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Title:
CEILING LIGHTING SYSTEM USING GLASS LIGHT-GUIDE PLATE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/094285
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An illuminating vehicle assembly including an external first glass sheet; an internal second glass sheet; an interlayer disposed between the first glass sheet and the second glass sheet; and a third glass sheet. The third glass sheet has an inner surface, an outer surface opposite the inner surface, and an edge between the inner and outer surfaces, where the outer surface faces an interior surface of the second glass sheet that is opposite a side of the second glass sheet on which the interlayer is disposed. The assembly also includes a light source optically coupled to the edge of the third glass sheet, which is a light guide plate for light emitted by the light source. In one or more embodiments, the third glass sheet is moveable relative to the rest of the assembly. In one or more embodiments, the assembly is used for automotive glazing.

Inventors:
BHATIA, Vikram (3535 Conhocton Road, Painted Post, New York, 14870, US)
KUNIGONIS, Michael Paul (3012 S. Oakwood Drive, Painted Post, New York, 14870, US)
PARK, Sang-Ki (186 Woodsedge Dr, Painted Post, New York, 14870, US)
Application Number:
US2018/058886
Publication Date:
May 16, 2019
Filing Date:
November 02, 2018
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
CORNING INCORPORATED (1 Riverfront Plaza, Corning, New York, 14831, US)
International Classes:
B32B17/10
Domestic Patent References:
WO2016196535A22016-12-08
WO2014167291A12014-10-16
Foreign References:
US20160356942A12016-12-08
US20150368146A12015-12-24
US20150003088A12015-01-01
US201615769639A2016-10-18
US9902644B22018-02-27
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
RIGGS, F. Brock (Corning Incorporated, Intellectual Property DepartmentSP-TI-3-, Corning New York, 14831, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An illuminating vehicle assembly comprising:

an external first glass sheet;

an internal second glass sheet ;

an interlayer disposed between the first glass sheet and the second glass sheet;

a third glass sheet comprising an inner surface, an outer surface opposite the inner surface, and an edge between the inner and outer surfaces, the outer surface facing an interior surface of the second glass sheet that is opposite a side of the second glass sheet on which the interlayer is disposed; and

a light source optically coupled to the edge,

wherein the third glass sheet is a light guide plate for light emitted by the light source.

2. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 1 , wherein the vehicle assembly is an automotive glazing comprising all or a portion of a windshield, rear window, side window, sunroof, moonroof, interior ceiling panel, or exterior panel, or is a vehicle interior panel comprising all or a portion of a dashboard, instrument panel, center console, steering wheel, side door, or video or infotainment panel.

3. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 1 or claim 2, further comprising an edge reflector disposed on at least a portion of the edge of the third glass layer.

4. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 3, wherein the edge reflector is configured to reflect light emitted from the light source to enhance light output from the inner surface or the outer surface of the third glass sheet.

5. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, further comprising a planar reflector disposed on the outer surface of the third glass sheet.

6. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 5, wherein the planar reflector is configured to reflect light emitted from the light source to enhance light output from the inner surface of the third glass sheet.

7. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet has low light loss.

8. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet is a fusion-drawn glass sheet.

9. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet is chemically strengthened.

10. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet is a non-alkaline-based glass.

11. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the light source is disposed on the edge.

12. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the light source comprises a light-emitting diode (LED), a laser, or a light-diffusing fiber.

13. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 12, wherein the light-diffusing fiber is arranged such that light emitted from a circumferential surface of the light-diffusing fiber enters the light guide plate via the edge of the third glass sheet.

14. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the light source comprises multiple light emitting sources along the edge of the third glass sheet.

15. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 14, wherein at least some of the multiple light emitting sources are arranged along the edge of the third glass sheet on opposite ends of the inner surface of third glass sheet.

16. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 14 or claim 15, wherein the multiple light emitting sources comprise light emitting sources of more than one color of light.

17. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the light source comprises one or more source of red, green, and blue light.

18. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the light source is configured to output ultra-violet light.

19. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 18, further comprising a light extraction feature located on or in at least one of the inner surface and the outer surface of the light guide plate,

wherein the light extraction feature converts the ultra-violet light to visible light that is output from the inner surface or the outer surface of the third glass sheet.

20. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 19, wherein the light extraction feature comprises phosphors.

21. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the light source is configured to output more than one color of light.

22. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass layer is movable independently from the first and second glass sheets.

23. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 22, wherein the third glass layer is retractable.

24. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 23, wherein the third glass layer is retractable in a direction substantially parallel to the interior surface of the second glass sheet.

25. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the inner surface and the outer surface of the third glass layer are substantially flat.

26. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the first glass sheet and the second glass sheet are curved.

27. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of claims 1-24 and 26, wherein at least one of the inner surface and the outer surface of the third glass layer is curved.

28. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, further comprising a light extraction feature located on or in at least one of the inner surface and the outer surface of the light guide plate.

29. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 28, wherein the light extraction feature is shaped to form an informational graphic.

30. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 28, wherein the light extraction feature is arranged to enhance uniformity of light output across the inner surface or the outer surface of the light guide plate.

31. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 30, wherein the light extraction feature is arranged to enhance uniformity of light output over a continuous surface of the light guide plate, the continuous surface being the inner surface or the outer surface.

32. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 30, wherein the light extraction feature is arranged to enhance uniformity of light output across discrete regions of the inner surface or the outer surface of the light guide plate.

33. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of claims 28-32, wherein the light extraction feature is formed from an ink material, a micro-structured surface, a prism, a chemical etch, or a laser etch.

34. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 33, wherein the light extraction feature is formed from the ink material, the ink material being printed onto the third glass sheet via ink- jet printing.

35. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of claims 28-34, wherein the light extraction feature comprises a protruding structure or a recessed structure.

36. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of claims 28-35, wherein the light extraction feature is configured to extract light from the light guide plate and direct the light through the interior side of the third glass sheet.

37. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet comprises a core glass layer, a first cladding glass layer disposed on one side of the core glass layer, and a second cladding glass layer disposed on the other side of the core glass layer,

wherein the core glass layer and the first and second cladding glass layers are fused together.

38. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 37, wherein the core glass layer has a refractive index that differs from refractive indices of the first and second cladding glass layers.

39. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 38, wherein the core glass layer is a light guide layer based on the difference in the refractive index of the core glass layer and the refractive indices of the first and second glass layers.

40. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 38, wherein the core glass layer together with the first and second glass layers is a light guide layer based on the refractive index of the core glass layer, the refractive indices of the first and second glass layers, and a refractive index of air surrounding the third glass sheet.

41. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the first glass sheet is a non-chemically-strengthened glass sheet.

42. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the first glass sheet comprises a material selected from the group consisting of soda-lime glass and annealed glass.

43. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the first glass sheet has a thickness ranging from about 1.5 mm to about 3.0 mm

44 The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein a surface of the external glass layer adjacent the interlayer is acid etched

45. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the second glass sheet is a strengthened glass sheet.

46. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 45, wherein the second glass sheet is chemically strengthened.

47. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the second glass sheet includes one or more alkaline earth oxides, such that a content of alkaline earth oxides is at least about 5 wt. %.

48. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the second glass sheet includes at least about 6 wt. % aluminum oxide.

49. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the second glass sheet has a thickness ranging from about 0.5 mm to about 1.5 mm

50. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 49, wherein the second glass sheet has a thickness of between about 0.5 mm to about 0.7 mm.

51. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the second glass sheet has a surface compressive stress between about 250 MPa and about 900 MPa.

52. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the second glass sheet has a surface compressive stress of between about 250 MPa and about 350 MPa and a DOL of compressive stress greater than about 20 um.

53. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein a surface of the second glass sheet opposite the interlayer is acid etched.

54. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the interlayer comprises a single polymer sheet, a multilayer polymer sheet, or a composite polymer sheet.

55. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the interlayer comprises a material selected from the group consisting of polyvinyl butyral (PVB), polycarbonate, ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), ionomer, a thermoplastic material, and combinations thereof.

56. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the polymer interlayer has a thickness of between about 0.4 to about 1.2 mm.

57. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the light guide plate is monolithic.

58. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the first glass sheet, the interlayer, and the second glass sheet compose a glass laminate, the glass laminate having an area greater than 1 m2.

59. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet comprises:

between about 70 mol % to about 85 mol% S1O2,

between about 0 mol% to about 5 mol% AI2O3,

between about 0 mol% to about 5 mol% B2O3,

between about 0 mol% to about 10 mol% Na20,

between about 0 mol% to about 12 mol% K2O,

between about 0 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO,

between about 3 mol% to about 12 mol% MgO,

between about 0 mol% to about 5 mol% CaO,

between about 0 mol% to about 3 mol% SrO,

between about 0 mol% to about 3 mol% BaO, and

between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.5 mol% SnC .

60. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet comprises:

greater than about 80 mol % S1O2,

between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% AI2O3,

between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% B2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% Na20,

between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O,

between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO,

between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO,

between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% CaO,

between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% SrO,

between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% BaO, and

between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.1 1 mol% SnC>2.

61. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet is substantially free of AI2O3 and B2O3 and comprises:

greater than about 80 mol % S1O2,

between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% Na20,

between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O,

between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO,

between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, and

between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.1 1 mol% Sn02.

62. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 61, wherein the third glass sheet is substantially free of B2O3, Na20, CaO, SrO, or BaO, and combinations thereof.

63. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet comprises an alumina free, potassium silicate composition comprising: greater than about 80 mol % S1O2,

between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O,

between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO,

between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, and

between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.1 1 mol% Sn02.

64. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 63, wherein the third glass sheet is substantially free of B2O3, Na20, CaO, SrO, or BaO, and combinations thereof.

65. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet comprises: between about 72.82 mol % to about 82.03 mol% S1O2,

between about 0 mol% to about 4.8 mol% AI2O3,

between about 0 mol% to about 2.77 mol% B2O3,

between about 0 mol% to about 9.28 mol% Na20,

between about 0.58 mol% to about 10.58 mol% K2O,

between about 0 mol% to about 2.93 mol% ZnO,

between about 3.1 mol% to about 10.58 mol% MgO,

between about 0 mol% to about 4.82 mol% CaO,

between about 0 mol% to about 1.59 mol% SrO,

between about 0 mol% to about 3 mol% BaO, and

between about 0.08 mol% to about 0.15 mol% Sn02.

66. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 65, wherein the third glass sheet is substantially free of AI2O3, B2O3, Na20, CaO, SrO, or BaO, and combinations thereof.

67. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet has a color shift < 0.008.

68. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet has a color shift < 0.005.

69. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet has a strain temperature between about 512 °C and 653 °C.

70. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet has an annealing temperature between about 564 °C and 721 °C.

71. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet has a softening temperature between about 795 °C and 1013 °C.

72. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet has a CTE between about 64 x 10-7/ °C to about 77 x 10-7/ °C.

73. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet has a density between about 2.34 gm/cc @ 20 C and about 2.56 gm/cc @ 20 C.

74. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the thickness of the third glass sheet is between about 0.2 mm and about 8 mm.

75. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet comprises less than 1 ppm each of Co, Ni, and Cr.

76. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding claims, wherein the concentration of Fe in the third glass sheet is < about 20 ppm.

77. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding claims, wherein the concentration of Fe in the third glass sheet is < about 10 ppm.

78. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding claims, wherein, for the third glass sheet, the transmittance at 450 nm with at least 500 mm in length is greater than or equal to 85%, the transmittance at 550 nm with at least 500 mm in length is greater than or equal to 90%, or the transmittance at 630 nm with at least 500 mm in length is greater than or equal to 85%, and combinations thereof.

79. The glass article of claim 9, wherein the glass comprises between 0.1 mol% to no more than about 3.0 mol% of one or combination of any of ZnO, T1O2, V2O3, Nb20s, MnO, Zr02, As203, Sn02, M0O3, Sb203, and Ce02.

80. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims, wherein the third glass sheet is substantially free of AI2O3 and B2O3 and comprises greater than about 80

wherein the glass has a color shift < 0.005.

81. The illuminating vehicle assembly of Claim 80, wherein the third glass sheet comprises:

between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O,

between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, and

between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.1 1 mol% SnC>2.

82. The illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding claims,wherein the third glass sheet is substantially free of AI2O3, B2O3, Na20, CaO, SrO, and BaO, and

wherein the glass has a color shift < 0.005.

83. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 82, wherein the third glass sheet comprises greater than about 80 mol % S1O2.

84. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 82, wherein the third glass sheet comprises:

between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O,

between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO,

between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, and

between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.1 1 mol% SnC .

85. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 22, further comprising a conveyance system configured to move the third glass sheet, wherein the conveyance system is capable of moving the third glass sheet without moving the first and second glass sheets.

86. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 85, wherein the convenyance system comprises a guide configured to guide the third glass sheet in a direction substantially parallel to the interior surface of the second glass sheet.

87. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 86, wherein the guide is a frame around at least a portion of a perimeter of the third glass sheet.

88. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 87, wherein the third glass sheet is slidable within the frame.

89. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 87, wherein the frame is coupled to a motor configured to move the frame between at least two states, including a closed state and an open state, wherein, in the closed state, the third glass sheet is adjacent to and facing the second glass sheet, and

wherein, in the open state, the third glass sheet is in a position in which the third glass sheet is not facing a substantial portion of the second glass sheet.

90. The illuminating vehicle assembly of claim 86, wherein the guide is a roller system configured to move the third glass sheet relative to the first and second glass sheets via at least one roller coupled to the third glass sheet.

91. A vehicle comprising:

a body defining an interior and an opening in communication with the interior;

a complexly curved laminate disposed in the opening, the laminate comprising: a first curved glass substrate comprising a first major surface, a second major surface opposing the first major surface, and a first thickness defined as the distance between the first major surface and second major surface;

a second curved glass substrate comprising a third major surface, a fourth major surface opposing the third major surface, and a second thickness defined as the distance between the third major surface and the fourth major surface; and

an interlayer disposed between the first curved glass substrate and the second curved glass substrate and adjacent the second major surface and third major surface; a third glass substrate comprising a fifth major surface, a sixth major surface opposing the fifth major surface, and an edge between the fifth and sixth major surfaces, the fifth major surface facing the fourth major surface of the second curved glass substrate; and

a light source optically coupled to the edge,

wherein the third glass substrate is a light guide plate for light emitted by the light source.

92. The vehicle of claim 91, wherein the third glass substrate is movable with respect to the complexly curved laminate.

93. The vehicle of claim 92, wherein the third glass substrate is configured to move btween at least two states, the two states comprising:

a closed state in which the fifth major surface is adjacent to and faces a substantial portion of the fourth major surface of the second curved glass substrate, and an open state in which the fifth major surface is not adjacent to and does not face a substantial portion of the fourth major surface of the second curved glass substrate.

Description:
CEILING LIGHTING SYSTEM USING GLASS LIGHT-GUIDE PLATE

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims the benefit of priority under 35 U.S.C. § 119 of U.S.

Provisional Application Serial No. 62/583,232 filed on November 08, 2017, the content of which is relied upon and incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND

[0002] The disclosure relates to glass light-guide plates and lighting systems using the same, and more particularly to lighting systems in vehicular or automotive interior applications using glass light-guide plates to disperse light.

[0003] Lighting systems in automotive applications, such as automotive interiors, have not substantially evolved in recent history. However, to meet the changing wants and needs of drivers and passengers, there is an increased demand for innovative lighting systems that provide functionality and flexibility. This is increasingly true with the advent of autonomous or driverless cars, which may change the way that drivers or passengers use the automotive interior environment. Also, changing vehicle design makes some lighting solutions inferior or impossible. For example, the increase in number and size of transparent ceiling or roof systems, such as sunroofs, and other transparent vehicle panels can make the placement of lighting elements difficult. When exterior lighting sources are available, the interior of a vehicle can be lit through these transparent elements. However, when exterior lighting sources are not available, as is often the case at night, there is a need to generate light within the vehicle interior.

[0004] Thus, there is a need for flexible lighting systems that meet the changing demands of vehicle drivers and passenger while conforming to the changing designs of vehicles.

SUMMARY

[0005] A first aspect of this disclosure pertains to illuminating glazing assembly comprising: an external first glass sheet; an internal second glass sheet; an interlayer disposed between the first glass sheet and the second glass sheet; a third glass sheet comprising an inner surface, an outer surface opposite the inner surface, and an edge between the inner and outer surfaces, the outer surface facing an interior surface of the second glass sheet that is opposite a side of the second glass sheet on which the interlayer is disposed; and a light source optically coupled to the edge, wherein the third glass sheet is a light guide plate for light emitted by the light source.

[0006] A second aspect of this disclosure pertains to a vehicle comprising: a body defining an interior and an opening in communication with the interior; and a complexly curved laminate disposed in the opening. The laminate comprises: a first curved glass substrate comprising a first major surface, a second major surface opposing the first major surface, and a first thickness defined as the distance between the first major surface and second major surface; a second curved glass substrate comprising a third major surface, a fourth major surface opposing the third major surface, and a second thickness defined as the distance between the third major surface and the fourth major surface; and an interlayer disposed between the first curved glass substrate and the second curved glass substrate and adjacent the second major surface and third major surface. The vehicle also comprises a third glass substrate comprising a fifth major surface, a sixth major surface opposing the fifth major surface, and an edge between the fifth and sixth major surfaces, the fifth major surface facing the fourth major surface of the second curved glass substrate; and a light source optically coupled to the edge, wherein the third glass substrate is a light guide plate for light emitted by the light source.

[0007] Additional features and advantages will be set forth in the detailed description which follows, and in part will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art from that description or recognized by practicing the embodiments as described herein, including the detailed description which follows, the claims, as well as the appended drawings.

[0008] It is to be understood that both the foregoing general description and the following detailed description are merely exemplary, and are intended to provide an overview or framework to understanding the nature and character of the claims. The accompanying drawings are included to provide a further understanding, and are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification. The drawings illustrate one or more embodiment(s), and together with the description serve to explain principles and operation of the various embodiments. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0009] Figure 1 illustrates an exemplary vehicle having various components which may be comprise automotive glazings according to certain embodiments of the disclosure;

[0010] Figure 2 is a pictorial illustration of a plan view of an embodiment of a vehicle roof having a sunroof;

[0011] Figure 3 A is a side view of shaped laminate according to one or more

embodiments;

[0012] Figure 3B is a side view of a shaped laminate according to one or more

embodiments;

[0013] Figure 4 is a pictorial illustration of an exemplary embodiment of a light guide plate;

[0014] Figures 5A and 5B are pictorial illustrations showing side and plan views of an embodiment of a light guide plate with a light source;

[0015] Figures 6A and 6B are pictorial illustrations showing side and plan views of an embodiment of a light guide plate with a light source;

[0016] Figures 7A and 7B are pictorial illustrations showing side and plan views of an embodiment of a light guide plate with a light-diffusing fiber as a light source;

[0017] Figures 8 A and 8B are pictorial illustrations showing side and plan views of an embodiment of a light guide plate with a light source and edge reflector;

[0018] Figures 9A and 9B are pictorial illustrations showing side and isometric views of an embodiment of a light guide plate with a light source and planar reflector; and

[0019] Figures lOA-lOC are pictorial illustrations showing side views of an embodiment of a retractable light guide plate.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0020] Reference will now be made in detail to various embodiments, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

[0021] Automotive glazings may be used in a wide range of applications in accordance with various aspects of the disclosure. For example, automotive glazings may be used in various functional and/or decorative applications such as exterior and interior surfaces of vehicles including, but not limited to, cars, trucks, buses, and boats. FIG. 1 illustrates an exemplary vehicle 100, which includes front and rear assemblies 1 10 and 120, having front and rear side windows 130 and 140. The vehicle 100 also comprises a forward pillar A, conventionally referred to as an A-pillar, a rear pillar C, conventionally referred to as a Capillar, and a center pillar B, located between the front and rear side windows 130 and 140 and conventionally referred to as a B-pillar. The vehicle 100 can further comprises a windshield 150, rear window 160, and, as shown in FIG. 2, a sunroof or moonroof 190. FIG. 2 illustrates a plan view of a vehicle roof 180 that has an opening 185 for a sunroof or moonroof 190. As used herein, "sunroof or "moonroof will be used interchangeably, and refer to an element in a vehicle roof that is at least partially transparent to visible light. According to various non- limiting embodiments, the automotive glazings disclosed herein can comprise all or a portion of the illustrated vehicle components including, but not limited to, the front window

(windshield), rear window, side windows, sunroof, moonroof, and/or exterior paneling, including, for instance, the A, B, and/or C panels. In additional embodiments, the light-guide plate construction disclosed herein can be used on interior panels inside the vehicle 100 (not illustrated), such as the dashboard, console, interior side paneling, and/or seats, e.g., headrests. Of course, automotive glazings according to the instant disclosure can also be applied to other exterior or interior portions of the vehicle.

[0022] Aspects of this disclosure pertain to glass laminates that are thin or have a reduced weight compared to conventional laminates, while exhibiting superior strength and meeting regulatory requirements for use in automotive and architectural applications. Conventional laminates include two soda lime silicate glass substrates having a thickness in a range from about 1.6 mm to about 3 mm. To reduce the thickness of at least one of the glass substrates, while maintaining or improving the strength and other performance of the laminate, one of the glass substrates can include a strengthened glass substrate.

[0023] An aspect of this disclosure pertains to a laminate 300 comprising a first curved glass substrate 310, a second curved glass substrate 320 and an interlayer 330 disposed between the first curved glass substrate and the second curved glass substrate, as illustrated in Figure 3. In one or more embodiments, the first curved glass substrate 310 includes a first major surface 312, a second major surface 314 opposing the first major surface, a first thickness 3 16 defined as the distance between the first major surface and second major surface, and a first sag depth 318. In one or more embodiments, the second curved glass substrate 320 includes a third major surface 322, a fourth major surface 324 opposing the third major surface, a second thickness 326 defined as the distance between the third major surface and the fourth major surface, and a second sag depth 328. [0024] In one or more embodiments, the interlayer 330 is disposed between the first curved glass substrate and the second curved glass substrate such that it is adjacent the second major surface 314 and third major surface 322, as shown in Figure 3.

[0025] In the embodiment shown in Figure 3, the first surface 312 forms a convex surface and the fourth surface 324 forms a concave surface. In the embodiment of the laminate 300A shown in Figure 3A, the position of the glass substrates may be interchanged such that the interlayer 330 is disposed between the first curved glass substrate 310 and the second curved glass substrate 320 such that it is adjacent the first major surface 312 and fourth major surface 324. In such embodiments, the second surface 314 forms a convex surface and the third surface 322 forms a concave surface, as shown in Figure 3A.

[0026] In one or more embodiments the first glass substrate and/or the second glass substrate (or the first glass substrate and/or second glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate and second curved glass substrate, respectively) includes a mechanically strengthened glass substrate (as described herein).

[0027] In one or more embodiments, one or both the first sag depth 318 and the second sag depth 328 is about 2 mm or greater. For example, one or both the first sag depth 318 and the second sag depth 328 may be in a range from about 2 mm to about 30 mm, from about 4 mm to about 30 mm, from about 5 mm to about 30 mm, from about 6 mm to about 30 mm, from about 8 mm to about 30 mm, from about 10 mm to about 30 mm, from about 12 mm to about 30 mm, from about 14 mm to about 30 mm, from about 15 mm to about 30 mm, from about 2 mm to about 28 mm, from about 2 mm to about 26 mm, from about 2 mm to about 25 mm, from about 2 mm to about 24 mm, from about 2 mm to about 22 mm, from about 2 mm to about 20 mm, from about 2 mm to about 18 mm, from about 2 mm to about 16 mm, from about 2 mm to about 15 mm, from about 2 mm to about 14 mm, from about 2 mm to about 12 mm, from about 2 mm to about 10 mm, from about 2 mm to about 8 mm, from about 6 mm to about 20 mm, from about 8 mm to about 18 mm, from about 10 mm to about 15 mm, from about 12 mm to about 22 mm, from about 15 mm to about 25 mm, or from about 18 mm to about 22 mm.

[0028] In one or more embodiments, the first sag depth 318 and the second sag depth 328 are substantially equal to one another. In one or more embodiments, the first sag depth is within 10% of the second sag depth. For example, the first sag depth is within 9%, within 8%, within 7%, within 6% or within 5% of the second sag depth. For illustration, the second sag depth is about 15 mm, and the first sag depth is in a range from about 14.5 mm to about 16.5 mm (or within 10% of the second sag depth). [0029] In one or more embodiments, the first curved glass substrate and the second curved glass substrate comprise a shape deviation therebetween the first glass substrate and the second glass substrate of ± 5 mm or less as measured by an optical three-dimensional scanner such as the ATOS Triple Scan supplied by GOM GmbH, located in Braunschweig, Germany. In one or more embodiments, the shape deviation is measured between the second surface 314 and the third surface 322, or between the first surface 312 and the fourth surface 324. In one or more embodiments, the shape deviation between the first glass substrate and the second glass substrate is about ± 4 mm or less, about ±3 mm or less, about ± 2 mm or less, about ± 1 mm or less, about ± 0.8 mm or less, about ± 0.6 mm or less, about ± 0.5 mm or less, about ± 0.4 mm or less, about ± 0.3 mm or less, about ± 0.2 mm or less, or about ± 0.1 mm or less. As used herein, the shape deviation refers to the maximum shape deviation measured on the respective surfaces.

[0030] In one or more embodiments, one of or both the first major surface 312 and the fourth major surface 324 exhibit minimal optical distortion. For example, one of or both the first major surface 312 and the fourth major surface 324 exhibit less than about 400 millidiopters, less than about 300 millidiopters, or less than about 250 millidiopters, as measured by an optical distortion detector using transmission optics according to ASTM 1561. A suitable optical distortion detector is supplied by ISRA VISIION AG, located in Darmstadt, Germany, under the tradename SCREENSCAN-Faultfinder. In one or more embodiments, one of or both the first major surface 312 and the fourth major surface 324 exhibit about 190 millidiopters or less, about 180 millidiopters or less, about 170

millidiopters or less, about 160 millidiopters or less, about 150 millidiopters or less, about 140 millidiopters or less, about 130 millidiopters or less, about 120 millidiopters or less, about 110 millidiopters or less, about 100 millidiopters or less, about 90 millidiopters or less, about 80 millidiopters or less, about 70 millidiopters or less, about 60 millidiopters or less, or about 50 millidiopters or less. As used herein, the optical distortion refers to the maximum optical distortion measured on the respective surfaces.

[0031] In one or more embodiments, the laminate 300 may have a thickness of 6.85 mm or less, or 5.85 mm or less, where the thickness comprises the sum of thicknesses of the first curved glass substrate, the second curved glass substrate, and the interlayer. In various embodiments, the laminate may have a thickness in the range of about 1.8 mm to about 6.85 mm, or in the range of about 1.8 mm to about 5.85 mm, or in the range of about 1.8 mm to about 5.0 mm, or 2.1 mm to about 6.85 mm, or in the range of about 2.1 mm to about 5.85 mm, or in the range of about 2.1 mm to about 5.0 mm, or in the range of about 2.4 mm to about 6.85 mm, or in the range of about 2.4 mm to about 5.85 mm, or in the range of about 2.4 mm to about 5.0 mm, or in the range of about 3.4 mm to about 6.85 mm, or in the range of about 3.4 mm to about 5.85 mm, or in the range of about 3.4 mm to about 5.0 mm.

[0032] In one or more embodiments, the laminate 300 exhibits radii of curvature that is less than 1000 mm, or less than 750 mm, or less than 500 mm, or less than 300 mm. In one or more embodiments, the laminate 300 exhibits at least one radius of curvature of about 10 m or less, or about 5 m or less along at least one axis. In one or more embodiments, the laminate 300 may have a radius of curvature of 5 m or less along at least a first axis and along the second axis that is perpendicular to the first axis. In one or more embodiments, the laminate may have a radius of curvature of 5 m or less along at least a first axis and along the second axis that is not perpendicular to the first axis.

[0033] In one or more embodiments the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) is relatively thin in comparison to the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate). In other words, the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) has a thickness greater than the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate). In one or more embodiments, the first thickness (or the thickness of the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) is more than two times the second thickness. In one or more embodiments, the first thickness (or the thickness of the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) is in the range from about 1.5 times to about 10 times the second thickness (e.g., from about 1.75 times to about 10 times, from about 2 times to about 10 times, from about 2.25 times to about 10 times, from about 2.5 times to about 10 times, from about 2.75 times to about 10 times, from about 3 times to about 10 times, from about 3.25 times to about 10 times, from about 3.5 times to about 10 times, from about 3.75 times to about 10 times, from about 4 times to about 10 times, from about 1.5 times to about 9 times, from about 1.5 times to about 8 times, from about 1.5 times to about 7.5 times, from about 1.5 times to about 7 times, from about 1.5 times to about 6.5 times, from about 1.5 times to about 6 times, from about 1.5 times to about 5.5 times, from about 1.5 times to about 5 times, from about 1.5 times to about 4.5 times, from about 1.5 times to about 4 times, from about 1.5 times to about 3.5 times, from about 2 times to about 7 times, from about 2.5 times to about 6 times, from about 3 times to about 6 times).

[0034] In one or more embodiments, the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) may have the same thickness. In one or more specific embodiments, the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) is more rigid or has a greater stiffness than the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate), and in very specific embodiments, both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) have a thickness in the range of 0.2 mm and 1.6 mm.

[0035] In one or more embodiments, either one or both the first thickness (or the thickness of the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second thickness (or the thickness of the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) is less than 1.6 mm (e.g., 1.55 mm or less, 1.5 mm or less, 1.45 mm or less, 1.4 mm or less, 1.35 mm or less, 1.3 mm or less, 1.25 mm or less, 1.2 mm or less, 1.15 mm or less, 1.1 mm or less, 1.05 mm or less, 1 mm or less, 0.95 mm or less, 0.9 mm or less, 0.85 mm or less, 0.8 mm or less, 0.75 mm or less, 0.7 mm or less, 0.65 mm or less, 0.6 mm or less, 0.55 mm or less, 0. 5mm or less, 0.45 mm or less, 0. 4 mm or less, 0.35 mm or less, 0. 3 mm or less, 0.25 mm or less, 0.2 mm or less, 0.15 mm or less, or about 0.1 mm or less). The lower limit of thickness may be 0.1 mm, 0. 2mm or 0.3 mm. In some embodiments, either one or both the first thickness (or the thickness of the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second thickness (or the thickness of the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) is in the range from about 0.1 mm to less than about 1.6 mm, from about 0.1 mm to about 1.5 mm, from about 0.1 mm to about 1.4 mm, from about 0.1 mm to about 1.3 mm, from about 0.1 mm to about 1.2 mm, from about 0.1 mm to about 1.1 mm, from about 0.1 mm to about 1 mm, from about 0.1 mm to about 0.9 mm, from about 0.1 mm to about 0.8 mm, from about 0.1 mm to about 0.7 mm, from about 0.1 mm, from about 0.2 mm to less than about 1.6 mm, from about 0.3 mm to less than about 1.6 mm, from about 0.4 mm to less than about 1.6 mm, from about 0.5 mm to less than about 1.6 mm, from about 0.6 mm to less than about 1.6 mm, from about 0.7 mm to less than about 1.6 mm, from about 0.8 mm to less than about 1.6 mm, from about 0.9 mm to less than about 1.6 mm, or from about 1 mm to about 1.6 mm.

[0036] In some embodiments, while one of the first thickness (or the thickness of the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second thickness (or the thickness of the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) is less than about 1.6 mm, the other of the first thickness (or the thickness of the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second thickness (or the thickness of the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) is about 1.6 mm or greater. In such embodiments, first thickness (or the thickness of the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second thickness (or the thickness of the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) differ from one another. For example, the while one of the first thickness (or the thickness of the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second thickness (or the thickness of the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) is less than about 1.6 mm, the other of the first thickness (or the thickness of the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second thickness (or the thickness of the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) is about 1.7 mm or greater, about 1.75 mm or greater, about 1.8 mm or greater, about 1.7 mm or greater, about 1.7 mm or greater, about 1.7 mm or greater, about 1.85 mm or greater, about 1.9 mm or greater, about 1.95 mm or greater, about 2 mm or greater, about 2.1 mm or greater, about 2.2 mm or greater, about 2.3 mm or greater, about 2.4 mm or greater, 2.5 mm or greater, 2.6 mm or greater, 2.7 mm or greater, 2.8 mm or greater, 2.9 mm or greater, 3 mm or greater, 3.2 mm or greater, 3.4 mm or greater, 3.5 mm or greater, 3.6 mm or greater, 3.8 mm or greater, 4 mm or greater, 4.2 mm or greater, 4.4 mm or greater, 4.6 mm or greater, 4.8 mm or greater, 5 mm or greater, 5.2 mm or greater, 5.4 mm or greater, 5.6 mm or greater, 5.8 mm or greater, or 6 mm or greater. In some embodiments the first thickness (or the thickness of the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) or the second thickness (or the thickness of the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) is in a range from about 1.6 mm to about 6 mm, from about 1.7 mm to about 6 mm, from about 1.8 mm to about 6 mm, from about 1.9 mm to about 6 mm, from about 2 mm to about 6 mm, from about 2.1 mm to about 6 mm, from about 2.2 mm to about 6 mm, from about 2.3 mm to about 6 mm, from about 2.4 mm to about 6 mm, from about 2.5 mm to about 6 mm, from about 2.6 mm to about 6 mm, from about 2.8 mm to about 6 mm, from about 3 mm to about 6 mm, from about 3.2 mm to about 6 mm, from about 3.4 mm to about 6 mm, from about 3.6 mm to about 6 mm, from about 3.8 mm to about 6 mm, from about 4 mm to about 6 mm, from about 1.6 mm to about 5.8 mm, from about 1.6 mm to about 5.6 mm, from about 1.6 mm to about 5.5 mm, from about 1.6 mm to about 5.4 mm, from about 1.6 mm to about 5.2 mm, from about 1.6 mm to about 5 mm, from about 1.6 mm to about 4.8 mm, from about 1.6 mm to about 4.6 mm, from about 1.6 mm to about 4.4 mm, from about 1.6 mm to about 4.2 mm, from about 1.6 mm to about 4 mm, from about 3.8 mm to about 5.8 mm, from about 1.6 mm to about 3.6 mm, from about 1.6 mm to about 3.4 mm, from about 1.6 mm to about 3.2 mm, or from about 1.6 mm to about 3 mm.

[0037] In one or more specific examples, the first thickness (or the thickness of the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) is from about 1.6 mm to about 3 mm, and the second thickness (or the thickness of the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) is in a range from about 0.1 mm to less than about 1.6 mm.

[0038] In one or more embodiments, the laminate 300 is substantially free of visual distortion as measured by ASTM C1652/C1652M. In specific embodiments, the laminate, the first curved glass substrate and/or the second curved glass substrate are substantially free of wrinkles or distortions that can be visually detected by the naked eye, according to ASTM C1652/C1652M.

[0039] In one or more embodiments, the first major surface 312 or the second major surface 314 comprises a surface compressive stress of less than 3 MPa as measured by a surface stress meter, such as the surface stress meter commercially available under the tradename FSM-6000, from Orihara Industrial Co., Ltd. (Japan) ("FSM"). In some embodiments, the first curved glass substrate is unstrengthened as will be described herein (but may optionally be annealed), and exhibits a surface compressive stress of less than about 3 MPa, or about 2.5 MPa or less, 2 MPa or less, 1.5 MPa or less, 1 MPa or less, or about 0.5 MPa or less. In some embodiments, such surface compressive stress ranges are present on both the first major surface and the second major surface.

[0040] In one or more embodiments, the first and second glass substrates used to form the first curved glass substrate and second curved substrate are provided as a substantially planar sheet prior to being co-shaped to form a first curved glass substrate and second curved glass substrate. In some instances, one or both of the first glass substrate and the second glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate and second curved substrate may have a 3D or 2.5D shape that does not exhibit the sag depth desired and will eventually be formed during the co-shaping process and present in the resulting laminate. Additionally or alternatively, the thickness of the one or both of the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) may be constant along one or more dimension or may vary along one or more of its dimensions for aesthetic and/or functional reasons. For example, the edges of one or both of the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) may be thicker as compared to more central regions of the glass substrate.

[0041] The length, width and thickness dimensions of the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) may also vary according to the article application or use. In one or more embodiments, the first curved glass substrate 310 (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) includes a first length and a first width (the first thickness is orthogonal both the first length and the first width), and the second curved glass substrate 320 (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) includes a second length and a second width orthogonal the second length (the second thickness is orthogonal both the second length and the second width). In one or more embodiments, either one of or both the first length and the first width is about 0.25 meters (m) or greater. For example, the first length and/or the second length may be in a range from about 1 m to about 3 m, from about 1.2 m to about 3 m, from about 1.4 m to about 3 m, from about 1.5 m to about 3 m, from about 1.6 m to about 3 m, from about 1.8 m to about 3 m, from about 2 m to about 3 m, from about 1 m to about 2.8 m, from about 1 m to about 2.8 m, from about 1 m to about 2.8 m, from about 1 m to about 2.8 m, from about 1 m to about 2.6 m, from about 1 m to about 2.5 m, from about 1 m to about 2.4 m, from about 1 m to about 2.2 m, from about 1 m to about 2 m, from about 1 m to about 1.8 m, from about 1 m to about 1.6 m, from about 1 m to about 1.5 m, from about 1.2 m to about 1.8 m or from about 1.4 m to about 1.6 m.

[0042] For example, the first width and/or the second width may be in a range from about 0.5 m to about 2 m, from about 0.6 m to about 2 m, from about 0.8 m to about 2 m, from about 1 m to about 2 m, from about 1.2 m to about 2 m, from about 1.4 m to about 2 m, from about 1.5 m to about 2 m, from about 0.5 m to about 1.8 m, from about 0.5 m to about 1.6 m, from about 0.5 m to about 1.5 m, from about 0.5 m to about 1.4 m, from about 0.5 m to about 1.2 m, from about 0.5 m to about 1 m, from about 0.5 m to about 0.8 m, from about 0.75 m to about 1.5 m, from about 0.75 m to about 1.25 m, or from about 0.8 m to about 1.2 m.

[0043] In one or more embodiments, the second length is within 5% of the first length (e.g., about 5% or less, about 4% or less, about 3% or less, or about 2% or less). For example if the first length is 1.5 m, the second length may be in a range from about 1.425 m to about 1.575 m and still be within 5% of the first length. In one or more embodiments, the second width is within 5% of the first width (e.g., about 5% or less, about 4% or less, about 3% or less, or about 2% or less). For example if the first width is 1 m, the second width may be in a range from about 1.05 m to about 0.95 m and still be within 5% of the first width.

[0044] In one or more embodiments, the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) may have a refractive index in the range from about 1.2 to about 1.8, from about 1.2 to about 1.75, from about 1.2 to about 1.7, from about 1.2 to about 1.65, from about 1.2 to about 1.6, from about 1.2 to about 1.55, from about 1.25 to about 1.8, from about 1.3 to about 1.8, from about 1.35 to about 1.8, from about 1.4 to about 1.8, from about 1.45 to about 1.8, from about 1.5 to about 1.8, from about 1.55 to about 1.8, of from about 1.45 to about 1.55. As used herein, the refractive index values are with respect to a wavelength of 550 nm.

[0045] In one or more embodiments, the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) may be characterized by the manner in which it is formed. For instance, one of or both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) may be characterized as float-formable (i.e., formed by a float process), down-drawable and, in particular, fusion-formable or slot-drawable (i.e., formed by a down draw process such as a fusion draw process or a slot draw process).

[0046] One of or both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) described herein may be formed by a float process. A float-formable glass substrate may be characterized by smooth surfaces and uniform thickness is made by floating molten glass on a bed of molten metal, typically tin. In an example process, molten glass that is fed onto the surface of the molten tin bed forms a floating glass ribbon. As the glass ribbon flows along the tin bath, the temperature is gradually decreased until the glass ribbon solidifies into a solid glass substrate that can be lifted from the tin onto rollers. Once off the bath, the glass substrate can be cooled further and annealed to reduce internal stress.

[0047] One of or both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) may be formed by a down-draw process. Down-draw processes produce glass substrates having a substantially uniform thickness that possess relatively pristine surfaces. Because the average flexural strength of the glass substrates is generally controlled by the amount and size of surface flaws, a pristine surface that has had minimal contact has a higher initial strength. In addition, down drawn glass substrates have a very flat, smooth surface that can be used in its final application without costly grinding and polishing.

[0048] One of or both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) may be described as fusion- formable (i.e., formable using a fusion draw process). The fusion process uses a drawing tank that has a channel for accepting molten glass raw material. The channel has weirs that are open at the top along the length of the channel on both sides of the channel. When the channel fills with molten material, the molten glass overflows the weirs. Due to gravity, the molten glass flows down the outside surfaces of the drawing tank as two flowing glass films. These outside surfaces of the drawing tank extend down and inwardly so that they join at an edge below the drawing tank. The two flowing glass films join at this edge to fuse and form a single flowing glass substrate. The fusion draw method offers the advantage that, because the two glass films flowing over the channel fuse together, neither of the outside surfaces of the resulting glass substrate comes in contact with any part of the apparatus. Thus, the surface properties of the fusion drawn glass substrate are not affected by such contact.

[0049] One of or both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) described herein may be formed by a slot draw process. The slot draw process is distinct from the fusion draw method. In slow draw processes, the molten raw material glass is provided to a drawing tank. The bottom of the drawing tank has an open slot with a nozzle that extends the length of the slot. The molten glass flows through the slot/nozzle and is drawn downward as a continuous glass substrate and into an annealing region.

[0050] In one or more embodiments, one of or both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) and second substrate may be glass (e.g., soda lime glass, alkali aluminosilicate glass, alkali containing borosilicate glass and/or alkali aluminoborosilicate glass) or glass-ceramic. In some embodiments, one of or both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) described herein may exhibit an amorphous microstructure and may be substantially free of crystals or crystallites. In other words, the glass substrates of certain embodiments exclude glass-ceramic materials. In some embodiments, one of or both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) is a glass- ceramic. Examples of suitable glass-ceramics include LiiO-AhC -SiOi system (i.e. LAS- System) glass-ceramics, MgO-AhC -SiOi system (i.e. MAS-System) glass-ceramics, and glass-ceramics including crystalline phases of any one or more of mullite, spinel, a-quartz, β- quartz solid solution, petalite, lithium dissilicate, β-spodumene, nepheline, and alumina. Such substrates including glass-ceramic materials may be strengthened as described herein.

[0051] In one or more embodiments, one of or both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) exhibits a total solar transmittance of about 92% or less, over a wavelength range from about 300 nm to about 2500 nm, when the glass substrate has a thickness of 0.7 mm. For example, the one of or both the first and second glass substrates exhibits a total solar transmittance in a range from about 60% to about 92%, from about 62% to about 92%, from about 64% to about 92%, from about 65% to about 92%, from about 66% to about 92%, from about 68% to about 92%, from about 70% to about 92%, from about 72% to about 92%, from about 60% to about 90%, from about 60% to about 88%, from about 60% to about 86%, from about 60% to about 85%, from about 60% to about 84%, from about 60% to about 82%, from about 60% to about 80%, from about 60% to about 78%, from about 60% to about 76%, from about 60% to about 75%, from about 60% to about 74%, or from about 60% to about 72%.

[0052] In one or more embodiments, one or both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) are tinted. In such embodiments, the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) may comprise a first tint and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) comprises a second tint that differs from the first tint, in the CIE L*a*b* (CIELAB) color space. In one or more embodiments, the first tint and the second tint are the same. In one or more specific embodiments, the first curved glass substrate comprises a first tint, and the second curved glass substrate is not tinted. In one or more specific embodiments, the second curved glass substrate comprises a second tint, and the first curved glass substrate is not tinted.

[0053] In one or embodiments, the one of or both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) exhibits an average transmittance in the range from about 75% to about 85%, at a thickness of 0.7 mm or 1 mm, over a wavelength range from about 380 nm to about 780 nm. In some embodiments, the average transmittance at this thickness and over this wavelength range may be in a range from about 75% to about 84%, from about 75% to about 83%, from about 75% to about 82%, from about 75% to about 81 %, from about 75% to about 80%, from about 76% to about 85%, from about 77% to about 85%, from about 78% to about 85%, from about 79% to about 85%, or from about 80% to about 85%. In one or more embodiments, the one of or both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) exhibits Tuv-38o or Tuv-400 of 50% or less (e.g., 49% or less, 48% or less, 45% or less, 40% or less, 30% or less, 25% or less, 23% or less, 20% or less, or 15 % or less), at a thickness of 0.7 mm or 1 mm, over a wavelength range from about 300 nm to about 400 nm.

[0054] In one or more embodiments, the one of or both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) may be strengthened to include compressive stress that extends from a surface to a depth of compression (DOC). The compressive stress regions are balanced by a central portion exhibiting a tensile stress. At the DOC, the stress crosses from a positive (compressive) stress to a negative (tensile) stress.

[0055] In one or more embodiments, such strengthened glass substrates may be chemically strengthened, mechanically strengthened or thermally strengthened. In some embodiments, the strengthened glass substrate may be chemically and mechanically strengthened, mechanically and thermally strengthened, chemically and thermally strengthened or chemically, mechanically and thermally strengthened. In one or more specific embodiments, the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) is strengthened and the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) is unstrengthened but optionally annealed. In one or more embodiments, the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) is strengthened. In specific embodiments, both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) are strengthened. In one or more embodiments, where one or both the glass substrates are chemically and/or thermally strengthened, such chemical and/or thermal strengthening is performed on the curved glass substrate (i.e., after shaping). In some embodiments, such glass substrates may be optionally mechanically strengthened before shaping. In one or more embodiments, where one or both the glass substrates are mechanically strengthened (and optionally combined with one or more other strengthening methods), such mechanical strengthening occurs before shaping.

[0056] In one or more embodiments, the one of or both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) may be strengthened mechanically by utilizing a mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion between portions of the article to create a compressive stress region and a central region exhibiting a tensile stress. The DOC in such mechanically strengthened substrates is typically the thickness of the outer portions of the glass substrate having one coefficient of thermal expansion (i.e., the point at which the glass substrate coefficient of thermal expansion changes from one to another value).

[0057] In some embodiments, the one of or both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) may be strengthened thermally by heating the glass substrate to a temperature below the glass transition point and then rapidly thermally quenching, or lowering its temperature. As noted above, in one or more embodiments, where one or both the glass substrates are thermally strengthened, such thermal strengthening is performed on the curved glass substrate (i.e., after shaping).

[0058] In one or more embodiments, the one of or both the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) may be chemically strengthening by ion exchange. As noted above, in one or more embodiments, where one or both the glass substrates are chemically strengthened, such chemical strengthening is performed on the curved glass substrate (i.e., after shaping). In the ion exchange process, ions at or near the surface of the glass substrate are replaced by - or exchanged with - larger ions having the same valence or oxidation state. In those embodiments in which the glass substrate comprises a composition including at least one alkali metal oxide as measured on an oxide basis (e.g., L12O , Na20, K2O, RbiO, or CS2O), ions in the surface layer of the article and the larger ions are monovalent alkali metal cations, such as Li + , Na + , K + , Rb + , and Cs + . Alternatively, monovalent cations in the surface layer may be replaced with monovalent cations other than alkali metal cations, such as Ag + or the like. In such embodiments, the monovalent ions (or cations) exchanged into the glass substrate generate a compressive stress on the surface portions, balanced by a tensile stress in the central portions.

[0059] Ion exchange processes are typically carried out by immersing a glass substrate in a molten salt bath (or two or more molten salt baths) containing the larger ions to be exchanged with the smaller ions in the glass substrate. It should be noted that aqueous salt baths may also be utilized. In addition, the composition of the bath(s) may include more than one type of larger ion (e.g., Na+ and K+) or a single larger ion. It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that parameters for the ion exchange process, including, but not limited to, bath composition and temperature, immersion time, the number of immersions of the glass substrate in a salt bath (or baths), use of multiple salt baths, additional steps such as annealing, washing, and the like, are generally determined by the composition of the glass substrate (including the structure of the article and any crystalline phases present) and the desired DOC and CS of the glass substrate that results from strengthening. Exemplary molten bath composition may include nitrates, sulfates, and chlorides of the larger alkali metal ion. Typical nitrates include KNO3, NaNC , L1NO3, NaS04 and combinations thereof. The temperature of the molten salt bath typically is in a range from about 380°C up to about 450°C, while immersion times range from about 15 minutes up to about 100 hours depending on glass substrate thickness, bath temperature and glass (or monovalent ion) diffusivity. However, temperatures and immersion times different from those described above may also be used.

[0060] In one or more embodiments, the glass substrate may be immersed in a molten salt bath of 100% NaN0 3 , 100% KNO3, or a combination of NaN0 3 and KNO3 having a temperature from about 370 °C to about 480 °C. In some embodiments, the glass substrate may be immersed in a molten mixed salt bath including from about 5% to about 90% KNO3 and from about 10% to about 95% NaNC . In one or more embodiments, the glass substrate may be immersed in a second bath, after immersion in a first bath. The first and second baths may have different compositions and/or temperatures from one another. The immersion times in the first and second baths may vary. For example, immersion in the first bath may be longer than the immersion in the second bath.

[0061] In one or more embodiments, the glass substrate may be immersed in a molten, mixed salt bath including NaN0 3 and KNO3 (e.g., 49%/51%, 50%/50%, 51%/49%) having a temperature less than about 420 °C (e.g., about 400 °C or about 380 °C). for less than about 5 hours, or even about 4 hours or less.

[0062] Ion exchange conditions can be tailored to provide a "spike" or to increase the slope of the stress profile at or near the surface of the resulting glass substrate. The spike may result in a greater surface CS value. This spike can be achieved by single bath or multiple baths, with the bath(s) having a single composition or mixed composition, due to the unique properties of the glass compositions used in the glass substrates described herein.

[0063] In one or more embodiments, where more than one monovalent ion is exchanged into the glass substrate, the different monovalent ions may exchange to different depths within the glass substrate (and generate different magnitude stresses within the glass substrate at different depths). The resulting relative depths of the stress-generating ions can be determined and cause different characteristics of the stress profile.

[0064] CS is measured using those means known in the art, such as by surface stress meter (FSM) using commercially available instruments such as the FSM-6000, manufactured by Orihara Industrial Co., Ltd. (Japan). Surface stress measurements rely upon the accurate measurement of the stress optical coefficient (SOC), which is related to the birefringence of the glass. SOC in turn is measured by those methods that are known in the art, such as fiber and four point bend methods, both of which are described in ASTM standard C770-98 (2013), entitled "Standard Test Method for Measurement of Glass Stress-Optical

Coefficient," the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety, and a bulk cylinder method. As used herein CS may be the "maximum compressive stress" which is the highest compressive stress value measured within the compressive stress layer. In some embodiments, the maximum compressive stress is located at the surface of the glass substrate. In other embodiments, the maximum compressive stress may occur at a depth below the surface, giving the compressive profile the appearance of a "buried peak."

[0065] DOC may be measured by FSM or by a scattered light polariscope (SCALP) (such as the SCALP-04 scattered light polariscope available from Glasstress Ltd., located in Tallinn Estonia), depending on the strengthening method and conditions. When the glass substrate is chemically strengthened by an ion exchange treatment, FSM or SCALP may be used depending on which ion is exchanged into the glass substrate. Where the stress in the glass substrate is generated by exchanging potassium ions into the glass substrate, FSM is used to measure DOC. Where the stress is generated by exchanging sodium ions into the glass substrate, SCALP is used to measure DOC. Where the stress in the glass substrate is generated by exchanging both potassium and sodium ions into the glass, the DOC is measured by SCALP, since it is believed the exchange depth of sodium indicates the DOC and the exchange depth of potassium ions indicates a change in the magnitude of the compressive stress (but not the change in stress from compressive to tensile); the exchange depth of potassium ions in such glass substrates is measured by FSM. Central tension or CT is the maximum tensile stress and is measured by SCALP.

[0066] In one or more embodiments, the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) may be strengthened to exhibit a DOC that is described a fraction of the thickness t of the glass substrate (as described herein). For example, in one or more embodiments, the DOC may be equal to or greater than about 0.03t, equal to or greater than about 0.035t, equal to or greater than about 0.04t, equal to or greater than about 0.045t, equal to or greater than about 0.05t, equal to or greater than about 0. It, equal to or greater than about 0.1 It, equal to or greater than about 0.12t, equal to or greater than about 0.13t, equal to or greater than about 0.14t, equal to or greater than about 0.15t, equal to or greater than about 0.16t, equal to or greater than about 0.17t, equal to or greater than about 0.18t, equal to or greater than about 0.19t, equal to or greater than about 0.2t, equal to or greater than about 0.21t. In some

embodiments, The DOC may be in a range from about 0.03t to about 0.25t, from about 0.04t to about 0.25 t, from about 0.05t to about 0.25 t, from about 0.06t to about 0.25 t, from about 0.07t to about 0.25 t, from about 0.08t to about 0.25t, from about 0.09t to about 0.25t, from about 0.18t to about 0.25t, from about 0.1 It to about 0.25t, from about 0.12t to about 0.25t, from about 0. Ot to about 0.25t, from about 0.14t to about 0.25t, from about 0.15t to about 0.251, from about 0.08t to about 0.24t, from about 0.08t to about 0.23t, from about 0.08t to about 0.22t, from about 0.08t to about 0.21t, from about 0.08t to about 0.2t, from about 0.08t to about 0.19t, from about 0.08t to about 0.18t, from about 0.08t to about 0.17t, from about 0.08t to about 0.16t, or from about 0.08t to about 0.15t. In some instances, the DOC may be about 20 um or less. In one or more embodiments, the DOC may be about 40 μιη or greater (e.g., from about 40 μιη to about 300 μιη, from about 50 μιη to about 300 μιη, from about 60 μιη to about 300 μιη, from about 70 μιη to about 300 μιη, from about 80 μιη to about 300 μιη, from about 90 μιη to about 300 μιη, from about 100 μιη to about 300 μιη, from about 1 10 μηι to about 300 μηι, from about 120 μιη to about 300 μιη, from about 140 μιη to about 300 μιη, from about 150 μιη to about 300 μιη, from about 40 μιη to about 290 μιη, from about 40 μιη to about 280 μιη, from about 40 μιη to about 260 μιη, from about 40 μιη to about 250 μιη, from about 40 μm to about 240 μιη, from about 40 μιη to about 230 μιη, from about 40 μιη to about 220 μm, from about 40 μιη to about 210 μιη, from about 40 μιη to about 200 μιη, from about 40 μm to about 180 μιη, from about 40 μιη to about 160 μιη, from about 40 μιη to about 150 μm, from about 40 μιη to about 140 μιη, from about 40 μιη to about 130 μιη, from about 40 μm to about 120 μιη, from about 40 μιη to about 110 μιη, or from about 40 μιη to about 100 μιη.

[0067] In one or more embodiments, the strengthened glass substrate may have a CS (which may be found at the surface or a depth within the glass substrate) of about 100 MPa or greater, about 150 MPa or greater, about 200 MPa or greater, about 300 MPa or greater, about 400 MPa or greater, about 500 MPa or greater, about 600 MPa or greater, about 700 MPa or greater, about 800 MPa or greater, about 900 MPa or greater, about 930 MPa or greater, about 1000 MPa or greater, or about 1050 MPa or greater.

[0068] In one or more embodiments, the strengthened glass substrate may have a maximum tensile stress or central tension (CT) of about 20 MPa or greater, about 30 MPa or greater, about 40 MPa or greater, about 45 MPa or greater, about 50 MPa or greater, about 60 MPa or greater, about 70 MPa or greater, about 75 MPa or greater, about 80 MPa or greater, or about 85 MPa or greater. In some embodiments, the maximum tensile stress or central tension (CT) may be in a range from about 40 MPa to about 100 MPa.

[0069] In one or more embodiments, the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) comprise one of soda lime silicate glass, an alkali aluminosilicate glass, alkali containing borosilicate glass, alkali aluminophosphosilicate glass, or alkali aluminoboro silicate glass. In one or more embodiments, one of the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) is a soda lime silicate glass, while the other of the first curved glass substrate (or the first glass substrate used to form the first curved glass substrate) and the second curved glass substrate (or the second glass substrate used to form the second curved glass substrate) is an alkali aluminosilicate glass, alkali containing borosilicate glass, alkali aluminophosphosilicate glass, or alkali

aluminoboro silicate glass. [0070] In one or more embodiments, the interlayer used herein (e.g., 330) may include a single layer or multiple layers. The interlayer (or layers thereof) may be formed polymers such as polyvinyl butyral (PVB), acoustic PBV (APVB), ionomers, ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), polyester (PE), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and the like. The thickness of the interlayer may be in the range from about 0.5 mm to about 2.5 mm, from about 0.8 mm to about 2.5 mm, from about 1 mm to about 2.5 mm or from about 1.5 mm to about 2.5 mm. The interlayer may also have a non-uniform thickness, or wedge shape, from one edge to the other edge of the laminate.

[0071] In one more embodiments, the laminate (and/or one of or both the first curved glass substrate and the second curved glass substrate) exhibits a complexly curved shape. As used herein "complex curve" and "complexly curved" mean a non-planar shape having curvature along two orthogonal axes that are different from one another. Examples of complexly curved shapes includes having simple or compound curves, also referred to as non- developable shapes, which include but are not limited to spherical, aspherical, and toroidal. The complexly curved laminates according to embodiments may also include segments or portions of such surfaces, or be comprised of a combination of such curves and surfaces. In one or more embodiments, a laminate may have a compound curve including a major radius and a cross curvature. A complexly curved laminate according to one or more embodiments may have a distinct radius of curvature in two independent directions. According to one or more embodiments, complexly curved laminates may thus be characterized as having "cross curvature," where the laminate is curved along an axis (i.e., a first axis) that is parallel to a given dimension and also curved along an axis (i.e., a second axis) that is perpendicular to the same dimension. The curvature of the laminate can be even more complex when a significant minimum radius is combined with a significant cross curvature, and/or depth of bend. Some laminates may also include bending along axes that are not perpendicular to one another. As a non-limiting example, the complexly-curved laminate may have length and width dimensions of 0.5 m by 1.0 m and a radius of curvature of 2 to 2.5 m along the minor axis, and a radius of curvature of 4 to 5 m along the major axis. In one or more embodiments, the complexly-curved laminate may have a radius of curvature of 5 m or less along at least one axis. In one or more embodiments, the complexly-curved laminate may have a radius of curvature of 5 m or less along at least a first axis and along the second axis that is perpendicular to the first axis. In one or more embodiments, the complexly-curved laminate may have a radius of curvature of 5 m or less along at least a first axis and along the second axis that is not perpendicular to the first axis. [0072] Aspects of this disclosure pertains to an illuminating glazing assembly in which a glass article or glass sheet is arranged adjacent to a laminate. The glass sheet, or third glass sheet, is a light-guide plate for providing illumination to a space, such as a vehicle interior. FIG. 4 shows an example of such the third glass sheet A material of the third glass sheet 400. The third glass sheet has a first major surface 410 and a second major surface (not shown) opposing the first major surface 410. The first major surface 410 may be referred to herein as an inner surface of the third glass sheet 400. As used herein, "an inner surface" is a surface facing toward an interior of a space, such as a vehicle interior or building interior.

Conversely, "an outer surface" is a surface facing toward an exterior of a vehicle or building. In the view of FIG. 4, two edges are visible: a first edge 430 and a second edge 440. The first and second faces may have a height, H, and a width, W. The first and/or second face(s) may have a roughness that is less than 0.6 nm, less than 0.5 nm, less than 0.4 nm, less than 0.3 nm, less than 0.2 nm, less than 0.1 nm, or between about 0.1 nm and about 0.6 nm.

[0073] The glass sheet may have a thickness, T, between the front face and the back face, where the thickness forms four edges. The thickness of the glass sheet may be less than the height and width of the front and back faces. In various embodiments, the thickness of the plate may be less than 1.5% of the height of the front and/or back face. Alternatively, the thickness, T, may be less than about 3 mm, less than about 2 mm, less than about 1 mm, or between about 0.1 mm to about 3 mm. The height, width, and thickness of the light guide plate may be configured and dimensioned for use in an LCD backlight application.

[0074] As a light-guide plate, the third glass sheet is edge-illuminated via one or more light sources. A first edge 130 may be a light injection edge that receives light provided for example by a light emitting diode (LED). The light injection edge may scatter light within an angle less than 12.8 degrees full width half maximum (FWHM) in transmission. The light injection edge may be obtained by grinding the edge without polishing the light injection edge. The glass sheet may further comprise a second edge 140 adjacent to the light injection edge and a third edge opposite the second edge and adjacent to the light injection edge, where the second edge and/or the third edge scatter light within an angle of less than 12.8 degrees FWHM in reflection. The second edge 140 and/or the third edge may have a diffusion angle in reflection that is below 6.4 degrees. It should be noted that while the embodiment depicted in FIG. 1 shows a single edge 130 injected with light, the claimed subject matter should not be so limited as any one or several of the edges of an exemplary embodiment 100 can be injected with light. For example, in some embodiments, the first edge 130 and its opposing edge can both be injected with light. Such an exemplary embodiment may be used in a display device having a large and or curvilinear width W. Additional embodiments may inject light at the second edge 140 and its opposing edge rather than the first edge 130 and/or its opposing edge. Thicknesses of exemplary display devices can be less than about 10 mm, less than about 9 mm, less than about 8 mm, less than about 7 mm, less than about 6 mm, less than about 5 mm, less than about 4 mm, less than about 3 mm, or less than about 2 mm.

[0075] FIG. 5A shows a diagram of one or more embodiments in which a light source 550 is optically coupled to an edge 510 of a LGP 500. Light L input into the LGP 500 from the light source 550 can illuminate the inner surface 520 or light extraction features (not pictured) provided on the inner surface 520 of the LGP 500. The outer surface 530 would be arranged to face the laminate or sunroof (not pictured) described herein, and light might or might not be emitted from the outer surface 530. FIG. 5B shows a plan view of the LGP 500 and light source 550 of FIG. 5A. Although light source 550 is shown as having the same length as the edge 510, the light source 550 may only emit light at discrete points along the edge 510, or may emit light over the entire edge. For example, the light source 550 may contain one or more LEDs, laser lights, or other suitable emitters. In some embodiments, the light source 550 can contain light emitters of various types or colors, or emitters capable of emitting more than one color of light. For example, the light source 550 may contain RGB LEDs. FIGS. 6A and 6B show an alternative embodiment in which multiple light sources 650, 660 are provided on opposite edges 610, 615 of the LGP 600. Having multiple light sources 650, 660 can enhance light output from the LGP 600. Although the light sources 650, 660 are only shown on opposite edges 610, 615, according to other embodiments, multiple light sources can be provided on any opposite edges, adjacent edges, or combination of opposite and adjacent edges. For example, light sources can be provided on one, two, three, four, or more edges of an LGP.

[0076] FIG. 7A shows an aspect of one or more embodiments in which the provided light source includes a light emitting fiber 750. The light emitting fiber 750 is a lossy light fiber that emits light from a circumferential surface 755 of all or a portion of the length of the light emitting fiber 750. The light emitting fiber 750 can be optically coupled to the edge 710 of the LGP 700 over the entire circumference of the LGP 700, or in the alternative, over only a portion of the circumference, or one or more edges of the LGP 700. Light is provided to the light emitting fiber 750 by one or more light sources 760, which can includes an LED, laser, or other suitable light source.

[0077] In some embodiments, reflectors can be used on or in a LGP to internally reflect light within the LGP to enhance the light output (in intensity or uniformity) at the desired output surface of the LGP. In FIG. 8A, one or more reflectors 860 can be arranged along an edge 820 of the LGP, as shown in a side view of FIG. 8A. The edge reflector 860 has a reflective surface 865 to reflect light contained within the LGP 800, which is light emitted from the light source 850 optically coupled to another edge 810 of the LGP 800. FIG. 8B is a plan view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 8A. Alternatively, a planar reflector 960 can be used on the outer surface 930 of an LGP 900, as shown in FIGS. 9A-9B. In some embodiments, the planar reflector 960 can be partially transparent so that a person within, for example, a vehicle interior, can see through the LGP 900 and planar reflector 960 to an exterior of the vehicle.

[0078] According to one or more embodiments, the third glass layer or light guide plate of the illuminating glazing assembly is arranged in the assembly to be independent of the laminate that forms the sunroof. This allows the LGP to be moved or "opened" independently of the laminate, the exterior side of which faces an exterior of the vehicle. In some embodiments, this may be advantages because the LGP may not be needed in certain environments, and the LGP can be moved or retracted based on a preference of a driver or passenger. In some embodiments, features of the LGP may obstruct a view of the exterior of the vehicle, so that the passenger may want to retract the LGP to remove those obstructions from view. However, at other times, the LGP can be "closed" or put in place to act as an overhead source of illumination for the interior of the vehicle. FIGS. lOA-lOC show an example of such an embodiment. In this embodiment, the illuminating glazing assembly 1000 is mounted in a frame or bracket 1050. The frame or bracket may be attached to some external structure of a vehicle, for example. The assembly 1000 includes a laminate sunroof comprising a first glass sheet 1010, a second glass sheet 1030, and an interlayer 1020 between the first glass sheet 1010 and the second glass sheet 1030. The third glass sheet 1040 is disposed below the laminate. A gap 1060 is present between the laminate and the third glass sheet 1040. The gap 1060 is sufficiently large to allow movement of the third glass sheet 1040 relative to the second glass sheet 1030 without causing damage to either glass sheet. In some embodiments, the gap 1060 may be filled with a substantially transparent material or coating of the laminate. In FIG. 10A, the third glass sheet 1040 is in a closed state, meaning that the outer surface 1041 is adjacent the inner surface 1031 of the second glass sheet 1030 across all or a substantial portion of the second glass sheet, as shown. In FIG. 10B, the third glass sheet 1040 is moving in a direction M substantially parallel to the laminate and the outer surface 1041 of the third glass sheet 1040. As the third glass sheet 1040 moves, it exposes portions of the second glass sheet 1030 that were covered by the third glass sheet 1040 when the third glass sheet was in the closed state. FIG. IOC shows the third glass laminate in the "open" state, which exposes a substantial portion of the second glass sheet 1030 that was previously covered by the third glass sheet 1040. In some embodiments, a portion of the retracted (or opened) third glass sheet 1040 may be stored within an internal compartment of a vehicle, so that it is hidden from view of a vehicle passenger.

[0079] Light guide plates (LGP) are often made of high transmission plastic materials such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Although such plastic materials present excellent properties such as light transmission, these materials exhibit relatively poor mechanical properties such as rigidity, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), and moisture absorption, and can be difficult to make in large sizes. Accordingly, the LGP of the present disclosure is made of a glass-based material that results in an improved LGP having attributes that achieve an improved optical performance in terms of light transmission, solarization, scattering and light coupling as well as exhibiting exceptional mechanical performance in terms of rigidity, CTE, and moisture absorption. Exemplary LGPs according to the instant disclosure can provide a tunable color shift as a function of the glass composition. For exemplary glass light-guide plates the color shift Ay can be reported as Ay=y(L2)-y(Li) where L2 and Li are Z positions along the panel or substrate direction away from the source launch (e.g., LED or otherwise) and where L2-Li=0.5 meters, wherein smaller differences between point 1 and point 2 translate to less color shift in the respective LGP. To achieve a low color shift, an exemplary LGP absorption curve should take on a certain shape, e.g., blue absorption at 450nm should be lower than red absorption at 630nm. Thus, the lower the blue absorption is relative to the red absorption, the lower the color shift in the LGP. Control of optical absorption in exemplary embodiments, specifically, that of Cr and Ni can be achieved by manipulating the optical basicity of the glass.

[0080] The cost associated with manufacturing LGPs can be dependent upon the glass composition. For example, while melting process parameters can be manipulated to shift the optical absorption demonstrated by a particular glass composition, this cannot be used to completely remove the tramp metal absorption from the visible portion of the spectrum. Additionally, the cost of high purity raw materials (those that are processed to contain very low amounts of tramp metals) are in some cases up to eight times more expensive than standard raw materials. For this reason, it is important to design glass compositions that minimize the use of the most expensive raw materials. Conventional glass LGPs have utilized compositions in the sodium aluminosilicate composition space. However, the cost of such compositions are somewhat prohibitive to profitability and thus exemplary compositions described herein include alumina free, potassium silicate compositions to enable lower cost LGPs.

[0081] Generally, LGPs use either white light LEDs or blue light LEDs. The presence of transition metals in the glass causes the formation of absorption bands in the visible light region. These absorption bands can result in a decrease in the amount of light passing through the glass (a viewer would perceive this as a decrease in LCD screen brightness) and result in an increase in color shift. Thus, exemplary embodiments can maximize brightness and minimize color shift by controlling transition metals including iron, nickel and chromium (each of which are particularly damaging to the transmission of glass and increase color shift due to the location of the bands and the absorption coefficients (intensity) of these bands). Exemplary embodiments described herein, however, minimize the effect of these absorption bands by the structure of the respective glass network which shifts some of these bands to a higher wavelength, e.g., increasing the transmission at 450 and 550 nm. Exemplary alumina free, potassium silicate compositions described herein provide a glass network which was found to decrease the intensity of the absorption bands by changing the equilibrium state of the transition metal (e.g., Cr, Ni) to more be reduced, that is, by decreasing the absorption at lower wavelengths. For example, the Ni absorption in exemplary compositions described herein are better than sodium aluminosilicate compositions due to the use of K20 in the place of Na20. This is due in part to the larger bond length necessitated by K20 bonding shifting, e.g., Ni absorption away from 450nm towards longer wavelengths. Such a shift dramatically increases an exemplary LGP 450nm transmission and provides a competitive advantage for both color shift and possible use of blue LEDs in LGP assemblies.

[0082] The decrease in the absorption coefficients discovered in exemplary alumina free, potassium silicate compositions provides an additional advantage: the glass can have a higher concentration of tramp metals but still maintain the transmission and the color shift required by the industry. This directly results in an additional cost savings opportunity due to the utilization of lower purity raw materials equating to lower costs. It was also discovered that the exemplary alumina free, potassium silicate compositions described herein results in a reduction in manufacturing costs. For example, manufacturing cost was reduced by changing melting process parameters such as flow. Exemplary alumina free, potassium silicate compositions enable high flow in a fusion draw process which generally requires a viscosity curve that minimizes the difference between the melting viscosity (200P) and the draw viscosity (35kP) to control the cooling rate of the glass melt, and in this situation provide a steeper viscosity curve resulting in a higher the flow rate. Exemplary viscosity curves of embodiments described herein also resulted in an improved melting furnace or tank lifetime due to lower wear of refractory (e.g., zirconia) materials.

[0083] In various embodiments, the glass composition of the glass sheet may comprise less than 50 ppm iron (Fe) concentration. In some embodiments, there may be less than 25 ppm Fe, or in some embodiments the Fe concentration may be about 20 ppm or less. In additional embodiments, the glass sheet may be formed by a polished float glass, a fusion draw process, a slot draw process, a redraw process, or another suitable forming process.

[0084] According to one or more embodiments, the LGP can be made from a glass comprising colorless oxide components selected from the glass formers S1O2, AI2O3, and/or B2O3. The exemplary glass may also include fluxes to obtain favorable melting and forming attributes. Such fluxes include alkali oxides (L12O, Na20, K2O, Rb20 and CS2O) and alkaline earth oxides (MgO, CaO, SrO, ZnO and BaO). In one embodiment, the glass contains constituents in the range of between about 70 mol % to about 85 mol% S1O2, between about 0 mol% to about 5 mol% AI2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 5 mol% B2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 10 mol% Na20, between about 0 mol% to about 12 mol% K2O, between about 0 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 3 mol% to about 12 mol% MgO, between about 0 mol% to about 5 mol% CaO, between about 0 mol% to about 3 mol% SrO, between about 0 mol% to about 3 mol% BaO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.5 mol% Sn02. Other glass compositions include a glass sheet having greater than about 80 mol % S1O2, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% AI2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% B2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% Na20, between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O, between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% CaO, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% SrO, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% BaO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.11 mol% Sn02. Further glass compositions include a glass sheet that is substantially free of AI2O3 and B2O3 and comprises greater than about 80 mol % S1O2, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% Na20, between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O, between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.11 mol% Sn02. In some embodiments, the glass sheet is substantially free of B2O3, Na20, CaO, SrO, or BaO, and combinations thereof.

[0085] Additional glass compositions include a glass sheet that is an alumina free, potassium silicate composition comprising greater than about 80 mol % S1O2, between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O, between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.11 mol% SnC . In some embodiments, the glass sheet is substantially free of B2O3, Na20, CaO, SrO, or BaO, and combinations thereof. Further glass compositions include a glass sheet having between about 72.82 mol % to about 82.03 mol% S1O2, between about 0 mol% to about 4.8 mol% AI2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 2.77 mol% B2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 9.28 mol% Na20, between about 0.58 mol% to about 10.58 mol% K2O, between about 0 mol% to about 2.93 mol% ZnO, between about 3.1 mol% to about 10.58 mol% MgO, between about 0 mol% to about 4.82 mol% CaO, between about 0 mol% to about 1.59 mol% SrO, between about 0 mol% to about 3 mol% BaO, and between about 0.08 mol% to about 0.15 mol% Sn02. In further embodiments, the glass sheet is substantially free of AI2O3, B2O3, Na20, CaO, SrO, or BaO, and combinations thereof.

[0086] Further glass compositions include a glass sheet substantially free of AI2O3 and B2O3 and comprises greater than about 80 mol % S1O2, and wherein the glass has a color shift < 0.005. In some embodiments, the glass sheet comprises between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O, between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.11 mol% Sn02. Additional glass compositions include a glass sheet that is substantially free of AI2O3, B2O3, Na20, CaO, SrO, and BaO, wherein the glass has a color shift < 0.005. In some embodiments, the glass sheet comprises greater than about 80 mol % S1O2 In some embodiments, the glass sheet comprises between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O, between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.1 1 mol% Sn02.

[0087] In some glass compositions described herein, S1O2 can serve as the basic glass former. In certain embodiments, the concentration of S1O 2 can be greater than 60 mole percent to provide the glass with a density and chemical durability suitable for a display glasses or light guide plate glasses, and a liquidus temperature (liquidus viscosity), which allows the glass to be formed by a downdraw process (e.g., a fusion process). In terms of an upper limit, in general, the S1O2 concentration can be less than or equal to about 80 mole percent to allow batch materials to be melted using conventional, high volume, melting techniques, e.g., Joule melting in a refractory melter. As the concentration of S1O2 increases, the 200 poise temperature (melting temperature) generally rises. In various applications, the S1O2 concentration is adjusted so that the glass composition has a melting temperature less than or equal to 1,750°C. In various embodiments, the mol% of S1O2 may be in the range of about 70% to about 85%, or in the range of about 72.82% and 82.03%, or alternatively in the range of about 75% to about 85%, or in the range of about 80% to about 85%, and all subranges therebetween. In additional embodiments, the mol% of S1O2 may be greater than about 80%, greater than about 81%, or greater than about 82%.

[0088] AI2O3 is another glass former used to make the glasses described herein. Higher mole percent AI2O3 can improve the glass's annealing point and modulus but can increase melting and batch costs. In various embodiments, the mol% of AI2O3 may be in the range of about 0% to about 5%, or alternatively in the range of about 0% to about 4.8%, or in the range of about 0% to about 4%, or in the range of about 0% to about 3%, and all subranges therebetween. In additional embodiments, the mol% of AI2O3 may be less than about 0.1 %. In other embodiments, the glass is substantially free of AI2O3. For the avoidance of doubt, substantially free should be interpreted to mean that the glass does not have a constituent unless it was intentionally batched or added in the respective melting process and therefore its mol% is negligible or less than 0.01 mol%. With reference to these ranges of AI2O3, manufacturing costs for exemplary embodiments were significantly reduces as AI2O3 is an expensive raw material to purchase in pure form.

[0089] B2O3 is both a glass former and a flux that aids melting and lowers the melting temperature. It has an impact on both liquidus temperature and viscosity. Increasing B2O3 can be used to increase the liquidus viscosity of a glass. To achieve these effects, the glass compositions of one or more embodiments may have B2O3 concentrations that are equal to or greater than 0.1 mole percent; however, some compositions may have a negligible amount of B2O3. As discussed above with regard to S1O2, glass durability is very important for display applications. Durability can be controlled somewhat by elevated concentrations of alkaline earth oxides, and significantly reduced by elevated B2O3 content. Annealing point decreases as B2O3 increases, so it may be helpful to keep B2O3 content low. Further, it was discovered that B2O3 shifts Fe redox to Fe 3+ thereby impacting the blue transmission. Thus, a reduction in B2O3 was found to yield better optical properties in some embodiments. Thus, in various embodiments, the mol% of B2O3 may be in the range of about 0% to about 5%, or alternatively in the range of about 0% to about 4%, or in the range of about 0% to about 3%, in the range of about 0% to about 2.77%, and all subranges therebetween. In some embodiments, the glass may be substantially free of B2O3.

[0090] In addition to the glass formers (S1O2, AI2O3, and B2O3), the glasses described herein also include alkaline earth oxides. In one embodiment, at least three alkaline earth oxides are part of the glass composition, e.g., MgO, CaO, BaO, and SrO. The alkaline earth oxides provide the glass with various properties important to melting, fining, forming, and ultimate use. Accordingly, to improve glass performance in these regards, in one embodiment, the (MgO+CaO+SrO+BaOyAhC ratio is between 0 and 2.0. As this ratio increases, viscosity tends to decrease more strongly than liquidus temperature, and thus it is increasingly difficult to obtain suitably high values for Tssk - Tu q . In embodiments that are substantially free of alumina, the ratio (MgO+CaO+SrO+BaO)/Ah03 cannot be calculated (i.e., AI2O3 is zero or negligible).

[0091] For certain embodiments of this disclosure, the alkaline earth oxides may be treated as what is in effect a single compositional component. This is because their impact upon viscoelastic properties, liquidus temperatures and liquidus phase relationships are qualitatively more similar to one another than they are to the glass forming oxides S1O2, AI2O3 and B2O3. However, the alkaline earth oxides CaO, SrO and BaO can form feldspar minerals, notably anorthite (CaAl2Si20s) and celsian (BaAl2Si20s) and strontium-bearing solid solutions of same, but MgO does not participate in these crystals to a significant degree. Therefore, when a feldspar crystal is already the liquidus phase, a superaddition of MgO may serves to stabilize the liquid relative to the crystal and thus lower the liquidus temperature. At the same time, the viscosity curve typically becomes steeper, reducing melting temperatures while having little or no impact on low-temperature viscosities.

[0092] Small amounts of MgO may benefit melting by reducing melting temperatures, forming by reducing liquidus temperatures and increasing liquidus viscosity, while preserving high annealing points. In various embodiments, the glass composition comprises MgO in an amount in the range of about 3 mol% to about 12 mol%, or in the range of about 6 mol% to about 10 mol%, or in the range of about 3.1 mol% to about 10.58 mol%, and all subranges therebetween.

[0093] Without being bound by any particular theory of operation, it is believed that calcium oxide present in the glass composition can produce low liquidus temperatures (high liquidus viscosities), high annealing points and moduli, and CTE's in the most desired ranges for display and light guide plate applications. It also contributes favorably to chemical durability, and compared to other alkaline earth oxides, it is relatively inexpensive as a batch material. However, at high concentrations, CaO increases the density and CTE. Furthermore, at sufficiently low S1O2 concentrations, CaO may stabilize anorthite, thus decreasing liquidus viscosity. Accordingly, in one or more embodiment, the CaO concentration can be between 0 and 5 mol%. In various embodiments, the CaO concentration of the glass composition is in the range of about 0 mol% to about 4.82 mol%, or in the range of about 0 mol% to about 4 mol%, or in the range of about 0 mol% to about 3 mol%, or in the range of about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol%, or in the range of about 0 mol% to about 0.1 mol%, and all subranges therebetween. In other embodiments, the glass is substantially free of CaO.

[0094] SrO and BaO can both contribute to low liquidus temperatures (high liquidus viscosities). The selection and concentration of these oxides can be selected to avoid an increase in CTE and density and a decrease in modulus and annealing point. The relative proportions of SrO and BaO can be balanced so as to obtain a suitable combination of physical properties and liquidus viscosity such that the glass can be formed by a downdraw process. In various embodiments, the glass comprises SrO in the range of about 0 to about 2.0 mol%, or between about 0 mol% to about 1.59 mol%, or about 0 to about 1 mol%, and all subranges therebetween. In other embodiments, the glass is substantially free of SrO. In one or more embodiments, the glass comprises BaO in the range of about 0 to about 2 mol%, or between 0 to about 1.5 mol%, or between 0 to about 1.0 mol%, and all subranges therebetween. In other embodiments, the glass is substantially free of BaO.

[0095] In addition to the above components, the glass compositions described herein can include various other oxides to adjust various physical, melting, fining, and forming attributes of the glasses. Examples of such other oxides include, but are not limited to, Ti0 2 , MnO, V2O3, Fe 2 0 3 , Zr0 2 , ZnO, Nb 2 0 5 , M0O3, Ta 2 0 5 , WO3, Y 2 0 3 , La 2 0 3 and Ce0 2 as well as other rare earth oxides and phosphates. In one embodiment, the amount of each of these oxides can be less than or equal to 2.0 mole percent, and their total combined concentration can be less than or equal to 5.0 mole percent. In some embodiments, the glass composition comprises ZnO in an amount in the range of about 0 to about 4.0 mol%, or about 0 to about 3.5 mol%, or about 0 to about 3.01 mol%, or about 0 to about 2.0 mol%, and all subranges

therebetween. In other embodiments, the glass composition comprises from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % titanium oxide ; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % vanadium oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % niobium oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % manganese oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % zirconium oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % tin oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % molybdenum oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % cerium oxide; and all subranges therebetween of any of the above listed transition metal oxides. The glass compositions described herein can also include various contaminants associated with batch materials and/or introduced into the glass by the melting, fining, and/or forming equipment used to produce the glass. The glasses can also contain Sn0 2 either as a result of Joule melting using tin-oxide electrodes and/or through the batching of tin containing materials, e.g., Sn0 2 , SnO, SnC03, SnC 2 0 2 , etc. [0096] In addition, increasing silica content and/or adding ZnO to some embodiments improved the surface durability of the glass. Thus, in some embodiments the glass composition comprises ZnO in an amount in the range of about 0 to about 4 mol%, or about 0.01 to about 4 mol%, or about 0 to about 2.93 mol%, and all sub-ranges therebetween.

[0097] The glass compositions described herein can contain some alkali constituents, e.g., these glasses are not alkali-free glasses. As used herein, an "alkali-free glass" is a glass having a total alkali concentration which is less than or equal to 0.1 mole percent, where the total alkali concentration is the sum of the Na20, K2O, and L12O concentrations. In some embodiments, the glass comprises L12O in the range of about 0 to about 3.0 mol%, in the range of about 0 to about 2.0 mol%, or in the range of about 0 to about 1.0 mol%, and all subranges therebetween. In other embodiments, the glass is substantially free of L12O. In other embodiments, the glass comprises Na20 in the range of about 0 mol% to about 10 mol%, in the range of about 0 mol% to about 9.28 mol%, in the range of about 0 to about 5 mol%, in the range of about 0 to about 3 mol%, or in the range of about 0 to about 0.5 mol%, and all subranges therebetween. In other embodiments, the glass is substantially free of Na20. In some embodiments, the glass comprises K2O in the range of about 0 to about 12.0 mol%, in the range of about 8 to about 1 1 mol%, in the range of about 0.58 to about 10.58 mol%, and all subranges therebetween. With reference to these ranges of K2O, Na20, and other alkali materials, it was discovered that contaminant constituent (e.g., Ni, Fe, Cr) absorbance was better due to the larger bond length necessitated by K2O bonding which shifts the constituent (Ni, Fe, Cr) absorption away from 450 nm towards longer wavelengths. This shift dramatically increases the 450 nm transmission of exemplary embodiments thereby providing a competitive advantage for both color shift and use of blue LEDs in LGPs.

Further, it was also unexpectedly discovered that the lower absorpotion bands of Ni, Fe, and/or Cr allow for the utilization of less pure raw materials while maintaining properties of the current glass which decreases overall cost.

[0098] In some embodiments, the glass compositions described herein can have one or more or all of the following compositional characteristics: (i) an AS2O3 concentration of at most 0.05 to 1.0 mol%; (ii) an Sb2C>3 concentration of at most 0.05 to 1.0 mol%; (iii) a SnC concentration of at most 0.25 to 3.0 mol%.

[0099] AS2O3 is an effective high temperature fining agent for display glasses, and in some embodiments described herein, AS2O3 is used for fining because of its superior fining properties. However, AS2O3 is poisonous and requires special handling during the glass manufacturing process. Accordingly, in certain embodiments, fining is performed without the use of substantial amounts of AS2O3, i.e., the finished glass has at most 0.05 mole percent AS2O3. In one embodiment, no AS2O3 is purposely used in the fining of the glass. In such cases, the finished glass will typically have at most 0.005 mole percent AS2O3 as a result of contaminants present in the batch materials and/or the equipment used to melt the batch materials.

[00100] Although not as toxic as AS2O3, Sb2C>3 is also poisonous and requires special handling. In addition, Sb2C>3 raises the density, raises the CTE, and lowers the annealing point in comparison to glasses that use AS2O3 or Sn02 as a fining agent. Accordingly, in certain embodiments, fining is performed without the use of substantial amounts of Sb2C>3, i.e., the finished glass has at most 0.05 mole percent Sb203. In another embodiment, no Sb203 is purposely used in the fining of the glass. In such cases, the finished glass will typically have at most 0.005 mole percent Sb2C>3 as a result of contaminants present in the batch materials and/or the equipment used to melt the batch materials.

[00101] Compared to AS2O3 and Sb2C>3 fining, tin fining (i.e., SnC>2 fining) is less effective, but Sn02 is a ubiquitous material that has no known hazardous properties. Also, for many years, SnC has been a component of display glasses through the use of tin oxide electrodes in the Joule melting of the batch materials for such glasses. The presence of SnC in display glasses has not resulted in any known adverse effects in the use of these glasses in the manufacture of liquid crystal displays. However, high concentrations of SnC are not preferred as this can result in the formation of crystalline defects in display glasses. In one embodiment, the concentration of SnC in the finished glass is less than or equal to 0.5 mole percent, in the range of about 0.01 to about 0.5 mol%, in the range of about 0.01 to about 0.11 mol%, from about 0.08 to about 0.15 mol%, and all subranges therebetween.

[00102] Tin fining can be used alone or in combination with other fining techniques if desired. For example, tin fining can be combined with halide fining, e.g., bromine fining. Other possible combinations include, but are not limited to, tin fining plus sulfate, sulfide, cerium oxide, mechanical bubbling, and/or vacuum fining. It is contemplated that these other fining techniques can be used alone. In certain embodiments, maintaining the

(MgO+CaO+SrO+BaO)/Ai203 ratio and individual alkaline earth concentrations within the ranges discussed above makes the fining process easier to perform and more effective.

[00103] In one or more embodiments and as noted above, exemplary glasses can have low concentrations of elements that produce visible absorption when in a glass matrix. Such absorbers include transition elements such as Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu, and rare earth elements with partially-filled f-orbitals, including Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er and Tm. Of these, the most abundant in conventional raw materials used for glass melting are Fe, Cr and Ni. Iron is a common contaminant in sand, the source of S1O2, and is a typical contaminant as well in raw material sources for aluminum, magnesium and calcium.

Chromium and nickel are typically present at low concentration in normal glass raw materials, but can be present in various ores of sand and must be controlled at a low concentration. Additionally, chromium and nickel can be introduced via contact with stainless steel, e.g., when raw material or cullet is jaw-crushed, through erosion of steel-lined mixers or screw feeders, or unintended contact with structural steel in the melting unit itself. The concentration of iron in some embodiments can be specifically less than 50ppm, more specifically less than 40ppm, or less than 25 ppm, and the concentration of Ni and Cr can be specifically less than 5 ppm, and more specifically less than 2ppm. In further embodiments, the concentration of all other absorbers listed above may be less than lppm for each. In various embodiments the glass comprises 1 ppm or less of Co, Ni, and Cr, or alternatively less than 1 ppm of Co, Ni, and Cr. In various embodiments, the transition elements (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu) may be present in the glass at 0.1 wt% or less. In some

embodiments, the concentration of Fe can be < about 50 ppm, < about 40 ppm, < about 30 ppm, < about 20 ppm, or < about 10 ppm.

[00104] According to some embodiments, the LGP can include a glass material disclosed in U.S. Patent Application No. 15/769,639 and U.S. Patent No. 9,902,644, both of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.

[00105] In other embodiments, it has been discovered that the addition of certain transition metal oxides that do not cause absorption from 300 nm to 650 nm and that have absorption bands < about 300 nm will prevent network defects from forming processes and will prevent color centers (e.g., absorption of light from 300 nm to 650 nm) post UV exposure when curing ink since the bond by the transition metal oxide in the glass network will absorb the light instead of allowing the light to break up the fundamental bonds of the glass network. Thus, exemplary embodiments can include any one or combination of the following transition metal oxides to minimize UV color center formation: from about 0.1 mol % to about 3.0 mol % zinc oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % titanium oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % vanadium oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1 .0 mol % niobium oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % manganese oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1 .0 mol % zirconium oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1 .0 mol % arsenic oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % tin oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % molybdenum oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % antimony oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % cerium oxide; and all subranges

therebetween of any of the above listed transition metal oxides. In some embodiments, an exemplary glass can contain from 0.1 mol% to less than or no more than about 3.0 mol% of any combination of zinc oxide, titanium oxide, vanadium oxide, niobium oxide, manganese oxide, zirconium oxide, arsenic oxide, tin oxide, molybdenum oxide, antimony oxide, and cerium oxide.

[00106] Even in the case that the concentrations of transition metals are within the above described ranges, there can be matrix and redox effects that result in undesired absorption. As an example, it is well-known to those skilled in the art that iron occurs in two valences in glass, the +3 or ferric state, and the +2 or ferrous state. In glass, Fe 3+ produces absorptions at approximately 380, 420 and 435 nm, whereas Fe 2+ absorbs mostly at IR wavelengths.

Therefore, according to one or more embodiments, it may be desirable to force as much iron as possible into the ferrous state to achieve high transmission at visible wavelengths. One non-limiting method to accomplish this is to add components to the glass batch that are reducing in nature. Such components could include carbon, hydrocarbons, or reduced forms of certain metalloids, e.g., silicon, boron or aluminum. However it is achieved, if iron levels were within the described range, according to one or more embodiments, at least 10% of the iron in the ferrous state and more specifically greater than 20% of the iron in the ferrous state, improved transmissions can be produced at short wavelengths. Thus, in various

embodiments, the concentration of iron in the glass produces less than 1 .1 dB/500 mm of attenuation in the glass sheet.

[00107] In prior glasses although decreasing iron concentration minimized absorption and yellow shift, it was difficult to eliminate it completely. The Δχ, Ay in the measured for PMMA for a propagation distance of about 700mm was 0.0021 and 0.0063. In exemplary glasses having the compositional ranges described herein, the color shift Ay was < 0.015 and in exemplary embodiments was less than 0.0021, and less than 0.0063. For example, in some embodiments, the color shift was measured as 0.007842 and in other embodiments was measured as 0.005827. In other embodiments, an exemplary glass sheet can comprise a color shift Ay less than 0.015, such as ranging from about 0.001 to about 0.015 (e.g., about 0.001 , 0.002, 0.003, 0.004, 0.005, 0.006, 0.007, 0.008, 0.009, 0.010, 0.01 1, 0.012, 0.013, 0.014, or 0.015). In other embodiments, the transparent substrate can comprise a color shift less than 0.008, less than about 0.005, or less than about 0.003. Color shift may be characterized by measuring variation in the x and/or y chromaticity coordinates along a length L using the CIE 1931 standard for color measurements for a given source illumination. For exemplary glass light-guide plates the color shift Ay can be reported as Ay=y(L2)-y(Li) where L2 and Li are Z positions along the panel or substrate direction away from the source launch (e.g., LED or otherwise) and where L2-Li=0.5 meters. Exemplary light-guide plates described herein have Ay< 0.015, Ay< 0.005, Ay < 0.003, or Ay < 0.001. The color shift of a light guide plate can be estimated by measuring the optical absorption of the light guide plate, using the optical absorption to calculate the internal transmission of the LGP over 0.5 m, and then multiplying the resulting transmission curve by a typical LED source used in LCD backlights such as the Nichia NFSW157D-E. One can then use the CIE color matching functions to compute the (Χ,Υ,Ζ) tristimulus values of this spectrum. These values are then normalized by their sum to provide the (x,y) chromaticity coordinates. The difference between the (x,y) values of the LED spectrum multiplied by the 0.5 m LGP transmission and the (x,y) values of the original LED spectrum is the estimate of the color shift contribution of the light guide material. To address residual color shift, several exemplary solutions may be implemented. In one embodiment, light guide blue painting can be employed. By blue painting the light guide, one can artificially increase absorption in red and green and increase light extraction in blue. Accordingly, knowing how much differential color absorption exists, a blue paint pattern can be back calculated and applied that can compensate for color shift. In one or more embodiments, shallow surface scattering features can be employed to extract light with an efficiency that depends on the wavelength. As an example, a square grating has a maximum of efficiency when the optical path difference equals half of the wavelength. Accordingly, exemplary textures can be used to preferentially extract blue and can be added to the main light extraction texture. In additional embodiments, image processing can also be utilized. For example, an image filter can be applied that will attenuate blue close to the edge where light gets injected. This may require shifting the color of the LEDs themselves to keep the right white color. In further embodiments, pixel geometry can be used to address color shift by adjusting the surface ratio of the RGB pixels in the panel and increasing the surface of the blue pixels far away from the edge where the light gets injected.

[00108] Exemplary compositions as heretofore described can thus be used to achieve a strain point ranging from about 512 °C to about 653 °C, from about 540 °C to about 640 °C, or from about 570 °C to about 610 °C and all subranges therebetween. An exemplary annealing point can range from about 564 °C to about 721 °C, from about 580 °C to about 700 °C, and all subranges therebetween. An exemplary softening point of a glass ranges from about 795 °C to about 1013 °C, from about 820 °C to about 990 °C, or from about 850 °C to about 950 °C and all subranges therebetween. The density of exemplary glass compositions can range from about 2.34 gm/cc @ 20 C to about 2.56 gm/cc @ 20 C, from about 2.35 gm/cc @ 20 C to about 2.55 gm cc @ 20 C, or from about 2.4 gm/cc @ 20 C to about 2.5 gm/cc @ 20 C and all subranges therebetween. CTEs (0-300 °C) for exemplary embodiments can range from about 64 x 10-7/ °C to about 77 x 10-7/ °C, from about 66 x 10- 7/ °C to about 75 x 10-7/ °C, or from about 68 x 10-7/ °C to about 73 x 10-7/ °C and all subranges therebetween.

Certain embodiments and compositions described herein have provided an internal transmission from 400-700 nm greater than 90%, greater than 91%, greater than 92%, greater than 93%, greater than 94%, and even greater than 95%. Internal transmittance can be measured by comparing the light transmitted through a sample to the light emitted from a source. Broadband, incoherent light may be cylindrically focused on the end of the material to be tested. The light emitted from the far side may be collected by an integrating sphere fiber coupled to a spectrometer and forms the sample data. Reference data is obtained by removing the material under test from the system, translating the integrating sphere directly in front of the focusing optic, and collecting the light through the same apparatus as the reference data. The absorption at a given wavelength is then given by:

-iv log— —

absorption K&Si-m = - - lengt ■ f . fet . 5 - fatft Isngt sierm.*:* 4 &t&

The internal transmittance over 0.5 m is given by:

Transmit & cg = 1D# x «« X *AS

Thus, exemplary embodiments described herein can have an internal transmittance at 450 nm with 500 mm in length of greater than 85%, greater than 90%, greater than 91%, greater than 92%, greater than 93%, greater than 94%, and even greater than 95%. Exemplary embodiments described herein can also have an internal transmittance at 550 nm with 500 mm in length of greater than 90%, greater than 91%, greater than 92%, greater than 93%, greater than 94%, and even greater than 96%. Further embodiments described herein can have a transmittance at 630 nm with 500 mm in length of greater than 85%, greater than 90%, greater than 91%, greater than 92%, greater than 93%, greater than 94%, and even greater than 95%.

[00110] In one or more embodiments, the LGP has a width of at least about 1270 mm and a thickness of between about 0.5 mm and about 3.0 mm, wherein the transmittance of the LGP is at least 80% per 500 mm. In various embodiments, the thickness of the LGP is between about 1 mm and about 8 mm, and the width of the plate is between about 1100 mm and about 1300 mm.

[00111] In one or more embodiments, the LGP can be strengthened. For example, certain characteristics, such as a moderate compressive stress (CS), high depth of compressive layer (DOL), and/or moderate central tension (CT) can be provided in an exemplary glass sheet used for a LGP. One exemplary process includes chemically strengthening the glass by preparing a glass sheet capable of ion exchange. The glass sheet can then be subjected to an ion exchange process, and thereafter the glass sheet can be subjected to an anneal process if necessary. Of course, if the CS and DOL of the glass sheet are desired at the levels resulting from the ion exchange step, then no annealing step is required. In other embodiments, an acid etching process can be used to increase the CS on appropriate glass surfaces. The ion exchange process can involve subjecting the glass sheet to a molten salt bath including KNO3, preferably relatively pure KNO3 for one or more first temperatures within the range of about 400 - 500 °C and/or for a first time period within the range of about 1-24 hours, such as, but not limited to, about 8 hours. It is noted that other salt bath compositions are possible and would be within the skill level of an artisan to consider such alternatives. Thus, the disclosure of KNO3 should not limit the scope of the claims appended herewith. Such an exemplary ion exchange process can produce an initial CS at the surface of the glass sheet, an initial DOL into the glass sheet, and an initial CT within the glass sheet. Annealing can then produce a final CS, final DOL and final CT as desired.

[00112] The third glass sheet can be a monolith glass sheet or a glass sheet composite. For example, the third glass sheet can be a composite of multiple glass sheets fused directly to each other. In one embodiment, the fused glass sheets comprise three glass sheets composing a core (inner glass sheet) and cladding (two outer glass sheets). In such a case, the total internal reflection of light in the LGP can be confined to the core (inner glass sheet) or, with the proper indices of refraction across the three glass sheets, can occur within all three glass sheets, including the core and the cladding, with the surrounding environment (e.g., air) provided a sufficient difference in index of refraction to achieve total internal refraction within the fused glass sheets. [00113] Embodiments of this disclosure also pertain to a vehicle that includes an illuminating glazing assembly according to one or more embodiments described herein. For example, as shown in Figures 1 and 2. Such a vehicle comprises a body defining an interior, at least one opening in communication with the interior, and a glazing disposed in the opening, wherein the window comprises an illuminating glazing assembly, according to one or more embodiments described herein. In one or more embodiments, the laminate and/or the light guide plate of the glazing assembly is complexly curved. The glazing assembly may form the sidelights, windshields, rear windows, rearview mirrors, and sunroofs in the vehicle. In some embodiments, the glazing assembly may form an interior partition (not shown) within the interior of the vehicle, or may be disposed on an exterior surface of the vehicle and form an engine block cover, headlight cover, taillight cover, or pillar cover. In one or more embodiments, the vehicle may include an interior surface (not shown, but may include door trim, seat backs, door panels, dashboards, center consoles, floor boards, and pillars), and the glazing assembly or glass article described herein is disposed on the interior surface. In one or more embodiment, the interior surface includes a display and the glass layer is disposed over the display. As used herein, vehicle includes automobiles, motorcycles, rolling stock, locomotive, boats, ships, airplanes, helicopters, drones, space craft and the like.

[00114] Another aspect of this disclosure pertains to an architectural application that includes the illuminating glazing assembly described herein. In some embodiments, the architectural application includes balustrades, stairs, decorative panels or covering for walls, columns, partitions, elevator cabs, household appliances, windows, furniture, and other applications, formed at least partially using a laminate or glass article according to one or more embodiments.

[00115] In one or more embodiments, the glazing assembly is positioned within a vehicle or architectural application such that the second curved glass substrate faces the interior of the vehicle or the interior of a building or room, such that the second curved glass substrate is adjacent to the interior (and the first curved glass substrate is adjacent the exterior). In some embodiments, the second curved glass substrate is in direct contact with the interior. In one or more embodiments, the first surface of the first curved glass substrate is bare and is free of any coatings. In one or more embodiments, the laminate is positioned within a vehicle or architectural application such that the second curved glass substrate faces the exterior of the vehicle or the exterior of a building or room, such that the second first curved glass substrate is adjacent to the exterior (and the first curved glass substrate is adjacent the interior). In some embodiments, the second curved glass substrate of the laminate is in direct contact with the exterior (i.e., the surface of the second curved glass substrate facing the exterior is bare and is free of any coatings).

[00116] In one or more embodiments, referring to Figure 3, both the first surface 312 and the fourth surface 324 is bare and substantially free of any coatings. In some embodiment one or both the edge portions of the first surface 3 12 and the fourth surface 324 may include a coating while the central portions are bare and substantially free of any coatings. Optionally, one or both the first surface 3 12 and the fourth surface 324 includes a coating or surface treatment (e.g., antireflective coating, anti-glare coating or surface, easy-to-clean surface, ink decoration, conductive coatings etc.). In one or more embodiments, the laminate includes one or more conductive coatings on one of or both the second surface 312 or the third surface 322 adjacent the interlayer 330.

[00117] In one or more embodiments, referring to Figure 3A, both the first surface 322 and the fourth surface 3 14 is bare and substantially free of any coatings. In some embodiment one or both the edge portions of the first surface 322 and the fourth surface 314 may include a coating while the central portions are bare and substantially free of any coatings. Optionally, one or both the first surface 322 and the fourth surface 314 includes a coating or surface treatment (e.g., antireflective coating, anti-glare coating or surface, easy-to-clean surface, ink decoration, conductive coatings etc.). In one or more embodiments, the laminate includes one or more conductive coatings on one of or both the second surface 324 or the third surface 312 adjacent the interlayer 330.

[0001] EXAMPLES

[0002] The following examples are set forth below to illustrate the methods and results according to the disclosed subject matter. These examples are not intended to be inclusive of all embodiments of the subject matter disclosed herein, but rather to illustrate representative methods and results. These examples are not intended to exclude equivalents and variations of the present disclosure which are apparent to one skilled in the art.

[0003] Efforts have been made to ensure accuracy with respect to numbers (e.g., amounts, temperature, etc.) but some errors and deviations should be accounted for. Unless indicated otherwise, temperature is in °C or is at ambient temperature, and pressure is at or near atmospheric. The compositions themselves are given in mole percent on an oxide basis and have been normalized to 100%. There are numerous variations and combinations of reaction conditions, e.g., component concentrations, temperatures, pressures and other reaction ranges and conditions that can be used to optimize the product purity and yield obtained from the described process. Only reasonable and routine experimentation will be required to optimize such process conditions.

[0004] The glass properties set forth herein and in Table 1 below were determined in accordance with techniques conventional in the glass art. Thus, the linear coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) over the temperature range 25-300°C is expressed in terms of x 10- 7/°C and the annealing point is expressed in terms of °C. These were determined from fiber elongation techniques (ASTM references E228-85 and C336, respectively). The density in terms of grams/cm3 was measured via the Archimedes method (ASTM C693). The melting temperature in terms of °C (defined as the temperature at which the glass melt demonstrates a viscosity of 200 poises) was calculated employing a Fulcher equation fit to high temperature viscosity data measured via rotating cylinders viscometry (ASTM C965-81).

[0005] The liquidus temperature of the glass in terms of °C was measured using the standard gradient boat liquidus method of ASTM C829-81. This involves placing crushed glass particles in a platinum boat, placing the boat in a furnace having a region of gradient temperatures, heating the boat in an appropriate temperature region for 24 hours, and determining by means of microscopic examination the highest temperature at which crystals appear in the interior of the glass. More particularly, the glass sample is removed from the Pt boat in one piece, and examined using polarized light microscopy to identify the location and nature of crystals which have formed against the Pt and air interfaces, and in the interior of the sample. Because the gradient of the furnace is very well known, temperature vs. location can be well estimated, within 5-10 °C. The temperature at which crystals are observed in the internal portion of the sample is taken to represent the liquidus of the glass (for the corresponding test period). Testing is sometimes carried out at longer times (e.g. 72 hours), to observe slower growing phases. The liquidus viscosity in poises was determined from the liquidus temperature and the coefficients of the Fulcher equation. If included, Young's modulus values in terms of GPa were determined using a resonant ultrasonic spectroscopy technique of the general type set forth in ASTM E1875-00el .

[0006] The exemplary glasses of the tables herein were prepared using a commercial sand as a silica source, milled such that 90% by weight passed through a standard U.S. 100 mesh sieve. Alumina was the alumina source, periciase was the source for MgO, limestone the source for CaO, strontium carbonate, strontium nitrate or a mix thereof was the source for SrO, barium carbonate was the source for BaO, and tin (IV) oxide was the source for Sn02. The raw materials were thoroughly mixed, loaded into a platinum vessel suspended in a furnace heated by silicon carbide glowbars, melted and stirred for several hours at temperatures between 1600 and 1650oC to ensure homogeneity, and delivered through an orifice at the base of the platinum vessel. The resulting patties of glass were annealed at or near the annealing point, and then subjected to various experimental methods to determine physical, viscous and iiquidus attributes.

[0007] These methods are not unique, and the glasses of the tables herein can be prepared using standard methods well-known to those skilled in the art. Such methods include a continuous melting process, such as would be performed in a continuous melting process, wherein the melter used in the continuous melting process is heated by gas, by electric power, or combinations thereof.

[0008] Raw materials appropriate for producing exemplary glasses include commercially available sands as sources for Si02; alumina, aluminum hydroxide, hyd rated forms of alumina, and various aluminosiiicates, nitrates and halides as sources for A1203; boric acid, anhydrous boric acid and boric oxide as sources for B2Q3; periclase, dolomite (also a source of CaO), magnesia, magnesium carbonate, magnesium hydroxide, and various fonns of magnesium silicates, aluminosiiicates, nitrates and halides as sources for MgO; limestone, aragonite, dolomite (also a source of MgO), wolastonite, and various forms of calcium silicates, aluminosiiicates, nitrates and halides as sources for CaO: and oxides, carbonates, nitrates and halides of strontium and barium. If a chemical fining agent is desired, tin can be added as Sn02, as a mixed oxide with another major glass component (e.g., CaSnOS), or in oxidizing conditions as SnO, tin oxalate, tin halide, or other compounds of tin known to those skilled in the art.

[0009] The glasses in the tables herein can contain Sn02 as a fining agent, but other chemical fining agents could also be employed to obtain glass of sufficient quality for display applications. For example, exemplary glasses could employ any one or combinations of As203, Sb203, Ce02, Fe203, and halides as deliberate additions to facilitate fining, and any of these could be used in conjunction with the Sn02 chemical fining agent shown in the examples. Of these, As203 and Sb203 are generally recognized as hazardous materials, subject to control in waste streams such as m ight be generated in the course of glass manufacture or in the processing of TFT panels. It is therefore desirable to limit the concentration of As203 and Sb203 individually or in combination to no more than 0.005 mol%.

[00010] In addition to the elements deliberately incorporated into exemplary glasses, nearly all stable elements in the periodic table are present in glasses at some level, either through low levels of contamination in the raw materials, through high-temperature erosion of refractories and precious metals in the manufacturing process, or through deliberate introduction at low levels to fine tune the attributes of the final glass. For example, zirconium may be introduced as a contaminant via interaction with zirconium-rich refractories. As a further example, platinum and rhodium may be introduced via interactions with precious metals. As a further example, iron may be introduced as a tramp in raw materials, or deliberately added to enhance control of gaseous inclusions. As a further example, manganese may be introduced to control color or to enhance control of gaseous inclusions.

[00011] Hydrogen is inevitably present in the form of the hydroxyl anion, OH-, and its presence can be ascertained via standard infrared spectroscopy techniques. Dissolved hydroxyl ions significantly and noniineariy impact the annealing point of exemplary glasses, and thus to obtain the desired annealing point it may be necessary to adjust the concentrations of major oxide components so as to compensate. Hydroxy! ion concentration can be controlled to some extent through choice of raw materials or choice of melting system. For example, boric acid is a major source of hydroxyls, and replacing boric acid with boric oxide can be a useful means to control hydroxy! concentration in the final glass. The same reasoning applies to other potential raw materials comprising hydroxy! ions, hydrates, or compounds comprising phvsisorbed or chemisorbed water molecules. If burners are used in the melting process, then hydroxyl ions can also be introduced through the combustion products from combustion of natural gas and related hydrocarbons, and thus it may be desirable to shift the energy used in melting from burners to electrodes to compensate.

Alternatively, one might instead employ an iterative process of adjusting major oxide components so as to compensate for the deleterious impact of dissolved hydroxyl ions.

[00012] Sulfur is often present in natural gas, and likewise is a tramp component in many carbonate, nitrate, halide, and oxide raw materials. In the form of S02, sulfur can be a troublesome source of gaseous inclusions. The tendency to fonn S02-rich defects can be managed to a significant degree by controlling sulfur levels in the raw materials, and by incorporating low levels of comparatively reduced multivalent cations into the glass matrix. While not wishing to be bound by theory, it appears that S02-rich gaseous inclusions arise primarily through reduction of sulfate (S04=) dissolved in the glass. The elevated barium concentrations of exemplar}' glasses appear to increase sulfur retention in the glass in early- stages of melting, but as noted abov e, barium is required to obtain low liquidus temperature, and hence high T35k-Tliq and high liquidus viscosity. Deliberately controlling sulfur levels in raw materials to a low level is a useful means of reducing dissolved sulfur (presumably as sulfate) in the glass. In particular, sulfur is preferably less than 200ppm by weight in the batch materials, and more preferably less than l OOppm by weight in the batch materials.

[00013] Reduced multivalents can also be used to control the tendency of exemplary glasses to form S02 blisters. While not wishing to be bound to theory, these elements behave as potential electron donors that suppress the electromotive force for sulfate reduction.

Sulfate reduction can be written in terms of a half reaction such as S04== → S02 + 02 + 2e- where e- denotes an electron. The "equilibrium constant " ' for the half reaction is Keq =

[S02][02] [e-]2/[S04=] where the brackets denote chemical activities. Ideally one would like to force the reaction so as to create sulfate from S02, 02 and 2e-. Adding nitrates, peroxides, or other oxygen-rich raw materials may help, but also may work against sulfate reduction in the early stages of melting, which may counteract the benefits of adding them, in the first place. S02 has very low solubility in most glasses, and so is impractical to add to the glass melting process. Electrons may be "added" through reduced multivalents. For example, an appropriate electron-donating half reaction for ferrous iron (Fe2+) is expressed as 2Fe2+→ 2Fe3+ + 2e-

[00014] This "activity" of electrons can force the sulfate reduction reaction to the left, stabilizing S04 = in the glass. Suitable reduced multivalents include, but are not limited to, Fe2+, Mn2+, Sn2+, Sb3+, As3+, V3+, Ti3+, and others familiar to those skilled in the art. In each case, it may be important to minimize the concentrations of such components so as to avoid deleterious impact on color of the glass, or in the case of As and Sb, to avoid adding such components at a high enough level so as to complication of waste management in an end-user's process.

[00015] In addition to the major oxides components of exemplary glasses, and the minor or tramp constituents noted above, halides may be present at various levels, either as contaminants introduced through the choice of raw materials, or as deliberate components used to eliminate gaseous inclusions in the glass. As a fining agent, halides may be incorporated at a level of about 0.4 mol% or less, though it is generally desirable to use lower amounts if possible to avoid corrosion of off-gas handling equipment. In some embodiments, the concentrations of individual halide elements are below about 200ppm by weight for each individual halide, or below about 800ppm by weight for the sum of all halide elements.

[00016] In addition to these major oxide components, minor and tramp components, multivalents and halide fining agents, it may be useful to incorporate low concentrations of other colorless oxide components to achieve desired physical, solarization, optical or viscoelastic properties. Such oxides include, but are not limited to, Ti02, Zr02, Hf02, Nb205, Ta205, Mo03, W03, ZnO, In203, Ga203, Bi203, Ge02, PbO, Se03, Te02, Y203, La203, Gd203, and others known to those skilled in the art. By adjusting the relative proportions of the major oxide components of exemplary glasses, such colorless oxides can be added to a level of up to about 2 mol% to 3 mol% without unacceptable impact to annealing point, T35k~Tliq or liquidus viscosity. For example, some embodiments can include any one or combination of the following transition metal oxides to minimize UV color center formation: from about 0.1 mol % to about 3.0 mol % zinc oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % titanium oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % vanadium oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % niobium oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % manganese oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % zirconium oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % arsenic oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % tin oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % molybdenum oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % antimony oxide; from about 0.1 mol % to about 1.0 mol % cerium oxide; and all subranges therebetween of any of the above listed transition metal oxides. In some embodiments, an exemplary glass can contain from 0.1 mol% to less than or no more than about 3.0 mol% of any combination of zinc oxide, titanium oxide, vanadium oxide, niobium oxide, manganese oxide, zirconium oxide, arsenic oxide, tin oxide, molybdenum oxide, antimony oxide, and cerium oxide.

[00017] Table 1 shows examples of glasses (samples 1-106) with high transmissibility as described herein.

TABLE 1

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Si02 80.53 80.59 80.24 76.24 79.6 79.13 82.03

AI203 0 0 0 4.8 0.6 1.71 0

B203 1.7 0 0 0 0 1.63 2.52

Li20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Na20 1.4 0 0.96 11.36 1.59 3.14 1.88

K20 7.61 9.66 8.76 0.58 8.6 6.47 6.92

ZnO 0 1.87 0 0 0 0 0

MgO 7.8 7.7 9.79 6.89 9.49 7 6.54

CaO 0.03 0.03 0.03 0 0 0.03 0

SrO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BaO 0.72 0 0 0 0 0.76 0

Sn02 0.15 0.1 0.15 0.11 0.1 0.1 0.1

Fe203 0.06 0.06 0.06 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02

Zr02 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

R20/AI203 2.49 16.98 5.62

(R20+RO)/AI203 3.92 32.80 10.18

RO/AI203 1.44 15.82 4.56

Si02+AI203

+B203 82.23 80.59 80.24 81.04 80.20 82.47 84.55

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Si02 78.84 78.63 77.51 80.26 72.82 82.12 81.07

AI203 1.39 2.64 2.9 0.95 2.91 0 0

B203 0 2.56 1.28 0 0.93 0 1.89

Li20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Na20 1.3 2.93 4.83 0.01 0.03 0.03 0 K20 8.54 6.19 4.78 9.78 9.37 8.92 9.16

Ζηθ 0 0 0 0 0 2.53 0

MgO 9.77 5.57 3.87 8.82 5.43 6.16 7.65

CaO 0.03 0.03 3.32 0.06 4.82 0.03 0.03

SrO 0 0 0 0 1.59 0 0

BaO 0 1.33 1.41 0 2 0 0

Sn02 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.15 0.15

Fe203 0.02 0.02 0 0 0 0.06 0.06

Zr02 0 0 0 0.03 0 0 0

R20/AI203 7.08 3.45 3.31 10.31 3.23

(R20+RO)/AI203 14.13 6.08 6.28 19.65 7.99

RO/AI203 7.05 2.63 2.97 9.35 4.76

Si02+AI203 +B203 80.23 83.83 81.69 81.21 76.66 82.12 82.96

(Si02+AI203

+B203)-RO 70.43 78.23 74.50 72.33 64.82 75.93 75.28

(Si02+AI203

+B203)-RO-R20 60.59 69.11 64.89 62.54 55.42 66.98 66.12

(Si02+B203)-AI203 77.45 78.55 75.89 79.31 70.84 82.12 82.96

(Si02+B203)-

AI203-R20 67.61 69.43 66.28 69.52 61.44 73.17 73.80

(Si02+B203)-

AI203-RO 67.65 71.62 67.29 70.43 57.00 75.93 75.28

R20 - (AI203 +

B203) 8.45 3.92 5.43 8.84 5.56 8.95 7.27

Strain 558 541 630 596 611 611 anneal 610 590 694 647 672 668

Soft 818.2 973.4 868.7 938.6 914.6

CTE 66 70.6 69.3 77.6 65.3 66.4 density 2.359 2.418 2.46 2.352 2.541 2.389 2.363 strain (bbv) 604.3 558 540.3 630.9 597.4 607 609.8 anneal (bbv) 662.3 609.4 588.2 689.1 647.3 664.1 663.4 last bbv vise 12.0012 12.0093 12.0294 12.0253 12.0122 12.002 12.0259 last bbv T 708.3 649.3 625.4 734.4 686.4 708 704.7 soft (ppv)

CTE curve (heat)

CTE curve (cool)

Poisson 0.2 0.197

shear (Mpsi) 3.96 3.8

Young's (Mpsi) 9.5 9.1

soc

nD

Viscosity

A -3.092 -1.843 -1.709 -2.735 -2.14 -2.874 -2.413

B 8336.899 6252.518 5692.936 7588.096 5650.253 7902.572 6733.483

To 156 197.8 210.9 220.3 287.1 176.9 238.4

T(200P) 1702 1707 1631 1727 1559 1704 1667

T(400) 1620 1604 1531 1642 1479 1620 1581

T(35K) 1248 1177 1121 1263 1132 1242 1206

T(soft) 805 737 707 828 762 802 792

T(200P) - T(35kP) 454 530 510 464 427 462 461

72hr gradient boat

air 1150 935 970 1135 1130 1225 1130 int 945 915 965 <847 975 1050

Pt 945 905 965 <847 975 1020 liq phase Unknown Albite Forsterite No Devit Diopside Unknown Cristobal ite (K /quartz silicate)

int liq vise

T(35kP)-T(liq_int) 303 262 156 416 157 1242 156

[00019]

Viscosity

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Si02 79.86 79.7 74.05 78.75 80.46 80.28 80.99

AI203 1.7 0 2.91 1.7 1.95 0 0

B203 2.45 0 1.23 0 0 0 0

Li20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Na20 2.95 0 4.88 3.77 0.01 0.01 4.77

K20 6.01 9.35 4.73 6.27 9.6 9.69 4.7

ZnO 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.75

MgO 5.61 10.79 5.29 9.36 7.81 9.83 6.56

CaO 0.03 0.03 4.79 0.03 0.05 0.07 0.03

SrO 0 0 0.01 0 0 0 0

BaO 1.28 0 2 0 0 0 0

Sn02 0.1 0.1 0.11 0.1 0.1 0.09 0.15

Fe203 0.02 0.02 0 0.02 0 0 0.06

Zr02 0 0 0 0 0.03 0.03 0

R20/AI203 5.27 3.30 5.91 4.93

(R20+RO)/AI203 9.34 7.46 11.43 8.96

RO/AI203 4.07 4.15 5.52 4.03

Si02+AI203 +B203 84.01 79.70 78.19 80.45 82.41 80.28 80.99

(Si02+AI203

+B203)-RO 78.37 68.88 68.10 71.06 74.55 70.38 74.40

(Si02+AI203

+B203)-RO-R20 69.41 59.53 58.49 61.02 64.94 60.68 64.93

(Si02+B203)-AI203 80.61 79.70 72.37 77.05 78.51 80.28 80.99

(Si02+B203)- AI203-R20 71.65 70.35 62.76 67.01 68.90 70.58 71.52

(Si02+B203)- AI203-RO 73.69 68.88 60.28 67.66 70.65 70.38 74.40

R20 - (AI203 +

B203) 4.81 9.35 5.47 8.34 7.66 9.70 9.47

Strain 553 541 644 622 536 anneal 605 588 710 686 590

Soft 805.3 992.4 953.2 849

CTE 65.9 74.2 67.5 70.1 65.9 density 2.416 2.356 2.511 2.367 2.35 2.353 2.408 strain (bbv) 551.9 632.5 538.9 566 648.6 625.6 233.1 anneal (bbv) 602.8 690.6 585.6 621.4 707.8 682.7 585.1

36 37 38 39 40 41 42

Si02 72.36 80.24 80.3 80.48 79.88 81.33 78.94

AI203 2.92 1.95 0 0 0.21 1.78 0.53

B203 1.25 0 0 0 0 0.9 0

Li20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Na20 4.86 2.86 4.91 0.98 0.72 0 4.18

K20 4.75 6.87 4.86 8.75 9.32 9.23 7.55

ZnO 0 0 0 1.86 0 0 0 MgO 5.46 7.9 9.68 7.75 9.74 6.62 8.64

CaO 4.73 0.05 0.04 0.03 0 0 0.03

SrO 1.58 0 0 0 0 0 0

BaO 1.99 0 0 0 0 0 0

Sn02 0.1 0.1 0.15 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1

Fe203 0 0 0.06 0.06 0.02 0.02 0.02

Zr02 0 0.03 0 0 0 0 0

R20/AI203 3.29 4.99 47.81 5.19 22.13

(R20+RO)/AI203 8.00 9.07 94.19 8.90 38.49

RO/AI203 4.71 4.08 46.38 3.72 16.36

Si02+AI203 +B203 76.53 82.19 80.30 80.48 80.09 84.01 79.47

(Si02+AI203

+B203)-RO 64.76 74.24 70.58 72.70 70.35 77.39 70.80

(Si02+AI203

+B203)-RO-R20 55.15 64.51 60.81 62.97 60.31 68.16 59.07

(Si02+B203)-AI203 70.69 78.29 80.30 80.48 79.67 80.45 78.41

(Si02+B203)-

AI203-R20 61.08 68.56 70.53 70.75 69.63 71.22 66.68

(Si02+B203)-

AI203-RO 56.93 70.34 70.58 72.70 69.93 73.83 69.74

R20 - (AI203 +

B203) 5.44 7.78 9.77 9.73 9.83 6.55 11.20

Strain 537 577 531 549 592 625

anneal 584 637 587 640 654 687

Soft 795 933 853 907.5 930.5 960.7

CTE 76.9 69.1 68.3 70.4 65.5

density 2.56 2.356 2.365 2.39 2.356 2.35 2.37 strain (bbv) 536.1 576.2 534.3 583.9 596.2 631.9 512.1 anneal (bbv) 582.1 633.6 587.3 640.1 653.2 689 564.1 last bbv vise 12.0253 12.0103 12.0096 12.0014 12.0269 12.0091 12.0192 last bbv T 617.9 678.5 627.2 684.2 697.5 732.8 604.5 soft (ppv)

CTE curve (heat)

CTE curve (cool)

Poisson 0.184 0.201 shear (Mpsi) 4.06 3.96

Young's (Mpsi) 9.69 9.51 soc

nD

Viscosity

A -1.854 -2.02 -2.592 -2.818 -3.072 -2.476 -2.501

B 5298.62 6432.263 7462.031 7670.71 8209.559 7389.733 7259.613

To 236.2 220 116.2 166.6 153.8 222.6 104.6

T(200P) 1511 1709 1641 1665 1682 1770 1616

T(400) 1425 1612 1553 1582 1601 1678 1527

T(35K) 1064 1200 1162 1209 1232 1275 1135

T(soft) 692 766 720 776 794 827 697

T(200P) - T(35kP) 447 509 479 456 450 495 481

72hr gradient boat

air >1245 <781 1210 1010 <756 1020 <812 int 1015 <781 1145 1010 <756 1020 <812

Pt 980 <781 1145 1005 <756 1015 <812

Cristobalit

liq phase Diopside No Devit Unknown e/quartz No Devit unknown No Devit int liq vise T(35kP)-T(liq_int) 49 419 17 199 255

[00023]

50 51 52 53

Si02 80.1 77.67 80.49 82.25

AI203 0.38 3.45 2.94 0

B203 0 0 0 1.75

Li20 0 0 0 0

Na20 0 7.67 0.01 1.88

K20 10.58 3.14 9.54 8.11

ZnO 0 0 0 0

MgO 8.78 7.91 6.87 5.78

CaO 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.02

SrO 0 0 0 0

BaO 0 0 0 0

Sn02 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.15

Fe203 0.02 0.02 0 0.06

Zr02 0 0 0.03 0

R20/AI203 27.84 3.13 3.25

(R20+RO)/AI203 51.03 5.43 5.59

RO/AI203 23.18 2.30 2.34

Si02+AI203 +B203 80.48 81.12 83.43 84.00

(Si02+AI203

+B203)-RO 71.67 73.18 76.54 78.20

(Si02+AI203

+B203)-RO-R20 61.09 62.37 66.99 68.21

(Si02+B203)-AI203 79.72 74.22 77.55 84.00

(Si02+B203)- AI203-R20 69.14 63.41 68.00 74.01

(Si02+B203)- AI203-RO 70.91 66.28 70.66 78.20

R20 - (AI203 +

B203) 10.20 7.36 6.61 8.24

Strain 653 535 anneal 721 590

Soft 1013.6 835.5

CTE 66.3 density 2.356 2.372 2.347 2.369 strain (bbv) 599.8 552 658.4 535.9 anneal (bbv) 656.5 605 719.4 588.3 last bbv vise 12.0187 12.0067 12.0034 12.0284 last bbv T 700.8 646.6 767.4 628 soft (ppv)

T(35kP)-T(liq_int) 407 11

[00025] As noted in the above table an exemplary glass article in some embodiments can comprise a glass sheet with a front face having a width and a height, a back face opposite the front face, and a thickness between the front face and back face, forming four edges around the front and back faces, wherein the glass sheet comprises between about 70 mol % to about 85 mol% S1O2, between about 0 mol% to about 5 mol% AI2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 5 mol% B2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 10 mol% Na20, between about 0 mol% to about 12 mol% K2O, between about 0 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 3 mol% to about 12 mol% MgO, between about 0 mol% to about 5 mol% CaO, between about 0 mol% to about 3 mol% SrO, between about 0 mol% to about 3 mol% BaO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.5 mol% SnC .

[00026] In other embodiments, the glass article can comprise a glass sheet with a front face having a width and a height, a back face opposite the front face, and a thickness between the front face and back face forming four edges around the front and back faces, wherein the glass sheet comprises greater than about 80 mol % S1O2, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% AI2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% B2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% Na20, between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O, between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% CaO, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% SrO, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% BaO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.11 mol% Sn0 2 .

[00027] In further embodiments, the glass article can comprise a glass sheet with a front face having a width and a height, a back face opposite the front face, and a thickness between the front face and back face forming four edges around the front and back faces, wherein the glass sheet is substantially free of AI2O3 and B2O3 and comprises greater than about 80 mol % S1O2, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% Na20, between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O, between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.11 mol% SnC . In some embodiments, the glass sheet is substantially free of B2O3, Na20, CaO, SrO, or BaO, and combinations thereof.

[00028] In additional embodiments, the glass article can comprise a glass sheet with a front face having a width and a height, a back face opposite the front face, and a thickness between the front face and back face forming four edges around the front and back faces, wherein the glass sheet comprises an alumina free, potassium silicate composition comprising greater than about 80 mol % S1O2, between about 8 mol% to about 1 1 mol% K2O, between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.11 mol% Sn02. In some embodiments, the glass sheet is substantially free of B2O3, Na20, CaO, SrO, or BaO, and combinations thereof.

[00029] In some embodiments, the glass article can comprise a glass sheet with a front face having a width and a height, a back face opposite the front face, and a thickness between the front face and back face forming four edges around the front and back faces, wherein the glass sheet comprises between about 72.82 mol % to about 82.03 mol% S1O2, between about 0 mol% to about 4.8 mol% AI2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 2.77 mol% B2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 9.28 mol% Na20, between about 0.58 mol% to about 10.58 mol% K2O, between about 0 mol% to about 2.93 mol% ZnO, between about 3.1 mol% to about 10.58 mol% MgO, between about 0 mol% to about 4.82 mol% CaO, between about 0 mol% to about 1.59 mol% SrO, between about 0 mol% to about 3 mol% BaO, and between about 0.08 mol% to about 0.15 mol% Sn02. In further embodiments, the glass sheet is substantially free of AI2O3, B2O3, Na20, CaO, SrO, or BaO, and combinations thereof.

[00030] In further embodiments, the glass article can comprise a glass sheet with a front face having a width and a height, a back face opposite the front face, and a thickness between the front face and back face forming four edges around the front and back faces, wherein the glass sheet is substantially free of AI2O3 and B2O3 and comprises greater than about 80 mol % S1O2, and wherein the glass has a color shift < 0.005. In some embodiments, the glass sheet comprises between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O, between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.11 mol% Sn0 2 .

[00031] In additional embodiments, the glass article can comprise a glass sheet with a front face having a width and a height, a back face opposite the front face, and a thickness between the front face and back face forming four edges around the front and back faces, wherein the glass sheet is substantially free of AI2O3, B2O3, Na20, CaO, SrO, and BaO, and wherein the glass has a color shift < 0.005. In some embodiments, the glass sheet comprises greater than about 80 mol % S1O2 In some embodiments, the glass sheet comprises between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O, between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.11 mol% Sn0 2 .

[00032] In any of the aforementioned embodiments, the glass has a color shift < 0.008 or < 0.005. In some embodiments, the glass has a strain temperature between about 512 °C and 653 °C. In further embodiments, the glass has an annealing temperature between about 564 °C and 721 °C. In additional embodiments, the glass has a softening temperature between about 795 °C and 1013 °C. In some embodiments, the glass has a CTE between about 64 x 10-7/ °C to about 77 x 10-7/ °C. In further embodiments, the glass has a density between about 2.34 gm/cc @ 20 C and about 2.56 gm/cc @ 20 C. In yet additional embodiments, the glass article is a light guide plate having a thickness between about 0.2 mm and about 8 mm. Such a light guide plate may be manufactured from a fusion draw process, slot draw process, or a float process. In further embodiments, the glass comprises less than 1 ppm each of Co, Ni, and Cr. In some embodiments, the concentration of Fe is < about 20 ppm or < about 10 ppm. In some embodiments, the transmittance at 450 nm with at least 500 mm in length is greater than or equal to 85%, the transmittance at 550 nm with at least 500 mm in length is greater than or equal to 90%, or the transmittance at 630 nm with at least 500 mm in length is greater than or equal to 85%, and combinations thereof. In further embodiments, the glass sheet is chemically strengthened. In additional embodiments, the glass comprises between 0.1 mol% to no more than about 3.0 mol% of one or combination of any of ZnO, T1O2, V2O3, Nb 2 0 5 , MnO, Zr0 2 , As 2 0 3 , Sn0 2 , M0O3, Sb 2 0 3 , and Ce0 2 .

[00033] The following will describe various aspects of embodiments of this disclosure.

[00034] Aspect (1) of this disclosure pertains to an illuminating vehicle assembly comprising: an external first glass sheet; an internal second glass sheet; an interlayer disposed between the first glass sheet and the second glass sheet; a third glass sheet comprising an inner surface, an outer surface opposite the inner surface, and an edge between the inner and outer surfaces, the outer surface facing an interior surface of the second glass sheet that is opposite a side of the second glass sheet on which the interlayer is disposed; and a light source optically coupled to the edge, wherein the third glass sheet is a light guide plate for light emitted by the light source.

[00035] Aspect (2) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (1), wherein the vehicle assembly is an automotive glazing comprising all or a portion of a windshield, rear window, side window, sunroof, moonroof, interior ceiling panel, or exterior panel, or is a vehicle interior panel comprising all or a portion of a dashboard, instrument panel, center console, steering wheel, side door, or video or infotainment panel.

[00036] Aspect (3) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (1) or Aspect (2), further comprising an edge reflector disposed on at least a portion of the edge of the third glass layer.

[00037] Aspect (4) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (3), wherein the edge reflector is configured to reflect light emitted from the light source to enhance light output from the inner surface or the outer surface of the third glass sheet.

[00038] Aspect (5) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, further comprising a planar reflector disposed on the outer surface of the third glass sheet.

[00039] Aspect (6) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (5), wherein the planar reflector is configured to reflect light emitted from the light source to enhance light output from the inner surface of the third glass sheet.

[00040] Aspect (7) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet has low light loss.

[00041] Aspect (8) of this disclosure pertains to he illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet is a fusion-drawn glass sheet.

[00042] Aspect (9) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet is chemically strengthened.

[00043] Aspect (10) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet is a non-alkaline-based glass.

[00044] Aspect (11) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the light source is disposed on the edge. [00045] Aspect (12) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the light source comprises a light-emitting diode (LED), a laser, or a light-diffusing fiber.

[00046] Aspect (13) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (12), wherein the light-diffusing fiber is arranged such that light emitted from a circumferential surface of the light-diffusing fiber enters the light guide plate via the edge of the third glass sheet.

[00047] Aspect (14) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the light source comprises multiple light emitting sources along the edge of the third glass sheet.

[00048] Aspect (15) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (14), wherein at least some of the multiple light emitting sources are arranged along the edge of the third glass sheet on opposite ends of the inner surface of third glass sheet.

[00049] Aspect (16) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (14) or Aspect (15), wherein the multiple light emitting sources comprise light emitting sources of more than one color of light.

[00050] Aspect (17) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the light source comprises one or more source of red, green, and blue light.

[00051] Aspect (18) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the light source is configured to output ultra-violet light.

[00052] Aspect (19) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (18), further comprising a light extraction feature located on or in at least one of the inner surface and the outer surface of the light guide plate, wherein the light extraction feature converts the ultra-violet light to visible light that is output from the inner surface or the outer surface of the third glass sheet.

[00053] Aspect (20) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (19), wherein the light extraction feature comprises phosphors.

[00054] Aspect (21) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the light source is configured to output more than one color of light. [00055] Aspect (22) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass layer is movable independently from the first and second glass sheets.

[00056] Aspect (23) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of

Aspect (22), wherein the third glass layer is retractable.

[00057] Aspect (24) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of

Aspect (23), wherein the third glass layer is retractable in a direction substantially parallel to the interior surface of the second glass sheet.

[00058] Aspect (25) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the inner surface and the outer surface of the third glass layer are substantially flat.

[00059]

[00060] Aspect (26) of this disclosure pertains to he illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the first glass sheet and the second glass sheet are curved.

[00061] Aspect (27) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of Aspects (l)-(24) and (26), wherein at least one of the inner surface and the outer surface of the third glass layer is curved.

[00062] Aspect (28) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, further comprising a light extraction feature located on or in at least one of the inner surface and the outer surface of the light guide plate.

[00063] Aspect (29) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of

Aspect (28), wherein the light extraction feature is shaped to form an informational graphic.

[00064] Aspect (30) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (28), wherein the light extraction feature is arranged to enhance uniformity of light output across the inner surface or the outer surface of the light guide plate.

[00065] Aspect (31) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (30), wherein the light extraction feature is arranged to enhance uniformity of light output over a continuous surface of the light guide plate, the continuous surface being the inner surface or the outer surface.

[00066] Aspect (32) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of

Aspect (30), wherein the light extraction feature is arranged to enhance uniformity of light output across discrete regions of the inner surface or the outer surface of the light guide plate. [00067] Aspect (33) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of Aspects (28)-(32), wherein the light extraction feature is formed from an ink material, a micro -structured surface, a prism, a chemical etch, or a laser etch.

[00068] Aspect (34) of this disclosure pertains to he illuminating vehicle assembly of

Aspect (33), wherein the light extraction feature is formed from the ink material, the ink material being printed onto the third glass sheet via ink-jet printing.

[00069] Aspect (35) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of Aspects (28)-(34), wherein the light extraction feature comprises a protruding structure or a recessed structure.

[00070] Aspect (36) of this disclosure pertains to he illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of Aspects (28)-(35), wherein the light extraction feature is configured to extract light from the light guide plate and direct the light through the interior side of the third glass sheet.

[00071] Aspect (37) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet comprises a core glass layer, a first cladding glass layer disposed on one side of the core glass layer, and a second cladding glass layer disposed on the other side of the core glass layer, wherein the core glass layer and the first and second cladding glass layers are fused together.

[00072] Aspect (38) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of

Aspect (37), wherein the core glass layer has a refractive index that differs from refractive indices of the first and second cladding glass layers.

[00073] Aspect (39) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of

Aspect (38), wherein the core glass layer is a light guide layer based on the difference in the refractive index of the core glass layer and the refractive indices of the first and second glass layers.

[00074] Aspect (40) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (38), wherein the core glass layer together with the first and second glass layers is a light guide layer based on the refractive index of the core glass layer, the refractive indices of the first and second glass layers, and a refractive index of air surrounding the third glass sheet.

[00075] Aspect (41) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the first glass sheet is a non-chemically- strengthened glass sheet. [00076] Aspect (42) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the first glass sheet comprises a material selected from the group consisting of soda-lime glass and annealed glass.

[00077] Aspect (43) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the first glass sheet has a thickness ranging from about 1.5 mm to about 3.0 mm

[00078] Aspect (44) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein a surface of the external glass layer adjacent the interlayer is acid etched

[00079] Aspect (45) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the second glass sheet is a strengthened glass sheet.

[00080] Aspect (46) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (45), wherein the second glass sheet is chemically strengthened.

[00081] Aspect (47) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the second glass sheet includes one or more alkaline earth oxides, such that a content of alkaline earth oxides is at least about 5 wt. %.

[00082] Aspect (48) of this disclosure pertains to he illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the second glass sheet includes at least about 6 wt. % aluminum oxide.

[00083] Aspect (49) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the second glass sheet has a thickness ranging from about 0.5 mm to about 1.5 mm

[00084] Aspect (50) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (49), wherein the second glass sheet has a thickness of between about 0.5 mm to about 0.7 mm.

[00085] Aspect (51) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the second glass sheet has a surface compressive stress between about 250 MPa and about 900 MPa.

[00086] Aspect (52) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the second glass sheet has a surface compressive stress of between about 250 MPa and about 350 MPa and a DOL of compressive stress greater than about 20 um. [00087] Aspect (53) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein a surface of the second glass sheet opposite the interlayer is acid etched.

[00088] Aspect (54) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the interlayer comprises a single polymer sheet, a multilayer polymer sheet, or a composite polymer sheet.

[00089] Aspect (55) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the interlayer comprises a material selected from the group consisting of polyvinyl butyral (PVB), polycarbonate, ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), ionomer, a thermoplastic material, and combinations thereof.

[00090] Aspect (56) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the polymer interlayer has a thickness of between about 0.4 to about 1.2 mm.

[00091] Aspect (57) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the light guide plate is monolithic.

[00092] Aspect (58) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the first glass sheet, the interlayer, and the second glass sheet compose a glass laminate, the glass laminate having an area greater than 1 m 2 .

[00093] Aspect (59) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet comprises: between about 70 mol % to about 85 mol% SiC , between about 0 mol% to about 5 mol% AI2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 5 mol% B2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 10 mol% Na20, between about 0 mol% to about 12 mol% K2O, between about 0 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 3 mol% to about 12 mol% MgO, between about 0 mol% to about 5 mol% CaO, between about 0 mol% to about 3 mol% SrO, between about 0 mol% to about 3 mol% BaO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.5 mol% SnC .

[00094] Aspect (60) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet comprises: greater than about 80 mol % S1O2, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% AI2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% B2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% Na20, between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O, between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% CaO, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% SrO, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% BaO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.11 mol% SnC .

[00095] Aspect (61) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet is substantially free of AI2O3 and B2O3 and comprises: greater than about 80 mol % S1O2, between about 0 mol% to about 0.5 mol% Na20, between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O, between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.11 mol% Sn0 2 .

[00096] Aspect (62) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of

Aspect (61), wherein the third glass sheet is substantially free of B2O3, Na20, CaO, SrO, or BaO, and combinations thereof.

[00097] Aspect (63) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet comprises an alumina free, potassium silicate composition comprising: greater than about 80 mol % S1O2, between about 8 mol% to about 11 mol% K2O, between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0.11 mol% Sn0 2 .

[00098] Aspect (64) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of

Aspect (63), wherein the third glass sheet is substantially free of B2O3, Na20, CaO, SrO, or BaO, and combinations thereof.

[00099] Aspect (65) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet comprises: between about 72.82 mol % to about 82.03 mol% S1O2, between about 0 mol% to about 4.8 mol% AI2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 2.77 mol% B2O3, between about 0 mol% to about 9.28 mol% Na20, between about 0.58 mol% to about 10.58 mol% K2O, between about 0 mol% to about 2.93 mol% ZnO, between about 3.1 mol% to about 10.58 mol% MgO, between about 0 mol% to about 4.82 mol% CaO, between about 0 mol% to about 1.59 mol% SrO, between about 0 mol% to about 3 mol% BaO, and between about 0.08 mol% to about 0.15 mol% Sn02.

[000100] Aspect (66) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (65), wherein the third glass sheet is substantially free of AI2O3, B2O3, Na20, CaO, SrO, or BaO, and combinations thereof.

[000101] Aspect (67) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet has a color shift < 0.008. [000102] Aspect (68) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet has a color shift < 0.005.

[000103] Aspect (69) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet has a strain temperature between about 512 °C and 653 °C.

[000104] Aspect (70) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet has an annealing temperature between about 564 °C and 721 °C.

[000105] Aspect (71) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet has a softening temperature between about 795 °C and 1013 °C.

[000106] Aspect (72) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet has a CTE between about 64 x 10- 7/ °C to about 77 x 10-7/ °C.

[000107] Aspect (73) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet has a density between about 2.34 gm/cc @ 20 C and about 2.56 gm/cc @ 20 C.

[000108] Aspect (74) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the thickness of the third glass sheet is between about 0.2 mm and about 8 mm.

[000109] Aspect (75) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet comprises less than 1 ppm each of Co, Ni, and Cr.

[000110] Aspect (76) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding Aspects, wherein the concentration of Fe in the third glass sheet is < about 20 ppm.

[000111] Aspect (77) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding Aspects, wherein the concentration of Fe in the third glass sheet is < about 10 ppm.

[000112] Aspect (78) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any of the preceding Aspects, wherein, for the third glass sheet, the transmittance at 450 nm with at least 500 mm in length is greater than or equal to 85%, the transmittance at 550 nm with at least 500 mm in length is greater than or equal to 90%, or the transmittance at 630 nm with at least 500 mm in length is greater than or equal to 85%, and combinations thereof. [000113] Aspect (79) of this disclosure pertains to the glass article of Aspect (9), wherein the glass comprises between 0.1 mol% to no more than about 3.0 mol% of one or combination of any of ZnO, Ti0 2 , V 2 0 3 , Nb 2 0 5 , MnO, Zr0 2 , As 2 0 3 , Sn0 2 , M0O3, Sb 2 0 3 , and Ce0 2 .

[000114] Aspect (80) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet is substantially free of A1 2 0 3 and B 2 0 3 and comprises greater than about 80 mol % Si0 2 , and wherein the glass has a color shift < 0.005.

[000115] Aspect (81) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (80), wherein the third glass sheet comprises: between about 8 mol% to about 1 1 mol% K 2 0, between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0. l l mol% Sn0 2 .

[000116] Aspect (82) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of any one of the preceding Aspects, wherein the third glass sheet is substantially free of A1 2 0 3 , B 2 0 3 , Na 2 0, CaO, SrO, and BaO, and wherein the glass has a color shift < 0.005.

[000117] Aspect (83) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (82), wherein the third glass sheet comprises greater than about 80 mol % Si0 2 .

[000118] Aspect (84) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (82), wherein the third glass sheet comprises: between about 8 mol% to about 1 1 mol% K 2 0, between about 0.01 mol% to about 4 mol% ZnO, between about 6 mol% to about 10 mol% MgO, and between about 0.01 mol% to about 0. l l mol% Sn0 2 .

[000119] Aspect (85) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (22), further comprising a conveyance system configured to move the third glass sheet, wherein the conveyance system is capable of moving the third glass sheet without moving the first and second glass sheets.

[000120] Aspect (86) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (85), wherein the convenyance system comprises a guide configured to guide the third glass sheet in a direction substantially parallel to the interior surface of the second glass sheet.

[000121] Aspect (87) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (86), wherein the guide is a frame around at least a portion of a perimeter of the third glass sheet.

[000122] Aspect (88) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (87), wherein the third glass sheet is slidable within the frame. [000123] Aspect (89) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (87), wherein the frame is coupled to a motor configured to move the frame between at least two states, including a closed state and an open state, wherein, in the closed state, the third glass sheet is adjacent to and facing the second glass sheet, and wherein, in the open state, the third glass sheet is in a position in which the third glass sheet is not facing a substantial portion of the second glass sheet.

[000124] Aspect (90) of this disclosure pertains to the illuminating vehicle assembly of Aspect (86), wherein the guide is a roller system configured to move the third glass sheet relative to the first and second glass sheets via at least one roller coupled to the third glass sheet.

[000125] Aspect (91) of this disclosure pertains to a vehicle comprising: a body defining an interior and an opening in communication with the interior; a complexly curved laminate disposed in the opening, the laminate comprising: a first curved glass substrate comprising a first major surface, a second major surface opposing the first major surface, and a first thickness defined as the distance between the first major surface and second major surface; a second curved glass substrate comprising a third major surface, a fourth major surface opposing the third major surface, and a second thickness defined as the distance between the third major surface and the fourth major surface; and an interlayer disposed between the first curved glass substrate and the second curved glass substrate and adjacent the second major surface and third major surface; a third glass substrate comprising a fifth major surface, a sixth major surface opposing the fifth major surface, and an edge between the fifth and sixth major surfaces, the fifth major surface facing the fourth major surface of the second curved glass substrate; and a light source optically coupled to the edge, wherein the third glass substrate is a light guide plate for light emitted by the light source.

[000126] Aspect (92) of this disclosure pertains to the vehicle of Aspect (91), wherein the third glass substrate is movable with respect to the complexly curved laminate.

[000127] Aspect (93) of this disclosure pertains to the vehicle of Aspect (92), wherein the third glass substrate is configured to move btween at least two states, the two states comprising: a closed state in which the fifth major surface is adjacent to and faces a substantial portion of the fourth major surface of the second curved glass substrate, and an open state in which the fifth major surface is not adjacent to and does not face a substantial portion of the fourth major surface of the second curved glass substrate. [000128] It will be appreciated that the various disclosed embodiments may involve particular features, elements or steps that are described in connection with that particular embodiment. It will also be appreciated that a particular feature, element or step, although described in relation to one particular embodiment, may be interchanged or combined with alternate embodiments in various non-illustrated combinations or permutations.

[000129] It is also to be understood that, as used herein the terms "the," "a," or "an," mean "at least one," and should not be limited to "only one" unless explicitly indicated to the contrary. Thus, for example, reference to "a ring" includes examples having two or more such rings unless the context clearly indicates otherwise. Likewise, a "plurality" or an "array" is intended to denote "more than one." As such, a "plurality of droplets" includes two or more such droplets, such as three or more such droplets, etc., and an "array of rings" comprises two or more such droplets, such as three or more such rings, etc.

[000130] Ranges can be expressed herein as from "about" one particular value, and/or to "about" another particular value. When such a range is expressed, examples include from the one particular value and/or to the other particular value. Similarly, when values are expressed as approximations, by use of the antecedent "about," it will be understood that the particular value forms another aspect. It will be further understood that the endpoints of each of the ranges are significant both in relation to the other endpoint, and independently of the other endpoint.

[000131] The terms "substantial," "substantially," and variations thereof as used herein are intended to note that a described feature is equal or approximately equal to a value or description. For example, a "substantially planar" surface is intended to denote a surface that is planar or approximately planar. Moreover, as defined above, "substantially similar" is intended to denote that two values are equal or approximately equal. In some embodiments, "substantially similar" may denote values within about 10% of each other, such as within about 5% of each other, or within about 2% of each other.

[00118] It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications and variations can be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention.