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Title:
BRUSH ENCODING DEVICE, SYSTEM, AND USER INTERFACE TO PROMOTE OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE OF HANDHELD COSMETIC DEVICE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/005484
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A personal care appliance is provided that includes a brushhead for use in skincare; an appliance body having a motor assembly for oscillating the brushhead, wherein the brushhead or a portion of the motor assembly that is configured to oscillate includes a marking; and a brush encoder configured to detect the marking, and determine the oscillation of the brushhead. Further, there is a system and user interface to promote optimum performance of a personal care appliance is provided including: a personal care appliance having an appliance status; and a client device, in communication with the appliance, including circuitry configured to compare the appliance status with the protocol for using the appliance, control display of an indicator based on the comparison.

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Inventors:
STRAKA, Scott (17275 Ne 67th Ct, Redmond, WA, 98052, US)
RUTLEDGE, Ryan (17275 Ne 67th Ct, Redmond, WA, 98052, US)
BAYEH, Daniel (17275 Ne 67th Ct, Redmond, WA, 98052, US)
ALEXANDER, Jeff (17275 Ne 67th Ct, Redmond, WA, 98052, US)
KISSINGER, Jeffrey (17275 Ne 67th Ct, Redmond, WA, 98052, US)
Application Number:
US2017/039492
Publication Date:
January 04, 2018
Filing Date:
June 27, 2017
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
L'OREAL (14 Rue Royale, Paris, Paris, FR)
STRAKA, Scott (17275 Ne 67th Ct, Redmond, WA, 98052, US)
RUTLEDGE, Ryan (17275 Ne 67th Ct, Redmond, WA, 98052, US)
BAYEH, Daniel (17275 Ne 67th Ct, Redmond, WA, 98052, US)
ALEXANDER, Jeff (17275 Ne 67th Ct, Redmond, WA, 98052, US)
KISSINGER, Jeffrey (17275 Ne 67th Ct, Redmond, WA, 98052, US)
International Classes:
A46B13/00; A46B13/02; A46B15/00
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SIGNORE, Philippe, J.C. et al. (Oblon, McClelland Maire & Neustadt, L.L.P.,1940 Duke Stree, Alexandria VA, 22314, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS:

1. A personal care appliance comprising:

a brushhead for use in skincare;

an appliance body having a motor assembly for oscillating the brushhead,

wherein the brushhead or a portion of the motor assembly that is configured to oscillate includes a marking; and

a brush encoder configured to

detect the marking, and

determine the oscillation of the brushhead.

2. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, wherein the brush encoder detects at least one of an oscillation angle, an oscillation amplitude, an oscillation frequency, an oscillation phase, an oscillation velocity, and an oscillation acceleration.

3. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, wherein the brush encoder detects a change in the oscillation.

4. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, further comprising: circuitry configured to generate appliance performance information responsive to one or more inputs indicative of a change in oscillation amplitude.

5. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, further comprising: circuitry configured to generate life-time use information responsive to one or more inputs indicative of a speed.

6. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, further comprising: circuitry configured to generate appliance performance information responsive to one or more inputs indicative of a change in speed.

7. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, further comprising: circuitry configured to negotiate an authorization protocol between a client device and the personal care appliance.

8. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, further comprising: circuitry configured to negotiate an authorization protocol between a network entity and the personal care appliance.

9. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, further comprising: circuitry configured to negotiate and authorize one or more internet protocol (IP) services among a plurality of network entities,

10. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, wherein the brush encoder is an optical encoder.

11. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, further comprising:

at least one of an alert part, an indicator, and a display configured to provide an output to the user based on the determination of the oscillation.

12. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, further comprising a touch screen display configured to receive an input from the user.

13. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, wherein the marking is configured to indicate a type of brushhead.

14. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, wherein the marking includes a set of fiducial marks.

15. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, wherein the marking is an adliesive strip that is adhered to the brushhead or the portion of the motor assembly.

16. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, wherein the marking is a molded feature on the brushhead or the portion of the motor assembly.

17. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, wherein the marking is configured to identify the brushhead uniquely.

18. The personal care appliance as in Claim 1, wherein the brush encoder is configured to track the brushhead usage.

19. A system for testing a personal care appliance comprising:

an inner brushhead for use in skincare including a marking;

an appliance body having a motor assembly for oscillating the inner brushhead;

a brushhead encoder device having

an outer brushhead configured to attach to the appliance body,

a brush encoder configured to

detect the marking, and

determine the oscillation of the brushhead; and a central device in communication with the brushhead encoder device.

20. A method for using a personal care appliance having a brush encoder comprising:

controlling a motor assembly of the appliance to oscillate a brushhead,

wherein the brushhead or a portion of the motor assembly that is configured to oscillate includes a marking;

detecting the marking using the brush encoder; and

controlling display of an indicator based on the detection.

21. A method for controlling display of a user interface for optimizing performance in using a personal care appliance, the method comprising:

receiving a user info or regimen;

receiving a protocol or routine to use the appliance;

receiving an appliance status related to a user's usage of the appliance; comparing the appliance status to a target usage of the appliance in the protocol or routine; and

controlling display of an indicator of the user's perfonnance based on the comparison.

22. The method of Claim 221, the method further comprising:

controlling display of one or more tutorials based on the target usage of the appliance.

23. The method of Claim 221, the method further comprising:

controlling display of one or more products based on at least one of the user info, the regimen, and the target usage of the appliance.

24. The method of Claim 221, the method further comprising:

transmitting a communication to the appliance to control displaying of an indicator on the appliance.

25. The method of Claim 221, the method further comprising:

calculating a score based on the comparison,

wherein the indicator is based on the score.

26. The method of Claim 221, the method further comprising:

storing the appliance status in memory.

27. The method of Claim 221, wherein the appliance status is an oscillation of a brashliead.

28. The method of Claim 221, wherein the appliance status is a usage history of the brushhead.

29. The method of Claim 221, wherein the regimen includes one or more type of brushhead, wherein the protocol or routine to use the appliance is based on the type of brushhead.

30. The method of Claim 221, the method further comprising:

determining the target usage based on the user info or regimen.

31. The method of Claim 30, wherein the user info includes an event date.

32. The method of Claim 30, wherein the user info includes a location.

33. The method of Claim 30, wherein the regimen is based on one or more the protocol or routine to use the appliance.

34. A system to promote optimum performance of a personal care appliance comprising: a client device in communication with the appliance; and

circuitry configured to:

receive a protocol or routine for using the appliance,

detect an appliance status,

compare the appliance status to the protocol or routine,

control display of an indicator based on the comparison.

35. The system of Claim 34, the circuitry further configured to transmit a communication to a client device.

36. The system of Claim 34, the circuitry further configured to

receive a user info or regimen;

communicate the protocol or routine to the appliance;

receive an appliance status.

37. The system of Claim 34, wherein the appliance status is an oscillation of a brushhead.

The system of Claim 34, wherein the appliance status is a type of brushhead.

38. A system to promote optimum performance of a personal care appliance comprising: a personal care appliance having an appliance status; and

a client device, in communication with the appliance, including circuitry configured to compare the appliance status with the protocol for using the appliance,

control display of an indicator based on the comparison.

39. The system as in Claim 38, the circuitry is further configured to receive a set of user attributes, wherein the protocol for using the appliance are based on the set of user attributes.

40. The system as in Claim 38, the personal care appliance further comprising:

a brushhead for use in skincare,

an appliance body having a motor assembly for oscillating the brushhead, and

a brush encoder configured to encode the oscillation of the brushhead,

wherein the encoded oscillation is the appliance status.

41. The system as in Claim 40, where the circuitry is further configured to track a usage of the brushhead.

42. The system as in Claim 40, wherein the appliance status includes a type of brushhead, wherein the circuitry is further configured to identify the type of brushhead based on a detection from the brush encoder.

43. The system as in Claim 40, where the circuitry further is configured to

compare the encoded oscillation with a protocol,

control display of an indicator based on the comparison.

44. A method to promote optimum performance of a personal care appliance, the method comprising:

receiving, by a client device, a user info or regimen and a protocol or routine to use the appliance;

communicating the protocol or routine to the appliance;

receiving an appliance status;

comparing the appliance status to the user info or regimen and protocol or routine; and controlling display of an indicator based on the comparison.

45. The method of Claim 44, the method further comprising:

controlling display of a product for purchase based on the comparison.

46. The method of Claim 44, the method further comprising:

transmitting a communication to a client device.

47. The method of Claim 44, wherein the appliance status is an oscillation of a brushhead.

48. A method to promote optimum performance of a personal care appliance, the method comprising:

contiOlling a motor assembly of the personal care appliance to oscillate a brushhead; detecting an appliance status based on the oscillation; and

controlling display of an indicator.

49. The method of Claim 48, the method further comprising:

controlling the motor assembly of the personal care appliance to oscillate a brushhead based on the appliance status.

Description:
BRUSH ENCODING DEVICE, SYSTEM, AND USER INTERFACE TO PROMOTE OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE OF HANDHELD COSMETIC DEVICE

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of priority from each of U.S. Non-provisional Application Nos. 15/193,570, 15/193,616, and 15/193,661, all filed June 27, 2016, the entire contents of each of which are hereby incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND

Field

[0001] The present disclosure describes a personal care appliance for use in skincare including a brushhead encoder. The present disclosure further describes a user interface for a system to promote optimum performance of a personal care appliance for use in skincare.

SUMMARY

[0002] In an embodiment, a personal care appliance is provided including: a brushhead for use in skincare; an appliance body having a motor assembly for oscillating the brushhead, wherein the brushhead or a portion of the motor assembly that is configured to oscillate includes a marking; and a brush encoder configured to detect the marking, and determine the oscillation of the brushhead.

[0003] In an embodiment, the brush encoder determines at least one of an oscillation angle, an oscillation amplitude, an oscillation frequency, an oscillation phase, an oscillation velocity, an oscillation acceleration.

[0004] In an embodiment, the brush encoder determines a change in the oscillation. [0005] In an embodiment, circuitry is provided that is configured to generate appliance performance information responsive to one or more inputs indicative of a change in oscillation amplitude.

[0006] In an embodiment, circuitry is provided that is configured to generate life-time use information responsive to one or more inputs indicative of a speed.

[0007] In an embodiment, circuitiy is provided that is configured to generate appliance performance information responsive to one or more inputs indicative of a change in speed.

[0008] In an embodiment, circuitry is provided that is configured to negotiate an authorization protocol between a client device and the personal care appliance.

[0009] In an embodiment, circuitry is provided that is configured to negotiate an authorization protocol between a network entity and the personal care appliance.

[0010] In an embodiment, circuitry is provided that is configured to negotiate and authorize one or more internet protocol (IP) services among a plurality of network entities,

[0011] In an embodiment, the brush encoder is an optical encoder.

[0012] In an embodiment, the personal care appliance further includes at least one of an alert part, an indicator, and a display configured to communicate to the user based on the determination of the oscillation.

[0013] In an embodiment, the personal care appliance further includes a touch screen display configured to receive input from the user.

[0014] In an embodiment, the marking is configured to indicate a type of brushhead.

[0015] In an embodiment, the marking includes a set of fiducial marks.

[0016] In an embodiment, the marking includes a magnetic marker.

[0017] In an embodiment, the marking is an adhesive strip that is adhered to the brushhead or the portion of the motor assembly. [0018] In an embodiment, the marking is a molded feature on the brushhead or the portion of the motor assembly.

[0019] In an embodiment, the marking is configured to identify the brushhead uniquely.

[0020] In an embodiment, the brush encoder is configured to track the brushhead usage.

[0021] In an embodiment, a system for testing a personal care appliance is provided including: an inner brushhead for use in skincare including a marking; an appliance body having a motor assembly for oscillating the inner brushhead; a brushhead encoder device having an outer brushhead configured to attach to the appliance body, a brush encoder configured to detect the marking, and determine the oscillation of the brushhead; and a central device in communication with the brushhead encoder device.

[0022] In an embodiment, a method is provided for controlling display of a user interface for optimizing performance in using a personal care appliance is provided including: receiving a user info or regimen; receiving a protocol or routine to use the appliance; receiving an appliance status related to a user's usage of the appliance; comparing the appliance status to a target usage of the appliance in the protocol or routine; and controlling display of an indicator of the user's performance based on the comparison.

[0023] In an embodiment, the method further includes: controlling display of one or more tutorials based on the target usage of the appliance.

[0024] In an embodiment, the method further includes: controlling display of one or more products based on at least one of the user info, the regimen, and the target usage of the appliance.

[0025] In an embodiment, the method further includes: transmitting a communication to the appliance to control displaying of an indicator on the appliance.

[0026] In an embodiment, the method further includes: calculating a score based on the comparison, wherein the indicator is based on the score. [0027] In an embodiment, the method further includes: storing the appliance status in memory.

[0028] In an embodiment, the appliance status is an oscillation of a brushhead.

[0029] In an embodiment, the appliance status is a usage history of the brushhead.

[0030] In an embodiment, the regimen includes one or more type of brushhead, wherein the protocol or routine to use the appliance is based on the type of brushhead.

[0031] In an embodiment, the method further includes: determining the target usage based on the user info or regimen.

[0032] In an embodiment, the user info includes an event date.

[0033] In an embodiment, the user info includes a location.

[0034] In an embodiment, the regimen is based on one or more the protocol or routine to use the appliance.

[0035] In an embodiment, a system is provided to promote optimum performance of a personal care appliance is provided including: a client device in communication with the appliance; and circuitry configured to: receive a protocol or routine for using the appliance, detect an appliance status, compare the appliance status to the protocol or routine, control display of an indicator based on the comparison.

[0036] In an embodiment, circuitry is further configured to transmit a communication to a client device.

[0037] In an embodiment, circuitry is further configured to receive a user info or regimen; communicate the protocol or routine to the appliance; and receive an appliance status.

[0038] In an embodiment, the appliance status is an oscillation of a brushhead.

[0039] In an embodiment, the appliance status is a type of brushhead.

[0040] In an embodiment, a system to promote optimum performance of a personal care appliance is provided including: a personal care appliance having an appliance status; and a client device, in communication with the appliance, including circuitry configured to compare the appliance status with the protocol for using the appliance, control display of an indicator based on the comparison.

[0041] In an embodiment, the circuitry is further configured to receive a set of user attributes, wherein the protocol for using the appliance are based on the set of user attributes.

[0042] In an embodiment, the personal care appliance further includes: a brushhead for use in skincare, an appliance body having a motor assembly for oscillating the brushhead, and a brush encoder configured to encode the oscillation of the brushhead, wherein the encoded oscillation is the appliance status.

[0043] In an embodiment, the circuitry is further configured to track a usage of the brushhead.

[0044] In an embodiment, the appliance status includes a type of brushhead, wherein the circuitry is further configured to identify the type of brushhead based on a detection from the brush encoder.

[0045] In an embodiment, the circuitry further is configured to compare the encoded oscillation with a protocol, and control display of an indicator based on the comparison.

[0046] In an embodiment, a method to promote optimum performance of a personal care appliance is provided including: receiving, by a client device, a user info or regimen and a protocol or routine to use the appliance; communicating the protocol or routine to the appliance; receiving an appliance status; comparing the appliance status to the user info or regimen and protocol or routine; and controlling display of an indicator based on the comparison.

[0047] In an embodiment, the method further includes: controlling display of a product for purchase based on the comparison. [0048] In an embodiment, the method further includes: transmitting a communication to a client device.

[0049] In an embodiment, the appliance status is an oscillation of a brushhead.

[0050] In an embodiment, a method to promote optimum performance of a personal care appliance is provided including: controlling a motor assembly of the personal care appliance to oscillate a brushhead; detecting an appliance status based on the oscillation; and controlling display of an indicator.

[0051] In an embodiment, the method further includes: controlling the motor assembly of the personal care appliance to oscillate a brushhead based on the appliance status.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0052] A more complete appreciation of the embodiments and many of the attendant advantages thereof will be readily obtained as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

[0053] FIGURES 1A-1B show perspective drawings of an appliance having a brushhead and a brush encoder according to an example;

[0054] FIGURES 1C- 1D show perspective schematic diagrams of the appliance according to an example;

[0055] FIGURE 2A shows a perspective view of a brushliead attachment mechanism including a drive hub of the appliance and the brushhead divided into an outer brusliliead portion and an inner brushhead portion according to an example;

[0056] FIGURE 2B shows a perspective view of the inner brushhead portion having a marking according to an example;

[0057] FIGURE 2C shows a top view of the brushhead portion according to an example; [0058] FIGURES 2D-2G each show a cross-section of a brushhead that is positioned on the drive hub and connected to a drive shaft according to an example;

[0059] FIGURES 3A-3B are graphics showing an orientation of the brush encoder detecting the marking according to an example;

[0060] FIGURE 3C shows a graphic representing a signal generated by the brush encoder detecting the marking according to an example;

[0061] FIGURE 3D shows a cross-section of a portion of the marking having multiple layers according to an example;

[0062] FIGURE 4A is a brush oscillation graph showing curves representing an amplitude of oscillation as determined by the brush encoder as a function of a force applied on the brushhead when in use at a certain frequency according to an example;

[0063] FIGURE 4B is a brush oscillation graph showing a first curve representing the amplitude of oscillation determined by the brush encoder as a function of time, a second curve representing a target profile, and a target threshold according to an example;

[0064] FIGURE 4C is a brush oscillation graph showing an oscillation displacement, an oscillation velocity, and an oscillation acceleration over a number of periods of oscillation according to an example;

[0065] FIGURE 5A shows a drawing of a backside of the appliance according to an example;

[0066] FIGURE 5B shows a drawing of the backside of the appliance including an indicator according to an example;

[0067] FIGURE 5C shows a drawing of the backside of the appliance including a display according to an example;

[0068] FIGURE 5D shows a drawing of the backside of the appliance including a timer and a score according to an example; [0069] FIGURE 6A shows a system to promote an optimal performance of the appliance including the appliance in communication with a central device according to an example;

[0070] FIGURE 6B shows different examples of the central device including a mobile device, a wearable electronic, a television or magic mirror, a personal computer, and a network router according to an example;

[0071] FIGURE 6C shows a system including a baish encoder device including an outer brushhead portion having the brush encoder and a peripheral device configured for encoder processing according to an example;

[0072] FIGURE 6D is a diagram of a system to promote optimum performance of a personal care appliance according to one example;

[0073] FIGURES 7A-7E are set of flow diagrams describing methods to promote an optimal performance of the appliance according to different examples;

[0074] FIGURE 7F-7J shows additional aspects related to the set of flow diagrams describing methods to promote an optimal performance of the appliance;

[0075] FIGURES 7K-7M show examples of algorithms for performing comparisons of a appliance status with a respective routine;

[0076] FIGURE 8A-8F is a flow diagram describing a method performed on a central device to promote an optimal performance of an appliance according to an example;

[0077] FIGURE 8G shows examples of receiving a query based on the appliance status or the comparison;

[0078] FIGURE 8H is a diagram of a computer system having a set of software modules in the central device in the system for promoting optimum performance of the appliance according to an example; and

[0079] FIGURES 9A-9X show screenshots of examples of the set of software modules implemented on the mobile device according to an example. DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0080] The present disclosure describes systems, methods, and related devices to operation of a personal care appliance. The personal care appliance can be used to perform a routine for skin care of a user. The routine can include one or more regimens, where each regimen has a set of protocols. An example of a protocol includes using a personal care appliance having a brushhead to condition the user's skin by applying a particular brushhead, oscillating at a particular oscillation, to a particular portion of the user's skin for a particular duration.

[0081] The disclosed embodiments include a handheld personal care appliance or appliance having a motor assembly for oscillating a brushhead at an oscillation including a frequency and amplitude, and a brush encoder configured to detect the oscillation of the brushhead. The brusliliead can have one or more sets of bristles for applying to a person's face or body. An exemplary brushhead for use with a personal care appliance is an exfoliating brushhead for treating a user's epidermis as described in U.S. Patent No. 9,107,486 incorporated herein by reference. The brushhead can further include a marking or a set of fiducial marks that are detected by the brush encoder. In one example, the set of fiducial marks can be a set of engravings on a part of the brushhead. In an aspect, the marking or the set of fiducial marks can be configured to provide a precision of the amplitude of the oscillation of the brushhead, which are sensed by the brush encoder. In another aspect the marking or the set of fiducial marks can be a barcode used to identify a type of the brushhead such as an acne cleansing brush or an dynamic facial brush.

[0082] The brash encoder can be configured to promote optimum performance of the brushhead with the appliance. The brush encoder can be configured to provide calibration data of a part of the appliance or a combination of the appliance with the brushhead during manufacturing as well as prior to use in a regimen. Tracking of the oscillation of the brushhead can be used to coach proper (e.g. as prescribed) usage within a session, as well as monitor goal tracking over a period of time including a prescription or regimen.

[0083] In one embodiment, the motor assembly can produce motion at sonic frequencies. The amplitude can be described as a displacement or an angle according to an example. An exemplary device for providing oscillating sonic movement is the Clarisonic brush (Clarisonic, Redmond, WA) described in U.S. Patent No. 7,320,691 , incorporated herein by reference in its entirety, which describes an optimal frequency for providing oscillating sonic movement.

[0084] In one example, the motor assembly is configured to produce an oscillation frequency of less than 200 Hz. In one example, the motor assembly is configured to produce an oscillation frequency of greater than 10 Hz. The brushhead and the set of bristles can create a second order mechanical dynamic motion.

[0085] The motor assembly can have an optimal oscillation frequency unique to each manufactured appliance and in concert with an attached brush or implement. The optimal oscillation frequency can have secondary effects on another appliance part such as the power storage source, the motor assembly, as well as cause heating.

[0086] In an example, the brush encoder is configured to track the oscillation of the brushhead by detecting the set of fiducial markings. The brush encoder can be configured to detect or to measure at least one of the frequency, the amplitude of the oscillation of the brushhead according to an example. In an example, the brush encoder can be configured to detect or to measure a phase shift of the frequency of oscillation. The brush encoder can be configured to create a waveform representing the oscillation.

Uses of brush encoder information

[0087] In an example the brush encoder can be used to monitor and to test the appliance and the brushhead individually, as well as in their combination. In an example the brush encoder can be used to calibrate the appliance to the brushhead. In an aspect, the brush encoder can be used to tune a part of the motor assembly to oscillate. Further, the brush encoder can be used to monitor a status of a part of the motor assembly. In an example the brush encoder can be used to determine the type of the brushhead. In an example the brush encoder can be used to perform a set of self-diagnostics of the combination of the appliance and the brushhead. An example of a self-diagnostic test is to diagnose or determine when there is a residual formulation on the bristles of the brushhead or to determine a type of the attached brushhead.

[0088] In an example the brush encoder can be configured to monitor and to test manufacturing and production of a part of the appliance. In an example, the brush encoder can be interchanged and removably attached to different appliances such that the appliance can be tested.

[0089] The disclosed embodiments include use of a central device operating a software application having a set of software modules to promote optimum performance of the appliance. The central device can be in communication with the appliance in a number of ways, including wired, wireless, and through a set of contacts. An example of the central device can be a mobile device running the software application that is configured to be in communication with the appliance. The software application can be configured to receive the oscillation of the brushhead as detected by the brush encoder and to provide feedback to a user.

[0090] Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals designate identical or corresponding parts throughout the several views.

FIGURES 1A-B

[0091] FIGURES 1A-1B show perspective drawings of an appliance 100 according to an example. The appliance 100 includes a body 102 having a handle portion 104 and a head attachment portion 106. The head attachment portion 106 is configured to removable ly attach a head, such as brushhead 120, to the appliance 100. As shown in FIGURE IB, the appliance 100 includes a brush encoder 140.

[0092] The body 102 houses an operating structure of the appliance 100. As shown in a block diagram form in FIG. 1C, the operating structure in one embodiment includes a motor assembly 1 12, a power storage source 116, such as a rechargeable battery, and a controller 150. The controller 150 includes a drive control 152 and a communication part 154. In an aspect, the controller 150 can be controlled by on/off button 132 configured and arranged to selectively connect power from the power storage source 116 to the motor assembly 112. The power storage source 116 can be charged by power delivered by a cable connected to the appliance (not shown). In an alternative embodiment the power storage source 116 can be charged by any wireless means including by pLink charging system, inductive Qi charging system and AirFuel. A wireless charging status can be shown as an indicator on the appliance or on the central device (See FIGURE 9H).

[0093] In an example the communication part 154 can include circuitry and hardware for communication with a central device 620 (See FIGURES 6A-6B). In an example the communication part 154, or optionally the drive control 152, can include circuitry and hardware for communication with an alert part, an indicator, or a display 160 (See FIGURES ID and 5B-D). The communication part 154 can include a CPU, a I/O interface, and a network controller such as BCM43342 Wi-Fi, Frequency Modulation, and Bluetooth combo chip from Broadcom, for interfacing with a network. The hardware can be designed for reduced size. For example, the CPU may be an APL0778 from Apple Inc., or may be other processor types that would be recognized by one of ordinary skill in the art. Alternatively, the CPU may be implemented on an FPGA, ASIC, PLD or using discrete logic circuits, as one of ordinary skill in the art would recognize. Further, the CPU may be implemented as multiple processors cooperatively working in parallel to perform the instructions of the inventive processes described above.

[0094] In some embodiments, the controller 150 incudes a programmed microcontroller or processor, which is configured to control the oscillation of the brashhead by delivery of power to the motor assembly 1 12. In an aspect, either the drive control 152 or the communication part 154 can include the CPU, memory and store a usage of each brashhead uniquely and by the type of brashhead according to an example.

[0095] The motor assembly 112 in some embodiments includes an electric drive motor 1 13 that drives an attached head, such as the brashhead 120, via a drive shaft or armature 114. When the brashhead 120 is mounted to the head attachment portion 106, the motor assembly 1 12 is configured to impart motion to the brashhead 120. The motor assembly 1 12 may be configured to oscillate the brashhead 120 at sonic frequencies, typically in the range of 80- 300 Hz, oscillating the brashhead 120 back and forth within a range or amplitude of 3-20 degrees.

[0096] The motor assembly 1 12 may be configured to oscillate the brashhead 120 at a natural resonance or resonant frequency as detennined by: 2n - F = , where K is a system spring rate, J is a oscillating inertia, and F is the resonant frequency in Hertz. Loading the bristles causes a change in the spring rate due to bristle bending and a change in system inertia by removing free bristle tips from an oscillating mass.

[0097] In some embodiments, as will be described in more detail below, the brashhead 120 is operated in loaded or unloaded conditions at frequencies from about 40 Hz to 300 Hz with a range of about 3-17 degrees. In other embodiments, the brashhead 120 is operated in a loaded condition at frequencies from about 40 Hz to 300 Hz, a range or amplitude of 8-12 degrees, and a duty cycle of about 38-44%. [0098] One example of a motor assembly 1 12 that may be employed by the appliance 100 to oscillate the brushhead 120 is shown and described in U.S. Pat. No. 7,786,626, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. However, it should be understood that this is merely an example of the structure and operation of one such appliance and that the structure, operation frequency and oscillation amplitude of such an appliance could be varied, depending in part on its intended application and/or characteristics of the brushhead 120, such as its inertial properties, etc. In another example, the brushhead encoder can be configured to track linear motion such as in is the Clarisonic Opal™ device (Clarisonic, Redmond, WA), which is described by U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2009/0306577, incoiporated herein by reference in its entirety.

[0099] In some embodiments of the present disclosure, the frequency ranges are selected so as to drive the brushhead 120 at near resonance. Thus, selected frequency ranges are dependent, in part, on the inertial properties of the brushhead 120.

[00100] It will be appreciated that driving the attached head at near resonance provides many benefits, including the ability to drive the attached head at suitable amplitudes in loaded conditions (e.g. when contacting the skin) while consuming the least amount of energy from the power storage source. For a more detailed discussion on the design parameters of the appliance, please see U.S. Pat. No. 7,786,626, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

FIGURE ID

[00101] FIGURE ID shows a schematic diagram of an appliance 100" similar to that of appliance 100', further including an alert part, an indicator, or a display 160 according to an example (See FIGURES 5B-5D). The alert part can be configured to give an alert to the user based on the brush encoder 140 or the controller 150. The alert can be a sound, a visual alert, or a vibration or haptic feedback. In an aspect, the indicator and/or the display can be configured to communicate to the user, such as a routine on where and how to use the appliance 100" according to an example. In an aspect, the display can be a touch display and configured to receive input from the user.

[00102] A routine can include one or more regimens, where each regimen has a set of protocols. FIGURE 9D shows an example of a routine having an event date 901, and a face regimen (See FIGURE 91) with two protocols, one for each type of brushhead. The routine further can include a plan for a number of sessions. The plan can be based on the event date 901 according to an example. Each session can record a score 534 matching the protocol (See FIGURE 9C). An example of the score 534 can be based on multiplying the oscillation speed, pressure, and duration with each other. Other regimens include a regimen pedi 840 (See FIGURE 9 J), a regimen body 842 (See FIGURE 9K). As shown in FIGURE 9B, a protocol designer 836 can be used to define a regimen with a set of protocols. The regimen can have a protocol name, a type of brushhead, a duration, an applied force and a series of steps including a particular skin region to apply the protocol according to an example.

FIGURE 2A

[00103] Next, parts of the brushhead are described in different examples. Referring now to FIGURE 2A, an brushhead attacliment mechanism can include an inner brushhead portion 210, having a marking 240, interfacing with the drive hub 110, which oscillates through a selected angle or amplitude during operation of the appliance 100.

[00104] The marking 240 can be a set of fiducial marks that are detected by the brush encoder 140. In one example, the marking 240 can be a printed barcode or a set of engravings on a part of the brushhead. In an example the marking 240 can be a strip sized to cover a desired max angle. In an aspect, the marking 240 can be configured to provide a precision of the amplitude of the oscillation of the brushhead. In an example, the marking 240 can have 294 lines per inch (LPI). In an example each line can be developed by a contact photolithography process and have an accuracy based on a resolution of the contact photolithography process and the brushhead diameter. In an example one or more lines can be based on the oscillation such that they are configured to have an aliasing effect with respect to the oscillation. For instance, when the brushhead is oscillating at a specific frequency, the one or more lines can appear to be still based on a sampling rate of the brush encoder. A precision of the brush encoder can be based on variations of the aliasing effect of the oscillation.

[00105] In another aspect the marking 240 can be used to identify a type of the brushhead such as an acne cleansing brush or a dynamic facial brush (See FIGURES 9D and 9M). In another aspect the marking 240 can be used to identify the brushhead uniquely. In an example, the marking 240 can include a unique identifier such as a coded serial number separate from the set of fiducial marks. In an embodiment either the brushhead or the marking can include a RFID tag and the brush encoder 140 can be configured to detect the RFID tag and associate a usage history to the brushhead. The brush encoder can include an active RFID reader. The RFID reader can be used to track the position of the RFID tag in an Active Reader Active Tag (ARAT) system, for example. In an example, the usage history of the brushhead is communicated to the user and used to suggest or automatically replenish the brushhead (See FIGURES 9M and 9S).

[00106] In an example shown in FIGURES 3A-3B, the marking 240 can be a continuous line that meanders with symmetiy forming a ruler or a set of identical markings or lines that are identically spaced. In one example, the set of lines of the marking 240 can be configured to have optical contrast as in a barcode for a respective optical brush encoder. In another example the set of lines of the marking 240 can be configured to have a magnetic contrast for a respective magnetic brush encoder. As one skilled in the art would understand, alternate complementary markings or codes, and encoders can be used with the same or different amounts of precision in detecting the oscillation amplitude. [00107] The brush encoder 140 can be a 1-D camera such as a fiducial tracker, an optical encoder such as offered by Frencken Mechatronics, a 3-channel reflective incremental optical encoder such as Avago AEDR-850x by Avago Technologies (San Jose, California), and a custom discrete solution. The brash encoder is preferably water resistant or configured to be water resistant by packaging for wet brush loading. Alternatively, the brush encoder can be attached to the motor armature such that the brush encoder is contained within the body, making waterproofing unnecessary. In an aspect, the brush encoder 140 can detect the marking 240 with non-optical light such are IR. In an embodiment the brush encoder 140 can detect a mechanical and acoustic vibration of the oscillating brushhead.

[00108] Returning to FIGURE 2A, the brushhead 120 optionally can include an outer brushhead portion 220, which remains stationaiy during operation of the appliance 100. In an embodiment shown in FIGURES 2 A and 2C, a row(s) of bristle tufts are circular and move in an arcuate manner with an axis of rotation perpendicular to a surface of the skin. FIGURES 2 A and 2C show an embodiment in which a set of rows 212 move and an optional set of rows 222 are fixed.

[00109] The inner brushhead portion 210 has an operative relationship with the drive hub 110 such that as the drive hub 110 oscillates through a selected angle, so does the inner brushhead portion 210. The outer brushhead portion 220 includes a central, cylindrically shaped opening. The central opening is sized and configured to surround the sides of the inner brushhead portion 210. When attached to the appliance 100, a rim, which extends around the top periphery of the central opening, is flush with or positioned slightly above the outwardly facing surface of the body 102.

[00110] In some embodiments, the inner brushhead portion 210 and the outer brushhead portion 220 together include a brushhead attachment mechanism configured to provide selective attachment of the brushhead 120 to the head attachment portion 106 of the appliance 100.

[00111] In the embodiment shown, the outer brushhead portion 220 is annular, with an outside diameter of approximately 1.975 inches, with a central opening. The outer brushhead portion 220 includes a base portion 224 with a rim around the top periphery thereof which includes a plurality of spaced finger grips 226, which helps the user in installation and removal of the brushhead 120. The outer brushhead portion 220 can further include a plurality of brushhead bristles 222 which extend upwardly from the base portion 224. There may be a gap or space between the bristles of the inner and outer brushhead portions, in the range of 0.050-0.125 inches, preferably 0.084 inches.

[00112] When attached to the appliance 100 by the brushhead attachment mechanism, the following occurs: (1) the inner brushhead portion 210 is operatively connected to the motor assembly 112, for example, via a drive hub 110, in a manner that provides oscillating motion thereto; and (2) the outer brushhead portion 220 fixedly secures the brushhead 120 to the head attachment portion 106 of the appliance 100.

[00113] Accordingly, the brushhead attachment mechanism in some embodiments provides a quick and easy technique for attaching and detaching the brushhead 120 to the appliance 100. It will be appreciated that the brushhead attachment mechanism also allows for other personal care heads to be attached to the appliance, and allows for a replacement brushhead 120 to be attached to the appliance 100, when desired. One brushhead attaclnnent mechanism that may be practiced with embodiments of the present disclosure is set forth in U.S. Pat. No. 7,386,906, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

[00114] It will be appreciated that other brushhead attachment mechanisms can be employed to provide either tooled or tool-less techniques for selectively attaching the brushhead 120 to a personal care appliance, such as appliance 100, in a maimer that (1) provides oscillating motion to the inner brushhead portion 210; and (2) maintains the connection between the inner brushhead portion 210 and the motor assembly 112. For example, in some embodiments, the inner brushhead portion 210 includes a coupling interface configured to cooperatingly connect to an oscillating drive shaft or armature, such as armature 1 14, of an associated motor assembly 1 12 in a manner that transmits oscillating motion to the inner brushhead portion 210.

[00115] The above-described examples of the brushhead 120 can be used to exfoliate skin of a user's epidermis. In that regard, the brushhead 120 is first attached to the appliance 100. Next, if desired, a skin softening agent, such as skin care formula, can be placed on the tips of bristles of a first group of tufts 212.

FIGURE 2B

[00116] FIGURE 2B shows the inner brushhead portion 210 in more detail in according to an example. The inner brushhead portion 210 has a generally circular configuration and is arranged to fit into the central opening of the outer brushhead portion 220.

[00117] The inner brushhead portion 210 includes a plurality of inner brushhead bristles 212 which extend upwardly from a base portion 214, with the bristles 212 arranged in a circular pattern covering the entire upper surface of the base portion 214.

[00118] The inner brushhead portion 210 in the embodiment shown includes two sets of depending legs on the outer periphery thereof. The first set of three legs 242-242, spaced at

120° intervals, each leg having a pair of snap portions 244 and 246, defined by a slot 247 which extends down the middle of each snap leg 242.

[00119] The two snap portions of each snap leg are configured and arranged to slightly flex toward each other during installation of the inner brushhead portion 210 on the drive hub 1 10, with the outside edges of the free tips of the snap portions 244, 246 having outward bulges 249-249 which snap back (with the snap portions) after they pass over a pointed portion of the drive hub 1 10, helping to tightly engage the drive hub 1 10 and retain the inner brushhead portion 210 on the drive hub 1 10.

[00120] The inner brushhead portion 210 further includes a second trio of spaced drive legs 256-256. The drive legs 256 alternate with snap legs 242 around the periphery of inner brushhead portion 210 and are also separated by 120° intervals.

[00121] The drive legs 256 taper slightly from their base to their free ends, which are rounded, designed to provide a close tolerance fit between them and the drive hub 110.

[00122] The brushhead structure and assembly is described in more detail in U.S. Patent No. 7,386,906, which is owned by the assignee of the present application and is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

FIGURE 2C

[00123] FIGURE 2C shows a top view of the brushhead bristle arrangement according to an example. The plurality of inner brushhead bristles 212 with an outer-most row of bristles 212a. During oscillation, the outer-most row of bristles 212a will have a greater linear amplitude as compared to another row of bristles 212b, approximately according to r Θ, where r is a radius from a center of the brushhead and Θ is an angle of oscillation in radians.

[00124] The brushhead bristle arrangement shown and described herein, used in the appliance brushhead disclosed in the above applications is effective for skin cleaning applications, particularly facial skin. The present brushhead bristle arrangement can also be used in other skin care applications, however, as discussed in the above applications, including acne and black head treatment, athlete's foot treatment, callused skin and psoriasis, razor bumps and related skin applications, wound cleansing and treatment of slow or nonhealing wounds, scalp cleaning, chemical peel procedures and shaving cream applications. Preferred bristle configurations and arrangements will differ somewhat depending upon the particular application. FIGURES 2D-2G

[00125] FIGURES 2D-2E show a cross-section of a brushhead (e.g. of FIGURE 2A) that is positioned on the drive hub 110 and connected to the drive shaft 114. The brush encoder 140 and the marking 240 are shown in alternate locations in each of the figures. In FIGURE 2D, the marking 240a is shown located on an outer surface of the brushhead facing the outer brushhead portion 220, similarly as shown in FIGURES 2A-2B. The brush encoder 140a is positioned on an extension of the appliance in a respective location to detect the marking 240a. In FIGURE 2E, the marking 240b is shown on an underside of the inner brushead portion 210 facing the appliance. The brush encoder 140b is positioned in a respective location to detect the marking 240b. In FIGURE 2F, the marking 240c is shown on a side of the drive hub 1 10. The brush encoder 140c is positioned in a respective location to detect the marking 240c. In an aspect, the brush encoder can be used to monitor a status of a part of the motor assembly 112 such as the connection between the drive hub 1 10 and the drive shaft 114, which is prone to wear from oscillations of many millions of cycles. In an aspect, the brush encoder can be used to monitor a status of a part of the operating structure such as the power storage source 116 (e.g. battery). One or more markings and brush encoders can be placed at locations to differentiate an appliance status.

[00126] In an embodiment, the brush encoder 140d can be integrated in an outer brushhead portion that further includes a set of electrical connections connecting the brush encoder to the operating structure or circuitry of the appliance (See FIGURE 2G). In this example, circuitry can be connections to the controller 150, the drive control 152 or the communication part 154 as in FIGURES 1C-1D. In another embodiment the brush encoder 140 can be integrated in an outer brushhead portion as a separate brush encoder device (See FIGURE 6C). In another embodiment, the brush encoder can be integrated into an operating structure of the appliance such that the motion of the internal motor assembly components can be measured and correlated to the brush amplitude.

FIGURES 3A-D

[00127] FIGURES 3A-3B are graphics showing an orientation of the brush encoder 140 detecting the marking 240 of the brushhead. FIGURE 3 A shows the brush encoder 140 overlapping with at least a portion of the marking 240 of the brushhead according to an example. The brush encoder 140 can have a detector part 342 for sensing and a circuity part 344 for processing and/or transmitting. In FIGURE 3A, an outline of the detector part 342 is shown as a dotted circle. In an example, a lens can be further included for enhancing optics of the detector part 342.

[00128] FIGURE 3B shows a side view of an orientation of the brush encoder 140 detecting the marking 240 of the brushhead, exposing a gap 304 between the brush encoder 140 and the marking 240 of the brushhead according to an example. Here the detector part 342 is shown When in use, either circuitry of the appliance or the circuity part 344 counts the set of lines and sends out a signal or digital quadrature signal, or similar in function or purpose, Phase A and Phase B (See FIGURE 3C) encoding the oscillation or motion 302. [00129] In an example, the brush encoder 140 or the operating structure or circuitry of the appliance can calculate a degree per count (DPC) based on detection of the marking over time. The DPC can be calculated by an equation: [00130] DCP = jp T f ^

[00131] where LPI is the lines per inch, IF is an interpolation factor, and C is a circumference of the brushhead. The interpolation factor can account for interpolation between lines which may be performed by the brush encoder to enhance position resolution. [00132] FIGURE 3C shows a graphic representing the signal or digital quadrature signal Phase A and Phase B generated by the brush encoder 140 according to an example. [00133] FIGURE 3D shows a cross-section of a portion of the marking 240 having multiple layers according to an example. According to certain embodiments, the marking 240 can be a strip or metalized film that is added to the brushhead. The strip can have different stacked layers serving one or more purposes including adhering and reflecting. In the example shown, the strip can be made of a stack of layers including a poly liner 318, an acrylic pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) 316, a reflective aluminum coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) 314, an optical adhesive 312 such as 3M's 9471LE (St. Paul, MN), and a photographic PET film 310. In an example the poly liner 318 can have a thickness on the order of 0.003", the acrylic PSA 316 can have a thickness on the order of 0.001", the reflective aluminum coated PET 314 can have a thickness on the order of 0.003", the optical adhesive 312 can have a thickness on the order of 0.001", and the photographic PET film 310 can have a thickness on the order of 0.004" resulting in a total thickness for the stack of 0.012". Other materials and layer combinations can be used as one skilled in the art will appreciate.

FIGURE 4A-C

[00134] FIGURES 4A-C show different representations of oscillation attributes that can be correlated with optimal performance of the appliance according to an example. In an aspect, a routine can include a threshold that can be based on an oscillation attribute and configured to trigger the indicator as a protocol of a regimen.

[00135] FIGURE 4A is a brush oscillation graph 400a showing multiple curves 411-416 representing the amplitude of oscillation as determined by the brush encoder, as a function of a force applied on the brushhead when in use at a certain frequency according to an example.

[00136] When the brushhead is not pressed against the user's skin with a force, the brushhead will oscillate at peak amplitude at an unloaded frequency 421. [00137] When the brushhead is pressed against the user's skin with a force, the brushhead can modify (e.g. reduce or increase) the amplitude of oscillation as well as shift the frequency of resonance according to an example. Accordingly, the brush encoder can be configured to detect a change in frequency 420 and a change in amplitude 430 according to an example. In an aspect, when the amplitude of oscillation at the unloaded frequency 421 resembles a characteristically unloaded amplitude, the brush encoder can determine that the appliance is not in usage. Alternatively, the amplitude at a drive frequency can be determined to be characteristic of loaded or unloaded operation.

[00138] When the brushhead is pressed against the user's skin with a force greater than a recommended threshold, the appliance 100 can trigger the alert or an indicator (See FIGURES 5A-5D) upon detection of either the change in frequency 420, the change in amplitude 430, or any other change threshold such as a phase change. Brush encoder data can be used to maintain a target amplitude over various load conditions by dynamically adjusting the drive frequency or duty cycle.

[00139] FIGURE 4B is a brush oscillation graph 400b showing a first curve representing the amplitude of oscillation 440 determined by the brush encoder as a function of time, a second curve representing a target profile 450, and a target threshold 460 according to an example. In an example, the target profile 450 can be a duration where the amplitude of oscillation 440 is above the target threshold 460. In an aspect, when the frequency of oscillation is the unloaded frequency 421, as shown in the brush oscillation graph 400a (See FIGURE 4A) the duration of the amplitude of oscillation 440 can be paused. In another embodiment, an appliance having another input such as a pressure sensor can also be used to pause the duration of the amplitude of oscillation 440.

[00140] FIGURE 4C is a brush oscillation graph 400c showing a set of curves representing a oscillation displacement (m) 470, a oscillation velocity (m/s) 480, and a oscillation acceleration (rn/s 2 ) 490 over a number of periods of oscillation. In an example the curves can have different scales in the y-axis.

FIGURES 5A-D

[00141] FIGURES 5A-5D show drawings of alternate examples of a backside of the appliance 100. According to different embodiments, the appliance 100 can have one or more indicators and displays 160. FIGURE 5 A shows an embodiment of the backside of the appliance 100' having no additional features. FIGURE 5B shows an example of the backside of the appliance 100" having at least one indicator 510. Each indicator 510 can have one or more LEDs or light emitting colors and shapes which can be configured to indicate triggering of the alarm. FIGURE 5C shows an example of the backside of the appliance 100" having a display 160. In one example, the display 160 can be a digital screen such as an LCD configured to play videos and tutorials (See FIGURE 90) and demonstrate a method of use of the appliance 100" and highlight a target area 524. In another example the display 160 can be a fixed graphic 522 with an indicator 524 illuminating a different part of the fixed graphic 522. In an aspect, the display 160 can be configured to show a reverse image such that an image or graphic will appear correctly in a mirror during use.

[00142] FIGURE 5D shows an embodiment of the backside of the appliance 100" having the indicator or display as a timer 532 and/or a score 534. Here, the indicator can be made of one or more seven-segment displays (SSD), or seven-segment indicators for displaying decimal numerals. The timer 532 and the score 534 can correspond with the protocol according to an example. For instance, the timer 532 can correspond with a protocol duration of the target profile 450 as in FIGURE 4B. In an aspect, the timer 532 and the score 534 can be configured to show a reverse ordering such that they will appeal- in a correct ordering in a mirror during use. FIGURES 6A-D

[00143] FIGURE 6A shows a system 600 to promote an optimal performance of the appliance including the appliance 100 in communication with a central device 620 according to an example. In one example, the system 600 can include the appliance 100 in communication with the central device 620 with a wireless signal 610. The central device 620 can be configured to operate a software application or set of software modules (See FIGURE 8) to receive and send communications from and to the appliance 100. In an example, the software application can send a protocol or target profile 450 (See FIGURE 4B) to the appliance 100, as well as receive data from the brush encoder to track the usage in realtime.

[00144] FIGURE 6B shows different examples of the central devices 620 including, a mobile device 622, a wearable electronic 624, a television or magic mirror 626, a network router 628, and a personal computer 629. Examples of the software application configured for the mobile device 622 are shown in FIGURE 8. The wireless signal 610 can be any appropriate signal such as an electromagnetic signal including WIFI, Bluetooth, near-field, or any other signal such as optical, and acoustic. Each client device, including the appliance, may communicate with each other through an internet connection via an 802.1 1 wireless connection to a wireless internet access point, or a physical connection to the internet access point, such as through an Ethernet interface. Each connected device is capable of performing wireless communication with other devices, such as through a Bluetooth connection or other wireless means as well.

[00145] FIGURE 6C shows a system 630 including a brush encoder device 640 including an outer brushhead portion having the brush encoder and a peripheral device 621 configured for encoder processing according to an example. The brush encoder device 640 can be connected to the peripheral device 621 by a wireless signal 610 or a wired connection 61 1. The brush encoder device 640 can be interchanged and removably attached to different appliances such that a series of appliances can be tested with the same brush encoder such as for manufacturing use. Accordingly, the peripheral device 621 can be configured to monitor and to test manufacturing and production of a part of the appliance. The peripheral device 621 can be a computer or a data acquisition device (DAQ) such as mBed LPC1768, and can further connect to a computer operating data acquisition software or other peripheral device. In an aspect, the brush encoder device 640 can be used to test other embodiments of the appliances described here, as well as embodiments of appliances without the brush encoder.

[00146] FIGURE 6D is a diagram representing an example of a system to promote optimum performance of a personal care appliance 650, according to one example. The system 640 includes at least the appliance and the peripheral device. Optionally, the system 650 may further include one or more external servers 642 which are implemented as part of a cloud- computing environment and in communication with the system 650 through the Internet. The one or more external servers 642 can store user data, products such as brushheads and formulations, protocols and routines, tutorials, as well as other 3 rd party services according to an example.

FIGURES 7A-N

[00147] FIGURES 7A-7E are flow diagrams describing methods performed at least in part by the controller 150 to promote an optimal performance of an appliance according to a set of examples.

[00148] FIGURE 7A is a flow diagram describing a method 700a to promote an optimal performance of an appliance according to an example. The method 700a includes steps of controlling the motor assembly to oscillate the brushhead (702), detecting an appliance status based on the oscillation (720), and controlling display of an indicator (740). Optionally, a step 721 of repeating step 702 based on step 720 can be done (i.e. closed-loop control). [00149] Examples of detecting an appliance status based on the oscillation (720) include tracking oscillation of the brushhead using the brush encoder (722), determining a type of brushhead (724), determining brushhead ID (726), sensing a skin attribute (728), and determining an applied pressure (729) (See FIGURE 7G). Other examples of detecting an appliance status based on the oscillation include detecting motor malfunction, presence of impediments or debris around the brushhead and determining an age and wearout status of the brushhead.

[00150] Examples of controlling display of the indicator (740) include controlling display of a timer/score (e.g. score 534) indicator (742), controlling display of a pressure indicator (744), controlling display of a brushhead type indicator (746), and controlling display of a brushhead ID indicator (748).

[00151] FIGURE 7B is a flow diagram describing a method 700b to promote an optimal performance of an appliance according to an example. The method 700b includes steps of receiving a routine to use the appliance (710), controlling the motor assembly to oscillate the brushhead based on the routine (704), detecting an appliance status based on the oscillation (720), and controlling display of an indicator (740). As shown in FIGURE 7F, examples of receiving a routine to use the appliance includes creating a regimen or protocol on the appliance (712), creating a regimen or protocol on the client device (714), downloading a regimen or protocol from the client device (716), and receiving an optimized regimen or protocol infomation from a cloud computing environment based on the user's skin condition (718).

[00152] FIGURE 7C is a flow diagram describing a method 700c to promote an optimal performance of an appliance according to an example. The method 700c includes steps of receiving a routine to use the appliance (710), controlling the motor assembly to oscillate the brushliead based on the routine (704), detecting an appliance status based on the oscillation (720), comparing the appliance status to the routine (730), and controlling display of an indicator (740).

[00153] As shown in FIGURE 7H, examples of comparing the appliance status to the routine (730) include comparing the oscillation with the routine (732), comparing the type of brushhead with the routine (734), comparing a brushhead ID with the routine (736), comparing the skin attribute with the routine (738), and comparing an applied pressure with the routine (739). The routine can include any aspect of the regimen and the set of protocols. For instance, comparing the oscillation with the routine (732) can include any of the representations of oscillation attributes (See FIGURES 4A-C) corresponding with the set of protocols. In an aspect, the threshold of an oscillation attribute can be compared to the protocol directly or by a conversion. The conversion can be included in the routine.

[00154] FIGURE 7D is a flow diagram describing a method 700d to promote an optimal performance of an appliance according to an example. The method 700d includes steps of controlling the motor assembly to oscillate the brushhead (702), detecting an appliance status based on the oscillation (720), and transmitting a communication to a central device (750). Optionally, the method 700d further includes steps of receiving communication from the client device (780), and controlling display of an indicator based on the communication from the client device (788).

[00155] As shown in FIGURE 7J, examples of transmitting a communication to a client device (750) includes at least two embodiments. In a first embodiment, the step 750' includes a step of establishing communication to a client device (752), and transmitting a communication to a client device based on the appliance status detected in step 720 or the comparison done in step 730 (754). In a second embodiment, the step 750" includes a step of establishing communication to a network and transmitting a communication to the network based on the appliance status detected in step 720 or the comparison done in step 730 (756). In an example, the step 750" can include transmitting a communication to the network through a network router 628.

[00156] FIGURE 7E is a flow diagram describing a method 700e to promote an optimal performance of an appliance according to an example. The method 700e includes steps of receiving a routine to use the appliance (710), controlling the motor assembly to oscillate the brushhead based on the routine (704), detecting an appliance status based on the oscillation (720), comparing the appliance status to the routine (730), and transmitting a communication to a client device (750).

[00157] FIGURES 7K-7M show examples of algorithms for performing the comparisons of the appliance status with the respective routine. As shown in FIGURE 7K, step 732 comparing the encoded oscillation with a threshold can be done with an algorithm 732, shown as a flow diagram. At step 761 the oscillation is detected and decoded. At step 762 the encoded oscillation is compared to a respective threshold. The respective threshold can be the target threshold 460, the change in amplitude 430, the change in frequency 420, a duration, the oscillation displacement 470, the oscillation velocity 480, and the oscillation acceleration 490. When the oscillation is within the threshold the algorithm 732 returns a true indicator (763). Conversely, when the oscillation is not within the threshold, the algorithm 732 returns a false indicator (764).

[00158] As further shown in FIGURE 7L, step 734 comparing the type of brushhead with the routine can be done with an algorithm 734, shown as a flow diagram. At step 765 the type of brushhead is detected. At step 766 the type of brushhead is compared to a respective routine. When the type of brushhead matches the routine the algorithm 734 returns a true indicator (767). Conversely, when the type of brushhead does not match the routine, the algorithm 734 returns a false indicator (768). [00159] As further shown in FIGURE 7M, step 738 detecting a skin attribute can be done with an algorithm 738, shown as a flow diagram. At step 769 the skin attribute is detected. Skin attributes can include dryness, loss of firmness, rough patches, as well as other attributes related to a dermal condition. At step 770 the skin attribute is compared to a respective routine. When the skin attribute matches the routine the algorithm 738 returns a true indicator (771). Conversely, when the skin attribute does not match the routine, the algorithm 738 returns a false indicator (772).

User interface features

[00160] The operating system of the client device can have a user interface that is configured to perform multiple functions. In an aspect, the client device can be in communication with a network and enable the user interface access to the Internet as well as Internet of Things (IOT). As can be appreciated, the network can be a public network, such as the Internet, or a private network such as an LAN or WAN network, or any combination thereof and can also include PSTN or ISDN sub-networks. The network can also be wired, such as an Ethernet network, or can be wireless such as a cellular network including EDGE, 3G and 4G wireless cellular systems. The wireless network can also be WiFi, Bluetooth, or any other wireless form of communication that is known. In an example, the network can access a server hosting media, protocols, products, personal accounts, stored usage data, and other data related to the appliance, the brushheads, and skin care.

[00161] The user interface can display tutorials on how to use the appliance with the type of brushhead. The user interface can create and download protocols for a regimen or routine. The user interface can coach, track usage and compare the tracked usage to the protocol, the regimen, and the routine. The user interface can calculate a score based on the tracked usage. The user interface can store the scores and the tracked usage of each brushhead in memory of the client device. The user interface can be used to make a purchase of a brushhead based on the tracked usage.

FIGURES 8A-G

[00162] FIGURES 8A-F are flow diagrams describing a method 850 performed at least in part by a client device to promote an optimal performance of an appliance according to an example.

[00163] FIGURE 8A is a flow diagram describing a method 850a to promote an optimal performance of an appliance according to an example. The method 850a includes steps of establishing communication with the appliance (852), receiving an appliance status (854), and controlling display of an indicator (856). The step of receiving an appliance status (854) can be done with respect to step 720 of the method 700d and 700e according to an example (See FIGURES 7D-7E). The step of controlling display of an indicator (856) can be configured to be done similarly on an interface of the client device as for examples of step 740 shown in FIGURE 71.

[00164] FIGURE 8B is a flow diagram describing a method 850b to promote an optimal performance of an appliance according to an example. The method 850b includes steps of establishing communication with the appliance (852), communicating a routine to the appliance (858), receiving an appliance status or a comparison (860), and controlling display of an indicator (856). The step of receiving an appliance status or a comparison (860) can be done with respect to steps 750' and 754 of methods 700d and 700e.

[00165] FIGURE 8C is a flow diagram describing a method 850c to promote an optimal performance of an appliance according to an example. The method 850c includes steps of establishing communication with the appliance (852), receiving an appliance status (854), comparing the appliance status to the routine (862), transmitting a communication based on the comparison of step 862, and optionally controlling display of an indicator (856). The step of comparing the appliance status to the routine (862) can be done similarly as the examples for step 730 shown in FIGURES 7H, 7K-7M.

[00166] FIGURE 8D is a flow diagram describing a method 850d to promote an optimal performance of an appliance according to an example. The method 850d includes steps of establishing communication with a network (866), receiving a routine (868), establishing communication with the appliance (852), and transmitting the routine to the appliance (870).

[00167] FIGURE 8E is a flow diagram describing a method 850e to promote an optimal performance of an appliance according to an example. The method 850e includes steps of establishing communication with the appliance (852), receiving an appliance status or a comparison (860), establishing communication with a network (866), transmitting the appliance status or comparison to the network (872), and receiving a query based on the appliance status or comparison (880). Examples of receiving a query based on the appliance status or comparison (880) include receiving a product list (882), receiving a routine (884), and receiving appliance diagnostics (886), as shown in FIGURE 8G.

[00168] FIGURE 8F is a flow diagram describing a method 850f to promote an optimal performance of an appliance according to an example. The method 850f includes steps of receiving a set of user attributes (874), establishing communication with a network (866), transmitting the set of user attributes (876), receiving a routine based on the set of user attributes (878), establishing communication with the appliance (852), and transmitting the routine to the appliance (870).

[00169] The step of receiving a set of user attributes (874) can be done by inputting by the user into the client device 620 or by downloading from a remote server or the appliance. The step of receiving a routine based on the set of user attributes (878) can be done by inputting by the user into the client device 620 or downloaded from a remote server or the appliance. The step of transmitting the routine to the appliance (870) can be done by the wireless signal 610 according to an example (See FIGURE 6A).

FIGURE 8H

[00170] FIGURE 8H is an example computer system having a set of software modules 800 in the client device 620 in the system 600. The set of software modules 800 can include one or more of a home menu 801 , a navigation center bar 802, a routine 803, a device summary, 804, a Bluetooth Low-Energy (BLE) pairing 806, a BLE utility 808-810, a user settings 812, a user manual 814, a user manual turbo 816, a my brushes 818, a wireless charging status 820, a brush summary 822, a brush details 824, a brush tutorials 826, a brush shopping 828- 830, a shopping redirect 832, a protocol download 834, a protocol designer 836, a regimen face 838, a regimen pedi 840, a regimen body 842, a coach 844, and additional modules 846 such as service oriented third party applications can be merged or supplied as add-ins as appropriate.

FIGURES 9A-X

[00171] FIGURES 9A-9X show screenshots of examples of the set of software modules 800 implemented on the mobile device 622 according to an example.

[00172] As shown in FIGURE 9 A, the home menu 801 module can be used to navigate to the set of software modules 800.

[00173] FIGURE 9B shows an example of a custom protocol that will define a behavior of a certain cleansing brush when used by the appliance. As shown in FIGURE 9B, the protocol designer 836 module can be configured to allow creation of custom protocols such as a regimen using a particular type of bmslihead, for a particular oscillation, a duration, number of steps, as well as conditions for beeps or alarms, target thresholds, etc. In an example, a protocol is a custom brushing mode where a customer can create a user defined brushing routine(s) and where he/she can select a number of brushing segments, duration and brushing intensity (speed) of each segment. In an example the custom protocol can be created on the client device 620 and communicated to the controller 150.

[00174] As shown in FIGURE 9C, the coach 844 module can include the brush oscillation graph 400b and a cleansing game which can track how well the usage matches the protocol within a session. The brush oscillation graph 400b can show the brush amplitude (-pressure) in red/yellow/green vs. time over a run cycle according to an example. The cleansing game can show the score 534 according to an example.

[00175] As shown in FIGURE 9D, the routine 803 module can be used to track the usage as determined in the coach 844 module over multiple sessions according to an example. Obviously, alternate modules can be used to track the usage. The routine 803 module can include a countdown 901 to an event date. FIGURE 9D shows an example of a cleansing routine displaying tracked usage compared to recommended usage. FIGURE 91 is an alternate view of FIGURE 9D.

[00176] The my brushes 818 module can track and store the usage of each brushhead uniquely and by the type of brushhead according to an example (See FIGURE 9S). The BLE utility 808 can be used for internal purposes and allows engineers or production technicians to control the appliance as well as perform any diagnosis by reading and writing the internal memory of the appliance (See FIGURE 9W).

[00177] Additional features can be included in further embodiments. In an embodiment, the appliance can have an automated replenishment of the brushheads. In an aspect, the appliance can have a fast charging feature by an inductive Qi or AirFuel (formerly known as A4WP) charging method. In an embodiment, the appliance can have a location awareness such as a location setting (See FIGURE 9V), a location provided by the central device 620, or a GPS sensor. The location awareness can be used to create or to modify a regimen. In an example, when the location awareness indicates that the appliance is in a location with harsh weather for the skin, a regimen can be suggested that is appropriate for the user.

[00178] Obviously, numerous modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings. It is therefore to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described herein.