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Title:
CONDENSER INLET PRESSURE RECOVERY FEATURES FOR A CHILLER ASSEMBLY
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/060847
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A condenser unit for a chiller assembly is provided. The condenser unit includes a shell having a substantially cylindrical shape, a first tube bundle disposed within the shell, and an inlet pipe and an outlet pipe coupled with the shell. The inlet pipe receives vapor refrigerant and the outlet pipe discharges liquid refrigerant. The inlet includes a substantially straight portion having a first diameter and a flared lip portion having a second diameter. The second diameter is larger than the first diameter. The condenser unit further includes a baffle disposed below the flared lip portion and above the first tube bundle. The baffle obstructs refrigerant entering the shell from falling directly on the first tube bundle and has a substantially plate-like geometry.

Inventors:
XUE, Fang (No.32 Changjiang Road, Wuxi, Jiangsu 8, 214028, CN)
SU, Xiuping (No.32 Changjiang Road, Wuxi, Jiangsu 8, 214028, CN)
WELCH, Andrew M. (55 Olde Hickory Road, Mount Wolf, Pennsylvania, 17347, US)
RODRIGUEZ, Cesar G. (Carretera Mexico, Ciudad Juarez Km 945Durango, 34000, MX)
Application Number:
US2018/052479
Publication Date:
March 28, 2019
Filing Date:
September 24, 2018
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
JOHNSON CONTROLS TECHNOLOGY COMPANY (2875 High Meadow Circle, Auburn Hills, Michigan, 48326-2773, US)
XUE, Fang (No.32 Changjiang Road, Wuxi, Jiangsu 8, 214028, CN)
International Classes:
F28D21/00; F25B39/04; F25D3/04; F28D7/16
Foreign References:
US20070028647A12007-02-08
JPS5419359U1979-02-07
Other References:
None
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DE VELLIS, James et al. (Foley & Lardner LLP, 3000 K Street N.W.Suite 60, Washington District of Columbia, 20007-5109, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:

1. A condenser unit for a chiller assembly, comprising:

a shell having a substantially cylindrical shape;

a first tube bundle disposed within the shell;

an inlet pipe coupled with the shell for receiving vapor refrigerant, the inlet pipe comprising a substantially straight portion having a first diameter and a flared lip portion terminating in a second diameter, wherein the second diameter is larger than the first diameter,

a baffle disposed below the flared lip portion and above the first tube bundle, the baffle obstructing refrigerant entering the shell from falling directly on the first tube bundle and having a substantially plate-like geometry; and

an outlet pipe coupled with the shell for discharging liquid refrigerant.

2. The condenser unit of claim 1, wherein a radius of the flared lip portion ranges from 20 mm to 100 mm.

3. The condenser unit of claim 1, wherein the refrigerant is R1233zd.

4. The condenser unit of claim 1, further comprising a conical member coupled with the baffle.

5. The condenser unit of claim 1, further comprising an angle iron member coupled with the baffle.

6. The condenser unit of claim 1, wherein a distance H between a terminating edge of the

D - 2 flared lip portion and an upper surface of the baffle conforms to the equation 0.325 <

D lip

D - 2

H < -^2-, where Din is the first diameter of the substantially straight portion of the inlet pipe and Dlip is the second diameter of the flared lip portion of the inlet pipe.

7. A condenser unit for a chiller assembly, comprising:

a shell having a substantially cylindrical shape;

a first tube bundle disposed within the shell;

an inlet pipe coupled with the shell for receiving vapor refrigerant, the inlet pipe comprising a substantially straight portion having a first diameter and a conical portion having a substantially frustoconical shape and terminating in a second diameter wherein the second diameter is larger than the first diameter; and

an outlet pipe coupled with the shell for discharging liquid refrigerant.

8. The condenser unit of claim 7, wherein a cross-sectional area of the inlet pipe at the second diameter is approximately double the cross-sectional area of the inlet pipe at the first diameter.

9. The condenser unit of claim 7, wherein the conical portion is formed using a welding process.

10. The condenser unit of claim 7, further comprising a baffle disposed beneath the inlet pipe, the baffle obstructing refrigerant entering the shell from falling directly on the first tube bundle and having a substantially plate-like geometry.

11. The condenser unit of claim 10, further comprising a conical member coupled with the baffle.

12. The condenser unit of claim 10, further comprising an angle iron member coupled with the baffle.

13. The condenser unit of claim 7, wherein the refrigerant is R1233zd.

14. A condenser unit for a chiller assembly, comprising:

a shell having a substantially cylindrical shape;

a first tube bundle disposed within the shell;

an inlet pipe coupled with the shell for receiving vapor refrigerant, the inlet pipe comprising a substantially straight portion having a first diameter, a conical portion terminating in a second diameter, and a flared lip portion terminating in a third diameter, wherein the second diameter is larger than the first diameter and the third diameter is larger than the second diameter,

a baffle disposed below the flared lip portion and above the first tube bundle, the baffle obstructing refrigerant entering the shell from falling directly on the first tube bundle and having a substantially plate-like geometry; and

an outlet pipe coupled with the shell for discharging liquid refrigerant.

15. The condenser unit of claim 14, wherein a radius of the flared lip portion ranges from 20 mm to 100 mm.

16. The condenser unit of claim 14, wherein a cross-sectional area of the inlet pipe at the second diameter is approximately double the cross-sectional area of the inlet pipe at the first diameter.

17. The condenser unit of claim 14, further comprising a conical member coupled with the baffle.

18. The condenser unit of claim 14, further comprising an angle iron member coupled with the baffle.

19. The condenser unit of claim 14, wherein the refrigerant is 1233zd.

20. The condenser unit of claim 14, wherein a distance H between a terminating edge of the

D- 2 flared lip portion and an upper surface of the baffle conforms to the equation 0.325 -^ <

Dlip

D 2

H <—— , where Din is the first diameter of the substantially straight portion of the inlet pipe

Dlip

and Djjp is the third diameter of the flared lip portion of the inlet pipe.

Description:
CONDENSER INLET PRESSURE RECOVERY FEATURES FOR A

CHILLER ASSEMBLY

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED PATENT APPLICATION

[0001] This application claims the benefit of and priority to International Patent

Application No. PCT/CN2017/103198 filed September 25, 2017, the entire disclosure of which is incorporated by reference herein.

BACKGROUND

[0002] Buildings can include heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems.

SUMMARY

[0003] One implementation of the present disclosure is a condenser unit for a chiller assembly. The condenser unit includes a shell having a substantially cylindrical shape, a first tube bundle disposed within the shell, and an inlet pipe and an outlet pipe coupled with the shell. The inlet pipe receives vapor refrigerant and the outlet pipe discharges liquid refrigerant. The inlet includes a substantially straight portion having a first diameter and a flared lip portion having a second diameter. The second diameter is larger than the first diameter. The condenser unit further includes a baffle disposed below the flared lip portion and above the first tube bundle. The baffle obstructs refrigerant entering the shell from falling directly on the first tube bundle and has a substantially plate-like geometry.

[0004] Another implementation of the present disclosure is a condenser unit for a chiller assembly. The condenser unit includes a shell having a substantially cylindrical shape, a first tube bundle disposed within the shell, and an inlet pipe and an outlet pipe coupled with the shell. The inlet pipe receives vapor refrigerant and the outlet pipe discharges liquid refrigerant. The inlet includes a substantially straight portion having a first diameter and a conical portion having a substantially frustoconical shape and terminating in a second diameter. The second diameter is larger than the first diameter.

[0005] Yet another implementation of the present disclosure is a condenser unit for a chiller assembly. The condenser unit includes a shell having a substantially cylindrical shape, a first tube bundle disposed within the shell, and an inlet pipe and an outlet pipe coupled with the shell. The inlet pipe receives vapor refrigerant and the outlet pipe discharges liquid refrigerant. The inlet includes a substantially straight portion having a first diameter, a conical portion terminating in a second diameter, and a flared lip portion terminating in a third diameter. The second diameter is larger than the first diameter, and the third diameter is larger than the second diameter. The condenser unit further includes a baffle disposed below the flared lip portion and above the first tube bundle. The baffle obstructs refrigerant entering the shell from falling directly on the first tube bundle and has a substantially plate-like geometry.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0006] FIG. 1 is a perspective view drawing of a chiller assembly, according to some embodiments.

[0007] FIG. 2 is an elevation view drawing of the chiller assembly of FIG. 1, according to some embodiments.

[0008] FIG. 3 is a perspective view drawing of a condenser unit that may be used in the chiller assembly of FIG. 1, according to some embodiments.

[0009] FIG. 4 is a side cross-sectional view drawing of a condenser unit having a flared inlet pipe, according to some embodiments.

[0010] FIG. 5 is detail view drawing of the flared inlet pipe of FIG. 4, according to some embodiments.

[0011] FIG. 6 is a plot of the refrigerant pressure recovery achievable by a straight inlet pipe and a flared inlet pipe, according to some embodiments.

[0012] FIG.7 is a front elevation view drawing of a condenser unit having conical inlet pipes, according to some embodiments.

[0013] FIG. 8 is a detail view drawing of the conical inlet pipe of FIG.7, according to some embodiments.

[0014] FIG. 9 is a plot of the refrigerant pressure recovery achievable by a straight inlet pipe having a boss flange and a conical inlet pipe, according to some embodiments.

[0015] FIG. 10 is a perspective view drawing of a condenser unit that may be used in the chiller assembly of FIG. 1, according to some embodiments. [0016] FIG. 11 is a front cross-sectional view drawing of a condenser unit having a flared inlet and a conical baffle component, according to some embodiments.

[0017] FIG. 12 is a side cross- sectional view drawing of the condenser unit of FIG. 1 1, according to some embodiments.

[0018] FIG. 13 is a front cross-sectional view drawing of a condenser unit having a flared inlet and an angle iron baffle component, according to some embodiments.

[0019] FIG. 14 is a side cross- sectional view drawing of the condenser unit of FIG. 13, according to some embodiments.

[0020] FIG. 15 is a front cross-sectional view drawing of a condenser unit having a flared inlet and a smooth protrusion baffle component, according to some embodiments.

[0021] FIG. 16 is a side cross- sectional view drawing of the condenser unit of FIG. 15, according to some embodiments.

[0022] FIG. 17 is a front cross-sectional view drawing of a condenser unit having a flared conical inlet and a conical baffle component, according to some embodiments.

[0023] FIG. 18 is a side cross- sectional view drawing of the condenser unit of FIG. 17, according to some embodiments.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0024] Referring generally to the FIGURES, a condenser unit for a chiller assembly with an inlet having geometric features configured to conserve and/or recover pressure of refrigerant vapor are shown. Minimization of any pressure drop in refrigerant as the refrigerant flows to the condenser unit can be important as low refrigerant pressure conditions can result in an overall degradation in the performance of the chiller assembly. Minimization of pressure drop is particularly important when the chiller assembly utilizes a refrigerant with a low operating pressure relative to other refrigerants commonly used in chiller assemblies.

[0025] Referring now to FIGS. 1-2, an example implementation of a chiller assembly 100 is depicted. Chiller assembly 100 is shown to include a compressor 102 driven by a motor 104, a condenser 106, and an evaporator 108. A refrigerant can be circulated through chiller assembly 100 in a vapor compression cycle. Chiller assembly 100 can also include a control panel 1 14 to control operation of the vapor compression cycle within chiller assembly 100.

[0026] Motor 104 can be powered by a variable speed drive (VSD) 1 10. VSD 1 10 receives alternating current (AC) power having a particular fixed line voltage and fixed line frequency from an AC power source (not shown) and provides power having a variable voltage and frequency to motor 104. Motor 104 can be any type of electric motor than can be powered by a VSD 1 10. For example, motor 104 can be a high speed induction motor. Compressor 102 is driven by motor 104 to compress a refrigerant vapor received from evaporator 108 through suction line 112 and to deliver refrigerant vapor to condenser 106 through a discharge line 124. Compressor 102 can be a centrifugal compressor, a screw compressor, a scroll compressor, a turbine compressor, or any other type of suitable compressor.

[0027] Evaporator 108 can include an internal tube bundle, a supply line 120 and a return line 122 for supplying and removing a process fluid to the internal tube bundle. The supply line 120 and the return line 122 can be in fluid communication with a component within a HVAC system (e.g., an air handler) via conduits that that circulate the process fluid. The process fluid is a chilled liquid for cooling a building and can be, but is not limited to, water, ethylene glycol, calcium chloride brine, sodium chloride brine, or any other suitable liquid. Evaporator 108 is configured to lower the temperature of the process fluid as the process fluid passes through the tube bundle of evaporator 108 and exchanges heat with the refrigerant. Refrigerant vapor is formed in evaporator 108 by the refrigerant liquid delivered to the evaporator 108 exchanging heat with the process fluid and undergoing a phase change to refrigerant vapor.

[0028] Refrigerant vapor delivered by compressor 102 to condenser 106 transfers heat to a fluid. Refrigerant vapor condenses to refrigerant liquid in condenser 106 as a result of heat transfer with the fluid. The refrigerant liquid from condenser 106 flows through an expansion device (not shown) and is returned to evaporator 108 to complete the refrigerant cycle of the chiller assembly 100. Condenser 106 includes a supply line 1 16 and a return line 118 for circulating fluid between the condenser 106 and an external component of the HVAC system (e.g., a cooling tower). Fluid supplied to the condenser 106 via return line 118 exchanges heat with the refrigerant in the condenser 106 and is removed from the condenser 106 via supply line 116 to complete the cycle. The fluid circulating through the condenser 106 can be water or any other suitable liquid. [0029] The refrigerant can have an operating pressure of less than 400 kPa or

approximately 58 psi. For example, the refrigerant can be R1233zd. R1233zd is a nonflammable fluorinated gas with low Global Warming Potential (GWP) relative to other refrigerants utilized in commercial chiller assemblies. GWP is a metric developed to allow comparisons of the global warming impacts of different gases, by quantifying how much energy the emissions of 1 ton of a gas will absorb over a given period of time, relative to the emissions of 1 ton of carbon dioxide.

[0030] Turning now to FIG. 3, a simplified view of a condenser unit 106 is depicted, according to an example implementation. Condenser unit 106 includes a shell 300 with a generally cylindrical geometry. Shell 300 is coupled with both an inlet pipe 302 that is configured to receive refrigerant vapor 306 and an outlet pipe 304 that is configured to discharge liquid refrigerant 308.

[0031] First tube bundle 310 is disposed within the shell 300 and includes tubes that exchange heat with the refrigerant vapor 306 entering the condenser unit 106, causing the refrigerant to condense to refrigerant liquid 308. However, before the refrigerant liquid 308 can exit the condenser unit 106, the refrigerant liquid can be further cooled, or subcooled, to a temperature below the saturation temperature of the refrigerant via tubes 312 located within subcooler component 320. Subcooler component 320 is submerged in a liquid reservoir 324 that has a liquid surface 326 above the subcooler component 320. Liquid refrigerant passes through subcooler inlets 322 and over tubes 312 via central channel 318 and outer channels 314 having bottom walls 316 before exiting the condenser unit via outlet pipe 304.

[0032] Referring now to FIGS. 4-5, among others, an example implementation of a condenser unit 300 having a flared pipe inlet 304 is shown. FIG. 4 depicts a side cross- sectional view of a condenser unit 400 having a shell 402. Shell 402 can include a tube bundle (not shown) that is identical or substantially similar to tube bundle 310 described above with reference to FIG. 3. The shell 402 can be coupled to both a refrigerant inlet pipe 404 that is configured to deliver refrigerant vapor to the condenser unit 400, and a refrigerant outlet pipe 406 that is configured to remove liquid refrigerant from the condenser unit 400. Refrigerant inlet pipe 404 includes a flared end or lip portion 408, depicted in greater detail in FIG. 5. The flared end or lip portion 408 is situated above a baffle 414, described in greater detail with reference to FIGS. 10-18 below. The baffle 414 may be a flanged plate component secured to an interior surface of the shell 402. [0033] Still referring to FIGS. 4-5, flared end 408 gradually increases the diameter of the inlet pipe 404 from a first diameter 410 to a second diameter 412. This increase in diameter smooths the flow of refrigerant vapor and causes some of the kinetic energy of the refrigerant vapor to be converted to pressure energy. These effects can be achieved even though the second diameter 412 is not substantially larger than the first diameter 410. In the example implementation shown in FIG. 5, the second diameter 412 is only approximately (e.g., +/-10%) 1.17 times as wide as the first diameter 410. The dimensions of the flared end 408 may alternatively be defined in terms of an interior radius 416. For example, interior radius 416 may range from a minimum of 20 mm to a maximum of 100 mm.

[0034] Turning now to FIG. 6, plot 600 depicts the performance of a flared pipe inlet, as described above with reference to FIGS. 4-5, and a comparable straight pipe (i.e., non- flared) inlet. The x-axis 602 represents the dynamic pressure of the refrigerant vapor entering the condenser unit in pascals (Pa). The y-axis 604 represents the pressure drop experienced by the refrigerant vapor in kilopascals (kPa). Trendline 606 depicts the pressure drop experienced by a refrigerant vapor traveling through a straight pipe inlet to a condenser unit, while trendline 608 depicts the pressure drop experienced by refrigerant vapor traveling through a flared pipe inlet to a condenser unit. As shown, refrigerant vapor passing through the two types of pipe inlets experience an opposite relationship between the dynamic pressure and the change in pressure experienced by the refrigerant vapor. As the dynamic pressure of refrigerant flowing through the straight pipe increases, the pressure drop experienced by the refrigerant correspondingly increases. By contrast, as the dynamic pressure of refrigerant flowing through the flared pipe increases, the pressure recovered, instead of lost, by the refrigerant increases.

[0035] Referring now to FIG. 7, an example condenser unit 700 having conical inlet or discharge pipes is shown. Similar to the condenser unit 106 described above with reference to FIG. 3, condenser unit 700 is shown to include a shell 702 and a liquid refrigerant outlet pipe 708. However, in contrast to condenser unit 106, condenser unit 700 is shown to include two refrigerant vapor inlets 704, each with a conical discharge portion or pipe 706.

[0036] FIG. 8 provides a sectional view of a refrigerant vapor inlet 704 and a conical discharge inlet pipe 706 in greater detail. Like the flared pipe described above, the conical discharge inlet pipe 706 acts to gradually increase the cross-sectional area of the flow path as the refrigerant vapor enters the shell 702 of the condenser unit 700. The gradual increase in the cross-sectional area of the flow path acts to smoothly transition and gradually decelerate the flow of the refrigerant vapor, resulting in kinetic energy of the flow being converted into pressure energy. The conical discharge pipe 706 has a substantially frustoconical shape and can be formed using any suitable method (e.g., welding of sheet metal). In addition, the conical discharge inlet pipe 706 can be any dimensions necessary to achieve a desired amount of pressure energy recovery. For example, the cross-sectional area of the conical discharge portion 606 at the point at which the refrigerant exits to the shell 702 is approximately (e.g., +/-10%) double the cross-sectional area of the point at which the refrigerant transitions from the vapor inlet 704 to the conical discharge inlet pipe 706. In addition, the angle 712 between the vertical and the slope of the conical discharge inlet pipe 706 can be selected to optimize the pressure recovery of the refrigerant vapor. For example, in some implementations and as shown in FIG. 8, the angle 712 is

approximately (e.g., +/-10%) 8°. In other implementations, the angle 712 ranges between 1° and 4°.

[0037] Baffle 710 is suspended beneath the conical discharge portion 706 and coupled to the shell 702 via any suitable type of fasteners. Baffle 710 is configured to obstruct refrigerant entering the condenser unit 700 from falling directly on the tube bundle disposed within the shell 702 and causing potentially destructive vibrations to the tube bundle. In some implementations, baffle 710 includes a substantially plate-shaped member with a plurality of holes extending through the plate member.

[0038] Turning now to FIG. 9, plot 900 depicts the performance of a conical discharge inlet, as described above with reference to FIGS. 7-8, and a comparable straight pipe inlet having a boss flange located within the condenser shell. As used herein, a boss flange is similar to the flared pipe described above, however, the boss flange requires large forged parts which are expensive and impede upon a greater portion of the interior of the condenser shell than the flared pipe design. Similar to plot 600 described above, the x-axis 902 of graph 900 represents the dynamic pressure of the refrigerant vapor entering the condenser unit in kilpascals (kPa), while the y-axis 904 represents the pressure drop of the refrigerant vapor in kilopascals (kPa). Trendline 906 depicts the pressure drop experienced by refrigerant vapor traveling through the straight pipe with the boss flange, while trendline 908 depicts the pressure drop experienced by refrigerant vapor traveling through the conical discharge inlet. As shown, refrigerant vapor traveling through both the conical discharge inlet and the straight pipe inlet with the boss flange recovers more pressure as the dynamic pressure of the refrigerant increases, however, the effect is more pronounced with the conical discharge inlet, resulting in overall better chiller performance via use of the conical discharge inlet.

[0039] Referring now to FIG. 10, another example implementation of a condenser unit 1000 having an inlet pipe with pressure recovery features is depicted. Condenser unit 1000 includes a shell 1002 with a generally cylindrical geometry that is coupled with an inlet pipe 1004 and an outlet pipe (not shown). Inlet pipe 1004 may terminate in a flared end 1006 to increase pressure recovery of the refrigerant entering the shell 1002. The flared end 1006 may be disposed within the shell 1002. A baffle 1010 may be disposed inside the shell 1002 and below the flared end 1006. The baffle 1010 may be detachably coupled to an interior surface of the shell 1002 and may have a substantially plate-like geometry to aid in the recovery of dynamic pressure of the refrigerant entering the shell 1002. In various implementations, the baffle 1010 may be a flanged plate in order to ensure adequate baffle stiffness. The baffle 1010 may include a space 1008 reserved for a baffle feature that acts to guide the flow of refrigerant from the inlet pipe 1004 onto the baffle 1010 and into the shell 1002. In various implementations, the space 1008 reserved for the baffle feature may be centered below the flared end 1006 of the inlet pipe 1004.

[0040] Turning now to FIGS. 11-16, various implementations of condenser units having various baffle features are depicted in front and side cross-sectional views. Although FIGS. 11-16 depict condenser units including flared inlet pipes, in other implementations, conical inlet pipes may be utilized in place of the flared inlet pipes. Referring specifically to FIGS. 11-12, a condenser unit 1100 having a flared inlet pipe 1104 and a conical baffle component 1106 is depicted. Flared inlet pipe 1104 may be identical or substantially similar to the flared inlet pipe described above with reference to FIGS. 4-5. Conical baffle component 1106 may extend vertically from the baffle 1 1 10 towards the flared inlet pipe 1 104 to smoothly guide the flow of refrigerant from the flared inlet pipe 1104 into the shell 1 102 before the refrigerant flows onto a tube bundle (not shown) located within the shell 1 102. In various implementations, conical baffle component 1 106 may be integrally formed with the baffle 1110 or detachably coupled to the baffle 1110.

[0041] The position of the baffle 1110 and the dimensions of the conical baffle component 1 106 may be controlled to ensure adequate pressure recovery is achieved. For example, the distance 1118 between a terminating edge of the flared inlet pipe 1 104 and an upper surface of the baffle 1110 may be as follows: 0.325

[0042] In the equation above, D in is the interior diameter 11 12 of the flared inlet pipe 1104, D lip is the outer diameter 1114 of the terminating edge of the flared inlet pipe 1104, and H is the distance 1 1 18. Similarly, the minimum distance 1 108 between the conical baffle component 1106 and a tangent point 1 1 16 on an interior surface of the flared inlet may be as follows:

D in

L >—

~ 2

[0043] In the equation above, D in is the interior diameter 1112 of the flared inlet pipe 1104, and L is the minimum distance 1 108.

[0044] Referring now to FIGS. 13-14, a condenser unit 1300 having a flared inlet pipe 1304 and an angle iron baffle component 1306 is depicted. Condenser unit 1300 may be substantially similar to the condenser unit 1100 described above with reference to FIGS. 11- 12 and is shown to include a shell 1302 and a flared inlet pipe 1304. Angle iron baffle component 1306 may extend vertically from the baffle 1308 towards the flared inlet pipe 1304 and may comprise a structural bar fabricated from iron or steel with an L-shaped cross section. Referring specifically to FIG. 14, the angle iron baffle component 1306 is shown to stretch substantially the entire length of the baffle 1308, coupling with the shell 1302 and the baffle 1308 at attachment points 1310. In various implementations, the angle iron baffle component 1306 and the baffle 1308 may be located within the shell 1302 according to the equations for minimum distance 1 108 and distance 1 1 18 included above.

[0045] Similar to FIGS. 11-14, FIGS. 15-16 depict a condenser unit 1500 having a flared inlet pipe 1504 and a smooth protrusion baffle component 1506. Condenser unit 1500 may be substantially similar to the condenser units 1100 and 1300 described above and is shown to include a shell 1502 and a flared inlet pipe 1504. Smooth protrusion baffle component 1506 may extend vertically from the baffle 1508 and may comprise a substantially cone- shaped geometry with multiple rounded or smoothed exterior surfaces that contact the refrigerant entering the shell 1502. In various implementations, the smooth protrusion baffle component 1506 may be integrally formed with the baffle 1508 or detachably coupled to the baffle 1508.

[0046] Referring now to FIGS. 17-18, an implementation of a condenser unit 1700 having a combined flared and conical inlet pipe 1704 is depicted in front and side cross-sectional view. Similar to the implementations depicted in FIGS. 10-16, condenser unit 1700 is shown to include a shell 1702, a baffle 1708, and a conical baffle member 1706 extending from an upper surface of the baffle 1708 towards the inlet pipe 1704. However, in contrast to the inlet pipes 1004, 1104, 1304, and 1504 depicted in FIGS. 10-16, inlet pipe 1704 is shown to include both a conical portion 1710 and a flared lip 1712. Conical portion 1710 may have a substantially frustoconical shape that gradually increases in diameter as the refrigerant travels downward into the shell 1702. In various implementations, the dimensions of conical portion 1710 may conform to the dimensional requirements of conical discharge inlet pipe 706, described above with reference to FIGS. 7-8. Similarly, the dimensions of flared lip 1712 may conform to the dimensional requirements of the flared end 408, described above with reference to FIGS. 4-5. Although condenser unit 1700 is shown to include a conical baffle member 1706, another type of baffle member (e.g., angle iron, smooth protrusion) may be utilized.

[0047] The construction and arrangement of the systems and methods as shown in the various exemplary embodiments are illustrative only. Although only a few embodiments have been described in detail in this disclosure, many modifications are possible (e.g., variations in sizes, dimensions, structures, shapes and proportions of the various elements, values of parameters, mounting arrangements, use of materials, colors, orientations, etc.). For example, the position of elements can be reversed or otherwise varied and the nature or number of discrete elements or positions can be altered or varied. Accordingly, all such modifications are intended to be included within the scope of the present disclosure. The order or sequence of any process or method steps can be varied or re-sequenced according to alternative embodiments. Other substitutions, modifications, changes, and omissions can be made in the design, operating conditions and arrangement of the exemplary

embodiments without departing from the scope of the present disclosure.