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Title:
CREAMERS WITH IMPROVED TEXTURE/MOUTHFEEL AND METHOD OF MAKING THEREOF
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/105908
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The present invention relates to beverage products, in particular a liquid non-dairy creamer composition comprising high oleic oils; micellar casein; emulsifiers comprising a mixture of mono- and di-glycerides and diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and di-glycerides; and hydrocolloids comprising a mixture of carrageenan, microcrystalline cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose.

Inventors:
BEZELGUES, Jean-Baptiste (Building E-F, No 5 Dijin Road Haidian DistrictBeijing, 5, 100095, CN)
OCTAVIA, Winnie (351 Linwood Street, DELAWARE, OH Ohio, 43015, US)
NELSON, Richard (5228 Peavine View Trail, Prescott, AZ, 86301, US)
FU, Xiaoping (6821 Crafton Ln, DUBLIN, OH, 43016, US)
FU, Jun-Tse, Ray (7527 Windsor Dr, Dublin, OH, 43016, US)
SHER, Alexander, A (6101 Wynford Drive Dr, Dublin, OH, 43017, US)
Application Number:
EP2018/082636
Publication Date:
June 06, 2019
Filing Date:
November 27, 2018
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
NESTEC S.A. (Avenue Nestlé 55, 1800 VEVEY, 1800, CH)
International Classes:
A23C9/152; A23C11/04; A23C11/08; A23F3/14; A23F5/00; A23L2/52
Domestic Patent References:
WO2017098022A12017-06-15
WO2013092693A12013-06-27
WO2017162701A12017-09-28
Foreign References:
US20040062846A12004-04-01
US20160374360A12016-12-29
EP2978320B12018-05-02
Other References:
None
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
COUZENS, Patrick (Centre de Recherche Nestlé, Case postale 44 Vers-chez-les-Blanc, 1000 LAUSANNE 26, 1000, CH)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Claims

1. A liquid creamer composition comprising

high oleic oils;

micellar casein;

emulsifiers comprising a mixture of mono- and di-glycerides and diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and di-glycerides; and

hydrocolloids comprising a mixture of carrageenan, micro crystalline cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose.

2. The creamer of claim 1 wherein the high oleic oils ranges from 2 to 10 % of the creamer composition.

3. The creamer of claim 1 or claim 2 wherein the high oleic oils comprises a vegetable oil selected from the group consisting of high oleic canola, high oleic soybean oil, high oleic sunflower, high oleic safflower or a combination thereof.

4. The creamer of any one of claims 1 to 3 wherein micellar casein ranges from 0.5 to 1.2 % by weight the creamer composition.

5. The creamer of claim 4 wherein micellar casein ranging from 0.65 to 0.9% by weight of the creamer composition; preferably, ranging from 0.70 to 0.85% by weight of the creamer composition. 6. The creamer of any one of claims 1 to 5 wherein the mono and di-glycerides range from

0.1 to 0.125 % by weight the creamer composition and wherein the diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and di-glycerides range from 0.3 to 0.375 % by weight the creamer composition.

7. The creamer of any one of claims 1 to 6, further comprises sugar selected from the group consisting of sucrose, lactose, glucose, fructose and combinations of these, the sugar ranging from 0-35% % of the creamer composition.

8. The creamer according to any one of claimsl to 7, wherein carrageenan is present in amount ranging from 0.005 to 0.02 %.

9. The creamer according to any one of claims 1 to 8, wherein mixture of microcrystalline cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose is present in amount ranging from 0.2 - to 0.5 %.

10. The creamer according to any one of the preceding claims, further includes a pH buffer.

1 1. The creamer according to any one of claims 1 to 10, wherein the mean particle of oil- in-water emulsion ranging from 0.1 to 0.8 micrometers.

12. A beverage comprising water, beverage-forming components and a sufficient amount of the creamer composition according to any of the preceding claims to provide whitening, good texture and mouthfeel.

13. The beverage of claim 12 wherein the beverage forming component is coffee, tea, or/and chocolate.

14. A process of preparing the creamer composition according to any of the preceding claims comprising:

dissolving the ingredients in hot water under agitation;

sterilizing the composition using ultra-high temperature (UHT) treatment;

homogenizing the mixture at total pressure ranging from 135-300 bars and temperature ranging from 65 to 80 °C, wherein homogenization performed before UHT treatment, after

UHT treatment, or before and after UHT treatment;

sterilizing at UHT conditions at 136-150 °C for 3-30 seconds

cooling the obtained beverage base product to 25°C or below; and filling aseptically UHT beverages in aseptic containers.

15. The process of claim 14, wherein the homogenization is in two steps comprising the first step wherein liquid mixture is exposed to a pressure in the range of 100 to 250 bars and followed by a second step having pressure in the range of 35 to 50 bars.

Description:
Creamers with improved textnre/monthfeel and method of making thereof

Field of the invention [0001] The present invention relates to coffee creamers and the method to produce the same. More specifically, the present disclosure is directed to coffee creamers with improved texture/mouthfeel.

Background of the invention

[0002] Creamers are widely used as whitening agents with hot and cold beverages such as, for example, coffee, cocoa, tea, etc. Creamers can be in liquid or powder forms. A liquid creamer may be intended for storage at ambient temperatures or under refrigeration, and is expected to exhibit stability and retain a constant viscosity over time during storage without phase separation, creaming, gelation and sedimentation. A good creamer while providing a superior taste and mouthfeel dissolves rapidly and provides a good whitening capacity without feathering and/or sedimentation. Mouthfeel, also denoted richness, texture or creaminess, is usually provided by the oil emulsion present in the creamer.

[0003] Creamers such as non-dairy based comprise sodium caseinate which act as a whitener and emulsifier. Recently alternatives to sodium caseinate has emerged. Micellar casein has been developed to replace sodium caseinate in the liquid creamers. Micellar casein is known as an emulsifier, however functionality of micellar casein in the complex liquid creamer matrix was not known, namely if micellar casein could be used to replace sodium caseinate without compromising liquid creamer shelf-life physical and chemical stability, as well as its sensory impact and behavior in hot acidic environment when added to coffee. In addition, the creamer must tolerate most of coffee/tea brewing water hardness. It was surprisingly found that the micellar casein at the specific concentration in combination with low molecular weight emulsifiers provided good shelf life stability. Moreover, it did not compromise texture/mouthfeel and whitening capacity when added to hot coffees. Similar creamer behavior was found when added to hot tea. Additionally, the whitened coffee and tea had no instability issues such as feathering and/or de-oiling. [0004] The present invention relates to stabilizing systems and composition of non dairy shelf-stable aseptically packaged liquid creamers, and to the process of making thereof.

Summary of the Invention

[0005] The present invention now solves the foregoing problems by providing a stable beverage composition having enhanced or improved organoleptic properties.

[0006] Provided is composition of aseptic shelf-stable liquid creamers, formed by the interaction of oil(s)/fat(s), protein(s), carbohydrate(s), and optionally sweetener(s), flavor(s), and stabilized by the use of complex systems containing the combinations of hydrocolloid(s) and emulsifier(s).

[0007] In a first aspect, the invention relates to a liquid creamer composition comprising high oleic oils; micellar casein; emulsifiers comprising a mixture of mono- and di-glycerides and diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and di-glycerides; and hydrocolloids comprising a mixture of carrageenan, micro crystalline cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose.

[0008] The aseptic creamers are shelf-stable at 4 and 20°C for at least 6 months, 3 months at 30°C, and 1 month at 38°C.

[0009] The creamers are easily dispersible in coffee, stable in hot and cold acidic environment, without feathering, breaking emulsion, de-oiling, flocculation and sedimentation. When added to coffee or tea or other liquid products, the creamers provide improved mouthfeel, full body, smooth texture, and also a good flavor with no off-flavor notes developed during storage time.

[0010] Though the present invention discloses the coffee creamers, use of the creamers, it is not limited for only coffee applications. For example, the creamers can be also used for other beverages, such as tea or cocoa, or used with cereals or berries, creamers for soups, in many cooking applications, etc.

[0011] The products of the invention present excellent organoleptic properties, in particular in terms of texture and mouthfeel even when very low levels of fat are used. Besides, the products of the invention show good stability during shelf life. [0012] Another aspect of the present invention relates to a process of preparing the creamer composition comprising: dissolving the ingredients in hot water under agitation; sterilizing the composition using ultra-high temperature (UHT) treatment; homogenizing the composition at total pressure ranging from 135-300 bars and temperature ranging from 65 to 80 °C, wherein homogenization performed before UHT treatment, after UHT treatment, or before and after UHT treatment; sterilizing at UHT conditions at 136-150 °C for 3-30 seconds; cooling the obtained beverage creamer base product to 25°C or below; and filling aseptically UHT beverages in aseptic containers.

Brief description of figures

[0013] Figure 1. Effect of micellar casein concentration on particle size distribution of liquid creamers: a) 0.65%, b) 0.765% and c) 0.90% micellar casein.

[0014] Figure 2. Effect of micellar casein concentration on Integral Transmission measured by Lumisizer of liquid creamers: a) 0.65%, b) 0.765% and c) 0.90% micellar casein.

Detailed Description of the Invention

[0015] In the following description, the % values are in wt% unless otherwise specified.

[0016] The invention pertains to liquid creamers with good texture/mouthfeel and stability during shelf life as result of using specific combination of ingredients.

[0017] Advantageously and unexpectedly, a unique combination of the hydrocolloid texturizing/stabilizing system ingredients was found that improves beverage texture/mouthfeel and provides a pleasant, smooth creamy taste when the creamers added to coffee. In addition, the creamers have good physico-chemical stability during shelf life. The novel hydrocolloid texturizing /stabilizing system includes high oleic oils; emulsifiers comprising a mixture of mono- and di-glycerides and diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and di-glycerides; and hydrocolloids comprising a mixture of carrageenan, microcrystalline cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose.

[0018] In one embodiment of the present invention, the creamer comprises high oleic oils ranging from 2 to 10 wt/wt % of the creamer composition. The high oleic oils comprises a vegetable oil selected from the group consisting of high oleic canola, high oleic soybean oil, high oleic sunflower, high oleic safflower or a combination thereof.

[0019] Further in the present context unless otherwise indicated % of a component means the % of weight based on the weight of the creamer composition, i.e. weight/weight %.

[0020] In one embodiment of the present invention, the creamer comprises micellar casein ranging from 0.5 to 1% by weight of the creamer composition. Preferably, micellar casein ranging from 0.65 to 0.9% by weight of the creamer composition; more preferably, micellar casein ranging from 0.70 to 0.85% by weight of the creamer composition. As indicated in figure 1 and 2, the creamer comprises 0.765% micellar casein showed the most stable emulsions with lowest Lumisizer Integral Transmission and most uniformed emulsion particles.

[0021] In another embodiment of the present invention, the creamer comprises sugar comprising sucrose, lactose, glucose, fructose and/or combinations ranging from 0- 35% of the creamer composition. For example the creamer comprises sugar at from 0-35% of the creamer composition. For example, the creamer comprises sugar selected from the group consisting of sucrose, lactose, glucose, fructose and combinations of these ranging from 0-35% of the creamer composition.

[0022] In another embodiment of the present invention, the creamer comprises a sweetener in an amount of about 0.0003 to about 10% by weight of the composition.

[0023] By“sweetener” it is to be understood an ingredient and/or a mixture of ingredients, which imparts sweetness to the final product. These include natural sugars like cane sugar, beet sugar, molasses, other plant derived nutritive and non-nutritive sweeteners, and chemically synthesized non-nutritive high intensity sweeteners.

[0024] In one embodiment of the present invention, the creamer comprises oil-in water emulsion and the mean particle size of oil-in-water emulsion ranges from 0.1 to 0.8 micrometers, for example the D90 particle size measured by laser light scattering ranges from 0.1 to 0.8 micrometers.

Liquid beverage composition and product [0025] A beverage composition according to the invention comprises the creamer as described in the present invention and may be any beverage composition, meant to be consumed by a human or animal, such as e.g. a beverage, e.g. a coffee beverage, a cocoa or chocolate beverage, a malted beverage, a fruit or juice beverage, a carbonated beverage, a soft drink, or a milk based beverage; a performance nutrition product, , powder or ready-to- drink beverage; a medical nutrition product; a dairy product, e.g. a milk drink, a yogurt or other fermented dairy product; a product for improving mental performance or preventing mental decline, or a skin improving product.

Beverage or beverage composition

[0026] A beverage according to the invention comprises the creamer as described in the present invention and may e.g. be in the form of liquid or liquid concentrate to be mixed with a suitable liquid, e.g. water or milk, before consumption, or a ready-to-drink beverage. By a ready-to-drink beverage is meant a beverage in liquid form ready to be consumed without further addition of liquid. A beverage according to the invention may comprise any other suitable ingredients known in the art for producing a beverage, such as e.g. sweeteners, e.g. sugar, such as invert sugar, sucrose, fructose, glucose, or any mixture thereof, natural or artificial sweetener; aromas and flavors, e.g. fruit, cola, coffee, or tea aroma and/or flavor; fruit or vegetable juice or puree; milk; stabilizers; emulsifiers; natural or artificial color; preservatives; antioxidants, e.g. ascorbic acid; and the like.

[0027] Any suitable acid or base maybe used to achieve a desired pH of the product, e.g. citric acid or phosphoric acid. A beverage of the invention may be carbonated; carbon dioxide may be added by any suitable method known in the art. In a preferred embodiment a beverage comprises up to 10% sucrose or another sweetener in an amount yielding an equal degree of sweetness, more preferably between 2% and 5% sucrose or another sweetener in an amount yielding an equal degree of sweetness. If the beverage is a liquid concentrate or a ready-to-drink beverage it may be subjected to a heat treatment to increase the shelf life or the product, e.g. by retorting, UHT (Ultra High Temperature) treatment, HTST (High Temperature Short Time) pasteurization, batch pasteurization, or hot fill.

[0028] According to a particular embodiment, the pH is controlled by the presence of an acidic component. The acidic component is preferably selected from the group consisting of molasses, an organic acid such as citric acid, an inorganic acid such as phosphoric acid, fruit derived acids and fermentation derived acids.

[0029] The reduction of fat in beverages without compromising the indulgent quality of the product is one of the main challenges faced by the industry. The present invention is overcoming this issue in providing low fat or even non-fat products with similar texture and sensory attributes than those having higher fat contents in terms of creaminess and mouthfeel.

[0030] The products may thus include a stabilizer system. A“stabilizer system” is to be understood as a mixture of ingredients, which contributes to the stability of the beverage product with respect to shelf life, overall texture properties etc. Thus, the stabilizer system may comprise any ingredients, which are of physical and functional importance to the beverage.

[0031] The stabilizer system that may be used in the present products preferably comprises at least one natural emulsifier.

[0032] Natural emulsifiers include for example egg yolk, buttermilk, raw acacia gum, rice bran extract or mixtures thereof. The natural emulsifiers have the advantage of conferring to the finished product improved texture and mouthfeel.

[0033] According to another particular embodiment, the stabilizer system used in the products of the invention comprises at least one non-natural emulsifier. Any food grade emulsifier typically used in beverage could be used suitable emulsifiers include sugar esters, emulsifying waxes such as beeswax, camauba wax, candelilla wax, plant or fruit waxes and animal waxes, polyglycerol fatty acid esters, polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR), polysorbates (polyoxyethylene sorbitan esters), monoglycerides, diglycerides, lecithin and mixtures thereof.

[0034] In another embodiment of the present invention, the creamer comprises emulsifiers comprising a mixture of mono and diglycerides and tartaric acid esters of monoglycerides, wherein the mono and diglycerides range from 0.1 to 0.125 wt% by weight the creamer composition and wherein the tartaric acid esters of monoglycerides range from 0.3 to 0.375% by weight the creamer composition. [0035] The product may additionally comprise flavors or colorants. These are used in conventional amounts which can be optimized by routine testing for any particular product formulation.

EXAMPLES

[0036] By way of example and not limitation, the following examples are illustrative of various embodiments of the present disclosure.

[0037] Particle size distribution was determined by using a laser light scattering

Mastersizer 3000 MA (Malvern Instrument) equipped with Hydro 2000G dispersion unit.

[0038] Integral Transmission of liquid creamers was measured by Lumisizer (http://www.lumisizer.com).

EXAMPLE 1

[0039] Liquid creamers were produced as below.

29 kg sugar, 400 g dipotassium phosphate, 350 g of microcrystalline cellulose with carboxymethyl cellulose, 14 g carrageenan, 100 g mono- and di-glycerides, 300 g diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and di-glycerides; 765 g micellar casein, 15 g were added into 50 kg of hot water (~ 75°C) under high agitation.

[0040] Next, 8 kg of high oleic soybean oil was added to the above liquids under high agitation. Then, additional water was added to adjust the total amount to lOOkg.

[0041] The liquid creamer was pre -homogenized at 135/35 bars, pre -heated, ETTG treated for 12 sec at l40°C, homogenized at 135/35 bars, and cooled. Then the liquid creamer was aseptically filled into bottles.

[0042] The physico-chemical stability and sensory of creamer and coffee beverages with added liquid creamer were judged by trained panelists. No phase separation (creaming, de-oiling, marbling, etc), gelation, and practically no viscosity changes were found during the storage. [0043] The liquid creamer has good appearance, mouth-feel, smooth texture and a good flavor without“off’ taste when added to coffee.

EXAMPLE 2

[0044] A liquid creamer was prepared as in Example 1 but using 650 g micellar casein.

[0045] The physico-chemical stability and sensory of creamer and coffee beverages with added liquid creamer were judged by trained panelists. No phase separation (creaming, de-oiling, marbling, etc), gelation were found during the storage.

[0046] The liquid creamer has good appearance, mouth-feel, smooth texture and a good flavor without“off’ taste when added to coffee.

EXAMPLE 3

[0047] A liquid creamer was prepared as in Example 1 but using 900 g micellar casein.

[0048] The physico-chemical stability and sensory of creamer and coffee beverages with added liquid creamer were judged by trained panelists. No phase separation (creaming, de-oiling, marbling, etc), gelation were found during the storage.

[0049] The liquid creamer has good appearance, mouth-feel, smooth texture and a good flavor without“off’ taste when added to coffee.

[0050] Particle size distribution and Integral Transmission of products of Examples 1 , 2 and 3 are shown in figures 1 and 2. According to the figures, the best stability provided by 0.765% micellar casein, following by 0.90 and 0.65% micellar casein.

EXAMPLE 4

[0051] A liquid creamer was prepared as in Example 1 but using 6.8 kg soybean oil and 500 g micellar casein. [0052] The physico-chemical stability and sensory of creamer and coffee beverages with added liquid creamer were judged by trained panelists. No phase separation (creaming, de-oiling, marbling, etc), gelation were found during the storage.

[0053] The liquid creamer has good appearance, mouth-feel, smooth texture and a good flavor without“off’ taste when added to coffee.

EXAMPLE 5

[0054] A liquid creamer was prepared as in Example 1 but using 2.4 kg soybean oil and 1.2 kg micellar casein.

[0055] The physico-chemical stability and sensory of creamer and coffee beverages with added liquid creamer were judged by trained panelists. No phase separation (creaming, de-oiling, marbling, etc), gelation were found during the storage.

[0056] The liquid creamer has good appearance, mouth-feel, smooth texture and a good flavor without“off’ taste when added to coffee.

EXAMPLE 6

[0057] A liquid creamer was prepared as in Example 1 but using 2.4 kg soybean oil and 600 g micellar casein.

[0058] The physico-chemical stability and sensory of creamer and coffee beverages with added liquid creamer were judged by trained panelists. No phase separation (creaming, de-oiling, marbling, etc), gelation were found during the storage.

[0059] The liquid creamer has good appearance, mouth-feel, smooth texture and a good flavor without“off’ taste when added to coffee.