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Title:
DECREASED DRAG ELECTRIC MACHINE WITH DUAL STATOR AND DISTRIBUTED HIGH FLUX DENSITY SLOT ROTOR PAIRS
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2011/098859
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A method and apparatus for reducing drag in an electric generator are disclosed. Members of slot rotor pairs are distributed along the inner and outer periphery of sections of a stator having slots to accommodate induction windings. The members of the slot rotor pairs include slot rotors having at least one pair of pole sections of a first and a second magnetic polarity. The members of the slot rotor pairs are rotated in a synchronized manner such that a first one of the pole sections of the first member with a first magnetic polarity and a second one of the pole sections of the second member having a second magnetic polarity are aligned with the slots to provide maximum flux density in the induction windings to induce a current flow. The inner peripheries of the first and second stator sections are adjacent to each other. The slots of the stator sections are axially aligned. The first member and the second member of the respective slot rotor pairs are aligned with the aligned slots.

Inventors:
HOLCOMB, Robert, Ray (Nokomis, Florida, 34275, US)
Application Number:
IB2010/001693
Publication Date:
August 18, 2011
Filing Date:
July 09, 2010
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
HOLCOMB, Robert, Ray (Nokomis, Florida, 34275, US)
REDEMPTIVE TECHNOLOGIES LIMITED (Akara Building, 24 de castro StreetWickhams Cay I,,P.O Box 3136,Road Town, Tortola, VG)
International Classes:
H02K16/00
Domestic Patent References:
2009-03-19
1998-06-18
2010-07-15
Foreign References:
US7582982B12009-09-01
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HOLCOMB, Robert, Ray (2 Shenton Way#18-01 SGX Centre 1, Singapore 4, 06880, SG)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS:

1. A method for reducing drag in an electric generator comprising: distributing first members of slot rotor pairs along the outer periphery of a first stator section having induction windings;

distributing second members of the slot rotor pairs along the outer periphery of a second stator section having induction windings, the first members and the second members of the slot rotor pairs including slot rotors having at least one pair of pole sections of a first and a second magnetic polarity; and

rotating the first and second members of the slot rotor pairs in a synchronized manner such that a first one of the pole sections of the first member having the first magnetic polarity and a second one of the pole sections of the second member having the second magnetic polarity are aligned with the slots to provide maximum flux density in the induction windings to induce a current flow therein,

wherein:

the first stator section and the second stator section have slots to accommodate the induction windings;

the inner periphery of the first stator section and the inner periphery of the second stator section are adjacent to each other;

the slots of the first stator section and the second stator section are axially aligned along a lengthwise and depthwise axis thereof; and

the first member and the second member of the respective slot rotor pairs are aligned with the aligned slots of the first stator section and the second stator section along respective lengthwise axes of the first and second members and the slots such that the lengthwise axis of the first and second member are in normal alignment with the depthwise axis of the aligned slots.

2. The method of claim 1 , further comprising magnetically shielding the first and second members such that flux generated by the first and second members is directed into the slots so as to minimize flux leakage and magnetic drag.

3. The method of claim 1 , wherein the distributing first members and distributing second members further includes inserting the first and the second members into respective openings provided in the first and the second stator sections, the respective openings arranged in lengthwise alignment with the slots, to partially shield the first and the second members, and having a longitudinal opening corresponding to a longitudinal opening of the slots, to provide magnetic communication with the corresponding longitudinal opening in the slots.

4. The method of claim 1 , wherein the rotating the first and second members of the slot rotor pairs in a synchronized manner further includes rotating the first and second members of the slot rotor pairs about their axes in opposite directions over the slots such that the net torque generated by the polar force interaction between the first and second members is approximately zero.

5. The method of claim 1 , wherein the rotating the first and second members of the slot rotor pairs about their axes in opposite directions over the slots further includes rotating the first one of the pole sections of the first member having the first magnetic polarity over a slot in a first direction, the second one of the pole sections of the second member being sequenced such that it presents the second magnetic polarity opposite the first magnetic polarity, the second one being rotatable in a second direction opposite the first direction to form a magnetic circuit between the first and second magnetic polarities.

6. The method of claim 1 , further comprising driving the first and second members in a synchronized manner including turning on an excitation current in an armature of the first one of the pole sections of the first member having the first magnetic polarity when the first one is positioned over a slot in a first direction and turning on an excitation current in an armature of the second one of the pole sections of the second member having the second magnetic polarity when the second one is positioned over a corresponding aligned slot in a second direction.

7. The method of claim 1 , further comprising shielding the first and second members such that flux generated when an excitation current is supplied to the armatures of the first and the second members is directed substantially toward the slots.

8. The method of claim 1 , further comprising connecting the induction windings in a three phase, high wye connection. 9. The method of claim 1 , further comprising connecting the induction windings in a three phase, low wye connection.

10. An electromagnetic assembly for an electric generator comprising: a dual stator having a first stator section and a second stator section, a first plurality of slots arranged on an outer periphery of the first stator section and a second plurality of slots arranged on an outer periphery of the second stator section, respective inner peripheries of the first and second stator sections disposed in adjacent relation, each of the first and the second plurality of slots aligned along a lengthwise and depthwise axis to form slot pairs, each of the plurality of slots having induction coil windings disposed therein; and

slot rotor pairs associated with the slot pairs, each of the slot rotor pairs having a first slot rotor member disposed in aligned relation with one of the first plurality of slots and a second slot rotor member disposed in aligned relation with one of the second plurality of slots corresponding to the slot pair, each slot rotor member having at least a pair of magnetic poles one of the pair of magnetic poles having a first magnetic polarity and an other of the pair of magnetic poles having a second magnetic polarity, each slot rotor member being capable of rotating about a longitudinal axis, the slot rotor pairs disposed above the slot pairs such that the induction coil windings disposed in the slot pairs are exposed to magnetic flux generated by the slot rotor pairs;

wherein the first slot rotor member and the second slot rotor member are capable of rotating such that when magnetic flux of one of the magnetic poles of the first polarity associated with the first slot rotor member is directed to a corresponding first slot of the slot pair, magnetic flux of an associated one of the magnetic poles of the second polarity associated with the second slot rotor member is directed to a corresponding second slot of the slot pair such that the induction coil windings disposed in the first and second slots are exposed to increased magnetic flux and leakage of the magnetic flux is minimized.

11. The electromagnetic assembly of claim 10, further comprising a back iron disposed between the first stator section and the second stator section.

12. The electromagnetic assembly of claim 10, wherein each slot rotor member has a shield having an opening positioned over the slots. 13. The electromagnetic assembly of claim 10, further comprising a shield section for shielding magnetic coupling of magnetic flux from the first and second slot rotor members and end teeth portions of the first stator section and the second stator section. 14. The electromagnetic assembly of claims 12 and 13, wherein the shield is made from mu metal.

15. The electromagnetic assembly of any of the preceding claims, wherein the first plurality of slots includes 48 wire slots, and the second plurality of slots include 48 wire slots.

16. The electromagnetic assembly of any of the preceding claims, wherein each of the first stator section and the second stator section has a substantially circular shape. 17. The electromagnetic assembly of claim 16, wherein the first stator section and the second stator section are concentric about a longitudinal axis of the dual stator.

18. The electromagnetic assembly of any of the preceding claims, wherein the first stator section and the second stator section are planar.

19. The electromagnetic assembly of claim 10, further comprising an excitation circuit that applies an excitation current to the first slot rotor member and the second slot rotor member to generate the magnetic flux when the one of the magnetic poles of the first polarity associated with the first slot rotor member is rotated into alignment with a corresponding first slot of the slot pair, and to generate the magnetic flux when the associated one of the magnetic poles of the second polarity associated with the second slot rotor member is rotated into alignment with a corresponding second slot of the slot pair.

20. The electromagnetic assembly of claim 19, wherein the excitation circuit removes the excitation current from the first slot rotor member and the second slot rotor member to remove the magnetic flux when the one of the magnetic poles of the first polarity associated with the first slot rotor member is rotated out of alignment with the corresponding first slot of the slot pair, and to remove the magnetic flux when the associated one of the magnetic poles of the second polarity associated with the second slot rotor member is rotated out of alignment with the corresponding second slot of the slot pair

21. The electromagnetic assembly of claim 20, further comprising a diode circuit for transmitting a current generated when the magnetic flux is removed from the first and the second slot rotor members to a battery.

22. The electromagnetic assembly of claims 19 and 20, wherein the excitation circuit includes a commutator circuit associated with the first and second slot rotor members, the commutator circuit selectively coupling ones of the first and second slot rotor members to the excitation current as the ones are rotated into alignment.

Description:
DECREASED DRAG ELECTRIC MACHINE WITH DUAL STATOR AND DISTRIBUTED HIGH FLUX DENSITY SLOT ROTOR PAIRS

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to a decreased drag electric power generating machine, and more particularly, to reducing drag through the reduction of back electro-motive force (EMF) using a series of slot rotor pairs distributed around a dual wound stator. BACKGROUND

Rapid consumption of exhaustible energy from the earth, largely in the form of fossil fuels and rapid depletion of associated energy resources and

accompanying environmental pollution and climate change drives the clear need for alternative energy supplies. Existing energy supplies must be used more efficiently.

In view of these and other issues, the need for sustainable power generation units is obvious. Renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, hydroelectric, electrostatic, temperature differential and geothermal energy have significant problems of availability, reliability and expense. Even gravity, if it could be efficiently harnessed, could provide a most attractive alternative.

One contribution to increasing consumption efficiency and sustainability is to increase the efficiency of electrical power generation. Increasing the conversion efficiency associated with converting mechanical energy to electrical power can provide potentially large gains. An ordinary electric generator typically converts close to 99% of supplied mechanical power into electric power based on a conventional 100% conversion efficiency comparison factor of one horsepower per 746 watts generated. Still further gains can be achieved using superconducting technology. For example, a superconducting generator can be around 10-times smaller than a conventional generator for the same output.

While such gains are attractive, the expenses and challenges of implementing superconducting solutions are well known. It is therefore also desirable to achieve efficiency gains that are centered around more conventional structures. For example, if the reaction force or magnetic drag can be reduced or eliminated from the armature of an alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC) generator, the efficiency could be theoretically increased by 400 - 500%. Under such an increase in efficiency, one horsepower could generate up to 3,730 watts. Still further, by combining superconductivity with reduced magnetic drag, a greater than 10-fold increase in efficiency may be possible.

Every atom has a nucleus composed of positively charged protons and uncharged neutrons. Negatively charged electrons orbit the nucleus. In most atoms, the number of electrons is equal to the number of protons in the nucleus, so that there is no net charge. If the number of electrons is less than the number of protons, then the atom has a net positive charge. If the number of electrons is greater than the number of protons, then the atom has a net negative charge.

While on an aggregate scale, the universe is electrically neutral, local

concentrations of charge throughout biological and physical systems are responsible for all electrical activity. Further, not all electrons are involved in the structure of material. Vast numbers of electrons which are loosely bound

"electrons at large" are in equilibrium with outer shell electrons of atoms in the environment. It is from this pool of electrons in the atmosphere and in the ground, when set into combined motion along a path, that an electric current is generated. Thus if electrical pressure from a generator is applied to an electrical conductor, such as copper wire, and the circuit closed, electrons will flow along the wire from negative to positive, from atom to atom forming an electric current. The movement of energy associated with electrical current flow occurs at the speed of light, or approximately 186,000 miles per second. For conceptual purposes, a wire connected to a DC power source will cause electrons to flow through the wire in a manner approximating water flowing through a pipe. The path of any one electron can be anywhere within the volume of the wire or even at the surface. When an AC voltage is applied across a wire it will cause electrons to vibrate back and forth in such a manner as to generate magnetic fields that push electrons toward the surface of the wire. As the frequency of the applied AC signal increases, the electrons are pushed farther away from the center and toward the surface.

An electric power generator contains two main parts: a stator and a rotor. The stator is generally made of iron or other ferro-magnetic material and contains long slots having a certain depth and in which wire coils are wound in such a fashion to allow electric power to be generated when magnetic fields emanating from the rotor move past the coils. The rotor contains a specific arrangement of magnets, which are generally wound armature electro-magnets whose strength is governed by the amount of current flowing in the armature windings. When the rotor spins inside the stator, the magnetic fields from the rotor induce a current in the stator windings thus generating what is referred to as electrical power.

The energy required to spin the rotor is typically supplied by a drive unit of some kind, such as an electrical drive motor, diesel or other fossil fuel motor, steam turbine or the like. At typical efficiencies, only 20% of the energy input by the driver motor is devoted to creating electric power. The remaining 80% is dissipated by magnetic drag, or braking forces, that develop between the rotor and the stator.

When current is supplied to a load from a conventional generator, a magnetic force or reaction force is created by the flow of the load current in the generator conductors that opposes the rotation of the generator armature. If the load current in the generator conductors increases, the drag associated with the reaction force increases. More force must be applied to the armature as the load increases to keep the armature from slowing. Increasing drag and increasing load current leads to decreasing conversion efficiency and can eventually lead to destructive consequences for generator equipment.

It would be desirable for a way of increasing generator efficiency by reducing the motor reaction effect and the corresponding negative consequences. SUMMARY

Various exemplary embodiments are discussed and described herein involving aspects of an electric machine, such as a generator that produces power with high efficiency and low drag. In accordance with an aspect, a method is disclosed for reducing drag in an electric generator that includes distributing first members of slot rotor pairs along the outer periphery of a first stator section having induction windings accommodated in slots. Second members of the slot rotor pairs can be distributed along the outer periphery of a second stator section having induction windings accommodated in slots. The slots of the first stator section and the second stator section are axially aligned along a lengthwise and depthwise axis. The "outer" periphery of the second stator section can also correspond to an "inner circumference" where reference is made to a circular stator embodiment. The inner periphery of the first stator section and the inner periphery of the second stator section are adjacent to each other. The first members and the second members of the slot rotor pairs include slot rotors having at least one pair of wound armature pole sections of a first and a second magnetic polarity. The first and second members of the slot rotor pairs can be rotated in a synchronized manner such that a first one of the pole sections of the first member having the first magnetic polarity and a second one of the pole sections of the second member having the second magnetic polarity are aligned with the slots to provide maximum flux density in the induction windings to induce a current flow therein. The first member and the second member of the respective slot rotor pairs are aligned with the aligned slots of the first stator section and the second stator section along respective lengthwise axes of the first and second members and the slots such that the lengthwise axis of the first and second member are in normal alignment with the depthwise axis of the aligned slots. The first and second members can be magnetically shielded such that flux generated by the first and second members is directed into the slots so as to minimize flux leakage and magnetic drag. The first members and the second members can be inserted into respective openings provided in the first and the second stator sections. The respective openings can be arranged in lengthwise alignment with the slots, to partially shield the first and the second members and can be provided with a longitudinal opening corresponding to a longitudinal opening of the slots in order to provide magnetic communication with the corresponding longitudinal opening in the slots and ultimately to the winding disposed therein.

The first and second members of the slot rotor pairs can be rotated about their axes in opposite directions over the slots such that the net torque generated by the polar force interaction between the first and second members is approximately zero. Accordingly, as the first one of the pole sections of the first member having the first magnetic polarity is rotated over a slot in a first direction, the second one of the pole sections of the second member can be sequenced such that it presents the second magnetic polarity opposite the first magnetic polarity in order to maximize the flux density in the aligned slots. The second one of the pole sections is being rotatable in a second direction opposite the first direction to form a magnetic circuit between the first and second magnetic polarities.

The first and second members can be driven in a synchronized manner that includes turning on an excitation current in an armature of the first one of the pole sections of the first member having the first magnetic polarity at an instant in time when the first one of the pole sections is positioned over a slot in a first direction. An excitation current in an armature of the second one of the pole sections of the second member having the second magnetic polarity can be similarly turned on. The first and second members can be shielded such that flux generated when an excitation current is supplied to the armatures of the first and the second members is directed substantially toward the slots. The induction windings can be connected in a three phase, high wye or three phase low wye connection.

In accordance with another exemplary aspect, an electromagnetic assembly for an electric generator can be provided that includes a dual stator having a first stator section and a second stator section. A first plurality of slots are arranged on an outer periphery of the first stator section and a second plurality of slots arranged on an outer periphery of the second stator section. Again, as noted hereinabove, with respect to a circular stator the outer periphery of the second stator section can refer to an "inner circumference." Respective inner peripheries of the first and second stator sections are disposed in adjacent relation and can include a back iron disposed therebetween to improve magnetic coupling through the slots. Each of the first and the second plurality of slots are aligned along a lengthwise and depthwise axis to form slot pairs, each of the plurality of slots having induction coil windings disposed therein. The assembly can further include slot rotor pairs associated with the slot pair. Each of the slot rotor pairs has a first slot rotor member disposed in aligned relation with one of the first plurality of slots and a second slot rotor member disposed in aligned relation with one of the second plurality of slots corresponding to the slot pair. Each slot rotor member has at least a pair of magnetic poles with one of the pair of magnetic poles having a first magnetic polarity and another of the pair of magnetic poles having a second magnetic polarity. Each slot rotor member is capable of rotating about a longitudinal axis. The slot rotor pairs are disposed above the slot pairs such that the induction coil windings disposed in the slot pairs are exposed to magnetic flux generated by the slot rotor pairs. Each slot rotor member can be provided with a shield having an opening positioned over the slots to direct the flux into the slots but minimize external flux leakage. In addition, a shield section can be provided for shielding magnetic coupling of magnetic flux from the first and second slot rotor members and end teeth portions of the first stator section and the second stator section. The shielding can be made from mu metal. The first slot rotor member and the second slot rotor member are capable of rotating such that when magnetic flux of one of the magnetic poles of the first polarity associated with the first slot rotor member is directed to a corresponding first slot of the slot pair, magnetic flux of an associated one of the magnetic poles of the second polarity associated with the second slot rotor member is directed to a corresponding second slot of the slot pair such that the induction coil windings disposed in the first and second slots are exposed to increased magnetic flux and leakage of the magnetic flux is minimized. In one embodiment, the first plurality of slots can include 48 wire slots, and the second plurality of slots can include 48 wire slot. Each of the first stator section and the second stator section can have a substantially circular shape where the first stator section and the second stator section are concentric about a longitudinal axis of the dual stator. Alternatively, the first stator section and the second stator section are planar.

An excitation circuit can be provided that applies an excitation current to the first slot rotor member and the second slot rotor member so as to generate the magnetic flux when the one of the magnetic poles of the first polarity associated with the first slot rotor member is rotated into alignment with a corresponding first slot of the slot pair and to generate the magnetic flux when the associated one of the magnetic poles of the second polarity associated with the second slot rotor member is rotated into alignment with a corresponding second slot of the slot pair. The excitation circuit can further remove the excitation current from the first slot rotor member and the second slot rotor member in order to remove the magnetic flux at an instant when the one of the magnetic poles of the first polarity associated with the first slot rotor member is rotated out of alignment with the corresponding first slot of the slot pair, and to remove the magnetic flux at an instant when the associated one of the magnetic poles of the second polarity associated with the second slot rotor member is rotated out of alignment with the corresponding second slot of the slot pair. A diode circuit can be provided for transmitting a current generated when the magnetic flux is removed from the first and the second slot rotor members to a battery. The excitation circuit can include a commutator circuit associated with the first and second slot rotor members, the commutator circuit selectively coupling ones of the first and second slot rotor members to the excitation current as the ones are rotated into alignment.

It is an object therefore to provide distributed slot rotor pairs that rotate in close proximity to aligned wire slots disposed around the circumferences of a dual stator of an electric power generator,

It is a further object to demonstrate to complete an intensified magnetic circuit and place maximum moving flux into the wire slots using slot rotor pairs. It is a further object to release energy, which would be consumed by drag, as electric power by driving a high efficiency distributed slot rotor generator.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In order that embodiments of the invention may be fully and more clearly understood by way of non-limitative examples, the following description is taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which like reference numerals designate similar or corresponding elements, regions and portions, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary wound dual stator machine having dual electromagnetic slot rotors inserted into shielded recesses in accordance with an embodiment;

FIG. 2 - FIG. 49 are diagrams successively illustrating a series of 7.5 ° clockwise rotational advancements of an exemplary configuration with 48 outer stator slots having corresponding four-pole electromagnetic slot rotors in accordance with an embodiment;

FIG. 50 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary three-phase "high wye" winding connection embodiment of the dual stator arrangement of FIG. 1; FIG. 51 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary sequential phase coil lead arrangement in a three-phase, counterclockwise lap wound stator embodiment;

FIG. 52 is a diagram illustrating the wound stator arrangement of FIG. 51 and an exemplary three-phase "high wye" winding connection for the four-pole electromagnetic slot rotors in accordance with an embodiment; FIG. 53 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary sequential phase coil lead arrangement in a three-phase, clockwise lap wound stator embodiment;

FIG. 54 is a diagram illustrating one of an exemplary four-pole electromagnetic slot rotor and related shielding arrangements;

FIG. 55 is a superior lateral projection diagram illustrating an exemplary four-pole electromagnetic slot rotor;

FIG. 56 is a diagram illustrating a pair of exemplary four-pole electromagnetic slot rotors associated with a dual stator machine;

FIG. 57 is a diagram illustrating a dipole embodiment of an exemplary

electromagnetic slot rotor including pole windings and laminated mu metal shielding;

FIG. 58 is a diagram further illustrating a dipole embodiment of an exemplary electromagnetic slot rotor including pole windings, an exemplary cog wheel drive and mu metal shielding;

FIG. 59 is a diagram illustrating a superior lateral projection of a dipole embodiment of an exemplary electromagnetic slot rotor; FIG. 60 is a diagram illustrating a superior lateral projection of an exemplary steel sleeve shield containment means and mu metal magnetic shielding means;

FIG. 61 is a diagram illustrating a dual pole embodiment of an exemplary dipole electromagnetic slot rotor including pole windings, mu metal shielding around the rotors and on the stator and further illustrating a wire slot flux pattern between the north pole and the south pole; and

FIG. 62 is a diagram illustrating a pattern of separate phases of three phase power as it proceeds through one cycle of 360 electrical degrees as is generated by an exemplary generator.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

In accordance with various exemplary embodiments discussed and described herein, motor reaction force may be reduced and other problems can be solved in an embodiment whereby a series of rotatable bipolar or quadrapolar electromagnets, electrical armatures, rotors or the like, can be disposed or otherwise inserted on their axis into recesses in a stator. The recesses can be shielded and positioned over each wire slot of the generator such that wire slots are covered in the correct pattern to mimic a central single 4 pole rotor of a conventional generator. Maximum flux density is obtained in accordance with a novel embodiment whereby wire slots on an inner stator circumference and an outer stator circumference are each provided with slot rotors forming an exemplary dual slot rotor, dual stator configuration.

The following detailed description provides an understanding of embodiments of the invention as illustrated and described herein below. Exemplary embodiments are provided that allow electric energy to be generated based on directly or indirectly on conventional fossil fuel driven energy sources with greatly increased efficiency resulting in reduced consumption of fossil fuel supplies and reduced output of greenhouse gases. Accordingly a high efficiency generator is provided that shields or separates the drag creating magnetic forces from one another so that upwards of 80% of the driving energy which conventionally is consumed by magnetic drag is converted to electric power.

In accordance with an embodiment as will be described in greater detail in connection with the illustrations below, the classic rotor armature and stator have been replaced by a laminated steel dual stator having a stator section with an outer circumference and a stator section with an inner circumference. Each stator section has, in one example, 48 wire slots that are magnetically coupled with individual slot rotors of corresponding slot rotor pairs. The corresponding slots from the inner and outer stator sections are aligned with each other and a ferrous back iron can be disposed between the stator sections to increase the flux coupling. A slot rotor and/or slot rotor transmission support means can also be attached to the stator. The support means can be oriented in a variety of manners such as, for example, in a manner whereby the plane of the support means base is parallel with the planes of the end portions of the stator. A slot rotor pair support means, including, for example, bearing blocks and the like can also be attached to the base support means.

The slot rotor pair support means can support the combined 96 slot rotors of the inner and outer stator section circumferences. The slot rotors can be constituted of, for example, two pole or four pole wound armature poles and associated bearing mechanisms and other mechanisms. As will be appreciated, the exemplary apparatus can be configured with 48 slot rotor assemblies for the outer circumference and 48 slot rotor assemblies on the inner circumference. The slot rotors are positioned in close proximity to the wire slots in order for each rotor of the slot rotor pair to form a closed magnetic circuit through both slots. It should be noted that one of the slot rotors in the slot rotor pair rotates clockwise and the other rotates counterclockwise in order for the proper magnetic flux to be delivered to the wire slots.

The exemplary 96 armature mechanisms can be contained in magnetically shielded cylinders such as mu metal cylinders with an appropriate open slot in the shield that is positioned directly over the stator wire slots. Each slot rotor armature of the slot rotor pair can be energized and the individual rotor assembly can be rotated to provide alternating fields of north and south pole magnetic flux field energy into the open wire slots of the induction coils in the stator. Each of the slot rotors in the slot rotor pair is rotated such that a pole of one slot rotor makes up a complete magnetic flux circuit with the corresponding opposite pole of the other slot rotor of the slot rotor pair thereby directing a maximum amount of magnetic flux into the slots. The magnetic poles are activated with DC current via a brush and commutator apparatus or other appropriate solid state

mechanism such that the magnetic pole is activated only as it passes over the wire slot. Since the opening of the mu metal laminated shield is precisely positioned over the wire slot, the slots of the stator are exposed to only a small but intense window of magnetic flux. Accordingly, only minimal electromagnetic drag upon the slot rotors is experienced.

In accordance with an aspect, the slots in the outer circumference and inner circumference are aligned. The magnetic poles of each individual member of the pair of slot rotors rotate in a coordinated fashion respectively over the inner and outer aligned slots such that, for example, as a north pole of one of the pair of rotors rotates over one slot of the inner slot, a south pole of the other of the pair of rotors rotates over the outer slot. Thus, the dual rotors can be sequenced such that they present opposite poles to corresponding slots in the inner and outer stators respectively thereby making up a magnetic circuit between the north pole and south pole as they rotate past one another. The resulting magnetic circuit generates a very high flux density into the slots on both the inner and outer stators and into the shared back iron. In an exemplary bipolar slot rotor, one of the two pole sections is north pole charged and the opposite section is south pole charged. In one embodiment, the north pole section can be constituted by a 120° section and the south pole can be constituted by an opposite 120° section with a 60° neutral zone between poles on each side thereof. Pole sections can be shielded with mu metal shielding. Each of the slot rotor arrangements can be contained in a longitudinal cylindrical cavity that is located in close proximity to and extends lengthwise along the opening of the winding slots. The slot rotor mechanism, including a mu metal shield can be contained within a steel cylinder or partial cylinder which has an opening that approximately corresponds and is in communication with the opening of the stator wire slot. An opening along the length of the steel cylinder can be in alignment with a slot or opening along the length of the mu metal shield to allow magnetic coupling between the slot rotor and the winding slot. Due to the mu metal insulation, the north slot rotor pole of one of the pair of slot rotors only sees a narrow segment of the opposing field from the south slot rotor pole of the other of the pair of slot rotors coming through the wire in the wire slots. The degree of magnetic interaction between the slot rotor pairs and flux coupling from the opposite magnetic poles through the back iron is minimal due to current flow within the windings that occupy the slots. It should be noted that the induction coils of the stator are arranged in four groups per phase, four coils per group and three phases. The north poles and south poles of the slot rotors rotate in sequence and thereby mimic the four poles of a standard four pole, three phase generator.

It will be appreciated that in an embodiment, the slot rotors may be fashioned, for example, as wound electromagnetic armatures that are positioned as 48 pairs of rotors around the circumference of a dual wound stator. While 48 pairs are shown for illustrative purposes, it is by way of example only and different numbers of slot rotor pairs can be used. An individual slot rotor armature may be made by fashioning a series of laminated steel pole pieces upon a shaft in a manner similar to that of a conventional generator armature. The completed pole pieces can be wound in a conventional manner with insulated wire to suitable winding specifications for the operating demands of the generator. Power can be applied to the armatures as will be described in greater detail hereinafter.

To drive the shafts of the slot rotor mechanisms, a gear mechanism can be provided on one end of the individual slot rotor shafts which meshes with a gear mechanism on the same end of a magnet containment means over the circumference of the stator. As the slot rotor pairs and their respective armatures are rotated on both sides of the stator in a synchronized manner by the gear mechanism, power can be generated with greatly reduced drag as compared with a single, central rotating armature of a conventional generator. Power generation in accordance with the reduced electromagnetic drag provided by various embodiments discussed and described herein can result in, for example, a four to five fold increase in electrical energy output with the same mechanical or kinetic energy input. With an exemplary mechanical input of, for instance, one horsepower provided by an electric drive motor driving the exemplary gear mechanism, one horsepower of mechanical energy may generate approximately 3,000 watts, rather than the more conventional limit of 746 watts. Therefore, as the conventional 1 horsepower electric motor drives the gear mechanism the generator of the invention will consume 746 watts of electric energy and generate 3,000 watts, thereby generating an additional 2,254 watts of usable energy.

In an embodiment, a series of bipolar or quadrapolar magnetic slot rotors can be enclosed inside a cylinder, such as a shielded cylinder or the like, which can be fitted into, for example, cylindrical shaped opening provided in the stator. A small cylinder housed in a larger cylinder insert can be pressed into a bearing holder of each rotor which is positioned over aligned wire slots on the peripheries of sections of the stator of the generator such that only the area over the wire slots is exposed to the magnetic field of the spinning slot rotors, which can extend along the length of the wire slot. A North magnetic pole of one of the slot rotors in the pair and the South magnetic pole of the corresponding one of the slot rotors in the pair complete a magnetic circuit through the wire slots thereby exposing the wires in the slots to maximum moving lines of flux.

The slot rotors can be rotated in a synchronized fashion by a transmission mechanism that is, in turn rotated by, for example, a shaft off one of the cogs in the transmission, which can be attached to a mechanical drive. The foregoing arrangement, by preventing unwanted magnetic interaction between the stator and the armature, will decrease drag and, as an electrical load is applied to the generator, magnetic flux density and corresponding current flow increases in the wire slots. The process of electrical power generation can be thought of as a process by which the input of kinetic energy, for example, is used to move a magnetic field. The resulting moving magnetic field moves across the conductor wires in the stator induction wire slots of the electric generator causes an electrical current to flow in the coils of the generator. The electrical current flowing in the stator coils creates a magnetic field by virtue of the physical construction of the coils and the laminated steel in which they are wound. The newly created magnetic field in the stator iron increases in strength as electric power is increasingly drawn from the generator and is approximately equal and of opposite polarity to the original source of the magnetic field. The stator field interacts with the original source of the magnetic field in the rotor which ends up dissipating the kinetic energy input to the system. Therefore, it may appear that kinetic energy is being converted into electrical energy. In fact the kinetic energy is only eliciting electrical energy which, by virtue of design of the generator, is dissipating the kinetic energy by acting in the opposite direction of the original kinetic energy.

The problem associated with such energy dissipation is a fundamental problem of generator design rather than a practical necessity of the generator process. A change in generator design can eliminate the unwanted byproduct of back electromotive force (EMF) and subsequent magnetomotive force without affecting the generating process. The input of kinetic energy is no longer related to electrical output. In accordance with various embodiments, an electrical generator system can be provided in which a conventional magnetically polarized generator rotor is replaced by a series of distributed slot rotors having magnetic poles affixed over and in close proximity to each wire slot. In order to isolate the magnetic flux and direct it to the slots, the slot rotors can be shielded with, for example, mu metal, which can be an annealed metal of 75% nickel, 15% iron, plus copper and molybdenum.

A stator in accordance with the embodiments discussed and described herein can contain wire slots on the inner circumference as well as the outer

circumference. It should be noted however that, by use of the terms "inner" and "outer," illustrative reference is made to a circular shaped stator embodiment. It will be appreciated and should be emphasized that the dual stator need not be circular and can be linear or planar, or can be of a semi-circular or other shape and have dual stator sections with the same effect as the embodiments specifically illustrated and described herein. In such an embodiment where the stator is not circular, the terms inner circumference and outer circumference can be replaced by terms such as first outer periphery and second outer periphery. Further, since an exemplary stator in various embodiments is described herein as dual stator arrangement, the first outer periphery and second outer periphery can include the stator surface containing the slot rotors. The respective inner peripheries of the stator sections can be adjacent to and can face each other either directly or with an intervening member such as a back iron or the like.

The slots in the outer circumference and inner circumference are aligned. The magnetic poles rotate over both aligned slots such that as a north pole rotates over one slot, the pole over the aligned slot is sequenced such that it presents a south pole rotating in the opposite direction thereby making up a magnetic circuit between the north pole and south pole as they rotate past one another. This magnetic circuit generates a very high flux density into the slots on both the inner and outer radius and into the shared back iron. Each of the magnetic bodies is constructed as small, wound inductive magnetic armatures. The unique design is powered by a DC current supply which activates pole coils through a brush and slip ring mechanism such that the magnetic poles are only activated as they are rotated over the unshielded wire slot. The small armature mechanism is separated from the back EMF (and related magnetomotive force) by mu metal shields placed on the flat portion of the stator tooth between each slot which shields all except for an open slot over the wire slots of the stator. In addition, mu metal shield cylinders completely surround the electromagnetic armature mechanisms. These cylinders are only open to the wire slots of the stator. The shielded electromagnetic poles are rotated by a transmission mechanism which effectively exposes the wire slots to a high density moving magnetic field over and through the slots of the induction coils of the stator. The magnetic poles of the armature mechanism are only activated as they rotate over the wire slots. With the proper stator winding and pole activation sequence, clean balanced 3 phase alternating current (AC) can be generated. By making the appropriate changes, single phase, 2 phase and direct current may be generated. The attributes of the current invention allows generators of practically unlimited size with greatly improved efficiency to be constructed. The efficiency increase when compared to a present day electrical generation technology is significant.

With reference now to the figures, FIG. 1 shows an end view of an exemplary embodiment involving a dual laminated steel stator 1 embodiment with 96 armature mechanisms, or slot rotors as described hereinafter, which form 48 slot rotor pairs. The slot rotor pairs, such as is exemplified by outer slot rotor 2 and inner slot rotor 10, are shown positioned over wire slots 30 of the outer stator race and wire slots 116 of the inner stator race of stator 1. In the present embodiment, the outer race slots of laminated steel stator 1 contains a series of 48 slots, which slots and relationship between slot rotors can be more readily appreciated with reference to FIG. 2. For illustration purposes, FIG. 2 through FIG. 49 show only an exemplary outer stator race. However it will be

appreciated that since the inner stator race (not shown) is concentrically positioned and since the inner and outer slots are aligned, the same rotational advancement, such as in 7.5 degree increments from figure to figure is applicable. However, as previously noted, the slot rotors of the inner

circumference will rotate in an opposite direction and have slot rotor poles of the opposite polarity being positioned over the slots as compared to those of the outer slot rotors.

It will further be appreciated that, with reference to FIG. 1 , the outer race slots contain induction coils associated with a 3 phase generator. In the figure, the first phase 12, the second phase 14 and third phase 13. The various phase coils can be connected using a wye connection such as a "low wye" or a "high wye" connection. The inner race slots can also contain induction coils of a 3 phase generator wherein the first phase 15, the second phase 17 and the third phase 16 which can also use a wye connection such as a low wye or high wye. The rotating north-south-north-south pole energy is separated by areas of magnetic void between each pole as is represented in FIG 1 . In an embodiment, the four- pole electromagnetic slot rotors 2 in the outer race and electromagnetic slot rotors 10 in the inner race are only turned on, energized or excited as they rotate past the wire slots the depiction represents activation by outlined magnetic poles.

While, as noted, FIG. 1 depicts an exemplary stator 1 with both outer race wire slots 30 and inner race wire slots 116, FIG. 2 - FIG. 53 depict examples where only the outer wire slots 30 are shown. For the sake of simplicity, FIG. 2 - FIG. 49 depict the pole sequencing with reference only the outer slot 30 for the complete 360° rotational cycle. FIG. 50 - 53 illustrate winding connections and the like, with reference only to the outer slots 30 for simplicity.

To better understand the exemplary dual stator and slot rotor pair structure and operation, a description is provided that encompasses each magnetic section of the stator and the slot rotors during an instant of rotation. The term covered as used herein below refers to various states whereby a particular slot rotor pole is in full or partial alignment with the underlying wire slot as it rotates by the slot. Each slot is shown with a corresponding slot number shown inside the slot in brackets such as [1] through [48]. With reference again to FIG. 1, as can be seen, slot [45] is covered by a north pole which can be energized or otherwise activated as is represented by a solid state of the pole coloring nearest the slot. Progressing counterclockwise, slot [46] is covered by an activated magnetic pole as is slot [47], [48], [1], [2], [3], and [4]. An indication that all eight wire slots are receiving magnetic flux from the activated slot rotor is provided by the solid state of the pole coloring. The arc 18 refers to the span of north pole #1. Continuing counterclockwise on FIG. 1 , the rotors 4 covering slots [5], [6], [7], [8] are not excited and therefore are not emitting any magnetic flux as is indicated by the outlined or uncolored state of the pole coloring. Next, excitation for south pole #1 begins. The slot rotors that cover slots [9], [10], [11], [12], [13], [14], [15] and [16] are excited as is indicated by the solid state of the pole coloring. The arc 19 refers to the span of south pole #1. Continuing counterclockwise, the slot rotors that cover slots [17], [18], [19] and [20] are not excited and therefore are not emitting any magnetic flux as is indicated by the outlined state of the pole covering. Next, excitation for north pole #2 begins. The rotors that cover slots [21], [22], [23], [24], [25], [26], [27], and [28] are excited as is indicated by the solid state of the pole covering. The arc 20 refers to the span of north pole #2. Continuing counterclockwise in FIG 1 , the rotors covering slots [29], [30], [31] and [32] are not excited and therefore are not emitting any magnetic flux as is indicated by the outlined state of the pole coloring. Next, excitation for south pole #2 begins. The rotors which cover slots [33], [34], [35], [36], [37], [38], [39] and [40] are excited as is indicated by the solid state of the pole coloring. The arc 21 refers to the span of south pole #2. Continuing counterclockwise in FIG 1 , the rotors covering slots [41], [42], [43] and [44] are not electrically excited and therefore are not emitting any magnetic flux as is indicated by the outlined state of pole coloring.

When the pole rotors 3 and 9 begin to rotate in a synchronous fashion, four spans of actively excited slot rotors and corresponding magnetic poles distributed around the outer and inner circumferences of the stator each occupy

approximately 60° of the total stator circumference. The active spans are interspaced with four magnetically void segments corresponding to the slot rotors that are not actively excited that each occupy approximately 30° of the rotor circumference. FIG. 2 through FIG. 49 are sequential drawings in which the armatures of the slot rotors are rotated 7.5° in a clockwise fashion from those of the previous figure. With reference to FIG. 1 , the outer race wire slots and slot pole rotors are identical to those of FIG 2 - 49. FIG. 1 additionally shows the inner race wire slots and corresponding slot pole rotors of the slot rotor pairs associated with the dual stator, dual slot rotor configuration of various inventive embodiments. It should also be noted that in accordance with the embodiments, the dual slot rotors rotate in opposite directions such that the poles rotating over the inner slots 116 and the outer slots 30 are synchronized. When the poles are in position, they can be turned on simultaneously such that the north pole flux lines from one are synchronized with the south pole flux lines from the other and a magnetic circuit is completed therebetween. The resulting magnetic flux excites the stator induction coils while experiencing very little resistance due to counter EMF produced as the magnetic arc traverses the circumference of the stator. The rotational torque of the slot rotors approximates that of the separation forces in a mechanical gear system. Torque increase associated with the generation portion of the slot rotor's rotational cycle is only a small fraction of the force required to move these two poles laterally past one another due to the attracting and repelling flux lines of the lateral movement. As the trailing edge of the magnetic field produced by the rotating slot rotor pairs reaches the edge of the shielding slot and the wire slot, the DC excitation current for the rotor armatures is turned off until the next generation cycle.

It will be appreciated that in order to control the application of the current to the various slot rotor armatures, various means can be used both to synchronize rotation and energize the slot rotor armatures. For example, commutator arrangements can be used to selectively apply current to the slot rotor armatures at the appropriate time as the slot rotors are synchronously rotated about their respective axes. Alternatively, the application of current can be controlled by a computer, processor, controller or other suitable logic as would be appreciate to control the application of current to the slot rotor armatures and to accomplish current control for output voltage regulation purposes. Such a controller can make corrections at a rate much higher than the rotational rate of the slot rotors and thus can apply a degree of high resolution control that would be more difficult with a commutator arrangement. Also including in any such a rotation and excitation control circuit is a current recover circuit. As the current in the slot rotors is turned off, the excitation field in the rotor collapses sending a pulse of current in the opposite direction, which is returned to a battery through a diode circuit such that a minimal amount of power is consumed by the excitation of the slot rotors.

In accordance with various exemplary embodiments, and, in particular, a 48 slot embodiment, all of the slot rotors in the outer race and inner race of the stator can be connected in a permanent positional relationship through a transmission which is driven by a driver motor or other driving element. The synchronous rotation of the outer race slot rotors and the inner race slot rotors allows the generation of an arc of induction flux across the aligned wire slots in the outer race and in the inner race. The synchronization is such that at any one instant, 8 slot rotor pairs generate an arc of north pole flux in 8 corresponding slots of the outer race and an arc of south pole flux in 8 aligned slots in the inner race. The physical makeup of the slot rotors and the induction coils in the outer race and the inner race are identical. However, it will be noted that that rotational relationship of the inner slot rotors to the inner race slots is offset by 90° as compared to the rotational relationship of the outer slot rotors to the outer race slots.

With further reference to an embodiment, for example, as depicted in FIG. 1, it is noted that the 3 phase induction coils of the outer race are wound in the same fashion as the 3 phase induction coils of the inner race slots, however north pole #1 (22) is rotated 90° counterclockwise when compared to the north pole #1 (I8) of the outer race. It will further be noted an exemplary mu metal magnetic shield 8 is shown, for illustrative purposes, as being placed over the inner race slot rotor of slot #4, as is the shielding 6 over the outer race slot rotor of slot #4. Further examples are provided of mu metal magnetic shielding 5 on a stator tooth of the outer race and shielding 7 is on a stator tooth on the inner race. In accordance with an embodiment, though not shown, the shielding will be placed over each of the 96 rotors and over all the stator teeth of both the inner race and outer race to minimize flux leakage between the rotors and the stator sections.

As previously noted, an exemplary generator can be configured for three-phase, two-phase, single phase and DC generation. In the present example, a three- phase implementation is shown. Accordingly, a depiction of the internal wiring connections of the 3 phase 4 pole 12 coil generator is shown in FIG. 50 for both the outer race windings and the inner race windings. As would be readily appreciated by one of skill, the illustrated hookup is referred to as a "high wye" connection. More specifically, in a high wye connection, each phase can be configured to include two winding circuits which may be connected in series and produces 480 volts. Alternatively, the two of the winding circuits may be connected in parallel and can be referred to as a "low wye" connection. While a low wye configuration produces 240 volts, the current output can be doubled as compared with the "high wye" such that the power output is the same for each hookup.

Following the phase circuits from the power output leads through the circuits to the neutral "wye" connection for the outer race windings and the inner race windings, and with initial reference to the outer race, phase A leg 33 includes coil group 38 wound in a counterclockwise or north pole (N) direction. Input is at circle 1 ( © ) and output is at circle 4. The output lead 69 connects with coil group 41 , wound in a clockwise or south pole (S) direction with an input at circle 1 and output at circle 4. The output lead 72 connect with coil group 44, wound in a counter clockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 7 and output at circle 10. The output lead 75 connects with coil group 47 wound in a clockwise (S) direction with input at circle 7 and output at circle 10. The output lead 78 connects with lead 66 at the central "wye" connection 62 with the other two phases.

Phase B leg 35 includes coil 40 wound in a counterclockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 2 and an output at circle 5. The output lead 71 connects with coil group 43 which is wound in a clockwise direction (S) with an input on circle 2 and out on circle 5. The output lead 74 connects to coil group 46 wound in a counterclockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 8 and an output at circle 1 1. The output lead 77 connects to coil group 49 which is wound in a clockwise (S) direction with an input at circle 8 and an output at circle 1 1. The output lead 80 connects with lead 67 making up a portion of the "wye" connection at 62.

Phase C leg 35 connects to coil group 42 wound in a counterclockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 3 and an output at circle 6. The output lead 73 connects to coil group 45 wound in a clockwise (S) direction with an input at circle 3 and an output at circle 6. The output lead 76 connects to coil group 48 wound in a counterclockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 9 and an output at circle 12. The output lead 79 connects to coil group 39 wound in a clockwise (S) direction with an input at circle 9 and an output at circle 12. The output lead 70 connects to conductor 68 which forms the third leg of the "wye" connection 62.

With reference now to the inner race windings, phase A2 leg 34 connects to coil group 50 wound counterclockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 1 and an output at circle 4. The output lead 81 connects to coil group 53 wound in the clockwise (S) direction with an input at circle 1 and an output at circle 4. The output lead 84 of the two coil groups connects to coil group 56 wound in the counterclockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 7 and an output at circle 10. The output lead 87 connects to coil group 59 wound in a clockwise (S) direction with an input at circle 7 and an output at circle 10. The output lead 90 connects to conductor 63 which connects with the "wye" connection 62 with the other two phases.

Phase B2 leg 36 connects with coil group 52 wound in a counterclockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 2 and an output at circle 5. The output lead 83 connects to coil group 55 wound in a clockwise (S) direction with an input at circle 2 and an output at circle 5. The output lead 86 connects to coil group 58 wound in a counterclockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 8 and an output at circle 11. The output lead 89 connects to coil group 61 wound in a clockwise (S) direction with an input at circle 8 and an output at circle 11. The output lead 90a connects to neutral lead 64 which connects to the "wye" connection 62. Phase C leg 38 connects with coil group 54 wound in a counterclockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 3 and an output at circle 6. The output lead 85 connects to coil group 57 wound in a clockwise (S) direction with an input at circle 3 and an output at circle 6. The output lead 88 connects to coil group 60 wound in a counterclockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 9 and an output at circle 12. The output lead 91 connects to coil group 51 wound in a clockwise (S) direction with an input at circle 9 and an output at circle 12. The out lead 82 connects to conductor 65 which forms the third leg of the "wye" connection 62.

With the above described spacing of the inner race windings and the outer race windings and the internal connections, three phase power can be generated with the phase legs separated electrically by 120°, when an exemplary four pole rotating magnetic field with 60° of coverage of the stator with each pole and a 30° segment of no magnetic field between each 60° pole is employed and rotated at the proper speed from the dual slot rotors of the described embodiments. With reference to FIG. 51 , a depiction of the actual coil groups which are represented diagrammatically in FIG. 50 is shown. The input and output wires for each wound coil group in FIG. 51 correspond to the same numbers as represented in FIG. 50. The correspondence can be described as follows: Phase A coil group #1 input wire #1-92, output wire #2-93; Phase C coil group #1 input wire #3-115, output wire #4-94; Phase B coil group #1 input wire #5-95, output wire #6-96; Phase A coil group #2 input wire #7-97, output wire #8-98; Phase C coil group #2 input wire #9-99, output wire #10-100; Phase B coil group #2 input wire #11-101 , output wire #12-102; Phase A coil group #3 input wire #13-103; output wire #14-104; Phase C coil group #3 input wire #15-105, output wire #16- 106; Phase B coil group #3 input wire #17-107, output wire #18-108; Phase A coil group #4 input wire #19-109, output wire #20-110; Phase C coil! group #4 input wire #21-111 ; output wire #22-112; Phase B coil group #4 input wire #23- 113, output wire #24-114.

It will be appreciated that the above detailed description provides the ability to easily transpose the internal hookup diagram shown in FIG. 50 to an actual exemplary wire hookup of wound three phase coils of an embodiment. The winding depicted in FIG. 52, as in FIG. 50, is a three phase four pole winding. There are four coil groups per phase and are counterclockwise lap wound. The numerical labeling exercise in FIG. 50 and FIG. 51 denote like elements except for the coil numbers which denote like elements with FIG. 50.

With reference to FIG. 52, Phase A leg 92 is connected to coil group 38-A wound in a counterclockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 1 and an output at circle 4. The output lead 93 connects to coil group 41 -A which is wound in a clockwise (S) direction with an input at circle 1 and an output at circle 4. The output lead of these two coil groups 97 connects to coil group 44-A wound in a

counterclockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 7 and an output at circle 10. The output lead 104 connects to coil group 47-A wound in a clockwise (S) direction with an input at circle 7 and an output at circle 10. The output lead 109 makes up in the "wye" connection 62 with the other two phases.

Phase B leg 95 connects with coil group 40-B wound in a counterclockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 2 and an output at circle 5. The output lead 96 connects to coil group 43-B wound in clockwise (S) direction with an input at circle 2 and an output at circle 5. The output lead 101 connects to coil group 46- B wound in a counterclockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 8 and an output at circle 11. The output lead 108 connects to coil group 49-B wound in a clockwise (S) direction with an input at circle 8 and an output at circle 11. The output lead 113 connects to a portion of the "wye" connection 62. Phase C leg 99 connects to coil group 42-C wound in a counterclockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 3 and an output at circle 6. The output lead 100 connects to coil group 45-C wound in a clockwise (S) direction with an input at circle 3 and an output at circle 6. The output lead 105 connects to coil group 48- C wound in a counterclockwise (N) direction with an input at circle 9 and an output at circle 12. The output lead 112 connects to coil group 39-C wound in a clockwise (S) direction with an input at circle 9 and an output at circle 12. The output lead 115 connects to "wye" connection 62.

FIG. 53 illustrates an internal race winding of the stator 117 of the invention with a three phase four pole clockwise lap winding with four coils per phase. The slots 116 contain slot insulation as well as insulation between the phase coils. Phase A coils 120 are depicted in blue, Phase C coils 119 are depicted in brown, and Phase B coils are depicted in red.

FIG. 54 illustrates a four pole electromagnetic slot rotor including a portion of the stator, the winding slot, and the windings and shielding. Stator slot 116 reveals a cross-section of the copper induction coils making up the windings. The stator slot can be insulated with a material of high dielectric characteristics. The slot wedge 127 holds the wire firmly in the slots. The stator surface 125 is covered over the stator tooth with magnetic shielding 117. The four pole rotor 128 consists of laminated poles wound with copper magnet wire. North pole 126 is wound in a counterclockwise fashion, south pole 124 is wound in a clockwise fashion, north pole 121 is wound in a counterclockwise fashion, and south pole 19 is wound in a clockwise fashion. Shaft 122 is supported by bearings in a bearing pocket inside a support means. There is a center hole 120 in the shaft such that power wires may be fed to the electromagnetic pole heads. The electromagnetic shield 123 shields any interaction of magnetic fields when the electromagnetic heads are turned off just as they pass the slot opening 1 7. As described hereinabove, when the DC current is turned off the magnetic field collapses and reverses the polarity for an instant causing a current spike that can be recovered for storage in a battery or the like.

FIG. 55 further illustrates an exemplary four pole rotor 128 of an embodiment including shaft 122, lateral views of a magnetic pole shoe face 132 and 133. South pole 124 is wound in a clockwise fashion, north pole 121 is wound in a counterclockwise fashion, south pole 119 is wound in a clockwise fashion, and north pole 126 is wound in a counterclockwise fashion.

FIG. 56 further illustrates an exemplary pole rotor configuration providing distinct advantages. In accordance with an embodiment, the inner race slot and the corresponding outer race slot with their accompanying slot rotors are aligned with the slot rotors rotating in opposite directions. Accordingly, when a north pole rotates over the wire slot of the outer race, the opposite pole rotates in a synchronous fashion over the inner race wire slot. The described arrangement allows the completion of a magnetic circuit between the north poles of ones of the pairs of slot rotors and south poles of the others of the pairs of slot rotors as they rotate over the slots in a 60° arc. The combined action of the aligned fields of the slot rotors carries a high density magnetic flux across the induction coils in each slot of the stator. Moreover, the geometry and shielding directs the vast majority of the moving flux into the paired wire slots of the outer and inner stator races. Close examination of FIG. 56 reveals the outer race wire slot 134, the inner race wire slot 116 and the corresponding outer four pole slot rotor pole 144, and the inner four pole slot rotor pole 124. The slot rotors and slots are positioned such that the rotor is in close proximity to the stator wire slot. The four pole rotors 128 are rotated about shafts 120 and 140 which sit in bearings which are in turn contained in bearing pockets. The shaft 140, for example, contains a center hole 138 which contains the electrical conductor for the pole coils. North pole 144 is wound in a counterclockwise fashion, south pole 142 is wound in a clockwise fashion, north pole 139 is wound in a counterclockwise fashion, and south pole 137 is wound in a clockwise fashion. The magnetic shield 141 surrounds the rotor. A stator magnetic shield 143 is placed on the stator tooth. The inner race wire slot 116 and four pole rotor 128 is positioned such that the rotor is in close proximity to the stator wire slot. The four pole rotor is supported by shaft 122 which sits in bearings which are in turn contained in bearing pockets and support means. The shaft 122 contains a center hole 120 which contains electrical conduits for the pole coils. South pole 124 is wound in a clockwise fashion, north pole 126 in a counterclockwise fashion, south pole 119 is wound in a

counterclockwise fashion, and north pole 121 is wound in a counterclockwise fashion. The magnetic shield 123 surrounds the rotor. A stator magnetic shield 125 is placed on each stator tooth. The wire is retained in the wire slot 116 by a slot wedge 127. As the four pole rotors are rotated in synchrony, the outer race is rotating in a clockwise direction and the inner race in a counterclockwise direction.

As the leading edge of each pole approaches the slot opening, the coils are excited with DC current. The energized poles of the slot rotors rotate on their axis into alignment with the slots and during the first 30° of rotation exhibit a negative torque. During the second 30" of rotation, there is a slight positive torque. Accordingly, about the same degree of torque is generated as one would experience with meshing gears and associated separation forces. When the two pole faces begin to experience positive torque forces of separation, the current is turned off and the separation forces drop to approximately zero. The net torque due to the pole interaction is approximately zero. However, the arrangement places the maximum moving flux through the wire slots. The total flux is proportional to the number of pole windings and the current traveling through the coils of the poles. The north-south pole flux 158 is noted between north pole 144 and south pole 124.

FIG. 57 illustrates an exemplary two pole slot rotor. The magnetic shield slot 154 is positioned in alignment the wire slot of the stator. North pole 153 is wound counterclockwise and south pole 147 is wound clockwise. Coil windings 157 and 162 are connected with leads 152,151 ,156 and 155. The shield 148 can be constituted of laminated mu metal, cylinder 150 can be constituted of carbon steel and cylinder 149 can be constituted of mu metal.

FIG. 58 is similar to the configuration of FIG. 56 except that laminated shield 146 corresponds to the stator shielding 160 and the stator wire slot 159 with slot wedge 158 holding the wire in position. Gear wheel 165 can be used to drive rotor shaft 161 such as through a driver motor, transmission means or the like.

FIG. 59 illustrates a view of the two pole or dipole slot rotor with like numbers referring to like components shown and described in connection with FIG. 54. FIG. 60 illustrates a view of an exemplary slot rotor shield configuration of an embodiment. The open cavity 171 can receive the slot rotor, while openings 167 in the shielding are placed over the stator wire slots such that the magnetic fields generated thereby can couple into the slots. Bridging support 168,169 and 170 can be used to help maintain the structural integrity of the shield. The

laminations are explained in connection with FIG. 57 with like numbers and therefore the description here will be omitted.

FIG. 61 is an exemplary dipole configuration of a slot rotor an embodiment. Since the details are substantially the same as those of the four pole slot rotor explained in connection with FIG. 56, a detailed explanation will be omitted here for simplicity.

FIG. 62 is a graph that represents the pattern of the separate phases of three phase power generated by an exemplary generator constructed as described herein, where each phase is retarded by an electrical phase of 120° from the other phases.

While embodiments of the invention have been described and illustrated, it will be understood by those skilled in the technology concerned that many variations or modifications in details of design or construction may be made without departing from the present invention. For example, while the exemplary dual stator and slot rotor pair arrangement are substantially shown in the context of a conventional circular stator arrangement, embodiments can be planar, semicircular, or the like as described herein without departing from the disclosure herein. Further, the manner of driving the slot rotors can be accomplished in a variety of ways as described herein without departure from the gist of the invention.