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Patent Searching and Data


Title:
BAKING TOOL
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/234462
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The purpose of this invention is to receive a croissant from a standard croissant forming machine and then manipulate the croissant from the original straight shape into a circular shape. This is performed by placing the straight croissant into a cradle assembly of articulated arms mounted to a platen which is continuously driven as a conveyor. The arms are connected to the platens using bearings. The arms extend through the bearings below the platen. The articulated arms extended below the platen are then guided by tracks below the platen. As the platen is moved on the conveyor the tracks guide the animated arms into such a position as to cause the croissant to be formed from straight to round. The formed croissant are removed by a secondary conveyor belt above the platen.

Inventors:
INGLIS, Brian (4 riverdene, Berwick Upon Tweed Northumberland td152jd, td152jd, GB)
Application Number:
EP2018/066601
Publication Date:
December 27, 2018
Filing Date:
June 21, 2018
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
INGLIS, Brian (4 riverdene, Berwick Upon Tweed Northumberland td152jd, td152jd, GB)
International Classes:
A21C9/08; A21C11/00
Foreign References:
DE4429382A11996-02-15
US3433182A1969-03-18
ES2066647A21995-03-01
GB2174036A1986-10-29
DE102010027622A12011-11-24
DE4039793A11991-07-04
EP1342415A22003-09-10
EP0571089A11993-11-24
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Claims:
CLAIMS:

1. A food manipulating apparatus for shaping rolled croissant dough units, the apparatus comprising:

a first conveyor belt; and

a first arm and a second arm attached to the first conveyor belt and configured to move towards each other in a pivoting or a sliding motion to shape a rolled croissant dough unit;

wherein the motions of the first and second arms are driven by at least one driving mechanism.

2. The food manipulating apparatus of claim 1 wherein the first and second arms are both attached to the same side of the first conveyor belt.

3. The food manipulating apparatus of claim 1 or claim 2 wherein the first and second arms move towards each other substantially in a plane parallel to the plane of the first conveyor belt.

4. The food manipulating apparatus of any preceding claim wherein the first conveyor belt comprises a plurality of pairs of first and second arms wherein the respective first and second arms of each pair are configured to move towards each other in a pivoting or a sliding motion to shape a rolled croissant dough unit.

5. The food manipulating apparatus of any preceding claim further comprising a second conveyor belt configured for carrying rolled croissant dough units to within the operating range of a pair of arms or pairs of arms carried on the first conveyor belt.

6. The food manipulating apparatus of claim 5 wherein rolled croissant dough units are carried on an upwards facing surface of the second conveyor belt and the first and second conveyor belts are configured so that the rolled croissant dough units move to within the operating range of a pair of arms or pairs of arms carried on an upwards facing surface of the first conveyor belt, with the first conveyor belt located below the second.

7. The food manipulating apparatus of claim 5 wherein rolled dough croissant units are carried on an upwards facing surface of the second conveyor belt and the first and second conveyor belts are configured so that the rolled dough croissant units move to within the operating range of a pair of arms or pairs of arms carried on a downwards facing surface of the first conveyor belt, with the first conveyor belt located above the second conveyor belt.

8. The food manipulating apparatus of any one of claims 5 to 7 wherein the second conveyor belt is sufficiently narrow, so that rolled dough croissant units placed upon it, with their length transverse to the direction of travel, have ends projecting beyond the side edges of the belt.

9. The food manipulating apparatus of any one of claims 5 to 8 wherein the second conveyor belt is provided with locating pegs, projecting upwards from the upwards facing surface of the said second conveyor belt. 10. The food manipulating apparatus of any one of claims 5 to 8 wherein the first conveyor belt is provided with locating pegs, configured to project through apertures on the second conveyor belt, when rolled croissant dough units are within the operating range of a pair of arms or pairs of arms carried on the first conveyor belt .

1 1. The food manipulating apparatus of any preceding claim wherein the first conveyor belt comprises a series of platens, linked one to another.

12. The food manipulating apparatus of claim 1 1 wherein each platen carries at least one pair of first and second arms.

13. The food manipulating apparatus of any preceding claim wherein the first and second arms move towards each other in a pivoting motion and each arm pivots about a pivot point at one end.

14. The food manipulating apparatus of claim 13 wherein the pivot points at the ends of the two arms are located spaced apart and transverse to the direction of travel of the first conveyor belt.

15. The food manipulating apparatus of claim 14 wherein the first and second arms are moveable from a first, open, position where the ends of each arm distal to its pivot point is directed outwards towards the respective edge of the first conveyor belt to a second, closed position when the shaping of a rolled croissant dough unit is complete.

16. The food manipulating apparatus of any one of claims 13 to 15 wherein at least one of the first and second pivoting arms has a curved form.

17. The food manipulating apparatus of any one of claims 13 to 15 wherein at least one of the first and second pivoting arms is articulated.

18. The food manipulating apparatus of claim 17 wherein the at least one articulated arm has first and second sections, one connected to the next. 19. The food manipulating apparatus of claim 17 or claim 18 wherein both of the first and second arms, or both of each pair of first and second arms is articulated.

20. The food manipulating apparatus of any one of claims 13 to 19 wherein driving of the pivoting arms or sections of the pivoting arms is achieved by a driving member or members passing through the first conveyor belt, each driving member connecting at a pivot point on the arm.

21. The food manipulating apparatus of claim 20 wherein the first conveyor belt is provided with an aperture or apertures such as a slot or slots, to allow free passage for the driving member or driving members passing through the said first conveyor belt.

22. The food manipulating apparatus of any one of claims 1 to 12 wherein the first and second arms slide towards each other. 23. The food manipulating apparatus of claim 22 wherein the first and second arms are driven by one or more driving members passing through the first conveyor belt and connecting to the respective arm.

24. The food manipulating apparatus of any preceding claim wherein at least one driving member connected to an arm is moved by a cam mechanism.

25. The food manipulating apparatus of claim 24 wherein each arm is connected to at least one driving member and the driving members are moved by one or more cam mechanism.

26. The food manipulating apparatus of claim 24 or claim 25 wherein the driving member or driving members is/are provided with one or more cams or cam followers and the driving mechanism is provided with corresponding cam followers or cams. 27. The food manipulating apparatus of any one of claims 1 to 23 wherein an electric motor drive or drives moves the first and second arms.

28. The food manipulating apparatus of any preceding claim wherein the first and second arms are resiliently biased to a selected position.

29. A method of shaping rolled croissant dough units, the method comprising: providing an apparatus according to any one of claims 1 to 28;

feeding rolled croissant croissant dough units onto the first conveyor belt or onto the second conveyor belt, when one is provided; and

operating the apparatus to shape rolled croissant dough units.

Description:
Baking Tool

Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to a food manipulating apparatus for shaping rolled croissant dough.

Background to the Invention

When making croissants, dough is rolled out into sheets, and the sheet is then cut into triangles. Each triangle is then rolled up from base to tip to form an elongate, straight, dough unit. A point of the triangle is on the outside of the roll of dough, at the midpoint of its length.

Traditionally the straight dough unit is then shaped into a generally crescent shape, allowed to rise (prove) and then baked to form the croissant. The crescent shape can vary in curvature, for example in some croissants the ends of the straight dough unit are curved round to touch each other, even to overlap.

Some croissants, in particular some mass produced croissants, are not shaped into the crescent shape, but the straight rolled dough units are proved and baked to provide what can be described as straight croissants.

Traditionally these processes are done by hand, however machinery is used for the production of large quantities of croissant dough units. The dough units are then proved and baked. Alternatively dough units can be frozen, before or after proving, and stored for baking later, typically after transport to a location where fresh baked product is to be sold.

In mass production, machines may be used to prepare the dough, roll it into a sheet, and cut it into triangles. The triangles can be machine rolled into a straight croissant shape. Bending (shaping) into the traditional croissant shape can then be done by hand, for example as the dough units pass by on a conveyor belt. Alternatively a secondary apparatus may be used to shape the dough. Shaping the dough into the traditional form by machine, avoiding manual intervention, presents challenges. It is desirable that an acceptable baked product is made consistently. The position of the tip of the triangle on the outside of the rolled dough unit is important. If the tip is not in the desired position with respect to the surface on which the croissant is shaped and/or baked, then (during proving or baking) the croissant may become misshapen or the rolled up layers of dough may even unravel. Generally the preferred rotational position of the raw/un-proofed croissant dough unit is that the tip of the triangle is pointing down almost in contact with the surface on which the rolled dough unit is shaped.

There are existing methods of shaping croissant dough units by machine. For example, one method involves carrying rolled croissant dough units on a conveyor belt. At a shaping station on the belt's travel, a piston like projection extends upwards through a hole in the belt just in front of each dough unit. A group of rollers, descending from above the conveyor belt, then act together to shape each dough unit around its respective projection. The rollers and projection then move away from the belt as the dough unit continues towards further processing. Such a method requires accurate placement of each dough unit on the conveyor belt. The rollers carry out relatively complex motions to move into position, shape the dough unit, and then retreat away from the belt.

Another known method involves carrying dough units on a conveyor belt and making use of a robotic arm or arms to substitute for manual (human) shaping of dough units. The robotic arm moves to above a dough unit on the belt, descends and then a jaw mechanism on the robotic arm shapes the dough unit. The robotic arm then ascends and moves to above another dough unit; and the process is repeated. Whilst such methods can shape dough units successfully, such mechanisms are relatively complex and may require significant attention from an operator in use. Additionally a complex computer controlled mechanism, such as a robotic arm, often requires significant support from a skilled maintenance and repair specialist. Accordingly, there remains a need for improved apparatus for shaping dough units, especially where traditional shaped croissants are desired.

Description of the Invention

According to a first aspect the present invention provides a food manipulating apparatus for shaping rolled croissant dough units, the apparatus comprising:

a first conveyor belt; and

a first arm and a second arm attached to the first conveyor belt and configured to move towards each other in a pivoting or a sliding motion to shape a rolled croissant dough unit;

wherein the motions of the first and second arms are driven by at least one driving mechanism.

The rolled croissant dough units (hereafter also referred to as rolled dough units or dough units) can be prepared in the known manner.

The first and second arms are advantageously both attached to the same side of the belt, so that they may readily co-operate together in shaping the rolled dough units. The arms may move towards each other substantially in a plane parallel to the plane of the first conveyor belt.

Typically the first conveyor belt will comprise a plurality of pairs of first and second arms, each pair attached to the belt and with the respective first and second arms configured to move towards each other to shape a dough unit as described above. The first and second arms move towards each other to shape the dough unit and will then typically move apart again, for example immediately, so as to leave the shaped dough unit relatively unencumbered, allowing it to be more easily manipulated in further processing. Thus several rolled dough units may be shaped at the same time and/or in rapid succession as the first conveyor belt moves along. The shaping action of each pair of arms may occur at a shaping station. The shaping station is a selected position along the length of the first conveyor belt where rolled dough units are shaped before continuing on to further processing, such as proving and baking, or freezing and packing. Making use of first and second arms attached to the first conveyor belt can be a convenient arrangement that may avoid the need for relatively complex mechanisms on the same side of the belt as the dough units.

The rolled dough units that are to be shaped by the arms may be carried on the first conveyor belt and may be shaped by the action of the arms at a selected place (e.g. a shaping station). Thus for example straight dough units may be deposited on the first conveyor belt, each within reach of a respective pair of arms. After the arms move towards each other to shape the dough unit, they may then move apart again. The shaped dough units can then be removed from the belt for further processing. Conveniently the dough units may each be placed upon the first belt with their length transverse to the direction of travel. The first and second arm then move towards each other in the direction transverse to the direction of travel of the belt. However, removal of shaped dough units from a first conveyor belt carrying a pair of arms in close proximity to each unit may be awkward.

Therefore the apparatus may further comprise a second conveyor belt configured for carrying rolled dough units to within the operating range of a pair of arms or pairs of arms carried on the first conveyor belt. The term, within the operating range, means that the two conveyor belts approach sufficiently closely to each other so that a pair of arms can move to shape a dough unit. To allow time for the arms to interact properly with the dough units as they close, the first and second belts may be configured to run in the same direction as they move into operating range i.e. the pairs of arms and dough units are moving in the same direction as they interact.

In principle dough units can be carried on an upwards facing surface of a second conveyor belt that moves to within the operating range of a pair of arms or pairs of arms carried on a downwards facing surface of the first conveyor belt, with the first belt located above the second belt. However, with this arrangement the shaping of the dough units will be hidden from view, at least to some extent, by the presence of the first belt above the second belt. Conveniently the dough units may be carried on an upwards facing surface of a second belt and move to within the operating range of a pair of arms or pairs of arms carried on an upwards facing surface of the first belt, with the first belt located below the second. With such an arrangement the dough units and the operations to shape them can remain in full view.

Conveniently the second belt is relatively narrow, so that dough units placed upon it, with their length transverse to the direction of travel, have ends projecting beyond the side edges of the belt. This allows the arms carried on the first conveyor belt below to readily engage with and shape the dough units. A relatively narrow second belt has the further advantage that shaped dough units may be readily conveyed off the second belt onto a further conveyor arrangement - as discussed further below and with reference to a specific embodiment. The second belt may be provided with locating pegs, projecting upwards from the upwards facing surface of a second belt. A locating peg may be provided in front of and behind each location on the second belt where a rolled dough unit is placed for shaping. The locating peg or pegs associated with each dough unit may serve to keep the dough unit in place as it is shaped and/or may act as a former, aiding achievement of the desired shape.

As an alternative the first belt may be provided with locating pegs, projecting upwards from its upwards facing surface. In this arrangement the second belt may be provided with apertures such as slots. As the second belt approaches to within the operating range of arms on the first belt, the locating pegs on the first belt protrude through the apertures on the second belt. In this position the locating pegs can function to keep the dough unit in place as it is shaped and/or act as a former.

The first conveyor belt may be of any suitable belt material suitable for safe interaction with foodstuffs, provided it has sufficient strength for carrying the arms or pairs of arms and associated mechanism. Conveniently rather than being made from a continuous sheet of belt material, the first conveyor belt may comprise a series of platens, linked one to another. Each platen may be a substantially planar section of rigid or semi-rigid material such as of polypropylene sheeting or a composite sheet constructed of layers of suitable material(s). Each platen may carry at least one pair of first and second arms. A belt comprising platens can be convenient as the platen sections may more readily support the attached arms and associated components, avoiding unwanted flexing and possible loss of control of the motion of the arms. The platens may be releasably attached one to another by the use of releasable fixings. Where an arm on a platen is damaged or another fault occurs in the mechanism attached to a platen, the platen can be removed and replaced readily. This can avoid the need to replace the whole belt, or alternatively, the need carry our repairs or maintenance of an arm in situ. Similarly the second conveyor belt may be of any suitable belt material suitable for safe interaction with foodstuffs, provided it has sufficient strength for carrying rolled dough units. Similarly the second conveyor belt may comprise a series of platens, linked one to another. The first and second arms may take various forms and be driven in various ways.

The arms may move towards each other substantially in a plane parallel to the plane of the first conveyor belt. The plane of the first conveyor belt is defined at the point in the belt's travel where the shaping occurs e.g. in the vicinity of a shaping station. Such a motion can readily contact and shape a rolled dough unit travelling on either the first conveyor belt or on the second conveyor belt, when one is used.

Where the arms move towards each other in a pivoting motion each arm may pivot about one end. The pivot points at the ends of the two arms may be located spaced apart and transverse to the direction of travel of the first conveyor belt. In use of such arms the first and second arms may move from a first, open, position where the ends of each arm distal to its pivot point is directed outwards towards the respective edge of the first conveyor belt. When driven the arms pivot about their respective pivot points with the ends distal to the pivots moving towards each other, typically in the direction forwards of the pivot points, i.e. in the direction of travel of the belt. This pivoting forwards and towards each other motion of the arms, sweeps a dough unit placed forwards of the pivot points into the desired shape. The arms stop moving towards each other when they reach a desired second, closed, position and shaping of the rolled dough unit is complete. The arms may then move back to the first position again. At least one of the first and second pivoting arms may have a curved form, to aid in producing the desired curved shape of the shaped dough unit and hence baked croissant. Typically, to produce a generally symmetrical curvature to the shaped dough unit, both arms may have the same or substantially the same length and/or curvature.

Additionally or alternatively at least one of the first and second pivoting arms may be articulated. The articulated arm or arms may have two or more arm sections, one connected to the next, end to end. Typically an articulated arm will have two sections, but may have more. The first section pivots at the end of one section and is driven by a driving mechanism, the second section pivots at its end joining to the first section, and is also driven by a driving mechanism, which may be a part of the same driving mechanism that drives the first section. Further sections, if fitted, can be driven to rotate in a similar fashion.

An articulated arm allows a more complex motion to be applied to shaping the dough unit. The first section can be driven to contact the dough and start to shape it. The second section can then be driven to pivot with respect to the first section to provide further shaping of the dough. When in its second, closed, position such an articulated arm is bent about the joint between the sections, and can conform more closely to the desired shape of a shaped dough unit.

Typically, to produce a generally symmetrical curvature to each end of the shaped dough unit, both arms may have the same or substantially the same articulation, with each section being of the same or substantially the same length as the corresponding section on the other arm in the pair. Where articulated arm sections are curved the curvature of each section may be the same or substantially the same as that of the corresponding section on the other arm in the pair. Driving of pivoting arms and sections of pivoting arms may be conveniently achieved via a driving member passing through the first conveyor belt and connecting at a pivot point on the arm. The driving member is driven to rotate by a driving mechanism on the opposite side of the first conveyor belt to the arm. The driving member may be a rod passing through the first conveyor belt. Where a pivoting arm is articulated each pivot point may be provided with a driving member passing through the first conveyor belt and for driving a respective section of arm. Driving of such driving members can be by a driving mechanism on the opposite side of the first conveyor belt to the arm.

As the joint between sections of an articulated arm will move its position on the belt (as shown hereafter with respect to a particular embodiment), the belt may be provided with an aperture such as a slot to allow free passage for, or even provide guidance to, a driving member that passes through the belt connects to the joint (pivot point).

As an alternative to first and second arms that pivot towards each other (typically substantially in a plane parallel to the plane of the first conveyor belt) the first and second arms may slide towards each other. The sliding motion may be substantially in a plane parallel to the plane of the first conveyor belt. The arms move towards each other reducing the space between them, to contact and shape a dough unit placed in between.

Driving the arms that move in a sliding motion towards each other may be via one or more driving members passing through the first conveyor belt and connecting to the respective arm. Driving members may pass through an aperture such as a slot to allow free passage for or even provide guidance to a driving member that passes through the belt.

Driving arrangements may take different forms. Conveniently a driving member connected to an arm may be moved (rotated and/or moved from one position to another) by a cam mechanism or mechanisms.

Thus the driving member may be provided with one or more cams or cam followers and the driving mechanism will have corresponding cam followers or cams. At a selected position along the length of the first conveyor belt, such as at a shaping station, the driving mechanism interacts with the cam(s) or cam follower(s) on the driving member, causing the desired motion. With such an arrangement the bulk of the mechanism required to move the first and second arms is not carried along on the first conveyor belt but can be fixed (non-moving).

For example the drive mechanism(s) can be located at a fixed position (at a shaping station), located on the other side of the first conveyor belt from the first and second arms. As the arms on the first conveyor belt pass by the fixed position, one or more cams or cam followers of driving members passing through the belt interact with corresponding cam followers or cams of the drive mechanism(s) to cause the desired motion(s) of the arms.

Drive mechanisms will typically make use of one or more electric motors to provide motive power.

Where cam type mechanisms are not used, an alternative may be the use of electric motor drive typically employing gear and/or belt drive components. However such arrangements may require carrying more or even all of the drive arrangements on the first conveyor belt. For example each pair of arms may be provided with an electric motor drive carried on the first conveyor belt on the other side from the arms. For this reason the cam type drive mechanisms discussed above are convenient and economic, reducing the quantity of complex equipment employed with the apparatus.

To assist in achieving the desired motion of the arms they may be resiliently biased, for example towards a first, open, position. Biasing may be achieved by means of one or more springs.

The apparatus described herein is for use in a method of shaping rolled croissant dough units.

Thus according to a second aspect the present invention provides a method for shaping rolled croissant dough units, the method comprising providing an apparatus as described herein, feeding rolled croissant dough units onto the first conveyor belt or onto the second conveyor belt, when provided; and operating the apparatus to shape croissant dough units. Brief Description of the Drawings

Figure 1 shows in schematic perspective a food manipulating apparatus for shaping rolled croissant dough units;

Figure 1 a shows in schematic cross section elevation part of the apparatus of figure 1 ; Figure 2 shows in schematic plan view the apparatus of figure 1 ;

Figures 3 and 4 show details from figure 2; Figure 5a shows in schematic plan view another arrangement of food manipulating apparatus for shaping rolled croissant dough units; and

Figure 5b shows the arrangement of figure 5a in schematic cross section. Detailed Description of the Invention with Reference to Some Embodiments

In schematic perspective view figure 1 an apparatus 1 for shaping rolled croissant dough units is depicted. The apparatus 1 includes a first conveyor belt 2 which moves in the direction suggested by arrows T In this example first conveyor belt 2 is constructed of linked together platens 3, each of which may be removed and replaced with a like platen, when required for repair and/or maintenance.

Each platen 3 carries a pair of first and second arms 4,6. Each first arm 4 and second arm 6 can move about a pivot 8 at one end of the arm, substantially in the plane of the first belt 2.

The pivot points 8 are spaced apart and transverse to the direction of travel Ti of the first conveyor belt 3. A driving member in the form of a rod 9 (not visible, but see partial schematic cross section elevation figure 1 a), passes through belt 2 and can carry a cam 1 0.

Arms 4,6 are articulated, being divided into two sections 12, 14, the first section 12 can move about pivot 8 and the second section 14 can move about pivot 16 at the join between first and second sections.

As can be seen in figure 1 a driving members 9 and 17 pass through belt 2 and can each carry a cam 1 0. A driving mechanism including cam followers can be used to act on the cams as they pass by, causing the desired pivoting action. (Driving mechanism not shown, but suggested by arrows D).

A second conveyor belt 18 moving in direction T 2 is above the first conveyor belt 2 and is narrower. In this example second belt 18 includes upwards directed projections 20, 22 along its length. As shown in figure 1 and corresponding plan view figure 2 shaping of rolled dough units is carried out as belts 2 and 18 approach sufficiently closely so that dough units on the second conveyor belt move to within the operating range of arms 4,6 . As best seen in figure 2 these figures show (in succession along the belt) the shaping action of the motion of arms 4,6 moving towards each other. A (straight) rolled dough unit 20a is depicted deposited between projections (pegs) 20, 22 of second belt 18. Dough unit 20a is placed transverse to the direction of travel T 2 of belt 18. As the arms 4, 6 pivot towards each other a bent, partially shaped dough unit 20b is formed. Pivoting of second section 14 about pivot 16 results in the fully shaped dough unit 20c. The dough unit 20c has a substantially pentagonal shape.

Arms 4 and 6 then move back to the open position shown in the arms 4, 6 of platen 3a (figure 2). The region where the two belts 2, 18 are close together to allow shaping of dough units may be described as a shaping station on the pathway of the first conveyor belt 2.

Thus as first belt 2 moves along direction Ti and second belt 18 moves along direction T 2 rolled dough units 20 are shaped to the desired curved form for subsequent proving and baking. Shaped dough units can be removed from second belt 18 in various ways. For example a pair of further belts 23, in parallel with and to either side of belt 18 may pick up shaped dough units as they are carried away from belt 2. Belts 23 turn about wheels 24 and their upper surfaces move in the same general direction as T^ To complete the transfer of dough units from belt 18 to belts 23, belt 18 may descend and/or belts 23 ascend as they continue away from belt 2.

Croissants can be made in a range of sizes, typically from 13g to 120g in weight. The conveyor belts and platens employed will be sized accordingly. An example would be for a 80g croissant, the croissant length may be approximately 170mm long (triangle base length before rolling) and the second belt may be of the order of 25mm wide. The first section 12 of arms 4,6 may be of the order of 30mm long each and the second sections 14 about 25mm long. Other dimensions of belt and arms may be employed to suit the selected croissant size and desired final (baked) shape.

Figures 3 and 4 show, in magnified view, parts of the apparatus 1 of figures 1 and 2. In figure 3 bent, partially shaped dough unit 20b is shown and in figure 4 fully shaped dough unit 20c. In these figures slots 25, 26 are depicted. In the example of the apparatus shown herein, these slots will be provided for each pair of arms 4, 6 (not shown in figures 1 and 2 for clarity).

These slots pass through platens 3 that make up first conveyor belt 2. As the arms 4,6 pivot about pivots 8 the positions of pivots 16 moves in an arc, requiring the presence of slots 25, 26 to allow passage of driving members 17, such as shown in figure 1 a. Figure 5a shows in schematic partial plan view an arrangement where locating pegs are carried on the first conveyor belt 2. Figure 5b shows a schematic cross section elevation of the same arrangement .along X-X. As can be seen in these figures, a platen 3 of first conveyor belt 2 carries upwards projecting pegs 22, 20. Second conveyor belt 18 is close to conveyor belt 2 so that rolled dough units placed on it (as in figure 1 ) are in operating range of arms 4, 6. At the same time pegs 20, 22 pass through apertures 28, 30 of belt 2, to allow the pegs to interact with a rolled dough unit placed thereon.