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Title:
COMPOSITE FIBER BICYCLE WHEELS
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2010/138557
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Carbon fiber bicycle wheels are formed from parts cut from carbon fiber cloth and then joined together to form a rim, sidewalls, spokes, flanges and a center tunnel on which the flanges are mounted. The parts are then assembled, bonded together, and cured to form a wheel. During assembly, the spokes and the wheel are placed in tension by moving the flanges outwardly on the center tunnel after assembly and then bonding them in place to stiffen and strengthen the wheel. The spokes of the drive side of the rear wheel are specially shaped to accommodate torque transfer forces generated by pedaling.

Inventors:
KISMARTON, Max (14227 SE 163rd Place, Renton, WA, 98058-8262, US)
HJERTBERG, Eric (3215 East Madison Street, Seattle, WA, 98112-4331, US)
LOBISSER, G., Kyle (2000 First Avenue, Suite 601Seattle, WA, 98121-2166, US)
Application Number:
US2010/036155
Publication Date:
December 02, 2010
Filing Date:
May 26, 2010
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
MAD FIBER, LLC (1604 North 34th Street, Suite BSeattle, WA, 98103, US)
KISMARTON, Max (14227 SE 163rd Place, Renton, WA, 98058-8262, US)
HJERTBERG, Eric (3215 East Madison Street, Seattle, WA, 98112-4331, US)
LOBISSER, G., Kyle (2000 First Avenue, Suite 601Seattle, WA, 98121-2166, US)
International Classes:
B62K19/02; B62K3/02
Foreign References:
US20080265659A12008-10-30
US20070205654A12007-09-06
US6231128B12001-05-15
US20070194619A12007-08-23
US20080106141A12008-05-08
US20070063574A12007-03-22
DE102007036065A12008-02-07
Other References:
See also references of EP 2435291A4
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
UHLIR, James, R. (Christensen O'connor Johnson Kindness PLLC, 1420 Fifth Avenue Suite 280, Seattle WA, 98101, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. A carbon fiber bicycle wheel comprising: a rim having a center channel and first and second sides; first and second sidewalls bonded to said first and second sides of said rim; a plurality of flat spokes bonded to each of said sidewalls and extending inwardly toward first and second flanges, said flanges being laterally spaced from each other; said first and second flanges having at least one portion extending radially outward, said spokes bonded to said at least one portion.

2. The bicycle wheel of Claim 1, wherein said first and second sidewalls are formed from arcuate segments of woven carbon fiber cloth; said arcuate segments partially overlapping each other to form a circular sidewall.

3. The bicycle wheel of Claim 2, wherein said sidewalls are formed layers of arcuate segments of woven carbon fiber cloth, said layers being circumferentially offset with respect to each other.

4. The bicycle wheel of Claim 2, wherein each of said arcuate segments of woven carbon fiber cloth are cut so that a maximum number of carbon fibers run from end to end of said segments.

5. The bicycle wheel of Claim 1, wherein at least one of said flanges is laterally moveably mounted with respect to the other such that laterally outward movement of said flanges tensions said spokes.

6. The bicycle wheel of Claim 1, wherein said flat spokes are cut from carbon fiber material such that the maximum number of carbon fibers run longitudinally along said spoke.

7. The bicycle wheel of Claim 2, wherein said spokes are bonded to said sidewalls at points where at least two of said arcuate segments of said sidewall overlap each other.

8. The bicycle wheel of Claim 2, wherein said sidewall is formed of at least one layer of overlapping arcuate segments and spokes are bonded thereto at said areas of overlap.

9. The bicycle wheel of Claim 1, wherein said spokes extend longitudinally and are widened at least one end to increase the size of the bonding surface between said spoke end and said sidewall or said flange.

10. The bicycle wheel of Claim 1, wherein said first and second sidewalls include a circumferential profile change, said flat spokes extending inwardly toward said flanges through slots in said sidewalls, said slots being located at said circumferential profile change.

11. A carbon fiber bicycle wheel for the rear of a bicycle, comprising: a circular rim, first and second sidewalls bonded to said rim, a first set of spokes bonded to at least one of said sidewalls and extending inwardly for attachment to a first flange, a second set of spokes bonded to at least one of said sidewalls and extending inwardly for attachment to a second flange, said first flange and spokes differing in shape from said second flange and spokes.

12. The rear bicycle wheel of Claim 11, wherein said second set of spokes are bifurcated along their length adjacent the flange end of said spokes.

13. The rear bicycle wheel of Claim 11, wherein said first sidewall and set of spokes and flange are positioned on the left side of said rear bicycle wheel, and said second sidewall and set of spokes and flange are positioned on the right side of said wheel.

14. The rear bicycle wheel of Claim 12, wherein the bifurcated ends of said second set of spokes overlie each other and are bonded together.

15. The rear bicycle wheel of Claim 14, wherein said overlying spoke ends define a center opening shaped to mechanically mate with a like shaped portion of said associated flange.

16. A method of making a bicycle wheel comprising the steps of: selecting a piece of woven carbon fiber cloth; cutting pattern shapes from said cloth; laying up said pattern shapes to form bicycle wheel parts including a rim, a pair of sidewalls, a pair of flanges, and a plurality of spokes; curing said laid up bicycle wheel parts; bonding said cured parts together with adhesive to form a wheel and curing said bonded parts; joining said flanges in laterally spaced relation; and moving said flanges laterally apart to create tension in said spokes and bonding said flanges to maintain said tension in said spokes.

17. The method of Claim 16, wherein the step of joining said flanges in laterally spaced relation includes the step of mounting said flanges on a tubular tunnel.

18. The method of Claim 17, wherein the step of moving said flanges laterally apart and bonding them in place, includes the steps of forming one of said flanges to include a laterally extending tube and mounting the second of said flanges on said tube; moving said second flange laterally outward on said tubular tunnel, and bonding said second flange in place.

19. The method of Claim 16, wherein the step of cutting pattern shapes from said woven carbon fiber cloth to form said pair of sidewalls includes the step of cutting said pattern shapes in an arc so that a maximum number of carbon fibers extend from end to end of said arcuate pattern shape.

20. The method of Claim 16, wherein the step of laying up said pattern shapes includes the step of laying up said shapes such that a maximum number of the carbon fibers run end to end in said parts.

21. The method of Claim 16, wherein the steps of cutting and laying up said pattern shapes to form a sidewall includes the steps of cutting arcuate segments and laying said segments end to end such that their ends overlap.

22. The method of Claim 16, wherein the step of laying up said pattern shapes to form a rim includes the step of wrapping said rim pattern shapes around a filler piece.

Description:
COMPOSITE FIBER BICYCLE WHEELS

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/216,977, filed May 26, 2009, the entire disclosure of which is incorporated by reference herein.

BACKGROUND

Composite bicycle wheels are known, but have typically been made by molding the wheel as a single piece or molding parts thereof and then mechanically assembling the molded parts to form a wheel. Two piece wheels are known where each half comprises a rim, spokes and a hub, the two halves being bonded together. Wheels formed of composite portions and metal portions are also known. Wheels are known having spokes formed of composite fiber windings. In most instances the spokes of the composite wheels are of large diameter while in some cases the entire central portion of the wheel is formed as a single piece. All of the known processes for forming composite wheels are complex and costly and produce wheels which are heavier than wheels produced in accordance with the present invention.

SUMMARY

This Summary is provided to introduce (in a simplified form) a selection of concepts that are further described below in the Detailed Description. This Summary is not intended to identify key features of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended to be used as an aid in determining the scope of the claimed subject matter.

In view of the difficulty in manufacturing known composite bicycle wheels, their cost to produce and their weight, the inventors of the present application have devised an improved method of making novel carbon fiber bicycle wheels. The method economically produces carbon fiber bicycle wheels which are lighter and more aerodynamic than known wheels, while also being strong and durable.

In accordance with one embodiment of the invention, all parts of the wheel are formed from carbon fiber. The various pieces of the bicycle wheel comprising a rim, sidewalls, spokes, central flanges to which the spokes are attached, and a center tunnel on which the flanges are mounted, are all formed from pieces which are cut from carbon fiber cloth or tape. The cut pieces are laid together and cured to form the various parts of the wheel and the parts are then bonded together in a selected order and cured to form a wheel. Tension is added to the spokes by sliding the flanges mounted on the center tunnel outward and then bonding them in place. The addition of spoke tension stiffens and strengthens the wheel.

Forming all parts of the wheel from simple shapes eliminates the need for complex and costly molding techniques as used in the prior art. In addition, the present process allows each of the parts to be formed so that the forces the parts encounter in the wheel during use are borne by longitudinally aligned carbon fibers. The tensile strength of the carbon fibers is thus used to counter the loads experienced by the wheels during use. The described process allows for the manufacture of multiple varieties of rims and sidewalls and to join them in unique combinations to make different wheels to satisfy the needs of riders of various sizes and performance levels. Thus wheels of various degrees of stiffness, weight and durability may be made with the same tooling.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The foregoing aspects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will become more readily appreciated as the same become better understood by reference to the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein: FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a front bicycle wheel made in accordance with the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a side elevation view of the embodiment of FIGURE 1 ;

FIGURE 3 is an exploded view of the bicycle wheel of FIGURE 1 ;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of a sidewall of the bicycle wheel of FIGURE 1 showing the mounting of spokes on the sidewall;

FIGURE 5 is a section view of the sidewall of FIGURE 4 showing the bonding of the spoke to the sidewall;

FIGURE 6 is an exploded view of pieces of carbon fiber cloth being overlaid to form a sidewall; FIGURE 7 is a cross-sectional view of the rim of a bicycle wheel made in accordance with the present invention;

FIGURE 8 is a right side perspective view of a rear bicycle wheel made in accordance with the present invention; FIGURE 9 is a left side perspective view of the bicycle wheel of FIGURE 8;

FIGURE 10 is a right side elevation view of the bicycle wheel of FIGURE 8;

FIGURE 11 is a right side exploded view of the bicycle wheel of FIGURE 8;

FIGURE 12 is a left side exploded view of the bicycle wheel of FIGURE 8; FIGURE 13 is an exploded view of the spokes of the right side of the rear bicycle wheel of FIGURE 8 showing the manner in which the spokes are bonded together;

FIGURE 14 is a section view taken along lines 14 - 14 of FIGURE 10;

FIGURE 15A is an enlarged view of the hub portion of the bicycle wheel of FIGURE 14 showing the left side flange in its initial location; and FIGURE 15B is an enlarged perspective view of the hub of FIGURE 14 showing the left side flange moved outwardly to tension the spokes of the wheel.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

In accordance with a first embodiment of the present invention, in FIGURE 1, a carbon fiber front bicycle wheel 10 made in accordance with the present invention is illustrated. It will be understood that the front and rear bicycle wheels disclosed herein share the same fundamental design, a bonded structure made from simple shape carbon fiber components. However, some differences will be discussed relating to the rear wheel's need to handle the torque forces generated by pedaling. Turning to FIGURES 1-3, it will be seen that bicycle wheel 10 is formed from a plurality of separate parts including a rim 12, right and left side sidewalls 14 and 16, spokes 18, flanges 20 to which the inward ends of the spokes are bonded, and central tunnel 22. Each of these separate parts are formed from pieces cut from carbon fiber cloth. In some cases, pieces of unidirectional carbon fiber tape are also used, the choice being governed by the shape of the part and the avoidance of waste of expensive carbon fiber material. For example, spokes may be cut from unidirectional carbon fiber tape, although it will be understood that the spokes may alternatively be cut from woven carbon fiber cloth. In some instances, the parts may be made from a combination of cloth and unidirectional tape, the selection of appropriate materials being well within the skill of a man skilled in the art of forming carbon fiber parts and, thus, aware of the great tensile strength of carbon fiber.

Turning to FIGURE 6, one method of forming the sidewalls is disclosed to comprise joining arcuate sections of carbon fiber cloth. To strengthen the wheel, the arcuate sections are cut from carbon fiber cloth such that a maximum number of carbon fibers run in a full end-to-end direction. Tangential to the center of each arc, these fibers form tendons that lock each arcuate section against flexing from an arcuate shape toward a rectangular shape during use. Accordingly, such placement of the carbon fibers increases the wheel's load bearing capacity.

As shown in FIGURE 6, six arcuate sections 24 of carbon fiber cloth are joined and bonded in overlapping relationship to form a circular sidewall 16. Each of the sections 24 overlaps the adjacent sections to provide a large bonding area 26 for the placement of epoxy or other appropriate bonding material. It has been found that overlapping each section approximately one inch creates a strong bond between the sections and also provides a strong mounting area for the spokes 18.

In a preferred form, the joined and bonded sections are cured in a conventional tool that provides mechanical compression and pressure from thermally expanding rubber and a vacuum. It has been found that forming a sidewall from two layers of sections 24 provides a strong and durable sidewall. Preferably, the second layer of sections is clocked, approximately 30 degrees, from the first section so that the overlying joints are not disposed one on top of the other to prevent overly thickened sections on the sidewall. It has also been found that the second layer of arcuate sections need not overlap as great an amount as the sections of the first layer as described above. Overlapping joints 26 provide strong mounting points for the outer ends of spokes 18.

After bonding and curing of the sidewalls, their edges are trimmed and sanded before being joined to rim 12. It will be understood that unlike those found on other carbon composite wheels, the sidewalls of the present invention are load bearing, tensioned structures. This results in a more efficient, higher performing structure by reducing peak stresses where the spokes connect to the sidewalls. In some embodiments, the sidewalls may have a dedicated braking surface with a wear indicator such as a point covering. When worn, a new braking surface may be applied.

Turning to FIGURE 7, rim 12 is formed from laid up pieces of woven carbon fiber cloth and unidirectional tape which, in a preferred embodiment, surround a wood core 28. Wood core 28 is not a structural element, but rather acts as a spacer since wood is of lower density than carbon fiber and thus allows the wheel to be made lighter.

The rim is formed by placing the laid up pieces in a steel mold and then curing them in a conventional manner under heat and pressure. The formed rims are again finished by trimming with abrasive sanders and saws. The outer surface of the rim is formed in the shape of a channel 30 adapted to receive a conventional rubber tire. An opening 32 (FIGURE 4) is provided to receive an inwardly directed air valve, through which the tire is inflated, running from the tire through the rim. Flanges 20 (FIGURE 3) may be formed using rectangles and disks of woven carbon fiber cloth which are assembled and bound by a wrap of unidirectional tape so that the carbon fibers are oriented such that many lie in a radial direction to support the high spoke tension connection of the present invention. Again, the laid up rectangles, disks, and tape are cured in conventional tools and then trimmed with abrasive sanders to remove rough edges.

Spokes 18 are preferably formed from a multilayer unidirectional sandwich of carbon fiber tape in which the fibers run lengthwise to carry high tension loads from the hub flange 20 to the sidewalls 16. This construction increases the tensile strength of the spoke to provide improved stiffness and performance. The flatness of the spokes reduces drag to levels atypical of spoked wheels. The spokes are cured under high mechanical and expanded rubber pressure and then cut to precise shape as illustrated in the drawings. The widened ends of the spokes 18 provide a large bonding surface.

Turning, additionally, to FIGURES 4 and 5, the assembling of the parts of the wheel is carried out through a series of bonding procedures employing conventional tooling to ensure alignment, and high temperature and pressure. The first bond consists of bonding six spokes 18 to each sidewall 14 and 16 at locations 26 where the arcuate sections 24 of the sidewalls overlap. As discussed earlier, the spokes 18 are mounted at the overlapping joints 26 so that they can better support the high spoke tension loads imparted to the spokes as will be described hereafter. As shown in FIGURE 5, the outer ends of the spokes 18 extend through slots 34 and are bonded to the inside of the sidewall using a conventional adhesive 36 such as epoxy. As best seen in the cross-section view of FIGURE 14 with respect to the right rear wheel spokes, both sidewalls 14 and 16 include a circumferential profile change 15 at the location of the spoke insertion slots 34. This profile change allows slots 34 to be aimed toward the opposite side flange 20, while minimizing disruption to the sidewall surface thus improving both the strength and aerodynamics of the finished sidewall. As best seen in FIGURE 4, the inner ends of spokes 18 are shaped such that their bottom edges adjoin each other to define a circular opening 37 when all are mounted in place on the outer surface of the sidewall 16. After the spokes are bonded to the sidewalls, the two sidewalls 14 and 16 with attached spokes 18 are bonded to the lateral surfaces 38 of rim 12 and the bonds are cured in a conventional manner. The inner ends of the spokes 18 are then bonded to the outer surfaces of flanges 20 and cured. It will be understood that flanges 20 may be formed with short spoke mounting sections 39 extending outwardly therefrom, the material between these sections having been removed to reduce weight. See FIGURES 1 and 3.

Flanges 20 also include inwardly extending tubular portions 21 which are sized to receive central tunnel 22. When tunnel 22 is inserted through the flanges 20, the flanges come to rest at a first location. As will be discussed in greater detail hereafter with reference to FIGURES 15A and B, tension is added to the spokes 18 by moving the flanges 20 laterally apart a short distance. This process results in equally tensioned spokes, eliminates the need for trimming and reduces labor time and wheel cost. This process also allows the wheel to be easily customized for different types of riders without investing in new tooling since the spoke geometry, lay up and spoke tension level can be easily changed. In practice, it has been found that this lateral distance need be no more than a quarter of an inch or less, with further outward movement being limited by the resistance to longitudinal extension of the longitudinally extending carbon fibers of spokes 18. After the spokes are moved laterally outward, they are held in place by a conventional jig and bonded to tunnel 22 to maintain the induced tension in the spokes. It will be understood that the described method of forming a wheel of a bicycle uses 100% carbon fiber cloth and tape to form all structural parts, and that the wheel is assembled from flat sections of this material solely by bonding and curing the parts together and without the requirement of molding any hollow element. The resulting wheel is both less costly to manufacture than known carbon fiber wheels and also produces a very strong and durable wheel due to the addition of the induced stress.

Turning now to FIGURES 8-10, a rear bicycle wheel 40 is disclosed to comprise a left-hand side as best seen in FIGURE 9 which is of like configuration to the front wheel sidewall and spoke configuration discussed above with respect to FIGURES 1-7. As best seen in FIGURES 8 and 10, the right side of the rear wheel employs a different form of wishbone- shaped spoke 42 (see FIGURE 13 also), the inner ends 48 of which are bonded to each other and to the right side flange 44 of the rear wheel. It will be understood that, except for the differences in the configuration of the rear hub and the rear right side spokes, the method of manufacture of the rear wheel 40 is basically the same as that of front wheel 10 as described above.

As best seen in FIGURE 13, wishbone-shaped spokes 42 include a flat outer portion 46 which extends through a slot 34 in the left side sidewall 16 and is bonded to the inside of the sidewall in the manner discussed above with respect to the front wheel at FIGURE 5. The inner diverging ends 48 of wishbone-shaped spokes 42 overlie each other as best seen in FIGURE 13 and are bonded to define a hexagonal opening 50. The widened base of the spokes allows them to better carry shear loads resulting from the torque of the driven hub. The widened end may also be formed of fiber plies oriented at an angle to the length of the spoke to further strengthen the spoke/hub connection.

Referring to FIGURES 11 and 12, the hub parts of the rear wheel are shown to include left side flange 52 and right side flange 44 which is shown formed to include inwardly extending tunnel 56 on which left side flange 52 is mounted as will be discussed hereafter. Mounted within the outer central opening of flange 44 are fitting 58 having a hexagonal outer surface and outwardly extending tube 60 which is adapted to receive a conventional free hub. The drive side right rear spokes 42 are shaped to accommodate the high torque forces transmitted to the right side of the rear wheel 40 as a result of pedaling forces transmitted through the chain connecting the front and rear sprockets of the bicycle on which the wheels are mounted. The bifurcated spokes are designed to withstand the high torque transfer forces and include large bond surfaces 46 and 48 that are oriented to best accommodate such forces. As mentioned earlier, the hexagonal opening 50, formed by the joining of the overlapping spokes 42, fits over the hexagonal outer edge of fitting 58 to form a mechanical connection, thus, additionally accommodating torque transfer from the hub through the spokes to the outer wheel.

As best seen in FIGURE 13, the spoke pattern at the inner ends 48 of the spokes where they are joined together is formed in two layers, each spoke of a single layer spanning 120 degrees such that three spokes comprise a complete circular layer. The second layer of three spokes is offset 60 degrees from the first and is bonded on top of the first layer. The two-layer assembly is possible because of the flatness and width of the spokes and creates great strength in the final assembly.

Again, the front and rear wheels share the same fundamental design of a bonded structure made from simple shaped flat carbon fiber components. In the case of each component, pieces of carbon fiber pre-preg woven fabric or unidirectional carbon fiber tape are cut to pattern shapes. These fabric and tape pieces are laid up in conventional tools in precise order, direction, and layers and then cured in a vacuum and under pressure at high temperature. The cured components are then trimmed to shape, and the trimmed parts are assembled, bonded together with adhesives, and then temperature cured. Finally, as discussed hereafter, high tension is introduced to the final structure.

Turning now to FIGURES 14, 15 A, and 15B, a sectional view of the rear wheel 40 and its central hub assembly with wheel flanges 44 and 52 mounted thereon.

As best seen in FIGURE 15 A, after assembly of all parts of the wheel, left side flange 52 is slipped over the end of tunnel 56 which, as stated above, is formed as a part of right side flange 44.

Referring additionally to FIGURE 15B and in the manner discussed earlier with respect to the front wheel, tension is added to the spokes and wheel by moving right side flange 44 and left side flange 52 laterally apart and then bonding left side flange 52 to tunnel 56 to maintain the tension in the spokes and wheel. FIGURE 15B shows the original position of flange 52 in phantom line, and arrow 62 illustrates the direction in which flange 52 is moved with respect to flange 44. It will be understood that the distance of movement shown in FIGURE 15B is illustrative only and, in actuality, a relatively small movement is required to add high tension to the spokes and wheel structure.

As a final step, all spokes are lashed with high strength thread to prevent peel bond failure and increase durability and safety. The lashing 45 occurs around each spoke to hub bond for the front and left rear spokes. For the right rear spokes, the lashing ties spokes together as they cross on their path to the sidewall. In all cases, the lashing prevents spoke to hub bond failure in case the spoke would tend to be peeled away in an accident.

While certain embodiments have been illustrated and described, it will be appreciated that various changes can be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.