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Title:
COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING A BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE MATERIAL AND A NON-ORDERED INORGANIC OXIDE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2014/078435
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Compositions containing a biologically active material and a non-ordered inorganic oxide material are disclosed. Methods of making and using compositions containing a biologically active material and a non-ordered inorganic oxide material are also disclosed.

Inventors:
LIBANATI, Cristian (417 Windsor Street, Silver Spring, Maryland, 20910, US)
VAN SPEYBROECK, Michiel (Mechelsevest 122, Leuven, Leuven, BE)
Application Number:
US2013/069921
Publication Date:
May 22, 2014
Filing Date:
November 13, 2013
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
W. R. GRACE & CO.-CONN. (7500 Grace Drive, Columbia, Maryland, 21044, US)
FORMAC PHARMACEUTICALS N.V. (Gaston Geenslaan 1, Leuven, Leuven, BE)
International Classes:
B01J20/28; A61K9/48; A61K31/41
Domestic Patent References:
WO2009106837A12009-09-03
WO1999037705A11999-07-29
Foreign References:
US8273371B22012-09-25
US8258137B22012-09-04
Other References:
See also references of EP 2919903A4
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ARTALE, Beverly (7500 Grace Drive, Columbia, Maryland, 21044, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
WHAT IS CLAIMED IS;

3. A composition comprising a biologically active material and an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises a non-ordered porous material comprising:

pores having a mean pore diameter of about 2.5 nrn to about 15.0 nm;

pores having a pore volume, as measured by nitrogen porosimetry, of about 0.5 ce/g or greater; and

a BET surface area, as measured by nitrogen adsorption, of about 300 srf/g or greater.

2. The composition according to claim 1, wherein the mean pore diameter is about 2,5 nm to about 10.0 nm.

3. The composition according to claim I or 2, wherein the mean pore diameter is about 3,0 nm to about 10,0 nm,

4. The composition according to any one of claims, i to 3, wherein the. pore volume is about 0.6 cc/g or greater,

5. The composition according to any one of claims Ϊ to 4, wherein the pore volume is about 0.7 cc/g or greater,

6. The composition according to any one of claims 1 to 5, wherein the surface area is about 350 rrr/g or greater.

?, The composition according to any one of claims 1 to 6, wherein the surface area is about 400 m"/g or greater.

8. The composition according to any one of claims 1 to 7» wherein {«} the mean pore diameter is aboist 5,0 nm to aboist 10.0 nm, (si) the pore volume is about 0.7 cc/g or greater, and (hi) the surface area is about 400 rrf/g or greater.

2S

9. The composition according to any one of claims 1 to 8, wherein as the pore volume increases above about 0,5 cc/g. the surface area ranges from { 1 ) a lower surface area amount represented by a sum of 300 m~/g plus about 27 nr/g per 0.1 cc/g increase in the pore volume above L I cc/g, and {2} m upper surface area amount represented by a sum of 800 nr/g plus about 160 srr/g per 0.1 cc/g increase in the pore volume above 0.5 cc/g.

10. The composition according to any one of claims 1 to 8, wherein as the pore volume increases above about 0.7 cc/g, the surface area ranges from (1 ) a lower surface area amount represented by a sum of 400 nr/g plus about 40 nr/g per 0. i cc/g increase in the pore volume above 1.0 cc/g, and (2) an u per surface area amount represented by a sum of 560 nr/g pins about 84 nr/g per 0, S cc/g increase in the pore volume above 0,7 ce/g.

1 1. The composition according to any one of claims 1 to 10, wherein the non-ordered porous material further comprises a specific surface area is about 500 nr/g or greater.

12. The composition according to any one of claims 1 to I I , wherein the non-ordered porous material further comprises a specific surface area is about 600 nr/g or greater.

1 . The composition according to any one of claims 1 to 12, wherein the non-ordered porous material possesses a loss on ignition of more than 4% by weight based upon the weight of the non-ordered porous material.

14. The composition according to any one of claims i to 12. wherein the non-ordered porous material possesses a loss on ignition of more than 5% by weight based upon the weight of the non-ordered porous material

15. The composition according to any one of claims 3 to 12, wherein the non-ordered porous material possesses a loss on ignition of more than 6% by weight based upon the weight of the non-ordered porous material

16. The. composition according to any one of claims 1 to 12, wherein the non-ordered porous material possesses a loss on ignition of more than 1% by weight based upon the weight of the non-ordered porous material.

2o

17. The composition according to any one of claims 1 to 16, wherein the in vitro dissolution rate of the biologically active material is at least about 2 times higher than the dissolution rate of the biologically active material in crystalline form or its equilibrium solubility.

18. The composition according to any one of claims S to 16, wherein the in vitro dissolution rate of the biologically active material is at least about 2 to about 10 times higher than the dissolution rate of the biologically active material in crystalline form,

1 . The composition according to any one of claims 1 to I B, wherein said non-ordered porous material have a pore size distribution relative span of at least about 0.4,

20. The composition according to any one of claims 1 to 18, wherein said non-ordered porous material have a pore size distribution relative span of at least about 1.0.

21. The composition according to any one of claims I to 20, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises two or more different and distinct types of non-ordered porous material.

22. The composition according to any one of claims 1 to 20. wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises two or more different and distinct types of non-ordered porous material with each distinct type of non-ordered porous material providing a specific dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material so as to form a composite dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material.

23. The composition according to claim 22, wherein the composite dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material provides a greater overall dissolution rate for the biologically active material compared to any specific dissolution rate profile for any type of non-ordered porous material

24. The composition according to any one of claims 1 to 20, wherein the inorganic oxide material further comprises a? least one ordered porous material.

25. A pharmaceutical composition comprising:

at least one pharmaceutical dosage formulating ingredient; and a drug release composition comprising a biologically active materia? and an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises a non-ordered porous material comprising:

pores having & mean pore diameter of about 2.5 urn to about 15,0 rsm; pores having a pore volume, as measured by nitrogen porosimetry, of about 0,5 cc/g or greater; and

a BET surface area, as measured by nitrogen adsorption, of about 300 m2/g or greater.

26, The composition according to claim 25, wherein the mean pore diameter is about 2.5 nm to about ! 0.0 nm.

27, The composition according io claim 25 or 26, wherein the mean pore diameter is about 3,0 nm to bou 10,0 nm.

28, The composition according to any one of claims 25 to 27, wherein the pore volume is about 0,6 cc/g or greater.

29, The composition according to any one of claims 25 to 28, wherein the pore volume is about 0,7 cc/g or greater.

30, The composition according to any one of claims 25 to 29, wherein the surface area is about 350 m2/g or greater.

31 , Use composition according to any on of claims 25 to 30, wherein the surface area is about 400 nr/g or greater.

32, The composition according to any one of claims 25 to 31 , wherein (i) the mean pore diameter is about 5.0 nm to about 10,0 nm, (si) the pore volume is about 0.7 cc/g or greater, and (Hi) the surface area is ahout 400 m"/g or greater.

33, The composition according to any one of claims 23 to 32, wherein as the pore volume increases above about 0.5 cc/g, the susface area ranges from ( 1) a lower surface area amount represented by a sum of 300 srr/g pins about 27 m~1g per 0.1 cc/g increase in the pore volume above L I cc/g, and (2) an upper surface area amount represented by a sum of 800 mVg plus about S60 nr/g per 0.1 cc/g increase in fte pore volume above 0.5 ec/g.

34. The composition according to any one of claims 25 to 33, wherein as the pore volume increases above about 0.7 ec/g, the surface area ranges from ( 1 ) a lower surface area amount represented by a sum of 400 nr/g pins about 40 nr/g per 0.1 ec/g increase in the pore volume above 1.0 ec/g, snd (2) an upper surface area amount represented by a sum of 560 m'/g plus about 84 nr/g per 0.1 cc/g increase in the pore volume above 0.7 cc/g.

35. The composition according to any one of claims 21 to 34, wherein the non-ordered porous material further comprises a specific surface area of about 500 nr/g or greater.

36. The composition according to any one of claims 25 to 30, wherein the non-ordered porous material further comprises a specific surface area of about 600 ~/g or greater.

37. The composition according to any one of claims 1 to 36, wherein the biologically active material comprises at least one active pharmaceutical ingredient (API).

38. The composition according to any one of claims I to 36, wherein the biologically active material comprises ezetimimbe.

39. The composition according to any one of claims 1 to 36, wherein the biologically active material comprises tadalafil

40. The composition according to any one of claims 1 to 36, wherein the biologically active material comprises fenofibrate,

41. The composition according to any one of claims 25 to 40, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises two or more different and distinct types of non-ordered porous material,

42. The composition according to any one of claims 25 to 41 , wherein the Inorganic oxide material comprises two or more different and distinct types of non-ordered porous material with each distinct type of non-ordered porous material providing a specific dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material so as to form a composite dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material

43. The composition according to claim 42, wherein the composite dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material provides a greater overall dissolution rate for the biologically active material compared to any specific dissolution rate profile for any type of non-ordered porous material.

44. The composition according to any ore of claims 25 to 43, wherein the inorganic oxide material further comprises at least one ordered porous material.

45. The composition according to any one of claims 25 to 44, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises silicon oxide,

46. The composition according to any one of claims 25 to 45, wherein the in vitro dissolution rate of the biologically active material is at least about 2 times higher than the issolution rate of the biologically active material in crystalline form or its equilibrium solubility.

47. The composition according to any one of claims 25 to 45, wherein the in vitro dissolution rate of the biologically active material is at least about 2 to about 10 times higher th&n the dissolution rate of the biologically active material in crystalline form.

48. The composition according to any on of claims 25 to 45, wherein said non-ordered porous material have a pore size distribution relative span of at least about 0.4.

49. The composition according to any one of claims 25 to 45, wherein said non-ordered porous material have a pore size distribution relative span of at least about 1.0,

50. A method of using the composition according to any one of claims I to 49, said method comprising:

administering the composition to a patient so as to deliver the biologically active material to the patient.

51. A method of making the composition according to any one of claims 3 to 49, said method comprising:

incorporating the biologically active material into the inorganic oxide material

52. A composition comprising a biologically active materia! and an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises a non-ordered porous material, and wherein as the pore volume increases above about 0.5 cc/g, the surface area ranges from { 1} a lower surface area amount represented by a sum of 300 πΓ/'g plus about 2? nr/g per 0.1 cc/g increase in the pore volume above 1 , 1 cc/g, and (2) an tipper surface area amount represented by a sum of 800 m'/g plus about 160 nr/g per 0.1 cc/g increase in the pore volume above 0.5 cc/g.

53. The composition according to claim 52, wherein the in vitro dissolution rate of the biologically active material is at least about 2 times higher titan the dissolution rate of the biologically active material in crystalline form or its equilibrium solubility.

54. The composition according to any one of claims 52 or 53, wherein the in vitro dissolution rate of the biologically active material is at least about 2 to about 10 times higher than the dissolution rate of the biologically active material in crystalline form.

55. The composition according to any one of claims 52 to 54, wherein said non-ordered porous material have a pore size distribution relative span of at least about 0.4.

56. The composition according to any one of claims 52 to 55, wherein said non-ordered porous material have a pore size distribution relative span of at least about 1.0,

57. A composition comprising a biologically active material and an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises two or more different and distinct types of non-ordered porous material with each distinct type of non-ordered porous material providing a specific dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material so as to form a composite dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material.

58. The composition according to claim 57, wherein the in vitro dissolution rate of the biologically active material is at least about 2 times higher than the dissolution rate of the biologically active maierial in crystalline form or its equilibrium solubility.

5 . The composition according to any one of claims 57 or 58, wherein the in vitro dissolution rate of the biologically active material is at least about 2 to about 10 times higher than the dissolution rate of the biologically active material in crystalline form.

60. The composition according to any one of claims 57 to 59, wherein said non-ordered porous material have a pore size distribution relative spas of at least about 0.4.

61. The composition according to any one of claims 57 to 60, wherein said non-ordered porous material have a pore size distribution relative span of at least about 1.0.

62. A composition comprising a biologically active material and an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises two or more different and distinct types of porous material, a first porous material comprising at least one type of non-ordered porous material and a second porous material comprising at least one type of ordered porous material.

63. The composition according to claim 62, wherein each of the first and second porous materials provide a specific dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material so as to form a composite dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material,

64. The composition according to any one of claims 62 or 63» wherein the in vitro dissolution rate of the biologically active material is at least about 2 times higher than the dissolution rate of the biologically active material in crystalline form or its equilibrium solubility.

65. The composition according to any one of claims 62 to 64. wherein the in vitro dissolution rate of the biologically active material is at least about 2 to about 10 times higher than the dissolution rate of the biologically active material in crystalline form.

The composition according to any one of claims 62 to 65, wherein said non-ordered porotss material have a pore size distribution relative spars of at least about 0.4,

67. The composition according to any one of claims 62 to 66, wherein said non porous material have a pore size distribution relative span of at least about ί .0.

S3

Description:
COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING A BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE MATERIAL AND A NON-ORDERED INORGANIC OXIDE

TECHNICAL FIELD

[0001 J The present invention relates to compositions containing a biologically active material and a non-ordered inorganic oxide material, methods of making compositions containing a biologically active material and a non-ordered inorganic oxide material, and methods of using compositions containing a biologically active material and a non-ordered inorganic oxide material.

[0002] Efforts continue in the development of compositions suitable for effective drag bioavailability.

SilM A

[0003] The present invention continues the effort to develop compositions suitable for effective drug bioavailability by the developmeni of drug release compositions comprising one or more no -ordered inorganic oxide materials and at least one biologically active material incorporated therein, In one exemplary embodiment, the composition of the present invention comprises a biologically active material and art inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises a non-ordered porous material comprising pores having a mean pore diameter of about 2,5 nm to about 15.0 nm, or greater; pores having a pore volume, as measured by nitrogen porosimetry, of about 0.5 cc/g to about 3.0 cc/g, or greater; and a BET surface area, as measured by nitrogen adsorption, of about 300 m"/g up to 1500 trr/g, or greater. In some embodiments, the non-ordered porous material comprising pores having a mean pore diameter of from about 5.0 to about 10,0 nm; pores having a pore volume, as measured by nitrogen porosimetry, of from about 0.7 to about 2,5 cc/g; and a BET surface area, as measured by nitrogen adsorption, of from about 400 to about 1400 nrv'g, or greater,

[0004] In other embodiments, the inorganic oxide, material may have a pore six distribution relative span of at least about 0,4, at least about 0.5, at least about 0.6, at least about 0.7, at least about. 0.8, at least about 0.9, at least about i .Q, or at least about 1 , 1. in further embodiments, the inorganic oxide materials may have a pore size distribution relative span of at least about 0.4, at least about 0.5 » at least about 0.6, at least about 0.7, at least about 0.8, at least about 0.9, at least about 1.0, or at least about j . I . up to about 2.0.

[0005] In another exemplary embodiment, the present invention is directed to a composition comprising a biologically active material and an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises a non-ordered porous material, and wherein as the pore volume increases above about 0,5 cc/g, the surface area ranges from (1 ) a lower surface area amount represented by a sum of 300 nr/g plus about 27 nr/g per 0.1 cc/g increase n the pore volume above L I cc/g, and (2) an upper surface area amount represented by a sum of 800 m 2 /g plus about 160 nr/g per 0, 1 ce/g increase in the pore volume above 0.5 cc/g,

[0006J In a further exemplary embodiment, the present invention includes a composition comprising a biologically active material and an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises two or more different and distinct types of non-ordered porous material with each distinct type of non-ordered porous material providing a specific dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material so as to form a composite dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material.

[0007] In another exemplary embodiment, the present invention is directed to a pharmaceutical composition comprising at least one pharmaceutical dosage formulating ingredient; and a dreg release composition comprising a biologically active material and an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide materia! comprises a non-ordered porous material comprising pores having a mean pore diameter of about 2.5 nm to about 15.0 nrn, or greater; pores having a pore volume, as measured by nitrogen porosimetry, of about 0,5 cc/g to about 3.0 cc/g, or greater; and a BET surface area, as measured by nitrogen adsorption, of about 300 nr/g to about 1400 m 3 /g, or greater. In other embodiments, the inorganic oxide material may have a pore size distribution relative span of at least about 0.4, at least about 0.5, at least about 0.6, at least about 0.7, at least about 0,8, at least about 0.9, at least about 1.0, or at least about 1.3. In further embodiments, the inorganic oxide materials may have a pore size distribution relative span of at least about 0.4, at least about 0.5, at least about 0.6, at least about 0.7, at least about 0.8, at least about 0.9, at least about 1.0, or at least about 1.1, up to about 2.0.

[0008] In another exemplary' embodiment, the present invention is directed to a pharmaceutical composition comprising at least one pharmaceutical dosage formulating ingredient; and a dreg release composition comprising a biologically active material and an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises a non-ordered porous material, and wherein as the pore volume increases above about 0.5 ee/g, the surface area ranges from (I ) a lower surface area amount represented by a sum of 300 nr/g plus about 27 nr/g per 0.1 ec/g increase in the pore volume above L I cc/g, and (2) an upper surface area amount represented by a sum of 800 m g plus about 160 rrr/g per 0.1 cc/g increase in the pore volume above 0.5 ec/g.

[0009] In a further exemplary embodiment, the present invention includes a pharmaceutical composition comprising at least one pharmaceutical dosage formulating ingredient; and a drug release composition comprising a biologically active material and an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises two or mors different and distinct types of non-ordered porous material with each distinct type of non- ordered porous material providing a specific dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material so as to form a composite dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material.

[0010] The present invention is further directed to methods of making the disclosed compositions. In one exemplary embodiment, the method of making a composition of the present invention comprises incorporating at least one biologically active material into inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises a non-ordered porous material comprising pores having a mean pore diameter of about 25 angstroms to about 150 angstroms; pores having a pore volume, as measured by nitrogen porosimetry, of about 0.5 cc/g or greater; and a BET surface area, as measured by nitrogen adsorption, of about 300 nr/g or greater. In some embodiments, the method comprises combining a dreg release composition comprising the at least one biologically active material and the inorganic oxide material with at least one pharmaceutical dosage formulating ingredient so as to form a pharmaceutical composition.

[001 1] In another exemplary embodiment, the present invention is directed to a method of making a composition by incorporating at least one biologically active materia! into inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises a non-ordered porous material, and wherein as the pore volume increases above about 0.5 cc/g, the surface area ranges from { I } a lower surface area amount represented by a sum of 300 nr/g plus about 27 nr/g per 0.1 cc/g increase in the pore volume above 1.1 cc/g, and (2) an upper surface area amount represented by a sum of 800 nr/g plus about 160 nr/g per 0, 1 cc/g increase in the pore volume above 0.5 cc/g.

[0012] In a further exemplary embodiment, the present invention includes a method of making a composition by incorporating at least one biologically active material into inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises two or more different and distinct types of non-ordered porous material with each distinct type of non- ordered porous material providing a specific dissolution rate profile for the biologically active materia! so as to form a composite dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material.

[0013] The present invention is even further directed to methods of using the disclosed compositions. In one exemplary embodiment, the method of using a composition of the present invention comprises administering a composition to a patient so as to deliver a biologically active material to the patient, wherein the composition comprises at least one biologically active material arid an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises a non-ordered porous material comprising pores haying a mean pore diameter of about 2.5 nm to about 15.0 sim, or greater; pores having a pore volume, as measured by nitrogen porosimetry, of about 0.5 cc/g to about 3.0 cc/g, or greater; and a BET surface area, as measured by nitrogen adsorption, of about 300 m"/g to about 1400 nr/g, or greater. In another embodiment, the composition of the present invention possesses an in vitro dissolution rate of a biologically active material of at least about 2 times more than the dissolution rate of the same biologically active materia! in crystalline form. In a further embodiment, the in vitro dissolution rate of the biologically active material is at least about 2 to about 10, or about 3 to about 10, or about 4 to about 10, or about 5 to about 10 times, more than the dissolution rate of the biologically active material in crystalline form.

[0014] In another exemplary embodiment, the present invention is directed to a method of using a composition by administering the composition to a patient so as to deliver a biologically active material to the patient, wherein the composition comprises at least one biologically active material and an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises a non-ordered porous material, and wherein as the pore volume increases above about 0.5 cc/g, the surface area ranges from (1 ) a lower surface area amount represented by a sum of 300 nr/g pins about 27 nr/g per 0.1 cc/g increase in the pore volume above 1 , 1 cc g, and (2) an upper surface area amount represented by a sum of 800 nr/g plus about 160 nr/g per 0.1 cc/g increase in the pore volume above 0.5 cc/g.

[0015] In a farther exemplary embodiment, the present invention includes a method of using a composition by administering the composition to a patient so as to deliver a biologically active material to the patient, wherein the composition comprises at least one biologically active material and an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises a non-ordered porons material, and wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises two or more different and distinct types of no» -ordered porous material with each distinct type of non-ordered porous material providing a specific dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material so as to form a composite dissolution rate profile for the biologically active material.

[0016] These and other features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent after a revsew of the following detailed description of tJ e disclosed embodiments and the appended claims. mmMm mimmjMEm ims

[0017] The present invention is farther described with reference to the appended figures, wherein:

[0018] FIG. 1 graphically displays the rate of dissolution over time of an exemplary active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), danazoi, from various exemplary non-ordered silicas of the present invention;

[0019] FIG. 2 graphically displays the rate of dissolution over time of another exemplary API, itraconazole, from various exemplary non-ordered silicas of the present invention;

[0020] FIG. 3 graphically displays the rate of dissolution over time of another API, fenoftbrate, from various exemplary non-ordered silicas of the present invention;

[0021 ] FIG. 4 graphically displays the rate of dissolution over time of danazoi from a mixture of two different exemplary non-ordered silicas of the present invention;

[0022] FIG. 5 depicts a graph of pore size distributions of exemplary embodiments of the chromatography media of the present invention; and

[0023] FIGS.€ » S depict X-ray diffraction patterns of exemplary embodiments of the chromatography media of the present invention.

[0024] To promote an understanding of the principles of the present invention, descriptions of specific embodiments of the invention follow and specific language is used to describe the specific embodiments. It will nevertheless be understood that no limitation of the scope of the invention is intended by the use of specific language. Alterations, farmer modifications, and such further applications of the principles of the present invention discussed are contemplated as would normally occur to one ordinarily skilled in the art to which the invention pertains.

[0025] It must be noted that s used herein and in d e appended claims, the singular forms "a", "and", and "the" include plural referents unless the context clearly dictates otherwise. Thus, for example, reference to "an oxide" includes a plurality of such oxides and reference to "oxide" includes reference to one or more oxides and equivalents thereof known to those skilled in the art, and so forth.

[0026] "About" modifying, for example, the quantity of an ingredient in a composition, concentrations, volumes, process temperatures, process times, recoveries or yields, flow rates, and like values, and ranges thereof, employed in describing the embodiments of the disclosure, refers to variation in the numerical quantity that may occur, for example, through typical measuring and handling procedures; through inadvertent error in these procedures; through differences in the ingredients used to carry out the methods; and like proximate considerations. The term "about" also encompasses amounts that differ due to aging of a formulation with a particular initial concentration or mixture, and amounts that differ due to mixing or processing a formulation with a particular initial concentration or mixture. Whether modified by the term "about" the claims appended hereto include equivalents to these quantities.

[0027] As used herein, the term "biologically active material" means art active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), which provides a pharmacological activity or otherwise have direct effect in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease, or to have direct effect in restoring, correcting or modifying physiological functions in humans. Even though this includes poorly soluble material, it may also include materials that range in solubility, including those listed in the BCS (Biopharmaeeutic Classification System), which is a classification approach where drugs (APIs) are divided into four classes based on the extent (high or low) of their aqueous solubility and permeability through the GI tract wall, in particular intestinal. In this regard, these four classes are: (Group I) High Solubility and High Permeability drugs, (Group II) Low Solubility and High Permeability drugs, (Group HI) High Solubility and Low Permeability drugs and, (Group IV) Low solubility and Low Permeability drugs.

[0028] As used herein, "inorganic oxides" is defined as binary oxygen compounds where the inorganic component is the cation and the oxide is the anion, The inorganic material includes metals may also include metalloids. Metals include those elements on the left of the diagonal line drawn from boron to polonium on the periodic table. Metalloids or semi-metals include those elements that are on the right of this line. Examples of inorganic oxides include silica, alumina, titania, sirconia, etc., and mixtures thereof.

[0029] As used herein, the term "ordered porous material" refers to porous particles that have structural order with a very narrow pore ize distribution and X-ray diffraction patterns such thai the pore size distribution has a relative span, as defined herein, of less than 0,3.

[0030] As used herein, the term "non-ordered porous materia!" refers to porous particles possessing a pore size distribution that is not uniform (i.e., a very broad pore size distribution that is multimodal in nature), such that the pore size distribution has a relative span, as defined herein, of greater than 0.4. In addition, non-ordered porous materials may possess an internal structure such that they do not have a low angle X-ray diffraction pattern, as shown in FIGS, 6-8. Such materials may be formed via any known process including, but not limited to, a solution polymerisation process such as for forming colloidal particles, a continuous flame hydrolysis technique such as for forming fused particles, a gel technique such as for forming gelled particles, and a precipitation technique such as for forming precipitated particles. The particles may be subsequently modified by antoclaving, flash drying, super critical fluid extracting, etching, or like processes. The parik es may be composed of organic and/or inorganic materials and combinations thereof, In one exemplary embodiment the particles are composed of Inorganic materials such as inorganic oxides, sulfides, hydroxides, carbonates, silicates, phosphates, etc, but are. preferably inorganic oxides. The particles may be a variety of different symmetrical, asymmetrical or irregular shapes, including chain, rod or lath shape. The particles may have different structures including amorphous or crystalline, etc. The particles may include mixtures of panicles comprising different compositions, sizes, shapes or physical structures, or that may be the same except for different surface treatments. Porosity of the particles may be intraparticle or inierpartiele in cases where smaller particles are agglomerated to form larger particles. In one exemplary embodiment the particles are composed of inorganic materials such as inorganic oxides, sulfides, hydroxides, carbonates, silicates, phosphates, etc, but are. preferably inorganic oxides, Porous materials include organic and inorganic materials, or hybrids thereof, and may be in the form of particles, monoliths, membranes, coatings, and the like.

[0031] As used herein, the term "pore size distribution * ' means the relative abundance of each pore size in a representati e volume of porous Inorganic particles. As used herein "median pore size" is the. pore diameter below which 50% of the Intraparticle pore volume resides for pores between 20 and 600 angstroms. See FIG. S.

[0032] As used herein, the term "relative span" Is defined as meaning a measure of the breadth of pore size distribution. The "span" is measured by subtracting the d ¾ j pore size (i.e., the pore size/diameter below which 30% of the pore volume resides for pores between 20 and 600 angstroms) from the dgs pore size (i.e., the pore size/diameter below which 85% by pore volume resides) as measured by mercury porosimetry. The term "relative span" is defmed as the ratio of C gs- aO dst.

[0033] As used herein, the term "drag bioavailability" means the ability of the human body to absorb biologically active materials, including APIs, which depends upon the solubility of the materials in water.

[0034] As used herein, the term "dreg release" means the ability of the biologically active material to be released in biological fluids or simulated biological fluids.

[0035] As used herein, the term "crystalline" means a solid material whose constituent atoms, molecules, or ions are arranged in an ordered pattern extending in all three directions, which may be measured by X-ray diffraction or differential scanning calorimetry.

[0036] As used herein, the term "supersaturation" means a solution thai contains more of a dissolved material (i.e.. solute) than could be dissolved by a solvent under ambient conditions. This is a measure of the deviation of a dissolved material in a solution from its saturated equilibrium state.

[0037] As used herein, the terra "dissolution" means the process by which a solid, liquid or a gas forms a solution in a solvent. For dissolution of solids, the process involves the breakdown of the crystal lattice into individual ions, atoms or molecules and their transport into the solvent. Dissolution rates of a biologically active material (e.g., API) are a measure of drug release to determine in vivo bioavailability.

[0038] The present invention is directed to compositions comprising a biologically active material and an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises a non-ordered porous material. Drag bioavailability is a concern for many poorly soluble biologically active materials and this invention relates to various embodiments that provide solutions to this problem. Applicants of the present invention have found thai non- ordered porous material having a specific sets of physical properties provide exceptional drug bioavailability properties. In particular, non-ordered porous material comprising (i) pores having a mean pore diameter of about 2.5 nm to about 15.0 nm; (is) pores having a pore volume, as measured by nitrogen porosimetry, of about 0,5 ec/g to about 3.0 ec/g, or greater; and (iii) a BET surface area, as measured by nitrogen adsorption, of about 300 m * /g to or greater unexpectedly provide exceptional drug bioavailability properties. Further, non- ordered porous material comprising (i) pores having a mean pore diameter of from about 50 to about 100 angstroms; iii) pores having a pore volume, as measured by nitrogen porosimetry, of from about 0.7 to about 2.5 ec/g; and (iii) a BET surface area, as measured by nitrogen adsorption, of from about 400 to about 1400 nr/g, or greater, unexpectedly provide even more exceptional drag bioavailability properties, i an exemplary embodiment, the non-ordered porous material possesses a loss on ignition of more than 4%, 5%, 6%, 7%, 8%, 9%, 10%, or more by weight based upon the weight of the non-ordered porous material. In a further exemplary embodiment, the non-ordered porous material possesses a pore volume to [0039] Irs other embodiments, the inorganic oxide material may have a pore sise distribution relative span of at least about 0.4, at least about 0.5, at least about 0.6, at least about 0.7 » at least about 0.8, at least about 0.9, at least about 1.0, or at least about 1.1. In further embodiments, the inorganic oxide materials may have a pore size distribution relative span of at least about 0.4, at least about 0.5, at least about 0.6, at least about 0,7, at least about 0.8, at least about 0.9, at least about 1.0, or at least about 1. ?, up to about 2.0,

[0040] In one exemplary embodiment, the present invention is directed to a composition comprising a biologically active material and an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises a non-ordered porous material comprising (i) pores having a mean pore diameter of about 2.5 nm to about 15.0 itm; {ii} pores having a pore volume, as measured by nitrogen porosimetry, of about 0.5 cc/g to about 2.5 cc/g, or greater; and (tit) a BET surface area, as measured by nitrogen adsorption., of about 300 nr/g to about 1400 m 2 /g, or greater. la a further embodiment, the non-ordered porous material has a mean pore diameter of from about 3.0 nm to about 14.0 nm, or from about 3,0 nm to about 13.0 nm, or from about 4.0 nm to about 12.0 nm, or from about 4.0 nm to about 1 1.0 nm, or from about 5.0 nm to about 10.0 nm. In another embodiment, the non-ordered porous material has a pore volume of at least about 0.5 ec/g, or at least about 0.6 cc/g, or at least about 0.7 cc/g, or at least about 0.8 cc/g, or at least about 0.9 cc/g, or at least about 1.0 cc/g, or from at least about 0.5 ec/g up to about 3.0 cc/g. In a further embodiment, the non-ordered porous material has a surface area (i.e., a BET surface area as measured by nitrogen adsorption) of about 350 nr/g to about 1400 nr/g, or greater, or from about 400 nr/g to about 1300 nr/g or greater. In other embodiments, the inorganic oxide material may have a pore size distribution relative span of at least about 0.4, at least about 0.5, at least about 0.6, at least about 0.7, at least about 0,8, at least about 0.9, at least about 1.0, or at least about 1.1. In further embodiments, the inorganic oxide materials may have a pore ύζζ distribution relative span of at least about 0.4, at least about 0.5, at least about 0.6, at least about 0.7, at least about 0.8, at least about 0.9, at least about 1.0, or at least about 1.1 , up to about 2,0,

[0041 ] In some other embodiments, the non-ordered porous material has (i) a mean pore diameter of from about 50 angstroms to about 100 angstroms, (ii) a pore volume of about 0,7 ec/g to 2.5 cc/g, or greater, and (iis) a surface area of about 400 m '/g to about 1400 m 2 /g, or greater,

[0042] In some other embodiments, the non-ordered porous material used in the present invention has a desired pore volume that varies depending on the surface area, and a desired surface area depending on the pore volume, For example, in some desired embodiments, as the pore volume of the non-ordered porous material increases above about 0,5 cc/g, the surface area ranges from { 1 ) a lower surface area amount represented by a sum of .300 rrf/g plus about 27 nr/g per 0. i cc/g increase in the pore volume above I . I cc/g, and (2) an upper surface area amount represented by a sum of SOOmVg plus about 160 nr/g per 0, S ce/g increase in the pore volume above 0.5 cc/g,

[0043] In other embodiments, the non-ordered porous material used in the present invention also has a specific surface area of about 500 m'/g to about 1400 nr/g, or greater, or from about 600 nr/g to about 1200 nr/g, or greater.

[0044] The compositions of the present invention are also directed to pharmaceutical compositions. In one exemplary embodiment, the present invention is directed to a pharmaceutical composition comprising at least one pharmaceutical dosage formulating ingredient; and a drug release composition comprising a biologically active material and an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises a non-ordered porous material comprising (i) pores having a mean pore diameter of about 25 angstroms to about 150 angstroms; (ii) pores having a pone volume, as measured by nitrogen porosimetr , of about 0,5 cc/g or greater; and (iii) a BET surface area, as measured by nitrogen adsorption, of about 300 nr/g or greater.

[0045] When used in pharmaceutical compositions, the inorganic oxide material desirab y has (1) a mean pore diameter is about 40 angstroms to about 100 angstroms, more desirably, from about 50 angstroms to about 100 angstroms; (ii) a pore volume of about 0.6 cc/g to about 2.5 ce/g, or greater, more desirably, about 0.7 cc/g to about 2.0 cc/g, or greater, and (iii) a surface area of about 350 nr/g to about 1400 nr/g, or greater, more desirably, about 400 nr/g to about 1200 nr/g, or greater.

[0046] Further, when used in pharmaceutical compositions, the inorganic oxide material desirably has a pore volume and surface area that correspond with one another according to the following criteria: as the pore volume increases above about 0.5 ce/g, the surface area ranges from ( 1 ) a lower surface area amount represented by a sum of 300 nr/g plus about 27 nrVg per 0.1 cc/g increase in the pore volume above 1 , 1 cc/g, and {2} an upper surface area amount represented by a sum of 800 nr/g phss about 1 0 ro"/g per 0.1 cc/g increase in the pore volume above 0,5 cc/g.

[0047] in addition, when used in pharmaceutical compositions, the inorganic oxide materia! desirably has a specific surface area of about 500 m 2 /g to about 1400 rrf/g or greater, more desirably, a specific surface area of about 600 nr/g to about 1200 nr/g or greater, [0048] Although the inorganic oxide material may comprise a variety of inorganic oxide materials, typically, the inorganic oxide material used in the present Invention comprises silicon oxide.

[0049] The biologically active material used In the compositions of the present invention may comprise any known biologically active material, In some embodiments, the biologically active material comprises at least one active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In some embodiments, the biologically active material comprises two or more active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in combination with one another. In other embodiments, APIs include those of groups II or I V of the Biopharmaeeoties Classification System (BCS) (FDA). Exemplary APIs include, but are not limited to, atorvastatin, amiodarone, candesartan-eiiex- etil, earvediloi, clopidogrel bisulfate, dipyridamole, eprosartan mesylate, epierenone, ezeiimibe, felodipine, nsrasemtde, isradipine, lovasiaiin, metolazone, nicardipine, nisoidipine olmesartan medoxomil, propafenone HQ, qinapril, ramipril, simvastatin, telmisartan, trandolapril, valssrtan and other caalio-vascuiar active drugs; acyclovir, adefovlr, dipivoxil, amphotericin, amprenavir, cefixime, ceftazidime, clarithromycin, clotrimazole, efavirenz, ganciclovir, itraconazole, norfloxacin, nystatin ritonavir, saquinavir and other anti-infecfive drugs including anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-fungal and and-parasitic drags; cisplatin, carboplaiin, docetaxel, etoposide. exemestane, idarubicin. irinotecan, melphaian, mercaptopnrine, mitotane, paclitaxel, valnsbiein, vincristine and other drags used in oncology; axathioprine, tacrolimus, cyclosporine, pimecrcslimns, siro!imus arid other immonosnpresslve drugs; clozapine, entaeapone, fluphenazine, imipramine, nefazodone, olanzapine, paroxetine, pimozide, sertraline, triazolam, zaleplon, ziprasidoneand, risperidone, carbamazepine and other drags for CNS indications; danazoi, dutasteride, medroxyprogesterone, estradiol, raloxifene, sildenafil, tada!aflL testosterone, vardenaf l and other drugs used for reproductive health; celecosib, dihydroergotamine mesylate, eletriptan, ergolosdmesylates, ergotamine-tartrate, nabumetone, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, triamcinolone, triamcinolone acetonlde and other anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs; bosentan, budesonide, desloratadlne, fexofenadin, fluticasone, loratadlne, mometasone, sa!meterol xinafoate, triamcinolon acefonide, zafiriukasf and other drugs for respirator)' indications; and dronabinol, famotidine, g!ybunde, hyoscyamine, isotretinoin, megestrol, mesalamine, modafinsi, mosapride, nimodipine. perphenazine, propofot sucraifele, thalidomide, trimsidine hydrochloride and other drags for various indications including in particular gastrointestinal disorders, diabetes and dermatology indications. In further embodiments the APIs include ezctimim e glucoreniude, tadalafsl, fenofsbrate, danazoi, itraeonazol, carfeamaxepme, griseofulvin, nifedipin or a combination thereof.

[0050] The present invention is further directed to methods of making any of the herein disclosed compositions. In one exemplary embodi JTsem, the method of making a composition of the present invention comprises incorporating at least one biologically aciive material into inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises a non- ordered porous material comprising (!) pores having a mean pore diameter of about 2.5 nm to about 15.0 nm; (ii) pores having a pore volume, as measured by nitrogen porosimetry, of about 0.5 cc/g to about 3.0 cc/g or greater; and (Hi) a BET surface area, as measured by nitrogen adsorption, of about 300 rrr/g to about 1400 m g or greater.

[0051 ] In another embodiment, the method of making a composition of the present invention comprises combining a drug release composition comprising the at least one biologically active material incorporated into the inorganic oxide material with at least one pharmaceutical dosage formulating ingredient so as to form a pharmaceutical composition. As discussed above, the inorganic oxide material comprises a non-ordered porous material comprising (i) pores having a mean pore diameter of about 2,5 nm to about 15,0 nm; (is) pores having a pore volume, as measured by nitrogen porosimetry, of about 0.5 cc/g to about 3,0 cc/g or greater; and (iii) a BET surface area, as measured by nitrogen adsorption, of about 300 m 2 /g to about 1400 ro ' g or greater.

[0052] The non-ordered porous material may be in various forms, such as precipitates, gels, fumed, colloidal, etc, and combinations thereof, unmodified or modified by subsequent processes, such as autoclaving, super critical fluid extraction, flash drying and the like. In one embodiment, non-ordered porous inorganic oxide material that is suitable for use in the present invention includes precipitated inorganic oxide particles and inorganic oxide gel particles. These inorganic oxides are referred to herein as "parent inorganic oxides," "parent particles" or "parent dispersions". Even though any inorganic oxide composition may be suitable for use in this invention (e.g., SiC . AhO„ A1P€¾ > MgO, Tii>>, ZrC¾, etc.), provided that it is non- ordered, one embodiment of the present invention includes amorphous precipitated silica and silica gel The inorganic oxides may also include mixed inorganic oxides including SKXA C , MgO.SiOi.Al.Q.s and the like. Mixed inorganic oxides are prepared by conventional blending or cogelling procedures. In embodiments comprising gels, the dispersions are derived from porous inorganic oxide gels such as, but not limited to, gels comprising SiGi, AhOx, A I K ' . MgO, TiO_>, and ZrC¾. The gels cars be ydrogeis, aerogels, or xerogels. A hydrogel is also known as an aquagel which is formed in water and as a result its pores are filled with water. A xerogei is a hydrogel with the water removed, An aerogel is a type of xerogel from which the liquid has been removed in such a way as to minimize any collapse or change in the gel's structure as the water is removed.

[0053] In one embodiment of the present invention, the inorganic oxide gels include non-ordered porous silica gel. Such a silica gel may be prepared by mixing art aqueous solution of an alkali metal silicate (e.g., sodium silicate) with a strong acid such as nitric or sulfuric acid, the mixing being done under suitable conditions of agitation to form a clear silica sol which sets into a hydrogel i.e., maercgel, in less man about one-half hour. The resulting gel is then washed. The concentration of inorganic oxide, i.e., SiC , formed in the hydrogel is usually in the range of about 10 and about 50, or between about 20 and about 35, or between about 30 and about 35 weight percent, with the pH of that gel being from about I to about 9, or 1 to about 4. A wide range of mixing temperatures can be employed, this range being typically from about 20 to about 50' " ' C, The newly formed hydrogeis are washed simply by immersion in a continuously moving stream of water which leaches out the undesirable salts, leaving about 99.5 weight percent or more pure inorganic oxide behind. The pH, temperature, and duration of the wash water will influence the physical properties of the silica, such as surface area (SA) and pore volume (PV). Silica gel washed at 65-90° C. at pH's of 8-9 for 15-36 hours will usually have SA's of 250-400 and form aerogels with PVs of 1.4 to 1 ,7 cc/gm. Silica gel washed at pH's of 3-5 at 50-65* C. for 15-25 hours will have SA ' s of 700-850 and form aerogels with PVs of 0.6-1.3. In the present invention, the measurements of pore volume are generated by r¾ porosity analysis (ASTM D 4222083) and surface area are generated by the BET technique (ASTM D 3663-84 or DIN 661 1 ).

[0054] Methods for preparing inorganic oxide gels such as alumina and mixed inorganic oxide gels such as silica alumina cogels are also well known in the an, such as by conventional blending, co-gelation, co-precipitation, and the like. Methods for preparing such gels are described in U.S. Pat, No, 4,226,743, the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference. In general, alnrnina gels are prepared by mixing alkali metal aiuminates and aluminum sulfate. Cogels are prepared by eoge!ling two metal oxides so that the gels are composited together. For example, silica alumina cogels can be prepared by gelling an alkali metal silicate with an acid or acid salt, and then adding alkali metal aluminate, aging the mixture and subsequently adding aluminum sulfate. The gel is then washed using conventional techniques. Another embodiment of this invention is derived from dispersions of certain precipitated inorganic oxides. For example, miiling certain precipitated silicas results in dispersions having the porosity properties described later below and illustrated in FIG, 1. Reinforced precipitated silica such as that described in U.S. Pat. No. 4, 157,920 can also be used to prepare the dispersion of this invention. The contents of that patent are incorporated herein by reference. For example, reinforced precipitated silicas can be prepared by first acidulating an alkali inorganic silicate to create an initial precipitate. ' The resulting precipitate is then reinforced or "post conditioned" by additional silicate and acid. The precipitate resulting from the second addition of silicate and acid comprises 10 to 70% by weight of the precipitate initially prepared. It is believed that the reinforced structure of this precipitate is more rigid than conventional precipitates as a result of the second precipitation. Once an inorganic oxide is selected for the parent dispersion, a liquid phase of the selected inorganic oxide is prepared. In general, the parent dispersion should be in a state that can be wet milled. The medium for the liquid phase can be aqueous or non-aqueous, e g , organic. The liquid phase can be residual water in inorganic oxide gels which have been drained, but not yet dried, and to which additional water is added to reslurry the gel,

[0055 ' j In another embodiment, dried inorganic oxides, e.g.. xerogels, are dispersed in liquid medium. In yet another embodiment, the inorganic oxide can be dispersed in a liquid compound which is subsequently used as a reactant or solvent or medium, which forms the biologically active composition of the present invention. In some embodiments, the parent dispersion is then milled. The miiling is conducted "wet", i.e., in liquid media. The general milling conditions can vary depending on the feed material, residence time, impeller speeds, and miiling media particle size. The techniques for selecting and modifying these conditions to obtain the desired dispersions are known to those skilled in the art. The milling equipment used to mill the parent inorganic oxide particles should be of the type capable of severely milling and reducing materials to particles having the desired size, e.g., through mechanical action. Such mills are commercially available, with fluid energy mills, hammer mills, and sand mills being particularly suitable for this purpose. Hammer mills impart the necessary mechanical action through high speed metal blades, and sand mills impart the action through rapidly churning media such as zirconia or sand beads. Impact mills can also be used. Both impact mills and hammer mills reduce particle size by impact of the inorganic oxide with metal blades. A dispersion comprising particles of three microns or smaller is then recovered as the fmal product, Irs other embodiments, milling is not needed, such as for air-set inorganic oxide gels. Such geis are formed by air-spraying an intimate mixture of an alkali metal solution (e.g., sodium silicate) with a suitable acid (e.g., sulfuric acid) at such a concentration so thai mixture gels during flight, before being collected in a suitable medium, generally water. Any resulting dispersion or powder may also be further processed. For example, farther processing is desirable if there is a need to prepare a relatively stable dispersion without the aid of dispersing agents, or if there is a .significant population of particles that are larger than desired. Further processing may also be needed to Insure that essentially ali of the distribution of particles is below a certain size, !n such a case, the dispersion or powder is processed to separate the smaller particles from the larger particles. This separation can he created by centrifuging the inorganic oxide particles into a supernatant phase, which comprises the smaller particles of the final product, and a settled phase which comprises the larger particles. The supernatant phase is then removed from the settled phase, e.g., by decanting. Conventional centrifuges can be used for this phase separation, in some instances, it may be preferable to centrifuge the supernatant two, three or more times to further remove large particles remaining after the initial centrifuge. It is also contemplated that the larger particles of a milled dispersion can separate over time under normal gravity conditions, and the supernatant can be removed by decanting. Depending on the product particle size targets, the settled phase also can be regarded as the particles of this invention. The dispersion of particles or powder also can be modified after milling to insure a stable dispersion. This can he accomplished through pi! adjustment, e.g., adding alkaline material, or by the addition of conventional dispersants.

[0056] In the methods of making a composition of the present invention, the step of incorporating at least one biologically active material into inorganic oxide, material typically comprises a variety of API loading mechanisms, including a solvent method, an incipient wetness method, a melt method, and any combinations thereof.

[0057] In one embodiment of the present invention, the API is incorporated into the inorganic oxide materia! by means of impregnation with solution of the API in a volatile solvent system. Typically, the inorganic oxide material is dried for 30 minutes at 150 °C to remove physically adsorbed water. Subsequently, the inorganic oxide material is impregnated with a solution of the API in a volatile solvent system. The concentration of the API in the solution is typically between 5 - 500 mg/ml. Solvent systems may consist of pure solvents ore mixtures of solvents, Solvents may include aliphatic alcohols (e.g. methanol, ethanol, propanol, isopropanol), chlorinated hydrocarbons (e.g. methylene chloride, chloroform, trichloroethane, carbon tetrachloride), fiuorinated alcohols (e.g. hexafl uoroi sopropaool ), acetone, tetrahydrofuran, ethylacetate, acetoni rile, and combinations thereof. After impregnation, the solvent is removed by evaporation, which may achieved under reduced pressure (e.g. 0.00! bar) and elevated tem erate (e.g.40, 50 or 60€}.

[0058] in another embodiment of the present invention, the melt method includes a physical mixture of a biologically active species and a non-ordered porous inorganic oxide based material in the form of a powder or slurr with the desired drug loading weight ratio (e.g., op to about 30% drug by weight), which is prepared and heated at high temperature (e.g. 190* C.) for a relatively short period of time (e.g. 5 rmnutes). After this initial heating, the mixture may optionally be quickly shaken and heated again at a similarly high temperature for a similar period of time. After cooling, the resulting powders may then be stored, preferably under reduced pressure (e.g, 10 "3 bar) at about 40° C. for a significant period of time (e.g. 48 hours). An example of the "melt method" comprises for instance preparing a physical mixture of itraconazole and a non-ordered porous inorganic oxide material (e.g., non-ordered porous silica powder or slurry) with an itraconazole/ non- ordered porous inorganic oxide weight ratio from about 30:70 to about 20:80, and heating at 190* C for 5 minutes. After this initial heating, the mixture is shaken quickly and placed back at 1 0° C. for 5 minutes. The powders are stored for 48 hours under reduced pressure { 1 Gf 3 bar) at 40° C.

|0059] The methods of making the compositions of the present invention may comprise one or more additional steps including, but not limited to, formulating the compositions containing a biologically active material and a non-ordered inorganic oxide material into a final dosage form. The final dosage, form will vary depending upon the manner in which it is administered to the patient. For example, they may be in liquid dosage form, solid dosage form and semisolid dosage forms. Oral dosage forms include those for enteral, buccal, sublabial, sublingual and respiratory tract applications. Enteral or digestive tract dosage forms may include solid dosage forms such as, pill, tablet, capsule, time release technology, drug Buccal, sublabial, or sublingual dosage forms may include solid (e.g., orally disintegrating tablet, film, lollipop, lozenges, chewing gum, etc.) Dermal dosage forms include liquid and solid forms (e.g., ointment, liniment, paste, film, hydrogei, cream, lotion, lip balm, medicated shampoo, derma! patch, transdermal patch, transdermal spray,.),

[0060] In one embodiment of the present invention, the compositions containing a biologically active material and a non-ordered inorganic oxide material into a final oral dosage form, such as a pill or tablet. This may include one or more pharmaceutically acceptable excipients, and may be suitable for providing immediate or fast in vivo release of said biologically active species, or may be suitable for drag release. Furthermore, it may comprise at least one supersaiu- ratton-ssabiiiring agent, e.g., HPMCE5, PVP -3Q. Regardless of the production method used to prepare the compositions containing a biologically active material and a non-ordered inorganic oxide material, whether it is solvent -based or solverrtless, ¾½ the final dosage form comprises one or more pharmaceutically acceptable excipients, they may be introduced at any time daring the process, including the step designed to load the biologically active material into the pores of the non-ordered inorganic oxide material, or afterwards in a sep rate step. The pharmaceutical compositions used in the present invention may farther comprise one or more pharmaceutically acceptable excipients selected, for example, from hydrocolioids (such as xanthan gum), binding agents, glidants, lubricants, surfactants and diluents. The term "pharmaceutically acceptable excipsents" as ased herein is intended to refer to any material which is inert in the sense that it does not have any therapeutic and/or prophylactic effect per se but does not adversely interfere with the therapeutic or prophylactic property of the drag or biologically active species or pharmaceutical ingredient being formulated. The nature and amount of such excipients are not critical to the present invention. They include for instance diluents sweh as lactose, calcium carbonate, dextrose or mjcrocryslalline cellulose, binding agents such as starch, gelatin, water-soluble acrylic (co) polymers, polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyaminoacids, ethylene- vinyl acetate copolymers and the like; disintegrants such as erosslinked sodium camoxymeihylcellnlose;

[0061 ] The present invention is even further directed to methods of using any of the herein disclosed compositions. In some embodiments, the compositions of the present invention may be used as mediearnents. The present invention relates in another particular aspect to the pharmaceutical composition seconding to the invention for tine use as a medicament, wherein the composition is applied orally, subcutaneously, intraroascularly or intravenously. In some embodiments, the method of using a composition of the present invention comprises administering a composition to a patient so as to deliver at least one biologically active material to the patient, wherein the composition comprises the at least one biologically active material and an inorganic oxide material, wherein the inorganic oxide material comprises a non-ordered porous material comprising pores having a mean pore diameter of about 25 angstroms to about 150 angstroms; pores having a pore volume, as measured by nitrogen porosimetry, of about 0.5 ce/g or greater; and a BET surface area, as measured by nitrogen adsorption, of about 300 nr g or greater, for example, in some embodiments, the compositions according to the present invention may be administered by various means, including by oral, buccal, sublingual, periodontal, vaginal, rectal, transdermal and topical means.

[0062] The methods of using the compositions of the present invention may comprise one or more additional steps including, but not limited to, administering the pharmaceutical composition, which are well known in the art.

\ 7 [0063] It has been found thai the non-ordered porous materials used in the present invention provide desirable dissolution rate profiles for a variety of biologically active materials (e.g., APIs) such that the API is released at concentrations that are not achievable by dissolution of the API in crystalline form.

[0064] In some embodiments, exposure of a therapeutic dose of the API to a physiologically relevant volume of a physiologically relevant medium {i.e., a medium that is representative of the human gastrointestinal fluids) gives rise to supersaturation concentrations th i are in excess of those thai cats be obtained by dissolution of the crystalline drug form, such that the area under the concentration verstss time profile recorded during an in vitro experiment is equal to or higher than thai of the crystalline form, or 2 to 10 times higher, or 3 to 10 times higher, or 5 to 10 times higher. Dissolution rates may be measured by in vitro testing using a medium and conditions that simulate in vivo conditions in humans. For example, the testing may be conducted by dispersing an accurately weighed quantity of API-loaded inorganic oxide materia! in s fixed volume of release medium, such as SGF or FaSSIF, in order to simulate gastrointestinal conditions, followed by collection of multiple samples at predetermined time points. The inorganic oxide material is then removed by filtering, after which the filtrate (i.e., medium) is assayed for API concentration using a validated HPLC method.

[0065] ft should be understood that the inorganic oxide material may comprise two or more different and distinct types of non-ordered porous material with each distinct type of non-ordered porous material providing a specific dissolution profile for a single biologically active material {or two or more different biologically active materials) so as to form a composite dissolution profile for the single biologically active material (or two or more different biologically active materials). A given composite dissolution rate profile for a single biologically active material (or two or more different biologically active materials) provides a greater overall dissolution rate over time for the single biologically active material (or two or more different biologically active materials) compared to any specific dissolution rate profile for any type of non-ordered porous material.

|0066] The present invention is described above and further illustrated below by way of examples, which are not to be construed in any way as imposing limitations upon the scope of the invention. On the contrary, it is to be clearly understood that resort may be had to various other embodiments, modifications, and equivalents thereof which, after reading the description herein, may suggest themselves to those skilled in the art without departing from

I S the spsrii of the present in ention arsd or the scope of the appended claims.

[0061] In these Examples, the non-ordered inorganic oxide material utilized is silica.

However, any inorganic oxide materia] may be used, provided such materials possess the physical properties described herein. The silica samples {Sample 1 , 2 and 3) of the present invention selected for use in the Examples are made using the following process; I90g of a 19% sulfuric acid solution was placed in a reactor equipped with a overhead stirrer and chilled to 5°C. Separately, 26¾ of a solution of sodium silicate (22,9% S1O3) was also chilled to 5°C. Subsequently, the sodium silicate solution was added to the sulfuric acid solution via a pump at such a rate as to add the full quantity of silicate in 15 minutes. During the addition the temperature was maintained at 5°C. After the addition was completed, the reactor was warmed to room temperature and the contents were allowed to gel without stirring. Upon gelation, the gel mass was cut in small pieces and submerged in water, in order to remove the sodium sulfate formed during the reaction. The level of sodium sulfate remaining in the material was periodically checked, as wash water was drained and fresh water was added to the gel. When the level fell below 1 % the gel was suspended in water and the pH of the liquid was adjusted to pH-9.? and the solution heated to 67°C. The temperature was maintained for 20 hours and 20 minutes. At the end of the heating period the gel was recovered by filtration and dried in a 160°C oven until the moisture content of the gel was less than about 5% by weight. The silica gel thus obtained had a nitrogen BET surface area of 325m"/g and a nitrogen pore volume of 1 ,2 cc/g. Assuming cylindrical pores and using the equation; Fore Size (Angstroms) ~ 40Q00XPV/SA this material exhibits a pore size of 133 Angstroms, Subsequently, the gel is milled to the desired particle size (75 microns) using an ACM and then hydrothermaHy treated in an autoclave a? 300°C until the desired pore size is achieved.

[0068] The following silica particles shown in Tab!e 1 below were used in the examples of the present invention.

Table L Silica Particle Properties

[0069] The particle sizes reported in the Examples were determined by light scattering using a Malvern Mastersker 2000 available from Malvern Instruments Ltd, per ASTM B822- 10. Pore size distributions are measured by mercury intrusion using an Autopore .IV 9520 available from Micromeridcs Instrument Corp. Pore volumes referenced herein represent mercury intrusion into pores 10,000 A and below, Pore size distributions are also measured by nitrogen sorption {EM method) using a Tristar 3000 also available from Mieromeritics Instrument Corp. BET surface areas are also obtained from the nitrogen sorption analysis.

[0070] ;?· all the below examples, the APIs were loaded onto the silica materials via solvent impregnation. Prior to loading, all silica materials were dried at 150 °C for at least 1 hour to remove physically adsorbed water. Subsequently, the silica materials were allowed to cool down to room temperature, after which they were manually impregnated with a concentrated (20- 150 mg ml) API solution in methylene chloride. After impregnation, samples were dried under reduced pressure ( I O "3 bar) for at least 4 hours to remove the solvent.

[0071 ] The total API content in the loaded silica powders was determined by extraction of the API from the silica materials using methanol. An accurately weighed quantity of API-loaded silica was weighed into a 20 ml volumetric flask and made up io volume with methanol. After I hour of equilibration, the silica was removed by filtration and the filtrate assayed for API using high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV).

[0072] In the examples below, all loaded silica powders were devoid of crystalline

API as verified using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).

[0073] In all examples, in vitro dissolution testing was conducted by dispersing an accurately weighed quantity of API-loaded silica in a fixed volume of release medium, followed by collection of multiple samples at predetermined time points. All samples were filtered over a 0.45 μπ\ filter to separate silica particles or precipitated drug, after which the filtrate was assayed for API concentration using HPLC. Specific conditions (in terms of dose, volume of medium, composition of medium) are specified for each individual example. [0074] In this example, daxtazol-loaded silica powders set forth in Table 2 below were dispersed in FaSSIF, under supersaturating conditions (i.e. under conditions whereby complete release of the danazol load Is associated with the generation of concentrations that are in excess of the equilibrium solubility). A quantity of loaded silica powder equivalent to a 2 mg danazoi dose was dispersed in 40 ml of FaSSIF,

Table 2 Danazol content of loaded silica materials used in Example 1 ,

Silica Total danazol content in

loaded silica powder (w/w )

1 9.1

2 123

3 12, 1

[0075] FIG, 1 graphically displays in vitro release profdes over time of danazol from the exemplary silica/danazol combinations shown in T¾Me 2 above. As shown in FIG, I, Example 1 illustrates that all three silica materials tested were capable of releasing danazol at concentrations that are well in excess of its equilibrium solubility in FaSSIF (indicated by the dotted line in FIG. !).

[0076] In this example, itraconazole-ioaded silica powders set forth in Table 3 below were dispersed in SGF, under supersaturating conditions (i.e. under conditions whereby complete release of the itraconazole load is associated with the generation of concentrations that are in excess of the equilibrium solubility). A quantity of loaded silica powder equivalent to a 2 mg itraconazole dose was dispersed in 20 ml of SGF.

2 5 Table 3 Itraconazole content of loaded silica materials used in Example 2.

Silica Total itraconazole content in

loaded silica powder (w/w )

1 20.1

2 19.7

3 S6.8

[0077] FIG, 2 graphically displays in vitro release profiles over time of itraconazole from the exemplary siliea itraeonarole combinations shown in Table 3 above. As shown in FIG, 2, Example 2 illustrates that all three silica materials tested were capable of releasing itraconazole at concentrations that are well in excess of its equilibrium solubility in SGF (indicated by the dotted Sine in FIG, 2).

Si!M! s±!ste¾i^^

[0078] In this example, fenofibrate -loaded silica powders set forth in Table 4 below were dispersed in FaSSIF, under sink conditions (ϊ.ε under conditions whereby complete release of the fenofsbrate load is associated with the generation of concentrations that are below the equilibrium solubility). A quantity of loaded silica powder equivalent to a 0.8 rng fenofibrate dose was dispersed in 20 ml of FaSSIF.

Table 4 Fenofibrate content of loaded silica materials used in Exampl 3.

Silica Total fenofsbrate content in

loaded silica powder (w/w %)

1 21 .5

2 16, 1

3 19.7

1 . 0079] FIG. 3 graphically displays in vitro release profiles over time of fenofsbrate from the exemplary sHica/fenofibraie combinations shown in Table 4 above. As shown in FIG, 3, Example 3 illustrates tha? ah three silica materials tested were capable of releasing fenofsbrate at concentrations that are well in excess of dissolution of the crystalline form of the fenofibrate in FaSSGF (indicated by the lower lin in FIG, 3).

[0080] In this example, a mixture of danazol-loaded silica powders set forth in Table

5 below were dispersed in a medium comprising a phosphate buffer solution supplemented with 0.5% Tween SO CpH 6.5). A quantity of loaded silica powder equivalent to s 1 mg danazol dose was dispersed in 32 ml of medium,

[0081 1 Danazol was first loaded on the individual silica materials (Silica 2 and Silica

3), after which both loaded silica powders were blended in a 1 : 1 ratio. The release profile of the resulting blend is a reflection of the release profiles of its individual constituents (FIG. 4). Such combinations of silica materials enable one to fine tune the release profile according to the requirements of the application.

Table 5 Danazol content of loaded silica materials used in Example 4,

Silica Total danazol content in

loaded silica powder (w w %)

2 22.4

3 22.3

[00S2] FIG- 4 graphically displays m vitro release profiles over time of danazol from the exemplary mixture of two different silica danazol combinations shown in Tsble 5 above. As shown in FIG, 4, Example 4 illustrates how two silicas can be used as a combination, thereby giving rise to a new concentration-time profile.

[0083] While the invention has been described with a limited number of embodiments, these specific embodiments are not intended to limit the scope of the invention as otherwise described arid claimed herein. It may be evident to those of ordinary skill in the art upon review of the exemplary embodiments herein that further modifications, equivalents, and variations are possible, All parts and percentages in the examples, as well as in the remainder of the specification, are by weight unless otherwise specified. Further, any range of numbers recited in the specification or claims, such as that representing a particular set of properties, units of measure, conditions, physical states or percentages, is intended to literally incorporate expressly herein by reference or otherwise, any number failing within such range, including any subset of numbers within any range so recited. For example, whenever a numerical range with a Sower limit, and an upper limit Ru » is disclosed, any number R falling within the range is specifically disclosed. In particular, the following numbers within the range are specifically disclosed: R = RL - k{Ru -RLX where k is a variable ranging from Wo to 100% with a 1 % increment, e.g., k is \ %, 2%, 3%, 4%, 5%. ... 50%, 51 %, 52%. , , . 95%, 96%, 97%. 98%, 99%, or 100%. Moreover, any numerical range represented by any iwo values of R, as calculated above is also specifically disclosed. Any modifications of the invention, in addition to those shown and described herein, will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the foregoing description and accompanying drawings. Such modifications are intended to fall within the scope of the appended claims. All publications cited herein are incorporated by reference in their entirety ,