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Title:
CONTROL CIRCUIT MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY REMOTELY CONTROLLING CIRCUITS
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/227235
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Remote control of circuits is enabled by a control circuit management technology (CCMT) device, system and method coupled to one or more circuit breakers. The CCMT is enabled to remotely and selectively switch off and on one or more circuits typically located on a circuit board of residential or other premises. The CCMT replaces the need to control and/or reset the circuit breaker physically at the site. The CCMT is also enabled to be controlled via various triggers to automatically and selectively turn a circuit between an "off" and an "on" position without overriding the protective function of the circuit breaker. The CCMT includes a microcontroller, connected to a relay, which actuates the connected circuit breaker, without overriding the circuit breaker's function.

Inventors:
BOLTO, Kyle (PO Box 2039Sydney South, New South Wales 1235, 1235, AU)
PACK, Sunny Jin (PO Box 2039Sydney South, New South Wales 1235, 1235, AU)
Application Number:
AU2018/050546
Publication Date:
December 20, 2018
Filing Date:
June 01, 2018
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
SYMBIOT TECHNOLOGY PTY LTD (PO Box 2039Sydney South, New South Wales 1235, 1235, AU)
International Classes:
H01H47/22; H02H3/26
Domestic Patent References:
WO2016104667A12016-06-30
Foreign References:
US20110141647A12011-06-16
US20100042764A12010-02-18
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
JIPRA PATENT ATTORNEYS AND SOLICITORS (PO Box 2039, Sydney South, New South Wales 1235, 1235, AU)
Download PDF:
Claims:
A remote-control circuit switch device comprising:

i. a microcontroller, which contains one or more CPUs,

ii. a Network Interface Controller' (NIC) to receive instructions and/or send data; and

iii. a relay, which is enabled to actuate directly or indirectly (upon

receiving instructions sent from a remote location as received via said NIC and processed via microcontroller),

wherein said relay, when coupled to a plurality of circuit breakers, is enabled to switch the connected circuit breakers between "off" and "on" positions, without overriding the circuit breaker's protective function such that if one or more circuit breakers are tripped, then the relay cannot switch the circuit breakers back on.

A remote control circuit switch device according to claim 1 wherein said remote control circuit switch device is connected on the electrical supply side and coupled with one or more circuit breakers such that the remote control circuit switch device is powered by the power supply such that the remote control circuit switch device is not affected if one or more coupled circuit breakers (as coupled with the remote control circuit switch device) are tripped or otherwise, so that the remote control circuit switch device is not in need of a battery or alternate form of power when installed.

A remote-control circuit switch device according to any one of the preceding claims wherein said remote control circuit switch device is coupled to an electrical circuit breaker panel enabling the remote-control circuit switch device to receive:

i) the load at the load terminal receiving port enabling the current to pass to

attached load appliances downstream;

ii) the neutral terminal as the receiving port for the common neutral from

attached mains supply such that when coupled to the remote-control circuit switch device, the attached mains supply provides power to the remote-control circuit switch device, independent of whether the remote- control circuit switch device has actuated the circuit breaker into an "off" or an "on" state, such that the remote-control circuit switch device is powered so long as the main supply is intact. 4. A remote-control circuit switch device according to any one of the preceding claims wherein said remote control circuit switch device is coupled to an electrical circuit breaker panel with the incoming feed from mains supply to the remote-control circuit switch device as inserted into the live terminal receiving port and the remote-control circuit switch device is operational by inserting:

i) a Neutral feed from the mains supply plugs into a neutral terminal plug so that the remote-control circuit switch device is powered;

ii) a Live feed from the supply plugs into a Live Terminal input plug, so that power is provided from the mains supply to the remote-control circuit switch device and the coupled circuit breaker, and

iii) the Load feed is connected into a Load Terminal plug, so that current is enabled to flow downstream to meet load demands on the attached circuit within the premises.

5. A remote-control circuit switch device according to any one of the preceding claims wherein said remote control circuit switch device when coupled to an electrical circuit breaker panel has the Power Supply adjacent to the Neutral Terminal's receiving port such that the Neutral Terminal provides power to the remote-control circuit switch device's Power Supply which powers the Relay including a Current Transducer, the Microprocessor and NIC, which are enabled to draw power.

A remote-control circuit switch device according to any one of the preceding claims wherein said microcontroller's CPU(s) interpret communications it receives, as:

a) external communications communicated via the NIC in the form of a

wireless (including cellular) communication interface, for communication to one or more of the following: i) remotely located user;

ii) remote control circuit switch's cloud platform,

which is enabled to, in turn, communicate back to remote-control circuit switch device to actuate the connected circuit breaker via the device's relay such that these actuating instructions, as received by the device's relay switch, into an "on" or "off" position without overriding the circuit breaker's function, and

b) internal communication, as detected by the device's current transducer, wherein interpretation of said communications are performed via the device's microprocessor(s) such that said communications informing when one or more attached downstream appliances are in operation since they are drawing current through the device's coupled circuit breaker.

The method of operation the device according to claim 7, includes:

a) receipt of one or more communications in the form of data as received from at least one or more of the following:

i) external data sources as sent to the device's NIC;

ii) internal data sources including a current signature showing that one or more appliances are drawing power as detected by the device's current transducer;

b) interpretation of these communications by at least one or more of the following:

i) microcontroller's processors;

ii) device's cloud platform,

wherein the current signatures are enabled to be interpreted by at least one or more of the following:

a. the microprocessor(s),

b. the cloud platform

wherein a current signature passing through said device is enabled to be matched to one or more downstream appliances such that have a current signature library is enabled to be reference against said current signature in the device's processor(s) and/or by the device's cloud platform.

8. The method of operation the device according to claim 7 includes: a) receipt of one or more communications is enabled to send a notification to a device's external user interface as to which appliances are drawing current; wherein the notification provides the recipient with the option to turn "off" one or more such appliances.

9. The method of operation the device according to either claim 7 or claim 8,

includes:

a) selective actuation of the attached circuit breaker, wherein said device's current transducer detected one or more current signatures of one or more current drawing appliances,

wherein said selective actuation is enabled to be performed by a recipient in a remote location via one or more of the following:

i) the device's user interface in communication with said device; ii) a message, for example, via a cellular communication, to and from said device;

to actuate the device's coupled circuit via the following steps:

a. notification in the form of a communication received via the device's NIC,

b. interrupted via the device's microcontroller's processor(s), and c. actuated via the device's relay to switch off the device's coupled circuit breaker,

wherein said selective actuation switches off the device's coupled circuit

breaker such that said actuation effectively turns off the collection of current drawing appliances as connected via the device's coupled circuit.

10. A remote-control circuit switch device according to any one of the preceding claims wherein said device's processor and NIC is integrated with a cloud-based user environment via a Wi-Fi, cellular controller or via other control points such that a cloud-based user environment is enabled for the user to provide instructions to the device's processor.

1 1 . A remote-control circuit switch device according to any one of the preceding claims wherein said device's user interface provides a gateway to monitor and control the device's coupled circuit breakers, wherein said monitoring of current flow through each circuit breaker that the device is coupled with, is enabled via the current transducer, wherein current flow is monitored through each circuit breaker that the device is coupled with via the current transducer such that a user of said device's user interface is enabled to monitor current flow from a plurality of attached devices.

12. A remote-control circuit switch device comprising:

a) user interface, remotely connecting with

b) network interface card, communicating with

c) a processor, controlling

i. relay, and

ii current transducer, which receives the supply-side power source into the processor, via the NIC, which supplies:

a. remote connectivity to control of the relay at a suitable voltage and in a secure manner, and

b. wireless communication to enable wireless, cellular or other network means depending on communication and security requirements, wherein the device is powered by the power supply from the mains power such that the device takes input from said current transducer and outputs to the electrical switch to control the live/load circuit and enables communications to network interfaces so that the device is responsible for control, data acquisition and communication.

13. A method substantially as herein described with reference to the accompanying figures.

14. A system substantially as herein described with reference to the accompanying figures.

Description:
TITLE

CONTROL CIRCUIT MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY REMOTELY CONTROLLING CIRCUITS

FIELD OF INVENTION The present invention relates to the monitoring of circuit current flow to determine power consumption at the appliance level and to interpret this information to enable, if required, the switching off of the circuit, that such devices are connected, by actuating the circuit remotely without overriding the circuit breaker's function, using a programmable control circuit management device that selectively actuates circuits, fuses, valves and like controls.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

The inability to remotely control of resources, such as power or water usage in one or more specific premises, is governed by one or more specific circuits in these premises, has been a problem to date.

For example, in the case of a home's water supply, pipes may freeze and

consequently burst during winter in regions that have subzero climates.

In such situations, there is a need to be able to remotely control water supply into one or more homes, particularly to prepare for events such as when the weather is forecast locally to fall below freezing. Here the premises need to have the water shut off to stop the pipes freezing. This is a difficult task to perform when the property is vacant and the residents/manager is offsite.

The cost of not being able to mitigate potential damage, by turning off services into a home such as the water supply in a timely manner, is potentially impoverishing due to the costs of fixing burst pipes along with other additional damage caused. This cost for repair can be crippling in both time and money; however, so can the solutions provided to date to deal with circumventing such problems. Property owners or residents do not look at weather reports or like information except, typically, to remember to dress appropriately if it is raining, freezing or blowing a gale. Consequently, relying on human intervention alone may not fully resolve this problem. Therefore, selectively controlling one or more resources into one or more premises in a cost and condition (weather etc.) effective manner exists as a pressing need that is currently unmet.

For example, when a premise's residents take a holiday at a remote location they are not interested in the weather back at home, except after, say, a news report come to their attention which highlights the freezing weather back at home. This is likely to be after their home has suffered damage - here, the question often arises is who shut off the water to stop the pipes bursting, which is not an ideal question arising on a holiday.

This scenario highlights a need to remotely and, if desired, automatically control the delivery of one or more services within one or more homes or like premises.

The control of services into a home also includes the need to be able to remotely control water, gas or power consumption as consumed by services within a home such as cooking apparatus (stoves etc.), heaters, air-conditioners, lighting, security systems, etc. To date, there are no means available on a cost-effective basis to control one or more services by selectively turning "on" or "off" such services remotely. This need to control one or more services remotely has become more pressing since the cost of resources supplied, such as power, gas and/or water, have become more expensive in recent years, which need not be incurred when, say, premises are not occupied.

This remote control of turning on or off utilities to premises such as a home has traditionally been controlled by the utility provider, for example a power company, who supplies power to a home. The only way that a consumer can control the delivery of power into their home is to pay or not pay their bill. This gives poor indirect control without any selectivity as to what services are not required and which services the consumer requires over what period of time. Likewise, the power utilities would also like finer control to turn off particular services within a home when power demand is beyond the capacity of supply; however, to date, they do not have the means to, for example, turn off inessential items such as pool pumps, pool heating, etc. that many consumers would prefer over experiencing a "blackout". Similarly, a prudent owner/manger when managing such costly resources would, for example, like heating and/or air-conditioning to be selectively turned off but power to, say, the fridge and security system remain on when, say, the premises are not occupied.

This need for a means to selectively control services supplied into one or more homes also depends on local conditions (such as the weather, home occupancy - full or partial (a particular unit within a home, such as a granny flat, may be occupied whilst the rest of the home is vacant, since the extended family may be on vacation), etc.). This requires decisions to be made by residents, a home owner or manager that will impact on their home alone. For example, heavy rain will create flooding and impact a particular residence;

however, the impact on other residences close by may be negligible - here, the decision to cut services to one home is appropriate, but it is not appropriate to cut services to a neighbourhood. However, in such conditions it would be appropriate to cut particular services within nearby homes, such as turn off all pool pumps in a neighbourhood but leave on all other power drawing appliances. To date, such fine grained remote control of services into home by an individual or a power supply company has not been available.

The need for such remote control of services into premises such as a home has also grown exponentially in recent years with the emergence of short-term- accommodation as managed by an individual for their home or collection of premises.

For example, In the event of a short-term rental not being occupied, the heating and like services should be available to be selectively turned off remotely. Likewise, when the property is booked to be occupied, then the services should be enabled to be remotely turned on again in good time so the heating etc. is at a temperature suitable for the scheduled occupants. This remote control of services may need to take place several times a week for one property alone. However, to date there no means available to remotely control services at a circuit level into a home or like premises in a cost-effective manner.

Here, the control of services into a home may also need to be automated to reflect the arrival and departure times of guests in an automated manner, so that services supplied to home are controlled to reflect occupancy times scheduled via a booking calendar. Here an owner or manager of a property should only need to be involved if, say, a guest calls to request an early check-in or late check-out.

Likewise, services such as the control of pool pumps as mentioned earlier, should be automated to reflect conditions like the weather - if weather conditions are unsuitable for swimming or power supply conditions to an area are compromised, then it would be useful to be able to automatically turn-off non-essential power consumption by pool pumps and the like.

Installation and operation for remote control and automation needs also to be simple and cost effective to implement. For example, a premise's underfloor heating, which is expensive to run, has to date no means to be remotely controlled or automated so as to be switched from an "off" or an "on" position.

Underfloor heating may, for example, have been installed when the home was built, which, for the majority of houses, typically ranges from 30 to 70 years ago (land is getting scarcer and so housing development in many cities has proportionally slowed). Such houses typically have no means to remotely or automatically turn underfloor heating off or on, since its installation predates the computing age, let alone the wireless communication age.

In this scenario, the cost to retrogradely install remote and/or automated actuators to underfloor heating or onto one or more other services, such as air-conditioning, to date, is:

1 . not cost effective,

2. not available to be retrogradely installed to services such as underfloor

heating;

3. involves disturbing existing wiring, plumbing and the like, that potentially

raises secondary problems and unforeseen expense; and 4. in the case of a smart home automation solution, the level of complexity is great such that it befuddles most consumers for the operation of one service, let alone learning to operate multiple services.

To settle this need there is a plethora of approaches to the problem; however, the approaches have had one or more the following problems: 1 . There is no feed-forward and feedback communication system available to enable both monitoring and switching off power to circuits within a single building, home or unit; and

2. The removal of services, such as the power supply to premises, has been attempted by power utilities to control power management. In such scenarios, a power utility controls supply by shutting down power supply at specific junctions, which includes regulating supply to one or more neighbourhoods, but does not enable control of power consumption by an individual to their home or by management of services into a home by anyone other than the resource supplier. The difference between:

a. a power company controlling resources into multiple premises within one or more neighbourhoods; and

b. control of one or more services or circuits by a user, in a direct or

automated manner, selectively into their home or homes, has not been resolved by the solutions presented to date. Attempts to control services into a home have included:

Monitoring a service consumed, as contained in WO2016025990, which involves reading power consumption at the meter level and communicating such readings to an interested user when there is an increased demand in power consumption.

However, even when such communications are received, they are not very helpful if the user is off site, since there is no means to turn off the power to limit such power consumption.

AU 2015316569 proposes a current management device that includes a circuit breaker, such that the device replaces the role of the existing and/or traditional circuit breaker(s). This current management device contains a switching device that is a physical device performing the role of a circuit breaking system, which connects and disconnects via: 1 ) an increased voltage travelling through the circuit, or

2) a remote-control signal sending an instruction for switching and resetting the circuit breaker mechanism via control of a motor mechanism.

The problem with such a setup is that that circuit is enabled to be reset via the remote-control signal, even when it has been tripped by a current surge, which overrides the role of a circuit breaker mechanism (e.g. a fuse). This overrides the function of a circuit breaker, which is to automatically trip when a fault occurs (as detected by a current surge) and to be physically reset after appliances on the circuit have been investigated/switched off to limit the serge reoccurring.

Traditional circuit breaker automation is provided through a form of physical current monitoring within pre-set tolerances. For example, a fuse wire will melt when current flow is beyond the resistance tolerance of the fuse wire, or alternatively, some other form of physical device that moves so as to break the connection and therefore break the current flow with tolerances and the means to prevent the overriding of such tolerances. This break in the connection must be large enough to stop the current flow arcing across the break in electrical circuit of the circuit breaker. For this reason, most circuit breakers take the form of electro-mechanical devices.

Circuit breakers are present to prevent hazards in the form of fire and electrocution. Therefore, a circuit breaker, when tripped, requires investigation as opposed to remote resetting. This investigation is for the safety of the circuit downstream and the personnel in the premises where the circuit breaker is installed. When a circuit is tripped at the circuit breaker then appliances downstream of the circuit breaker typically need to be turned off and turned back on again in series so as to investigate as to whether a fault exists in an appliance.

Likewise, a circuit breaker trips also when resistance in the attached circuit changes (decreases) and current flow increases, indicating that the circuit may be grounded as in the case of an appliance or person acting as the ground. This circuit breaker tripping is therefore, also to protect against electrocution. Therefore, investigation is required as to why the change in the current flow has occurred, before physically resetting a fuse, so as to stop further problems arising such as electrical fires potentially leading to hazards or electrocution. Remote resetting of a circuit breaker directly overrides all the reasons for having a circuit breaking device/fuse installed. WO 2016/003357 proposes using a disconnecting switch arranged in series, which provides a physical separation within the flow. This appears to acknowledge the role of the existing circuit breakers/fuses in place; however, the solution provided is merely adding a further switch inline within an existing circuit or supply into a home. This is not a solution that can be installed using existing infrastructure and requires an electrician's expertise with implementation.

Other approaches have included circuit breaker monitoring devices, such as that contained in US 2006/0109599, which has a communication system incorporated within a circuit breaker, so that current flow is enabled to be monitored.

The limitation of such a device is that the monitoring and communication system is dependent on an DC battery or like power device, which has a limited life span and capacity. Such a device also requires a physical presence to download the collected data from the monitoring of the circuit along with the ongoing maintenance to replace the battery. The cost of physically downloading the monitored data and checking that the battery is still active appears to be a too greater cost compared to any benefit such as providing insight into power consumption and management.

US 2013/0329331 is an improvement on US 2006/0109599 in that it takes the form of a circuit breaker device that wirelessly communicates its state and fault information to a monitoring site. The device further harvests power from the circuit breaker's current conductor, and stores this energy via a battery, if the current conductor trips. This allows monitoring for a period post a break in the current conductor. The disadvantage is that the monitoring of the circuit is not constant; and it is further limited by the dependency on the life of the storage battery, post a break in the current conductor. This approach also provides only a passive means of energy management, through the observation of energy consumed, via a circuit breaker device.

US 2015/0227149 improves on US 2013/0329331 in respect of enabling real-time, periodic or user defined monitoring the circuit breaker and the devices in which the circuit breaker is connected. However, these improvements are enabled by an ethernet connection, which requires additional infrastructure at site for remote monitoring. WO 2014/018434 has incorporated circuitry coupled to one or more circuit breakers, so that a trip current value can be entered by a user for selected circuit breakers, so that they will trip in response to the current measurement value exceeding the user entered trip current value. The problem with this approach is that a current value may be entered by the user that is over the tolerance of the circuitry downstream. Consequently, this enables the user to override the function of traditional circuit breaker devices such as fuses and places the safety of the premises at risk.

US 2016/0225562 has a circuit breaker with an embedded microprocessor to enable the circuit breaker to operatable by identifying load and overload conditions. This device also enables a "soft start" following a disruption of the power source, which on restoration of electrical power after a failure, it will restart. This automation of having such "soft start" still appears to override the function of a circuit breaker, which is to automatically trip when a fault occurs and not to restart until an

investigation has occurred as to the cause of the circuit breaker tripping. In this patent there does not appear to be an explanation as to how the fault is investigated to allow a "soft start" to take place, in that can it isolate and disable a faulty appliance and/or remove a person from further electrocution. Such approaches represent the problems in the prior art in trying to resolve circuit management whilst overriding the protective functions of the circuit breaker.

Alternate approaches to the problem includes the use of networked devices on home-controlled networks. The use of local sensors to control items such as lights is well known - commonly an outside light will go on to illuminate access to, say, a door when the illumination is low (e.g. nightfall) and/or there is movement near the door. Such activity is sensed by light and motion detectors. Likewise, security systems have used remote control user inputs to activate lights, security alarms and locks. However, there is no remote control of other services such as heating except in circumstances of smart home wiring that enables control of heating, air- conditioning etc. on a house by house basis. Smart home automation and wiring is also not readily available since it is not cost effective in most scenarios, and in many cases, it is not available to be retrogradely installed without major rewiring. Smart home automation also, as mentioned earlier, befuddles the average consumer who: 1 . is not technically savvy;

2. is not interested in learning about the many bells and whistles of, say, remote control of lighting tied to mood music. Nor are they interested in the cost involved in setting up such "events" and modifying their home to host such events, and

3. wants to manage the supply of services within their home in the simplest and most cost-effective way possible - such as a simple "off" or "on" control of heating, lights or another service to their home.

Further, there are many approaches that have too many conflicting instructions and so that the complexity in operation is taxing on the time and resources of the individual managing the smart home operations.

For example, Patent US 9578443 B2 titled "Smart Home Device Adaptive

Configuration Systems and Methods" as published in 21 Feb, 2017, involves a home network that is configured to receive inputs from local sensors and/or physical actions from the user to determine whether to change the activity (switch "off" or "on") of appliances etc. connected to such a network.

The problem with such approaches is that there are conflicting instructions from the sensors (sensors often detect movement, from animals and the like, that creates false positive readings and unnecessary disturbance to occupants). Further, there is no prioritisation of actions or collective input from sensors and/or user instructions to prioritise the management of services into a home.

There is a need for a means to remotely control one or more services in a home or like premises so that one or more specific services can be switched off or on with minimal expense to the owner and/or disturbance to the home's infrastructure.

Further, the control of the services needs to be simple and straight forward so as not to require training and/or outsourcing of expertise, for example, to a technician for setup, operation and/or review/change of operations. Additionally, these services need to be able to be controlled remotely by either an individual, or in an automated manner, so that services into a home can be switch off or on according to criteria dependent on conditions contained in information available from remote sources about local conditions or other macro inputs such as weather forecasts. Such control should also not override existing protections in place provided by traditional (e.g. electro-mechanical) circuit breakers.

The above discussion of the background art should not be construed as forming part of the common general knowledge or be interpreted as being widely known within the field of use.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to provide a means for remotely controlling services into, and in, an individual home or like premises in a way that enables:

1 . ease of use by a consumer;

2. remote operation;

3. maintains the integrity of, without overriding, existing protections (e.g. circuit breaker electro-mechanical operations);

4. operates in a direct or automated manner;

5. that is relatively cost effective to install and maintain; and

6. causes minimal disruption with installation and/or operation, thereby improving control of resource consumption and/or the control of delivery of services into a home or like premises.

Alternatively, it is an object of the present invention to overcome or ameliorate at least one of the disadvantages of the prior art or to provide a useful alternative. While some embodiments are described herein with particular reference to an application, it will be appreciated that the invention is not limited to such field of use and is applicable in broader contexts.

One embodiment of the present invention provides a control circuit management technology (CCMT) which includes a CCMT device that is configured to received instructions to actuate a circuit, the CCMT device includes a remote control circuit switch device and methodology. For ease of use throughout this specification a CCMT device is used interchangeably with a remote control circuit switch device and methodology. According to a first aspect of the invention, there is provided a remote-control circuit switch device comprising:

i. a microcontroller, which contains one or more CPUs, ii. a Network Interface Controller' (NIC) to receive instructions and/or send data; and

iii. a relay, which is enabled to actuate directly or indirectly (upon receiving instructions sent from a remote location as received via said NIC and processed via microcontroller),

wherein said relay, when coupled to a plurality of circuit breakers, is enabled to switch the connected circuit breakers between "off" and "on" positions, without overriding the circuit breaker's protective function such that if one or more circuit breakers are tripped, then the relay cannot switch the circuit breakers back on.

According to a second aspect of the invention, there is provided a remote-control circuit switch device comprising:

a) user interface, remotely connecting with

b) network interface card, communicating with

c) a processor, controlling

i. relay, and

ii current transducer, which receives the supply-side power source into the processor, via the NIC, which supplies:

a. remote connectivity to control of the relay at a suitable voltage and in a secure manner, and

b. wireless communication to enable wireless, cellular or other network means depending on communication and security requirements, wherein the device is powered by the power supply from the mains power such that the device takes input from said current transducer and outputs to the electrical switch to control the live/load circuit and enables communications to network interfaces so that the device is responsible for control, data acquisition and communication. Disclosed herein is a device, method and system for providing remote control of one or more circuits (e.g. for controlling power, water or gas, etc.) within a home or other premises (hereafter, home will include any premises including installations used by industry including factories, agricultural plants, etc.) via a control circuit management technology (CCMT) device, system and methodology. The CCMT device is coupled to a circuit breaker for power, or alternatively to valves controlling water or gas supply and/or another consumable resource into a home. The preferred embodiment will be described in terms of remote actuation of power supply using the CCMT at the circuit level into a home; however, this CCMT device control is also available to remotely control water, gas and/or other resources supplied to a home in other embodiments.

Remote control of circuits is enabled by control circuit management technology (CCMT) coupled to one or more circuit breakers. The CCMT is enabled to remotely and selectively switch off and on one or more circuits typically on a circuit board of residential or other premises that draw power from an external source and that have a circuit board to control power from being overdrawn.

The CCMT replaces the need to control and/or reset the circuit breaker physically at the site. This overcomes the prior art approaches of controlling a circuit breaker, where such prior art control of the circuit breaker involves the resetting of a tripped circuit breaker, which overrides the purpose of a circuit breaker and poses a hazard to the safety of the electrical environment.

The CCMT is also enabled to be controlled via various triggers, as selected and/or programmed via one or more criteria, to automatically and selectively turn a circuit between an "off" and an "on" position without overriding the protective function of the circuit breaker. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

For a more complete understanding of the present invention, and the advantages thereof, reference is now made to the following descriptions taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 shows a perspective view of a Control Circuit Management Technology (CCMT) from a top view as a first embodiment in the present invention's

embodiments;

Fig. 2 shows a perspective view of a Control Circuit Management Technology (CCMT) from an underside view as a first embodiment in the present invention's embodiments; Fig. 3 shows an exploded perspective view of a Control Circuit Management

Technology (CCMT) as a typical embodiment in the present invention's

embodiments;

Fig. 4A shows a schematic view of a Control Circuit Management Technology (CCMT) features as in a typical arrangement as applied in one embodiment of the present invention;

Fig. 4B shows a schematic view of a Control Circuit Management Technology (CCMT) features including the relationships of communication as in a typical arrangement as applied in one embodiment of the present invention;

Fig. 5 shows a schematic view of a Control Circuit Management Technology (CCMT) as applied in the present invention's embodiments;

Fig. 6 shows a schematic view of a circuit breaker as applied in the alternate embodiments of the present invention;

Fig. 7 shows a screenshot of a user interface as viewed on a computer enabled devices (laptop, smart phone, etc.) as applied in the present invention embodiments; Fig. 8 shows a screenshot of CCMT sensing current flow through a circuit breaker and temperature on the surface of the control circuit management technology as applied in the present invention embodiments; Fig. 9 shows a schematic view of a Control Circuit Management Technology (CCMT) as implemented in the present invention's embodiments;

Fig. 10 shows a schematic view of a Control Circuit Management Technology (CCMT) as implemented in the present invention;

Fig. 1 1 shows a schematic view of a Control Circuit Management Technology (CCMT) as implemented in the present invention.

Fig. 12 shows a photograph of a Control Circuit Management Technology (CCMT) as implemented into a circuit board of a typical home as one embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 13 shows a flowchart of a Control Circuit Management Technology (CCMT) installation as one embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 14 shows a flowchart of a Control Circuit Management Technology (CCMT) operation as one embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The principles of the present invention and their advantages are best understood by referring to the illustrated embodiments depicted in FIGS. 1 -10 of the drawings, in which like numbers designate like parts. Certain terms are used throughout the following description and claims to refer to particular system components. As one skilled in the art will appreciate, individuals and companies practicing in the art may refer to a particular component by different names but not function.

In the embodiments described, the CCMT approach is different to the approaches presented in the prior art to date, in that the remotely controlled CCMT device switches a relay which actuates the coupled circuit as opposed to switching the circuit breaker directly. Therefore, there is remote control of the circuit indirectly via the relay and when, for example, turning the circuit back on via the relay, the user is not switching on a "tripped" circuit breaker. This overcomes the hazard of resetting a tripped circuit breaker remotely, which would override the purpose of a circuit breaker and would be hazardous to safety. Particular features throughout this specification as described in one embodiment may also be present in other alternative embodiments, in one or more combinations, as would be apparent to a person skilled in the art.

First embodiment A typical and first embodiment of the CCMT couples to a circuit breaker within the fuse box of, for example, the typical home. The CCMT device is connected on the electrical supply side downstream of the meter and coupled with one or more circuit breakers. This arrangement enables the CCMT device to be powered by the power supply into the home, and is not affected if one or more coupled circuit breakers (as coupled with the CCMT device) are tripped or otherwise. Consequently, the CCMT is not in need of a battery or alternate form of power in such typical installations.

This typical embodiment of the CCMT consists of a circuit board containing a microcontroller, which contains one or more CPUs (processor cores, which is termed "processor" hereafter for ease of use) along with memory, a Network Interface Controller'_(NIC - to receive instructions and/or send data) and a programmable input/output of peripherals including a relay, which will actuate (upon receiving instructions sent from a remote location) the connected circuit breaker between "off" and "on", without overriding the circuit breaker's function (if the circuit breaker is tripped, then the relay cannot switch the circuit breaker back on). This

programmable input/output of peripherals may directly or indirectly control a relay, which will actuate (upon receiving instructions sent from a remote location). The relay, when actuated directly or indirectly (upon receiving instructions sent from a remote location as received via said NIC and processed via microcontroller), may have the NIC and microprocessor integrated as one unit as many NIC currently have microcontrollers and CPUs integrated within the NIC.

Referring to Figure 1 ; a perspective top view of a Control Circuit Management Technology (CCMT) device 10 is shown according to one representative

embodiment of the principles of the present invention.

In the embodiment of FIG. 1 , the CCMT device 10 is inserted into an electrical circuit breaker panel and receives the Load at the Load Terminal 40 receiving port, so that the circuit is enabled to carry current to attached load/appliances downstream within the premises. An electrical circuit breaker panel is used to include all forms of devices that require a circuit breaker including power boards and the like.

The Neutral Terminal 50 is the receiving port for the common neutral from the mains supply, which when inserted into the CCMT device, provides power to the CCMT, whether or not the CCMT has actuated the circuit breaker in an "off" or an "on" state. That is, the CCMT device will be powered so long as the main supply is intact.

Referring to Figure 2; a perspective underside view of a Control Circuit Management Technology (CCMT) device 10 is shown according to one representative

embodiment of the principles of the present invention. The incoming feed from supply to the CCMT device 10 is inserted into the Live

Terminal 30 receiving port as shown in Figure 2. The CCMT device is operational by inserting:

1 . the Neutral from the supply plugs into the Neutral Terminal 50 plug so that the CCMT device is powered;

2. the Live from the supply plugs into the Live Terminal 30 input plug, so that power is provided from the supply to the CCMT device 10 and the coupled circuit breaker, and

3. the Load is connected into the Load Terminal 40 plug, so that current is

enabled to flow downstream to meet load demands on the attached circuit within the premises.

Figures 5 and 6 provide a system view of this setup, which are discussed further below.

Referring to Figure 3, a perspective exploded view of a Control Circuit Management Technology (CCMT) 10 is shown as a typical embodiment in the present invention's embodiments.

The CCMT device 10 has the following components as arranged within moulding such as the following exemplary embodiment shows in Figure 3:

The moulding consists of Left Side Enclosure Moulding 150 and Right Side

Enclosure Moulding 160, which is held in a reversibly secure manner (as shown in Fig. 3 by screws so that the internal environment is able to be inspected when removed from being coupled with a circuit breaker and the accompanying power supply).

Figure 3 further reveals components such as Divider Moulding 140, which hold the relay in position along with keeping the Neutral Terminal 50 (from common neutral) and the Load Terminal (to load/appliance) apart so as to minimise risk from these terminal arcing. Likewise, there is User Interface Moulding 170, located adjacent to the User interface RGB LED 1 10 on the circuit board, so as to indicate the

functioning of the CCMT device 10. Figure 12 shows a typical circuit board installation of the Symbiot CCMT device (as shown by the Symbiot label). The CCMT device's 10 Power Supply 70 is adjacent to the Neutral Terminal's 50 receiving port as the Neutral Terminal provides power to the Power Supply 70.

Adjacent to the Power Supply 70 is the Relay 60, the Current Transducer 80, and the Microprocessor/Network Interface Controller 100, which all draw power or

communicate with a component that is dependent on the Power Supply's 70 operation.

Preferable components in this typical embodiment include:

1 . A Rail Mounting Clip 130, to mount the CCMT device 10 to a rail using DIN rails or other mounting means suitable for requirements in particular jurisdictions, which typically is used to mount circuit breakers inside a premise's fuse box or like power distribution cabinet.

2. A Wireless Antenna 120, to send data and receive instructions via the NIC, which in turn, is interpreted by the CCMT device's 10 Microprocessor 100 to instruct the relay to actuate between an "on" or an "off" position to control current flow through the coupled circuit breaker.

3. A Temperature Sensor 90, to measure ambient temperature on the surface of the circuit board and accompany components including the CCMT device's 10 Microprocessor/Network Interface Controller 100, Power Supply 70, Relay 60 and Current Transducer 80, so as to monitor any unusual activity that may disturb normal operations and provide thermal override protection. Communications received and data sent

The CCMT microcontroller's processor(s) 100 interprets communications it receives, as:

1 ) External communications via the NIC, in the form of a wireless (including

cellular) communication interface for communication to a remotely located user and/or one or more alternate information sources including the CCMT's cloud platform, which may automate the actuation of the connected circuit breaker via the CCMT device's 10 relay 60.

These actuating instructions, as received by the CCMT device's 10 relay 60 switch the circuit into an "on" or "off" position without overriding the circuit breaker's function.

This actuation via the relay 60 is not physically tripping the circuit breaker into an "on" or "off" position; however, the relay is acting as an actuator, so as to switch the current flow across the circuit between an "on" or "off" position, without overriding the function of the circuit breaker.

An example of external information may be provided to the CCMT device's 10 specific locality as communicated via geolocation to the Bureau of

Meteorology, who send information to the CCMT's device 10 for interpretation by the microprocessor 100 that the outside ambient temperature at the specific location is over 25 degrees Celsius.

This information is processed by the CCMT's device 10 microprocessor 100 to instruct the relay 60 to actuate the coupled circuit, carrying the load for the premises underfloor heating, to an "off" position - this turns "off" the underfloor heating when the outside ambient temperature is above a specific threshold to trigger the underfloor heating. Consequently, the CCMT device 10 has effectively turned off the underfloor heating on information provided by an remote external source via the CCMT relay's actuation of the connected circuit breaker; and/or 2) Internal communication, as detected by the CCMT's current transducer 80, to interpret via the CCMT's processor(s) that one or more appliances are in operation since they are drawing current through the CCMT device's 10 coupled circuit breaker, that should not be in operation.

For example:

a) the oven has been "on" for over 60 minutes, and/or

b) floor heating is drawing power while ambient temperature is over 25

degrees Celsius (as communicated via temperature sensor located on the CCMT device and/or via external communication via the BOM as mentioned above).

The detection of one or more appliances that are in operation draw an identifying current, in the form of a specific current signature that is enabled to be detected by the CCMT current transducer 80 and interpreted by the CCMT processor 100 or by CCMT cloud platform as wirelessly connected via the NIC and wireless antenna 120.

Method of Operation

The method of operation in one embodiment may proceed in the conditions as described above as:

1 ) Receipt of one or more communications in the form of data are received from: a) external data sources as sent to the CCMT device's 10 NIC 100 (for example, a user sending an instruction or data received from information providers such as the BOM, who provide data concerning the external temperature via geolocation of the CCMT, etc.); and/or

b) internal data sources (a current signature showing that one or more appliances are drawing power as detected by the CCMT current transducer);

2) Interpretation of these communications by the:

a. microcontroller's processors 100 or, alternatively, in parallel or in series b. CCMT's cloud platform (not shown), so that, for example, the current signatures may be interpreted in either the CCMT's processor(s) 100 alone or in conjunction with the CCMT's cloud platform so that the current signature can be initially matched to one or more appliances that have a current signature in the CCMT's processor's 100 memory and/or by the CCMT's cloud platform, which may have a much better library of current signatures to match against and/or use the CCMT's processing power.

Such CCMT cloud processing power is enabled to deconstruct a plurality of contributory current signatures, so as to separate current signatures to those of particular contributory appliances (e.g. a current signature detected by the current transducer may have several contributory signatures combined as contributed by the current drawn to form multi-appliance current signature: for example, by a fridge, an iron and a radio). ) Notification to a CCMT device's 10 external user interface (see Figure 7) or as a message to a user of a CCMT device via a CCMT device application that is available on a computer enable device such as a smart phone or computer. This notification takes the form of a communication to a user as to which appliances are drawing current and provides the user with the option to turn "off" such appliances as a collection of current drawing appliances. ) Selective actuation of the circuit breaker, whose current transducer detected a current signature of one or more current drawing appliances. This selective actuation by a user is performed from a remote location via:

a. the CCMT's user interface (see Figure 7); and/or

b. a message, for example, via a cellular communication, so as to actuate the CCMT's coupled circuit via the following steps: a) received via the CCMT's NIC,

b) interrupted via the CCMT microcontroller's processor(s) 100, and c) actuated via the CCMT relay 60 to switch off the CCMT coupled circuit breaker, so effectively turning off the collection of current drawing appliances as connected via the CCMT device's 10 coupled circuit. The CCMT device 10, via instructions received from a remote source, is enabled to switch one or more coupled circuits selectively between an "off" and an "on" position. These CCMT device communications, as received from internal or external sources, are also enabled to be interpreted by the CCMT device's microprocessor 100 to be automatically actuated, so as conditions or requirements change, an earlier actuation to, say, turn "off" the underfloor heating due to the external temperature at a specific location being over 20 degrees Celsius, may now need to change due to the external temperature changing to be only 8 degrees Celsius.

Here in this example, such automatic actuation may be to turn "on" the underfloor heating when the temperature falls below 12 degrees Celsius and "off" when the temperature is above 15 degrees Celsius, which can be a fluctuation between night and day temperatures in specific locations. These automated communications to actuate a CCMT coupled circuit may also be communicated to a CCMT user to seek instructions - for example, when a home's owner/resident is away from the CCMT enabled residence they may not want the underfloor heating to be turned "on" every night when the temperature falls.

Likewise, such an exemplary user may also like to know, for example, via an SMS (cellular) or via instant messaging (data) that:

"the iron has been left "on" for over an hour, would you prefer that the iron is switched off? Please be aware that this will turn off all other devices on the same circuit as the iron."

This enables a user in a remote location, via their CCMT device 10, to switch off the CCMT device's coupled circuit that the device (e.g. the iron) is drawing current from.

In the preferred embodiment, the CCMT device enables remote selective control of one or more circuits, so as to control the power supply at the circuit level into a home in a secure manner. This security is enabled to be implemented as a software and/or as a hardware security measure. The CCMT device's control of the power supply at the circuit level, as enabled via a relay that acts as an actuator coupled to a circuit breaker, is typically located within a home's circuit board. The CCMT device's relay 60 in conjunction with the

microcontroller's processors and NIC 100 takes the form of a remotely controlled switch that switches "off" or "on" the CCMT device's coupled circuit, without physically switching "off" or "on" the circuit breaker itself and therefore, not affecting the circuit breaker's critical safety function. Figure 12 shows a typical installation of a CCMT device into a premises circuit board.

Preferred CCMT Device embodiment

The CCMT device 10 remotely controls power supply into a home by selectively switching on or off one or more circuits that the CCMT device is coupled to, so as to turn on or off heating, pool pumps, air conditioning, lighting, security systems or other items configured to be remotely controlled by each CCMT device at the circuit level.

The preferred embodiment of the CCMT device contains:

1 . a network interface controller (NIC), connected to

2. a processor, in the form of a programmable microcontroller, controlling

3. a relay, which acts as an actuator of a circuit, when coupled to a circuit

breaker,

wherein the above is powered by the supply-side power source into the coupled circuit.

The processor, via the NIC, may in some embodiments and arrangements, has one or more additional driver(s) to, for example, provide remote connectivity to control of the relay at, say, a suitable voltage and in a secure manner.

The wireless communication, enabled by the NIC, allows wireless, cellular or other network means depending on communication and security requirements.

For ease of explanation, the NIC will be referred to as containing, but not limited by, a wireless interface but includes cellular and other network means as included in the term wireless communication: "Wireless communication, or simply wireless, is the transfer of information between two or more points that are not connected by an electrical conductor".

Likewise, the CCMT device's 10 processor, in the form of a programmable microcontroller 100, (for example, containing a System on a Chip (SoC) that is optionally programmable, alternatively, a System in Package (SiP), firmware, etc.) with a NIC, provides asynchronous or synchronous communication depending on communication protocol used (e.g. Cellular, TCP/IP or other). The microcontroller has appropriate RAM and ROM to enable memory buffering and analysis to be performed at the microcontroller level or at the CCMT's cloud platform, as communicated via the CCMT's NIC. In other arrangements of the embodiments described, the microcontroller may take the form of a microprocessor so as to include the additional microprocessor functions of having a microprocessor clock to aid interpretation of programmable instructions containing time based triggers or interpretations of data received, along with a register based, digital-integrated circuit which accepts binary data as input, which is processed according to instructions stored, so as to provide an information output in the form of actuating one or more CCMTs or interrupting current flow as passing through the attached circuit breaker. Consequently, the microcontroller may be substituted with a microprocessor (or processor) and therefore, the terms

microcontroller and microprocessor may be used interchangeably as appreciated by those skilled in the art. However, for ease of understanding and for consistency of language, the term microcontroller is used to include microprocessors.

This interpretation of current flow is sensed via the CCMT device's 10 containing a current transducer 80 in alternate embodiments. This interpretation of current flow by the microcontroller 100 is enabled to use identification criteria, such as pattern matching, of one or more appliances connected and drawing power via the CCMT device's 100 coupled (i.e. connected) circuit breaker. Each connected appliance that is "on" draws current according to their specific current signature, whose profile is enabled to be matched against a library of known signatures.

For example, an iron across a range of temperatures, will fluctuate with its power consumption (an iron heats in pulses by drawing current with a typical profile of frequency of peaks to stay at a pre-set temperature as selected by a user - cool, hot, steam, etc.), so as to provide a signature that the power to the iron is on. This profile of usage is different to the current drawn by a fridge (even when it is left open or is opened and closed), a kettle, a heater and/or a dryer. Such current signatures are enabled to be specified and/or detected by a CCMT device's processor or, post communication, by the CCMT's cloud platform.

This device usage data as detected directly via the CCMT's current transducer, is transformed into information through interpretation by the CCMT's microcontroller's processor (or in the CCMT cloud platform). This interpretation may be performed by matching, for example, the iron's profile of power usage (as shown by current drawn against the profile of normal household usage) as matched or interpreted using a variety of techniques including pattern matchings.

For example, the signature of normal household power usage over different times of the day is collected to provide a typical signature. When an iron, kettle and/or or components are intermittingly used during the curse of the day, the power used and the current drawn will be greater - therefore, giving a signature of a appliance that is intermittingly used. The question as to what the appliance was that was drawing the additional current is enabled to be identified by its current signature. This appliance drawing the additional current is enabled to be presented to a user, via the CCMT user interface, so the particular appliances can be determined to be legitimate or alternatively, the circuit that the appliance is on can be closed.

Alternatively, signatures for typical appliance may be used form a library in the CCMT connect cloud or at contained within the microcontroller/processor's memory.

Such usage of specific appliances are enabled to be communicated back to the user so as to remind them that the kettle boiled a few minutes ago, the electric hot water heater has been running for 20 minutes - should you check if the bath is overflowing or the iron has been on for an 30 minutes, so if you are not at home you can remotely turn off the CCMT connected circuit breaker that has the iron connected.

This communication protocol enables the remote actuation of the circuit via the CCMT device, which is enabled through a user's input on a CCMT user interface via a remote computer enabled device that is enabled to send instruction to the CCMT device's processor.

These instructions in turn are interpreted via the processor so as to actuate the circuit via the relay coupled to the circuit breaker and/or housed inline with the circuit itself. The user's input via the CCMT user interface is enabled to control of one or more CCMT devices coupled to specific circuits at specific locations. This enables secure remote control of specified circuits. This remote control can also be secured to over both software and hardware circuitry. This approach is distinguished from prior art approaches in that circuits are directly controlled or added distally in series to circuit breakers. This creates control security issues.

Typically, the CCMT device's processor and NIC may also be integrated with a cloud-based user environment via a Wi-Fi, cellular controller or via other control points. The CCMT user interface accesses the cloud-based user environment to provide instructions to the CCMT device's processor.

In at least some embodiments, the CCMT user interface provides a gateway to monitor and control the CCMT device's coupled circuit breakers. The monitoring of current flow through each circuit breaker that the CCMT device is coupled with, is enabled via a current transducer as shown in Figure 6. The user is enabled to monitor the current flow through each circuit breaker that the CCMT device is coupled with via the current transducer.

The CCMT user may take the form of one or many users, who have an interest in controlling power consumption in a home or other environment, including a workplace, school, or any other envisaged environment that consumes power and has one or more circuit breakers installed.

Referring to Figure 1 1 , these CCMT users include power utilities that require management of the supply and demand of power. The prioritisation of power to vital circuits that include power circuits to keep refrigeration "on" so food is not spoiled, but pool pumps, air-conditioning and other non-essential devices are turned "off" via the CCMT device's relay which actuates at the circuit(s) responsible for such appliances.

Typically, this requires the pool pump, air-conditioning and the other non-essential devices to be on a separate CCMT device coupled circuit breaker to that of the refrigerator (as an example) and therefore the separate CCMT device is enabled to selectively turn "off" and then "on" again non-essential appliances, either remotely or directly (the CCMT device's circuit board has, in some embodiments, a reset switch to override previous commands and therefore directly actuate the current flow through the circuit breaker via the CCMT device's relay). The CCMT device's processor and/or communication via the CCMT cloud platform is enabled to also implement power management regimes to optimise power usage with premises by shutting down non-required CCMT device(s) coupled circuits and therefore, turning off the connect appliances on that circuit.

For example, a CCMT device is installed in the property and wirelessly connected to the CCMT cloud platform, which determines when to open and close circuits to optimise electricity power consumption relatively to cost.

Likewise, a CCMT device is enabled to be installed in a property so that the CCMT device is wirelessly connected to the CCMT cloud platform, which synchronises with an Energy Retailers resources. The CCMT cloud platform may be enabled to respond to the Energy Retailer's triggers by opening and closing circuits to either reduce the customers energy consumption or to avoid wholesale price exposure or both. The data collected by the CCMT is also use to calculate consumption for data analysis and/or billing purposes.

Further, the Energy Retailer's resources may be exchanged for an Energy Network Providers resources, so that the CCMT cloud platform responds to the Energy

Network Provider's triggers by opening and closing circuits to manage the demand on the network or respond to emergency network circumstances.

Additionally, Renewable Energy Management Platforms may be utilised to respond to triggers by opening and closing circuits to manage load, battery charge and discharge. The data collected by the CCMT device or platform may also be used to calculate triggers to optimise consumption.

A further embodiment of the CCMT device

Referring to Figure 4A, a further embodiment contains the following features:

1 . CCMT device

2. Switch

3. Power supply 4. Current transducer

5. Load signature detection

6. User interface

7. Network interface

8. Manual override 9. Environmental sensing

10. Power storage

CCMT device Relationship(s) The CCMT device is the unit responsible for control, data acquisition and

communication amongst all features within the design (1 -9 as referred to above, not as labelled within the figure), excluding the manual override (8). It is powered by the power supply (3) from the main power. The CCMT device takes input from the current transducer (4) and environmental sensors (9) and outputs to the electrical switch to control the live/load circuit and to user interface (6) and network interface (7). Additional processes allow communication from the CCMT device to the network interface (7) towards the Internet/cloud and processes data obtained from the current transducer (4) to enhance feature extraction from the load signature detection (5). The CCMT device may take output and input to and from the user interface (6), encapsulated by means of a multimedia interface. Function(s)

The CCMT device functions as the central control of the system, actuating features, processing on received data and transmitting required data to the Internet/cloud.

Example(s)

An example of an implementation of the CCMT device is enabled to be implemented using an STM32F502 microcontroller or the Microsemi SmartFusion2 family of chips.

1 .2.2 Switch

Relationship(s)

The switch connects or breaks the live and load line. It takes output from the CCMT device (1 ). Function(s)

Break or connect live and load line.

Example(s)

A simple solenoid-driven ferromagnetically-fused busbar between contacts may be used, or a feature such as the TE EW60 series relay. 1 .2.3 Power supply

Relationship(s)

The power supply supplies electrical current and a return path for all features in the design (1 -10). It takes power from the live and neutral wires and converts it to a suitable voltage and current supply for the features (1 -10). Function(s)

To provide electrical power to all features within the system.

Example(s)

AC-DC convertor such as the PBO-3 by Cui Inc. 1 .2.4 Current transducer Relationship(s)

The current transducer senses current between the live and load and communicates the data to the CCMT device (1 ) and to the load signature detection (5).

Function(s) To sense current and convert it to suitable form for the CCMT device and load signature detection.

Example(s)

Allegro ACS7XX series of hall-effect current transducers, toroidal transformers, etc.

1 .2.5 Load signature detection Relationship(s)

Load signature detection analyses data from the current transducer (4) and processes the data to obtain current load signatures from the load on the circuit. This processed data is sent back to the CCMT device (1 ).

Function(s) To extract features from the current transducer (4) data. Example(s)

On-board processing in the CCMT device or implementation of a peripheral FPGA such as the Xilinix Spartan 6 range.

1 .2.6 User interface Relationship(s)

User interface communicates pertinent information to the user via multimedia encapsulation (smart phone UX, audio, haptic feedback, video, vibration, etc.). It receives control instructions and data from the CCMT device (1 ) and outputs the information in an understandable format to the user. The user may also choose to input data physically to the user interface via buttons or other sensors. The user interface links back to the CCMT device (1 ) and the override mechanism (8). Function(s)

To provide a front-facing information display to the user and allow physical user input.

Example(s)

Tactile switches or pushbutton for user input. RGB led features may be utilised for a simplistic display feedback, simple LCD 6x2 character displays for textual information and simple images, full resolution displays for video, small speakers or piezoelectric buzzers for audio/sound and vibrators for haptic feedback.

1 .2.7 Network Interface

Relationship(s) The network interface communicates between the CCMT device (1 ) and the Internet/cloud. It allows local and wide area networking through multiple means. Wired, wireless and other technologies are utilised as a path to the Internet with this interface. Data can be received or transmitted through this interface.

Function(s) To provide networked capability to the system. Example(s)

Wireless (WiFi): Cypress CYW43362 Single-Chip IEEE 802.1 1 TM b/g/n

MAC/Baseband/Radio or

Wireless (4G): Quectel LTE EC21 Wired (Ethernet)Microchip ENC624J600 Ethernet controller or Xilinix Dual ARM® Cortex®-A9 MPCore™ with CoreSight™ System On Chip (SOC) IC Zynq®-7000 Artix™-7 FPGA, 28K Logic Cells 256KB 667MHz 225-CSPBGA 1 .2.8 Manual override Relationship(s)

Manual override bypasses the CCMT device (1 ) and directly triggers the switch (2). Function(s)

To trigger the switch without CCMT device interaction. Example(s)

Combinatorial logic gates arranged to take the momentary switch input and convert to a latching output.

1 .2.9 Environmental sensing Relationship(s) Consistently monitors the environment and reports back the readings to the CCMT device (1 ).

Function(s)

To monitor information from the environment and provide data to the CCMT device (1 )·

Example(s)

MCP9700A analog temperature sensor or Si7006 temperature and humidity sensor.

1 .2. 0 Power storage Relationship(s)

Connects to the supply lines of the power supply (3) and connects that line to all features to supply power in the event of a power failure (1 -9)

Function(s)

To provide backup power in the case that the power supply is unable to take power from the live/neutral line.

Example(s) Lithium batteries with an inline PMIC for charge and discharge based upon continuous power supply.

Figure 4B show the CCMT device interfacing with the CCMT cloud platform and the UX/UI interface as referred to within the system below.

Preferred CCMT System Embodiment

Referring to Figure 5, a system 200 in accordance with a preferred embodiment of this disclosure reflects the CCMT device's preferred embodiment. As shown in Figure 5, the system 200 comprises a relay 10 and a board with a microcontroller 20 containing a processor, memory (RAM/ROM or like memory storage) and a wireless interface.

Preferably, the system 200 may also include a current transducer (not shown) to measure the current passing across the CCMT device's coupled circuit (also known as a fuse) and to pass the measurement and/or signature of the current flow back to the microcontroller 20 processor, memory and/or wireless interface for analysis and/or communication with external CCMT cloud platform (not shown) or a CCMT user interface (not shown).

The block diagram's system 200 in Figure 5 takes the form of a CCMT device when installed and coupled upstream to a main supply power source and downstream to one or more circuit breakers (one device to one circuit is the typical arrangement; however, one CCMT device to multiple circuits will also be enabled). This CCMT device is installed into a fuse box, of a home or other premise(s).

The CCMT device has a circuit board containing a microcontroller 20, which on receiving instruction via one or more communication(s) received by the wireless interface, is enabled to actuate the relay 10 to an open and/or closed position, which in turn switches on or off the current flow through the CCMT device's coupled circuit breaker. This CCMT device controls current flow through the circuit, which in turn control power supply to all appliances on the circuit without tripping the circuit breaker. When in the "on" position, the circuit breaker is not compromised in detecting a short circuit and/or excessive current flow to initiate the circuit breaker tripping. If the circuit breaker is tripped then standard resetting of the circuit breaker will be required as this is not overridden by the control circuit management technology (CCMT) device coupled to the circuit breaker, since the CCMT device is enabled, via the relay, to only actuate current flow between an "on" or an "off" state when the coupled circuit breaker is "on" (as opposed to tripped).

Sensors

There are optionally sensors located on the board that communicate with the processor that are enabled to sense light, temperature, humidity, current, movement (accelerometer) and/or other environmental changes. The processor is enabled to be programmed to control the relay to open or close the circuit breaker under particular environmental changes associated with that circuit breaker's circuit functions (i.e. specific circuit breaker functions to protect lights, air-conditioning, stove, pool filters or other requirements). That is, if the number of lumens detected by the light sensor is below a threshold level, then for example the sensor may be detecting that nightfall has arrived. This sensor data is enabled to pass to the processor that can interrupt the data into information to turn open the relay to open activate the circuit breaker responsible for lights. That is, turn on and off the lights in, say, a household. This is used as a central control of the home's light switches to protect and/or welcome at times when lights on at night can say the home is occupied or welcome home, whilst not consuming power via lights during daylight, when the impact of such light is negligible.

Other exemplary functions of the sensors used in the control circuit management technology (CCMT) include:

1 . Humidity sensors collecting data to be used to control watering systems

and/or to shut down servers;

2. Temperature sensors collecting data to be used to control air-conditioning and/or watering systems and/or to shut down servers;

3. Current sensors collecting data to show power fluctuations such as power surges and/or failures upstream to be used to protect household appliances; 4. Movement (accelerometer) to detect earthquakes and like events to shut down power urgently.

The power supply for the CCMT device is provided by the circuit breaker that the CCMT device is coupled with. That is when the common neutral from the mains supply is also connected to the CCMT. Therefore, whether the CCMT has powered the circuit 'off or 'on', the CCMT will be powered so long as the main supply is intact.

In an alternate arrangement of the embodiments described throughout, the CCMT may be housed within a circuit breaker so it is part of a circuit breaker module rather than a module that is coupled with existing or standalone circuit breakers.

A further alternate arrangement of the embodiments described throughout, the CCMT may be housed within a plurality of circuit breakers mounted on a DIN rail. A CCMT may control a plurality of circuit breakers via the processor in this

embodiment or, alternatively, there may be a plurality of CCMTs to control the plurality of circuit breakers mounted. Likewise, CCMT devices may be built with circuit breakers as modules inserted with a circuit board or part of a circuit board. Figure 6 shows a system 200 in accordance with a further embodiment of the disclosure. As shown, the system 200 comprises a relay 10 and a board 20 containing a processor with a microcontroller and a wireless interface with the addition of a current sensing transducer 30 used to detect current flow passing through the circuit breaker to which the CCMT is coupled with. The block diagram in Figure 5 is an embodiment of the device as a preferred embodiment. The device is coupled upstream to a main supply power source and downstream to one or more circuit breakers (one CCMT device to one circuit breaker is one arrangement; alternatively, a single CCMT device controlling multiple circuits is another arrangement). The CCMT device's processor in the form of a microcontroller 20 on instruction via the wireless interface via the NIC is enabled to switch the relay 10 to an open and/or closed position, which in turn switches on or off the current flow through the circuit. This device controls current flow through the circuit, which in turn controls power supply to all appliances on the circuit without tripping the circuit breaker. When in the "on" position, the circuit breaker is not compromised in detecting a short circuit and/or excessive current flow to initiate the circuit breaker tripping. If the circuit breaker is tripped then standard resetting of the circuit breaker will be required as this is not overridden by the control circuit management technology (CCMT).

The CCMT is enabled to be controlled via user input and/or automated input via it connection to a cloud platform via API and/or web interface. This enables the CCMT to be used to control energy management and/or other resources vie demand management controls.

Referring to Figure 7, the screenshot, as viewed on a remote computer enabled device such as a smartphone or a laptop or other computer enabled device, reveals the CCMT user interface.

Alternatively, voice activation is enabled via Google Home Monitoring software interfacing with the CCMT via its network interface as shown in Figure 15. This enables microanalysis of power consumption of all or individual appliances along with remote actuation of all or individual appliances.

Alternate local CCMT Embodiment

Referring to Figure 16, an alternate local CCMT embodiment is shown which interfaces with a typical home power board.

Preferably, this alternate local CCMT embodiment include a current transducer (not shown) to measure the current passing across the CCMT to an attached appliance (not currently attached) so as to allow the measurement and/or signature of the current of the appliance as discussed earlier. The wireless interface is enabled to receive instruction via one or more communication(s) to actuate the relay to an open and/or closed position (not shown), which in turn switches on or off the current flow through the CCMT device's coupled appliance.

This alternate local CCMT embodiment is also enabled to be repositioned within the power board by rotating the alternate local CCMT embodiment around its plug insertion and receiving section as shown in Figure 16A, B & C. This rotation enables a functional placement of the Symbiot technology to suit consumer requirements to either hide the appliance from sight, optimise space and/or optimise WiFi

communication.

Installation

Referring to Figure 13, the CCMT device provides for the sensing and controlling of power flow through circuits. This is controlled by inserting the CCMT device on the power supply side of premise circuit. Once installed, the device undergoes a power up process where self-diagnosis and fault management regime is implemented to ensure safe operation. Once powered up, the CCMT device is linked to the communication ports to send and receive data and information from typical CCMT communication platforms such as a CCMT cloud platform. These communications can be overridden by the reset buttons on the device which will re-run the set-up processes when desired. Once connected to, for example, the cloud platform, the CCMT device will be operational.

Operation

Referring to Figure 14, the CCMT device provides for the sensing and controlling of power flow through circuits through communication to, for example, the cloud platform, which may read and communicate (publish) operational status. The sensors, for example, temperature sensors may provide override instructions to the CCMT device directly, or alternatively, via the cloud. Likewise, there are also manual override and cloud override means to control the CCMT device as instructed via the user and/or data analysis in the cloud.

There is a loop operation available when an override status has been communicated so that the override status is checked so that the status is enabled to be controlled in safe operational manner.

Control of power use

The CCMT user interface is enabled used by one or more users for many purposes, such as for controlling anticipated power usage as shown in Figure 7, which takes the form of an CCMT user interface modelled for accommodation usage in this example.

In this example of one embodiment, the CCMT user interface provides the means to control the CCMT device from a remote location. This exemplary interface is setup to remotely control power via the CCMT device on one or more specific circuits. This enables control of specific circuits to actuate heating, air conditioning, lighting security systems etc. for short-term rentals.

Shown on Figure 7 is a screenshot of a CCMT user interface that takes the form of calendar, which enables bookings to be scheduled, and when occupied, the hot water, air conditioning and floor heating are turned on via the slide buttons contained on the CCMT user interface. These buttons enable the user to remotely control each CCMT device coupled with - and to actuate circuits for - hot water, air conditioning and floor heating.

Conversely, when the accommodation is vacated, the hot water, air conditioning and floor heating are turned off via the CCMT user interface. There are any number of resources that are enabled to be added to this interface, so long as they are controllable via a CCMT connected circuit breaker or CCMT valve in the case of gas or water.

Currently, as shown in Figure 7, the hot water, air conditioning and floor heating are turned off in the property titled "Taj Mahal" since the guest "Serge LeMans' is not arriving until later today as shown in the description at the top of the page.

The services shown in Figure 7 in the form of the hot water, air conditioning and floor heating are enabled to be turned on:

1 . automatically via the booking calendar detail when occupied, or alternatively

2. manually via a user sliding the button to the right for each specific service. Likewise, information sources provide detail concerning the local environment of the CCMT device. For example, the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) provides information via:

1 . the networked computer enabled CCMT's interface's accommodation's

address settings, or alternatively 2. geolocation settings of the CCMT processor within the CCMT device via the NIC, concerning the current and forecast weather conditions in the location of the accommodation that has the CCMT device installed.

With such information available, the operation of the CCMT device is enabled to be automated. For example, the BOM provides information that the temperature is forecast to be greater than, for example, 24 degrees Celsius at the location of installed CCMT devices. This exemplary information meets a condition interpreted by the microcontroller and/or processed in the connect cloud platform, that the floor heating should not be turned on.

This is an automated response where CCMT devices in a specified location will respond to BOM forecasts for that location. This BOM information is enabled to be communicated via:

1 . the CCMT device's NIC directly, so as to be enabled to be interpreted by the CCMT's microprocessor; or

2. the CCMT's cloud platform, so the exemplary BOM information is processed in the cloud to: for example, override the manual setting concerning floor heating, as put into, for example, the booking calendar. Ultimately, this BOM information as communicated to the CCMT device directly or indirectly, instructs the CCMT device as interpreted via the CCMT's microprocessor, to actuate the relay to inactivate (turn off) the connected circuit controlling the underfloor heating -effectively placing the underfloor heating in to the an "off" position.

The user's commands may also be set to override all CCMT automated actuations in this embodiment. The information provided by the BOM is interrupted as existing within a set of parameters, termed conditions, to be processed to give a specific response to a specified set of conditions. For example, when temperature is below 15 degrees Celsius, then turn on underfloor heating.

Management of resources is enabled via the Energy Manager, which as shown in Figure 7. The Energy Manager tallys the amount of saving provided over set intervals of time such as the saving made on a monthly basis. These saving are the calculation of the period when one or more CCMT devices have turned off circuit breakers compared to the average energy consumption over the period of time when the same circuit breakers have remained on.

The CCMT interface is enabled to be adapted from an accommodation interface to be simply a CCMT actuation controller so as to just control one or more circuits directly via a user input or via Artificial Intelligence using information available to trigger the CCMT's actuator to turn off or on a circuit. Likewise, the CCMT is enabled to be used to control irrigation systems, gas flow, water resources and the like to meet demand on a time, information and/or scheduled context. The

combination of many inputs is enabled to be determined by an array giving weighting to specific criteria glean from, say, a user's or typical person's profile and/or to artificial intelligence where conditions are optimised.

Here, the actuation of a circuit via the CCMT device is enabled through a user's input using CCMT set triggers responding to information concerning local environmental conditions, a profile of a typical user or an actual specific user's profile or a

combination of these inputs

The NIC, accompanying APIs, the CCMT processing cloud and/or CCMT user interface enable the CCMT to connect with information sources available so as to turn off or on particular CCMT device connected circuits via inputs including the following example information sources: 1 . Bureau of Meteorology (BOM),

2. Booking sites (whether the building is vacant or in use),

3. triggers for grid supply (for example, if the grid is under capacity then switch to only critical supply circuits and turn off non-critical circuits to decrease consumption),

4. geofencing (the use of GPS or RFID technology with localised maps or zones to create a virtual geographic boundary, enabling software to trigger a response such as enable power for climate control and/or lights when a mobile device enters a particular geofenced area or turn off lights and/or climate control when the mobile device leaves a particular area). Likewise, these CCMT device can also control other resources such as the opening & closing irrigation valves when regulating water or gas supply. Automation of the CCMT device

The CCMT device will turn off or on one or more circuits when triggered by specific conditions provided via the information sources available and monitored. The triggers as set are enabled to be prioritised and automated via programming interfaces and/or using Artificial Intelligence (Al) to predict a typical user experience as programmed via a profile.

Referring to Figure 9, the control circuit management technology (CCMT) is implemented in close proximity to one or more circuit breakers. The CCMT receives information via one or more communication protocols as selected to Demand Triggers from one or more sources of information. The sources of information as shown in Figure 9 include:

1 . Time of Day,

2. Local weather information provided by sources such as the Bureau of

Meteorology (BOM),

3. Calendars showing intended occupancy of the abode in which the CCMT is implemented,

4. Co-generation sources activity;

5. Grid activity, which provides indicators as to whether resources need to be optimised or prioritised, and

6. Geofencing, to determine if a user of one or more CCMT device governed resources are in near proximity to the CCMT implemented abode.

Figure 9 also shows a CCMT user interface which may also provide information as to which CCMT device controlled circuits should be activated. The combination of the triggers and the user control inputs are optimised in one embodiment using a decision platform, which in some arrangement may include artificial intelligence, which enables integrated automation of the CCMT device controlled circuits.

The synchronous or asynchronous communication via the NIC's wireless interface to the CCMT device's processor enables data decisions to be confirmed and/or changed when the status in one or more CCMT enabled circuits need to be corrected (for example, when the current transducer of a CCMT device is showing current flowing through a circuit when the circuit breaker should be turn off).

The Al is enabled to make data decisions based upon information supplied, user profile (for example, the specific likes and dislikes of a guest in a specific CCMT device enabled home) provided and/or user input where the user creates conditions required. This is termed the services layer.

Here, the Al is enabled to link to services such as the BOM, one or more power suppliers, AirBnB or other accommodation booking service, along with time and/date restraints, industrial or train timetables to control station services etc., and any other service so desired. Here, the Al, profile and/or user is enabled to create an outcome desired by creating triggers in response to monitored information to produce one or more desired outcomes, which are enabled to be prioritised if required.

For example, an outcome desired maybe to water plants when required such as when it is a hot day increase water supply or on a cold day close greenhouse and decrease water supply. The triggers will be weather information including

temperature, humidity, rainfall and wind. These triggers will be calculated to optimise water supply under the matrix of the able conditions.

This programmed response is enabled to be outcome specific (water saturation level must be 0.30 +/- 0.05 mis water per cm 3 soil) or broad in that the outcome desired is to keep the plant alive and/or thriving. Here, Al in the form of, for example, machine learning is enabled to control outputs to maximise the outcome desired.

Here, data from service layer is used to achieve the automation outcome. The CCMT with it's associated web interface acts as a middle layer to interface with the information provided by the services linked (the service layer) to produce a desired outcome (optionally referred to as a presentation layer when referring to the software side of the CCMT).

For example, a CCMT device may be set up such that lights, heating, cooling, hot water service and pool heating is turned on in a time suitable to meet with the arrival of a guest, as determined by a booking services such as AirBnB's booking calendar. Each CCMT service will separately control lights, heating, cooling, hot water service and pool heating depending on the time that is required to activate the service.

Likewise, each CCMT service will be control also via information obtained via the service layer. For example, if the BOM states that the ambient temperature is 21 degrees Celsius then the heating and/or cooling will no longer be required to be activated (turned on). Profile data and user preference data is enabled to be used so that if there is a preference to have an ambient temperature slightly cooler at 17 degrees Celsius, then the cooling will be turned on to meet this preference.

Short-term Stay Use Case Example A Short-term Stay example is provided for controlling the CCMT device via its web interface using a service such as AirBnB:

The CCMT device is installed in a host property, so that the CCMT device is wirelessly connected to the CCMT platform (e.g. cloud platform) which synchronises with the hosts's booking system of choice. The CCMT platform then determines when to open and close circuits to assist the host economically (e.g. saving electricity costs) and to provide guests an enhanced experience by having heating etc. optimised for their stay.

This enhanced stay will be optimised via the guest's booking, which their arrival time will trigger an action specific to each appliance connected to the CCMT device coupled circuit. Therefore, appliances will be turned on for guests arrival and off after departure.

The AirBnB calendar shows the status of specific accommodation as Booked or Vacant. This status will also show when the expected occupancy is going to take place (arrival time between 2:00 & 6:00 pm) so the expected tolerance of arrival should be in activated in the order of 3 hours prior to arrival so as to activate the hot- water service; however, turning on the lighting circuit should not be required at a time any earlier than accepted booking time unless another agreement has taken place (early checking or the like).

The AirBnB calendar is enabled to be synchronised with the CCMT cloud platform to a program (located, for example, in the cloud) containing a series of instructions such as If X (for example, "if booked") then do Y (for example, "turn on lighting circuit" and if temperature is less than 17 degrees Celsius as reported via BOM then "turn on heating circuit"). This series of commands is sent to the CCMT's processor that will turn off or on one or more specific circuits (for example, when they are set up to a plurality of circuits). The CCMT may have firmware that is coded in response to the commands received. Likewise, the program and API is also able to monitor the CCMT status and/or receive any direct command from a user to change the status of one or more of the CCMT's actuate of its associated circuit.

Referring to Figure 10, the above example of the CCMT being used for control of resource use in short-term accommodation is shown schematically. The user interface information is linked to a decision platform where the command is determined from one or more triggers to turn one or more circuit breaker off or on. This action of switching one or more circuits on or off is then communicated back to the User Interface so as to reveal the change in the status of each CCMT controlled circuit.

Controlling unanticipated use

In situations where the grid is over capacity, there is enabled the monitoring of local grid conditions and the supply level and turn off non-critical circuits (for example, pool pumps and the like). Likewise, the use of resources such as power and/or water is enabled to be monitored for usage patterns such as time and frequency of use to optimise specific providers plans so as to optimise expenditure.

Referring to Figure 8, the CCMT collects information from the BOM and like information providers for information specifically relating to the local environmental conditions as shown the upper trace in the upper graph of Figure 8. Here the BOM is providing temperature information within the local area and showing that it is rising and falling as the day falls to night. The abscissa is time as shown over a period of one week. The temperature of the CCMT as shown detected by a local surface sensor is also mapped in the lower trace of the upper graph in Figure 8. This sensor shows that the CCMT local temperature is lower by approximately 30 degrees Celsius that of the BOM's local temperature settings and reflecting the BOM's diurnal temperature; however, at narrower peaks and troughs. This information can provide trouble shooting information such as if the circuit board is overheated or if there is any other potential danger such as fire in the local area.

The current flow through the circuit is also shown in Figure 8's lower graph, so the CCMT is enabled to be monitored as, for example when turn on, the circuit has current flow. Likewise, when turned off, there is no current flow.

In accordance with at least some embodiments, each CCMT device is configured to provide one or more of:

1 ) remote control of a circuit with overriding the circuit protective function;

2) remote monitoring/reading of power consumption via CCMT controlled circuit breakers;

3) automation of CCMT controlled circuits so as to turn off circuit(s) according to environmental requirements;

4) enables prioritisation of CCMT governed circuits so as to turn off circuit(s) which are not critical under resource poor conditions. Although the invention has been described with reference to specific embodiments, these descriptions are not meant to be construed in a limiting sense. Various modifications of the disclosed embodiments, as well as alternative embodiments of the invention, will become apparent to persons skilled in the art upon reference to the description of the invention.




 
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