter solenoid ignition switch circuit from energizing solenoid coil and mechanically moving solenoid plunger member 45, inwardly, for the engagement of the mechanically connected starter motor pinion gear to that of the vehicle engine flywheel ring gear for the illegal engagement of a supposed electrically disabled starter motor function. Solenoid plunger member 45, is physically connected to that of starter motor connective linkage.Starter solenoid 20 is mounted and fastened to starter motor mounting bracket, by means of shear off security fastener bolts, depicted and described above, as it relates to mounting 20 to starter motor, in a permanent non-removable fashion.

Referring now to Fig 3, which shows atop view of retainer lock ring serrated teeth of retainer lock ring 6. Protrude generally in a downwardly 30 degree direction inside of 3, so that

the serrated teeth of the retainer lock ring are securing printed wire board 7 inside of the metal module enclosure 224, by means of the serrated teeth of 6 making contact with inner walls of 224 in a spring like fashion, not allowing printed wire board 7 from falling out of position inside of metal module 224. The serrated teeth and steel ring are of 6 will not allow 7 to move, out of it's holding and permanently mounted position, near the inside top place of 224.

Referring now to Fig 4, a top view of printed wire board 7, depicting terminal extender mounting holes 14 and 15. A second means of ignition circuit disabling by a electromechanical solenoid switch 53, and digital code receiver 26, where when 26 detects monitored engine no run, 26 signals disabling solenoid 53 to de-energize plunger member of 53, causing electrical contacts of 53 to electrically and mechanically disengage from opposing separated electrical contacts, opening the ignition circuit across the separated contacts, internal to 224. Solenoid 53 energizes and electromechanically re-engages the ignition circuit of 1, when a correct plurality of security codes are read by digital code receiver 26 from input device and handshaking circuitry, allowing starter system functionality. Terminal extenders 5a and 5b, pass through printed wire board 7 mounting holes 14 and 15 during installation of unit on starter solenoid 1. Likewise, athird means of ignition circuit disabling by an electrical/mechanical relay switch 95, and digital code receiver 26, whereas ignition circuit disable relay 95 disengages and opens mechanical relay contacts, internal to 95 and metal housing 224. Disabling starter ignition circuit when the vehicles monitors engine is turned off. Starter ignition circuit is re-enabled by relay 95, when a correct plurality of security codes are read by digital code receiver 26 from input device and handshaking circuitry. Terminal extenders 5a and 5b, pass through printed wire board 7 mounting holes 14 and 15 during installation of unit on starter solenoid 1.

Referring now to Fig. 5, a3 dimensional view of metal module 3 illustrating the flared lip of3 at 32 and the terminal through holes 35 and 36. Male threaded liquid tight bushing 16 through hole 43, allow threaded system cable bushing to mount to 3, at through hole 43.

Bushing 16 mounts by means of female keeper nut, internal to 3. This 3 dimensional view of said inner metal protective module 224 to contain printed wire board 7, where circuit board 7is held to upper plane surface of 224, by means of holding ring 6, and where 224 is contained within interior of 3, and where terminal mounting holes 35 and 36 of 224 are line up, to allow

passage of terminal shaft members of said solenoid or other threaded terminal members described prior figures for said mounting of both metal protective modules 224 and 3 to permanently mount to that of a starter solenoid switch component.

Fig 6 is a side view depicting the starter system with the anti-theft device housing 3, attached to the starter solenoid 1. Starter solenoid 1, permanently mounted to the starter motor mounting bracket 21, by means of non-removable remainder of conical shaped security fastener appendage 22. Vehicle 12 volt battery 59 positive battery power cable, 58 attached to protruding power terminal extender 5a, by connector 55, by means of secure fastener nut 56a.

Starter motor auxiliary power cable 12 attached to terminal extender 5b, and held in place by common fastener nut 5b. Vehicle ignition switch wire and lug (not shown on drawing) which normally connects to solenoid switch lug 28, re-connects to 18, once the anti-theft system attached to starter solenoid mounts to the starter motor during installation of device on said vehicle.

System code control cable 17 and ignition switch wire and lug 18 depicted as passing through liquid tight bushing 16, into steel module 3 top place. Multiple pin connector 62 attached to system cable 17 plugs into system code receiver housing 64 receptacle connector 63.

System cable 17 is passed through vehicle firewall, into vehicles interior, where all other system hardware and electronic components are to be located, thus protecting electronic components from the harsh elements of the exterior.

Turning now to Fig. 7, system enclosure 64 contains TIRIS brand reader component 94, to receive complex security codes from said RF transponder device 100 through antenna 102 transfer said complex codes to primary microcontroller component 72, where if 72 receives correct code output from 94 via 100, 72 signals a plurality of same codes to code deciphering microcontroller 163 to again transmit same plurality of complex codes by means of system cable 17 at 62 and 63, to that of microcontroller 26 inside of metal module 3 attached to starter solenoid 1, where decision making element 26 instructs electrical switching element 11 or 53 or 95 internal to 3 to switch ignition switch input circuit of 18 to that of ignition switch output circuit 27 to solenoid ignition connector 28 to allow electrical energizing of starter solenoid coil for authorized operation of vehicle ignition switch device, thus enabling starter solenoid and

starter motor electrical functions, making starter system operable to start said vehicle, by possessor of code transponding component 100.

If incorrect, unauthorized codes are received by illegal digital code transmission device to reader component 100 via antenna 102, no hand shaking of security codes takes place within the operation of the anti-theft system. Power and ground cable system power functions are by power/ground cable wire 65. Pass through grommet 68, and wire to printed wire board 89.

LED light and lens enclosure, mounted to the vehicles interior dashboard surface. System enclosure housing contains horn relay switch 73, where if the drivers door is opened while the vehicles engine is not running and the security codes have not been transmitted by transmitter sending unit 98 and the vehicle is parked and UN-attended, the vehicles horn or other noise emitting device will sound in pulses. Door alarm function is set off by actuation of the vehicles driver door switch(s) or secondary installed door switch opened by the car thief. Audible sound produced by siren 52, is not activated by instant activation of the door switch plunger movement, however, primary microcontroller 72, detects the door opening signal from 86, and via embedded software control, a timed response siren sound will occur, if transponder 100 isn't humanly passed near antenna.

102 Code input from 100 to reader , prevents alarm timer from sounding siren. The vehicles driver door switch(s) circuit, is connected to the enclosure unit 64, through grommet 68, via door switch cable 83, where wires to the door switch circuit 85 and 86 are connected to detect the opening of the vehicle doors. Vehicle horn relay fuse block (not shown in figures) is connected to by horn relay cable 90 and horn relay connector wire 91 and 92, where when the drivers door is opened, prior to transmission of correct security codes from RF transponder component, 100 (Fig. 8) the anti-theft system alarm circuit detecting the actuated drivers door switch circuit, output through cable 90 a signal alarm horn to sound in pulses, as an alarm function to the system.

Door switch cable 83 and horn relay cable 90 pass through cable grommet 68. Both are hard wired to printed wire board 89, internal to housing enclosure 64. Decisions for alarm functions are controlled by primary microcontroller 72 of printed wire board 89 of enclosure housing 64. Pulsing LED anti-theft system activation light indicator 70, is mounted displayed

on the vehicles interior, in plain view to act as a visual deterrent to the potential car thief. LED 70 pulses on and off, while vehicles engine is not running. 70, a simple LED and mounting bezel 69, mounted on a visible surface within the vehicles interior. The LED and LED holder 700. LED cable 71, passes through cable grommet 68 and is hard wired to said printed wire board 89.

This vehicle anti-theft system has the ability to be system upgraded, by adding an anti- carjacking module component arrangement, that shuts down the vehicles engine by switching the vehicles primary coil circuit off and on multiple times, in a timed sequenced, simulating an engine malfunction and causing the carjacker to pull the vehicle off of the roadway, to avoid a traffic collision. All disabling functions instructed by the anti-carjacking software routine and system decisions, take place internal to microcontroller component 72 of 89 and housing 64, where when car-jacking criminal open the drivers door, driver door switch actuation is detected by plunger type door switch 86 through electrical cable, connected to printed wire board 89, where when vehicle door switch is activated, microcontroller 72, detects door open activation through it's cable link, and initiates a timed delay vehicle engine shutdown routine of the vehicle primary circuit, of electrically opening the vehicles primary electrical circuit with electrical switching relay 81 of anti-carjacking housing 80.

Microcontroller 72 monitors the mechanical driver door switch 86 through cable 85 for engine running for anti-carjacking control, by means of engine run monitor wire 161 of cable 65, where monitor wire 161 is hard wired from the vehicle radio or wiper electrical circuit to the printed wire board 89. Circuit 161 has 12 volts present when vehicles ignition circuit is in the on position. Once internal clock timer of primary microcontroller 72 has met the pre-prescribed time delay and the carjacker has driven the functioning vehicle away from the crime scene, microcontroller 72 outputs a coded signal to anti-carjacking microcontroller 82 of anti-carjacking housing 80, through housing output receptacle 7 connector jack 77 and cable 78, where anti- carjacking microcontroller reads coded signal of microcontroller 72.

If correct plurality digital code is read by 82, 82 signals primary circuit electrical disabling relay switch 81 to open, causing vehicle primary coil circuit, electrically connected to wire conductors 87 and 88 to open the primary circuit by 81, disrupting electrical energy to

vehicle primary coil circuit, causing vehicles engine to malfunction and the vehicle to stop running. To avoid a high speed collision on the freeway, by immediate electrical disruption and immediate stalling of said victims vehicle, a time pulsing of relay 81 to open relay 81 contacts to open and close for a timed period by microcontroller 72, simulates the vehicle malfunctioning or running out of fuel.

Simultaneously, audible warning buzzer component 74 sounds, indicating to the driver that the anti-carjacking system has been activated, and that the vehicle should be pulled over to the side of the road out of traffic, before microcontroller 72 signals relay 73 to open it' s ignition circuit disabling contacts, ceasing vehicles engine operation. The carjacker will sense the vehicle malfunction and pull the vehicle over to the side of the road, avoiding traffic conflict with other vehicle on the freeway, if either buzzer sounds, or certainly if the vehicle appears to malfunction normal operation.

Once microcontroller 72 has pulsed anti-carjacking disabling relay contacts 81 open and closed for the pre-prescribed timed period, relay 81 will remain open, stalling the vehicles engine completely. Once relay contacts of 81 are opened and remain open, microcontroller 72 signals starter solenoid microcontroller 26 (as shown in Fig 1) to disable and open starter solenoid ignition circuit with field effect transistor disabling switch 11 or other ignition circuit disabling switching component used like 53 or 95, disabling starter solenoid ignition circuit internal to 3 and 224 (as shown in Fig. 1 and Fig. 6), disallowing the car-jacker from re- starting victims engine at the ignition switch, or by hot wiring the starter solenoid electrical terminals at the starter solenoid. If cable 78 is disconnected from connector 76 by carjacker, said vehicle engine function will cease operation, as relay 81 opening it's electromechanical contacts, will open said ignition circuit, electrically connected to said relay switch component, stalling said engine function to carjacked vehicle.

Anti-carjacking cable 84 and butt splice connectors 87 and 88, connect to vehicle primary coil wire circuit. Primary coil circuit wire is cut in half and spliced to that of 87 and 88.Receptacle jack 75, is another auxiliary input/output port that will allow microcontroller 72 to disable other devices to be connected to the system. Other disabling devices include a fuel relay switch, to electrically disable the electronic fuel pump, an electrical relay or to disable the

primary coil circuit, or an electrical relay switch, to switch vehicles automatic or manual transmission electrical starter control circuits in disabling fashion, that will disallow thief to start engine due to an improper electrical control signal from vehicles transmission or clutch pedal position.

All signals to peripheral disabling devices from output receptacle port 75 are controlled by primary microcontroller 72, once the vehicles engine is \switched off at the ignition key.

Auxiliary disabling devices connected to receptacle 75, contained within a housing environment that are modular plug in devices, similar to that of anti-carjacking housing arrangement 80.

Housing of auxiliary disabling unit, not shown in figures) containing decision making microcontroller component and electronic disabling switching element.

Auxiliary I/O receptacle port 75, does not function in the anti-carjacking mode of operation. All disabling devices connected to 75, disable vehicle electrical functions, when vehicles engine is de-energized by the ignition switch, when vehicle is not being driven by authorized operator of vehicle.

Turning now to Fig. 9, an electromechanical device/system in which to electrically disable a vehicles primary ignition circuit in the event of a jacking crime, while said vehicles engine is running. Engine disablement and shutdown, in an automatic fashion by ROM software, controlled by primary microcontroller and electromechanical relay switch. A protective housing 152, in which printed wire board 151, DALLAS brand Semiconductor lock chip component 163, primary system microcontroller decision making element 72, alarm siren relay switch 73 and ignition circuit disabling electromechanical switch 81 reside upon, where code lock component 163 reads a plurality of complex digital codes contained within semi conductor key chip component internal to key fob code holder 227, of which when code key fob 227 is inserted into receptacle 226, said complex security codes are transmitted through cable 225 to system printed wire board 151 for the purpose of resetting anti-carjacking device circuits, after a carjacking crime has been committed, or the system is accidentally set off by the vehicles owner. The code key device is only used, if the vehicle has been carjacked and the car has ceased engine operation. The possessor of the coded key fob, makes the vehicle engine disabling operation upon insertion of the key into the receptacle.

The device's primary microcontroller component 72 runs it's monitoring program constantly, while there is power to the system through power cable 67, however, there is no disabling function, to the vehicles electrical or engine function while the engine is not running.

Microcontroller 72 reads the engine run circuit via engine run condition conductor, 161, where conductor 161, is electrically connected to the vehicle's radio or cigarette lighter circuit, where the radio or cigarette electrical circuits are only energized with current, when the vehicles engine is running, with the ignition switching the on position.

Once 72 detects an engine run condition, by the vehicles engine being started, 72 starts monitoring auxiliary mounted driver door switch 85 following a pre-prescribed programmed delay value embedded in the software routine. If driver door switch 85 is actuated past programmed delay period, and said engine run condition exists, microcontroller 72 will initiate internal clock timer, to start.

Timer function of 72 in response to actuation of door switch 85, is when pre- programmed timer routine has met its time to respond period, timer of 72, outputs signal to ignition circuit disabling relay switch 81 to open it's electrical contacts, opening the ignition circuit, stalling said vehicle engine function, where wire conductors 87 and 88 of cable 84 are electrically connected to vehicle ignition circuit for said engine cease function in the event of a carjacking. An alarm function is built into the system structure, where if driver door or other doors are opened, alarm siren 52 sounds in pulses as a system anti-theft deterrent, with visible LED 70 acting in same deterrent function.

There are three (3) built in public safety features meant to avoid possible traffic collisions that may occur as a result of vehicle operation interruption on the road. First feature programmed into the software routine, allows the owner of the vehicle to open the driver door, when the engine is running, even after the pre-programmed door monitor criteria has been met.

The driver door may be opened briefly in a pre-programmed portion of the software routine, without decision making microcontroller 72 starting the timer that will initiate the engine shutdown routine. This is a matter of convenience and safety, as a stuck seat belt or coat tail stuck in the driver door jamb, can allow the driver to safely open the driver door for this brief period, without the system responding as a carjacking in progress.

If the driver door is left opened for a period exceeding the brief programmed period, the anti-carjacking routine will initiate as programmed to do so. A second and third feature of safety, includes said microcontroller 72, sounding a audible buzzer 74 within the vehicles cab, prior to ignition circuit disabling relay 81 opening contacts, to allow vehicle operator to pull vehicle over to the side of the road prior to cease of engine function. As the above described audible signal is produce in said vehicles cab interior, relay 81 is simultaneously signaled by microcontroller 72 to open, then close relay contacts of 81, in timed pulses that provides the vehicle with the physical effect of engine trouble, of which the drivers natural instincts are to pull said dis-functioning vehicle off to the side of the road out of traffic. If the vehicle were to stall without warning to the carjacker or the vehicles owner, the stalled vehicle could cause traffic problems concerning public safety. The components of above described anti-carjacking system, as physically small, and the primary enclosure can be mounted in a multitude of hidden location.

The code receptacle is small, and can be mounted out of sight of the carjacker. The inventors do not feel it is in the best interest of driver safety, to give any indication that there is an anti-carjacking system connected to the vehicle, so that the vehicle will be given up by the driver without a fight and if the carjacker isn't aware that such a vehicle disabling device exists on the vehicle, there is less of a chance the cajacker will have cause for becoming combative with the carjacking victim.

Referring now to Fig. 10, astarter motor battery current disabling device, where high current starter relay 107, deprives 12 volts electrical energy from reaching the starter motor battery terminal of FORD brand starter systems. Three part conical shaped module housing 105 containing digital code receiver 26 on printed wire board 111, where 111 is attached to starter relay housing 107, by means of common machine hardware. Like other embodiments of this invention, the internal decision making microprocessor controls switching an electrical disabling switching element 107 (a high current switching relay device) internal to the enclosure 105 and held onto the starter motor battery terminal by means of keeper assembly 115.

Battery power cable 55, supplying 12 volts to the starter motor power terminal, 123 is connected to conductive terminal 113 and threaded keeper 112, by means of threaded fastener hex bolt 116. Internal threaded module power terminal keeper of 113 holds threaded member

liquid tight systems cable bushing 16, allowing system digital code input cable 17 to pass through battery terminal 113 and non conductive shoulder washer 114 into module housing 105 and connect 17 at connector 104, to printed wire board 111.

Disabling relay switch 107 is signaled to switch on and off by output wire connector lug 110, and held in place by relay existing fastener nut and washer at 110. Starter relay 107 is held in place and is conductive at the input terminal 108, threaded keeper of conductive member of 113. Starter relay 107 threaded output terminal 109 connects to electrically conductive threaded keeper of assembly 115 at keeper 131 and supplies switched enable/disable high current battery power to starter motor threaded battery terminal lug 123 ( as shown in Fig. 12).

To further make removal of steel module housing 105 difficult from removal of the starter motor battery terminal 123 ( as shown in Fig. 12), outer roller bearing mid section assembly 106, disallows any gripping tool to attach to the module outer surface and counter rotate or pull security module from starter motor battery terminal, in an attempt to force remove module enclosure 105, from starter motor battery terminal 123.

Referring briefly to Fig. 13, in a theft attempt to remove and circumvent the module disabling device. The inwardly conical shape of both halves of module housing 105, disallows gripping tools from being able to maintain a grip on module housing in a theft attempt to remove module enclosure 105 from starter motor battery terminal 123 ( as shown in Fig. 12) A gripping tool would only slide off of the conical housing.

Referring now to Fig. 8b (which is aligned alongside Fig. 10 and above Fig. 11 on drawing sheet number 4). Connector assembly 115 is attached to starter relay threaded output terminal 109 at threaded keeper 131, by rotating assembly 115 onto relay threads 109 in a clockwise rotation, until non-conductive insulator ring 139 seats internal to steel cavity of 105.

Non-conductive insulator 139, disallows electrical conductivity between relay output terminal 109 and starter motor housing 126 ( as shown in Fig. 12). The unique starter motor battery terminal keeper assembly of 115, attaches to battery terminal lug 123( as shown in Fig. 12), by means of a 2 two steel member conductor internal locking arrangement 118 and 121, where when the module 104 is mounted to that of starter motor battery terminal 123 ( as shown in Fig.

12), conductive keeper members 118 and 121 are pushed inwardly by battery terminal 112( as

shown in Fig. 12) at hinged pin locations 117 and 122 and springs 132 and 140, until keeper teeth 119 and 120 enter threaded hole of starter motor battery terminal 123 ( as shown in Fig.

12).

Once teeth of 119 and 120 of conductive members 118 and 121 enter threaded hole of starter motor battery terminal 123 ( as shown in Fig. 12) the battery current disabling module 104, is permanently locked onto the starter battery terminal and may not be removed by the car thief in an attempt to access starter motor battery terminal (as shown in Fig. 12), and electrically bypass the anti-theft device attached to the starter motor. This disabling device integrates with all other vehicle disabling functions described in the text of the preferred embodiment.

Referring now to Fig. 12 , an illustration is shown depicting starter motor 126 connecting to disabling device housing at connective assembly 115 ( as shown in Fig. 10 and Fig. 11) to that of starter motor battery terminal 123. Starter motor battery terminal 123 (a flat battery terminal slug), with a threaded hole near the center of the terminal, engages to that of the disabling devices keeper teeth. The threaded hole on terminal 123 is normally used to secure the vehicles battery cable, and is used with this disabling device, to secure the module housing to it for permanent attachment to 123 and subsequent disablement of the vehicle starter system for anti-theft protection of said vehicle. The module is pushed onto the starter motor battery terminal 123, until the teeth internal to assembly 115, lock onto the threaded hole of starter motor battery power terminal, 123.

Referring now to Fig. 13, another embodiment of a high current starter motor battery current disabling device, that shares the same basic design characteristics are described in,the previous three figures is shown, which alternate preferred embodiment contains all of the prior features but is better suited for gear reduction starter motor designs found on many later model foreign and domestic vehicles. The system computer instructions, electrical functions are identical to that of the devices described in Figure drawings 10,11 and 12. The hardware differences to the previous embodiment of the invention differ in that the means of attaching the output terminal of relay switch 107 at 109, attaches to a threaded insulated insert, which is meant to attach to a starter motor having a threaded battery terminal, unlike the Ford battery terminal depicted in Figs. 10,11 and 12.

The insulated non-conductive insert 137, isolates electrical contact with that of 105 and the outer housing of the starter motor. The conductive threaded insert member 133, electrically connects to relay output terminal 109 at threaded keeper 135 and where conductive insert 133 electrically connects to starter motor battery terminal 139 Fig 15, by insert keeper threads 138.

Insert 133 and insulator 137 are rotated to that of relay output terminal, until insulator 137 makes contacts to the interior cavity of 105, securing module to that of starter motor electrical terminal 139 Fig 15. Metal module housing is torqued to that of battery terminal 139, by means of torque tool 10 Fig 15, at shear off hex security fastener 134, whereby torquing hex 134, shears hex member off at pre-prescribed torque value, leaving base appendage of security fastener, not allowing car thief to attach any gripping tool to steel module or fastener and counter rotate said protective housing from that of starter motor battery terminal stud 139.

A thread bonding agent is applied to that of battery terminal threads, prior to steel housing being installed on starter motor, to make counter rotation of protective housing from battery terminal stud more difficult to remove housing from battery stud 139. Vehicle battery cable 55 is connected to electrically conductive terminal 113, by means of bolt fastener 116 at threaded keeper 112. Anti-theft system cable 17 passes through 113, into module cavity, and connects to printed wire board 111 at 104.

Security code from digital code input device is received via system cable 17 at 104, where decision making microcontroller 26, determines correct code input where said digital code receiver 26 responds with a correct security code input to signal relay switch 107 at switch lead connector 110, to switch high current battery power from vehicle battery cable 55, whereby switching element 107 supplies battery current to starter motor battery terminal 139, enabling said vehicle starter system operable to authorized operator of vehicle, and possessor of TIRIS brand code transponder component input device. As in all other embodiments, microcontroller response to incorrect code input, results in a negative switching of said disabling relay 107 to that of starter motor battery electrical terminal 139.

Fig 14 Depicts a side view of disabling module device of Figure drawing 11, and how it pertains to mounting disabling device of Figure 13 to that of the starter motor battery electrical terminal 139. Module housing is torqued to 139 by 10 in a clockwise rotation and permanent

mounting to starter motor. This disabling device integrates with all other vehicle disabling functions described in the text of the preferred embodiment.

Fig 15 shows another embodiment of the invention, with starter solenoid 1 and in particular battery current is interrupted, directly at the starter solenoid battery terminal stud 24, by high current relay switch 107 internal to a metal or steel protective module 105. A generally cylindrical metal or steel solenoid protective module 103 with two through holes (apertures), is placed over the electrical terminal end of 1 at battery stud 24 and auxiliary stud terminal extender 5. Threaded terminal extender 5 is attached to threaded solenoid auxiliary stud (auxiliary stud not shown on drawing) Protective module 103 is securely attached to the terminal end of started solenoid 1, by means of security shear off fastener 9 at threaded solenoid auxiliary terminal extender 5, where hex of 9 (hex not shown) shears off at specified torque applied by torquing tool, making steel module 103 non-removable to terminal end of starter solenoid 1, by 9 and threaded terminal extender 5, and where disabling steel module 105 attaches to protective module 103 by male threads 97 to that of female keeper threads 96, by the installer hand rotating 12 volt current disabling module 105 to 103, in a permanent non-removable mounting fashion. Mounting threads 97 and 96 are applied with a thread bonding agent for further securing of 105 to 103.

105 is further torqued to 103 by a torquing tool 10, (torquing tool not shown on Fig drawing 15) where attaching tool 10 to shear off hex security fastener 134, where when hex of 134 is rotated and torqued by tool 10, hex end member of 134 shears off at specified torque value, leaving flush non-gripping member of 113 remaining. Starter circuit shunting relay switch 107, is controlled in a open/close fashion by digital code receiver 26 internal to 105, where if digital code receiver 26 receives good digital security codes from transmitted codes by input device of Figure 9 and receiving/controlling unit depicted in Figure drawing 8, relay 107 will open high current electrical contacts internal to 105, enabling 12 volt starter battery power circuit to solenoid 1 at 24.

Battery source power cable 55 connected to 113 by fastener 116, insulated to 105 by non-conductive washer 114, to high current relay switch input 108, where when high current relay contacts are opened, thus allowing 12 volt battery current to flow from relay output 109,

stud, re-enabling starter solenoid function at solenoid battery stud 24. In-correct codes are ignored and the internal contacts of relay 107 are closed when vehicle motor is not running.

More in particular of code handshaking digital codes are read from transmitter as correct codes, by microcontroller receiver component 94 to primary microcontroller 72 to key chip microcontroller 163, where 163 outputs digital code to receiver 26 through multi-conductor system cable 17, liquid tight strain relief bushing or other cable connector 16, to printed wire board 111, to digital code receiver 26. 26 completely controls relay 107. Vehicle starter battery power circuit to the starter solenoid is either disabled by 107 with the vehicles engine off or enable by the transmission of correct digital codes from the transmitter unit of Figure 9.

When the vehicles engine is turned off at the ignition switch by its authorized operator, microcontroller 72 outputs signal to microcontroller 163 to output signal to digital code receiver 26 to output signal to high current relay 107 to close high current electrical contacts to disrupt 12 volt current flow to starter solenoid disabling starter motor functions, and preventing unauthorized starting of vehicle by a car thief.

Turning now to Fig. 16 yet another embodiment of the FORD brand starter system disableness device and system is shown. A generally cylindrical steel module housing 160, to contain electronic circuitry, digital code receiver 26 and starter relay disabling switching element 140, for disablement starter motor operation by high current switching relay 140 specifically for use on of FORD brand starter motor.

12 volt battery current from the vehicle battery cable, is electrically disrupted by high current relay switch 140, where battery cable 55 is connected to relay input terminal extender 148 and battery current is switched off, by relay electrical contacts opening internal to 140, preventing current output from that of relay output stud 169 through current conductor 150 to connector 149 to starter battery stud 123. With relay 140 contacts open, starter motor will not function via the ignition switch, and may not be electrically circumvented by the car thief.

Protective metal module 160 and internal electronic components are attached to FORD brand starter motor , after output cable 150 of high current disabling relay switch 140, is connected to starter motor electrical terminal 123, by means of output cable connector 149, with cable connector 149 connected to starter motor battery terminal 123, protective metal module 160 is

mounted to starter motor housing by first removing starter motor housing fastener bolts 124a and 124b and placing steel module 160 over rear of starter motor housing and re-bolting starter motor housing bolts 124a and 124b back down on starter housing and steel protective module 160, integrating both housings as one integral housing unit. Anti-theft system input code cable 17 is passed through liquid tight cable bushing 16 of which 16 is fastened to top plate 155.

System cable 17 is electrically connected to 147 of printed wire board 159 by system cable connector 104. Metal module top place 155 is permanently attached to side walls of 160 at top plate inner mounting edge 154 and 157 of 160, and where steel top plate 155 fastens to that of 160 by means of shear off security fasteners 156a and 156b, rotated to module top plate threaded keepers 153a and 153b at housing 160, that when hex members of security fasteners 156a and 156b are rotated by torquing tool 10, hex member shears off leaving conical appendage of fasteners 156a and 156b remaining. Conical shaped appendage of 156a and 156b do not allow any theft gripping tool to counter rotate conical security fastener appendages 156a and 156b from top plate 155, thus preventing illegal ingress to vital switching circuits within 160, in a theft attempt.

Relay switch threaded input terminal extender member 148, passes through top plate 155 at a through hole (aperture) in 155. Terminal 148 is electrically isolated from 155 by non- conductive shoulder washer 8, where vehicle battery cable 55 attached to 148 for 12 volt battery power to the starter motor 126. Housing top plate 155, is further held down with battery cable 55, by shear off hex security fastener 9, where hex member of 9 shears off at pre-prescribed torque value, by means of rotating tool 10, leaving lower conical non-grip appendage attaching 55 to 148 permanently. Electrical disabling relay switch 140, is mounted to that of printed wire board 159 by common fastening hardware 158 internal to 160. Digital code receiver 26 electrically attached to 159, and where 26 controls vehicle battery 12 volts current flow by switch relay 140, based on correct codes via transponder components 100, antenna 102 and reader component 94 as described in the preferred and other embodiments.

Turning now to Fig. 17. which likewise shows a FORD brand starter motor as shown in Fig. 16 with a disabling device attached and secured to that of starter motor 126. System code

input cable and connector 17 and 104, connected to printed wire board input jack at 147, to receive secret digital input codes from TIRIS brand RF input/reader digital security code device.

Top plate 155 permanently secured to that of 160 at threaded flange surfaces 153.

Security fastener nut of 156a and 156b shown sheared off, displaying remaining conical member. Battery power to starter motor input stud 148 depicted as securing battery cable and connector 55 through top plate 155, by security fastener 9 and torqued to shear off at weak point of 9 by rotation of torquing tool 10 to that of the hex. Hex fasteners 9 and 156b, shown torquing and hex sheared off by 10. Starter motor power terminal 124 shown as connected to relay output connector 149, receiving switched 12 volts from relay 140.

Turning now to Fig. 18, a side view of a gear reduction starter motor and third embodiment protective module housing containing control IC for disabling of ignition relay circuit. A threaded terminal extender and non counter rotatable security fastener for permanent attachment of housing on gear reduction type starter motors.. This device/system relates to electrically disabling the ignition switch circuit of a typical reduction gear type starter system found on many of the late model starter systems, both foreign and domestic.

The ignition switch lead circuit connector of starter motor 166 at 173, receives from module housing 162 disable/ re-enable ignition switch output wire connector 170 and 171 at starter motor ignition switch input connector 173. Ignition switch output circuit current 171 to 170 is switched on or off by means of field effect transistor element 11 or other electromechanical switching component, internal to module housing 162a. Switching element 11 is controlled by correct response from correct digital security codes, received from input device 100, to digital code receiver 26, through reader component 94, and primary microcontroller 72, and key chip microcontroller 163, as are all other disabling devices in this invention.

Correct digital codes received by code receiver 26 allow switching element 11 to enable starter ignition circuit at 173, (ignition switch wire, connects to wire 18, ignition switch wire; not shown) where an incorrect code will cause all microcontroller components to not enable starter ignition circuit at 173. Input codes are received via remote control transmitter device 98 Fig 7, activated by authorized user of vehicle.

Secret digital codes are transmitted through system input cable 17, where system cable 17 is contained in a liquid tight cable bushing 16 and is connected by means of cable connector 175 on printed wire board 174, internal to module housing 162. Protective housing module 162 of this design, attaches to outer case of starter housing 166 at the threaded battery power terminal stud 165, by means of internal and external threaded terminal extender member 164, where the internal threads of terminal extender 164 are torqued to external threads of 165, prior module 162 mounting to starter motor case 166, for permanent non-removable of disabling device to starter motor.

Module 162 is permanently held to that of 166, by a shear off security fastener 9, that when hex upper member of 9 is torqued to that of 164, hex member will shear off at weak mid section of 9, leaving only the conical shaped lower threaded fastener member, that resists any gripping tool from attaching itself to the conical member and counter rotating the member from threaded end of terminal extender 164. Once the hex of 9 shears off, leaving the lower threaded member of 9, steel protective module 162 will not be able to be removed from the starter motor housing 166.

The entire electrical terminal area of the starter motor 172 and 173 is completely covered by protective module housing 162, disallowing car thief from accessing ignition switch terminal of 173. Once module housing 162 is permanently mounted to starter motor housing 166, vehicle switch lead wire and connector 17 require the vehicles ignition switch wire and lug (not seen in drawing) to be re-connected to that 17. Starter motor pinion gear 167 engages starter motor to that of the vehicles engine ring gear located inside of the transmission bell housing (not seen in drawing).

Turning now to Fig. 19, which shows module housing 162, permanently mounted to that of starter motor case 166. Shear off security fastener 9 is seen torqued and sheared off at weak mid section by torquing tool 10, with internally threaded conical fastener member remaining to that of electrical terminal extender 164. The vehicles battery power cable, is then attached to threaded end of terminal extender 164 to supply electrical power to the starter motor.

Referring now to Fig. 17, which likewise shows a second embodiment side cut view of modue protective disabling housing assembled on the battery stud end wall of the FORD brand

starter motor. A three dimensional rear view of the metal protective module housing, designed for commercial starter systems. The cylinder of housing 168, contains the computer system printed wire board microprocessor and switch element as in the preferred embodiment of this invention. Outer metal collar 169 of 168, further protects starter solenoid electrical terminal end from destructive attempted theft ingress and tampering of electrical switching element on computer circuit board, inside of steel protective housing 168. Semi-circular shape 169 of 182, further makes access to starter solenoid terminal and circuits difficult to hammer off. Metal protrusion of 169 will deflect physical blows by a destructive tool. An inner metal module may be necessary in diesel engines, where the starter system is located near hot engine components.

Turning now to Fig 18 battery through hole terminal extender 165 and auxiliary terminal extender through hole 172 at the center of module 168, allow conductive terminal extenders Sa and 5b of Fig 20, to pass through for connection to starter solenoid 1. Through hole 17, allows system cable 17 and liquid tight bushing 16 Fig 20, to mount to that top the plate of 168 Fig 20. This commercial metal module generally mounts to that of starter solenoid in same manner as depicted in Figure drawings 1 and 5. Likewise, on some Ford, Dodge, GM and Kenworth brand commercial vehicles, the solenoid end cap is configured in an oblong shape,. Such enabling cap end requires a non-cylindrical steel module housing, to protect the switch circuit lug, that would be located inside of this other steel housing. The metal module is generally the same shape as the solenoid end cap, and has a blow deflector collar, as does the steel module as viewed in Fig. 19.

Turning now to Fig. 19, a side view, depicts a typical commercial vehicles starter system, with the invention device attached to the starter solenoid 1. Metal protective housing 168 positioned to the side of 1 covering starter solenoid terminal 5a and 5b. Computer system cable 17 and connector 62 are connector to the system receiver housing, located inside of vehicles cab. Liquid strain relief bushing 16 containing system cable 17 and ignition switch wire lead and connector lug 18.

Figs. 20-22 show a typical commercial diesel truck starter solenoid switch and starter motor. The three views of anti-theft protective housing to control truck engines comprising Fig.

21 illustrate a disabling relay switch (PWB and other components are not shown), while Fig. 22

shows anti-theft housing attached to commercial truck starter system and control cab and multi pin connector with a tamper proof security fastener for permanent attachment of starter solenoid to starter motor mounting flange.

Referring now to Figs. 23a, and 23b, In the following description, numerous well- known circuits are shown in block diagram form in order not to obscure the described concepts in unnecessary detail. Microcontroller 182 includes read only memory (ROM), random access memory (RAM), internal power-on reset circuitry, timing oscillator circuitry 179 and input/output (I/O) circuitry 195, 181, 184, 187, 189 and 192. While any one of a plurality of commercially available microcontrollers may be employed such as the 80C5 1 or the 68HC l 1.

In the presently preferred embodiment a commercially available microcontroller, part number XC68HC705KlDW, is employed. Vehicle direct current voltage regulation 177 is provided by a well-known means. A thorough discussion of oscillator circuit 179 can be found in Motorola publication MC68HC705K1/D, 1991.

Microcontroller receives date from the valid code input means 180, located within the vehicle operators compartment, via conductor cable 181.

The vehicle ignition circuit 185, indicated by an encircled "I", provides +12 volts via conductor 194 to ignition monitor circuit 183, being a opto-coupler in the present preferred embodiment, and to one of a plurality of contacts of ignition relay 200, 200 being in series between the ignition switch via conductor 194 and the ignition coil primary circuit via conductor 201. Output voltage level of said circuit 183 is applied to conductor 184 and read by a dedicated input port of 182.

The software program internal to 182 flashes light emitting diode 197 as indication the security sysstem is operable. Hood switch 186 monitors hood angular position and is read by 182 via conductor 187.

Door switch 199 monitors vehicle door position and is ready by 182 via conductor 222. Relay 188 is enabled by 182 via conductor 189 making starter solenoid circuit 190, indicated by an encircled "S", operable via conductor 195. Alarm relay 191, operable via conductor 223, and ignition relay 200, operable via conductor 192 are controlled by command of 182 in response to hood angular position change sensed by 186 or door position change

sensed by 199. Vehicle horn 193 being activated by 191 via conductor 196. Relay 200 will disable vehicle ignition by opening a plurality of contacts at 194 and 201 of relay 200, interrupting direct current flow to the ignition coil primary circuit.

Upon application of electrical power to 177 said microcontroller 182 performs power on reset 202 and firmware initialization 203. 182 flashes 197 indicating 182 is prepared to receive a valid code input via subroutine 214. A negative result will allow the subroutine to execute 205. 182 monitors 199 status via subroutine 205 and tests result via subroutine 206.

A negative result of which results in program loop back to 197; a positive result of which enables 207 and loads software timer 215 with a predetermined numerical value stored within the program internal to 182. Subroutine 209,tests status of 208, a negative result of said test being a loop to 207; a positive result disabling 191 and 200 via subroutine 218 and returning to 197.

In the present embodiment a remote control receiver is used for element 180. When remote control receiver 180 receives a valid code from a remote transmitter, 180 outputs a valid code voltage via 181 to 182. If invalid codes are received 180 will ignore subsequent code inputs for a period of time, thus foiling the attempts made by a code scanning device. 214 tests for a valid code condition. A positive response enables 216. Ignition circuit status, i.e., engine running, via conductor 194, is monitored by circuit 183. Subroutine 220 monitors status from 183 via conductor 184. Engine running status is verified by subroutine 217. If the result of the test is positive, the program continues; if the result is negative, subroutine 217 returns to software timer 215, where a time-out condition occurs, and the program returns to 197.

Maintenance mode of operation can be entered into and exited from only when the engine is running. When said remote control receiver 180 receives a valid code from a remote transmitter, 180 outputs a valid code voltage via 181 to 182. 214 tests for a valid code condition while 217 tests for a engine running condition. A positive response enables 216 and 218. If a corresponding discreet code input occurs at 214, said light emitting diode 197 stops flashing, relay 188 is enabled by 182 via conductor 189 making starter solenoid circuit 190 indicated by an encircled "S", operable via conductor 195.

Ignition circuit 185 via conductor 194 is monitored by circuit 183, element 182 subroutine 220 monitors status from 183 via conductor 184 to test engine running status by subroutine 217. If subroutine 221 determines engine is stopped, program returns to 197 and loops, waiting for a valid code input at 180.

While the invention has been particularly shown and described with reference to preferred embodiments thereof, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the foregoing and other changes in form and details may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Likewise, such permutations of the embodiments described herein as would become obvious to those having a modicum of skill in the art are contemplated by the present inventors as within the range of equivalents of the claimed invention as described above and defined below.