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Title:
DEPLOYABLE FLEXIBLE FLOOD MITIGATION DEVICE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2015/054007
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A method for the creation of a Deployable Flexible Flood Mitigation Device manufactured from textile and membrane materials. The Flexible Flood Mitigation Device comprises a textile/membrane panel configured to be movable between an opened position and a closed position, wherein in the closed position, the panel forms a barrier against flood water; and a spool that is manually or electrically operated Is used to move the panel from the dosed position to the opened position. The spool can also be eliminated and the panel can be manually folded for storage, The Flexible Flood Mitigation Device can be configured for use in many applications including subway tunnels, vehicular tunnels, stairwells, ventilation shafts, and other openings that can be threatened by flooding, ft can be used in any orientation 9vertical, horizontal or at an angle with respect to gravity) and can stop fluids approaching from either side.

Inventors:
CADOGAN, David, Phillip (107 Bohemian Dr, Middletown, DE, 19709, US)
HINKLE, Jonathan, Michael (448 Toftrees Drive, Middletown, DE, 19709, US)
ROUSHEY, Jeffrey, Lewis (14890 Heron Court, Milton, DE, 19968, US)
MCKEE, Tony, Ray (21 Waterwheel Circle, Dover, DE, 19901, US)
ELGESEM, Ralph, Olav (1228 Andrew Drive, Dover, DE, 19904, US)
Application Number:
US2014/058657
Publication Date:
April 16, 2015
Filing Date:
October 01, 2014
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
ILC DOVER LP (One Moonwalker Road, Frederica, DE, 19946-2080, US)
CADOGAN, David, Phillip (107 Bohemian Dr, Middletown, DE, 19709, US)
HINKLE, Jonathan, Michael (448 Toftrees Drive, Middletown, DE, 19709, US)
ROUSHEY, Jeffrey, Lewis (14890 Heron Court, Milton, DE, 19968, US)
MCKEE, Tony, Ray (21 Waterwheel Circle, Dover, DE, 19901, US)
ELGESEM, Ralph, Olav (1228 Andrew Drive, Dover, DE, 19904, US)
International Classes:
E04H9/14; E06B1/56; E06B9/00
Domestic Patent References:
WO2012169877A12012-12-13
Foreign References:
US20120279557A12012-11-08
US20120207545A12012-08-16
Other References:
See also references of EP 3052721A4
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PAVELKO, Thomas, P. (Novak Druce Connolly Bove + Quigg, LLP1875 Eye Street, NW,Eleventh Floo, Washington DC, 20006, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
We Claim:

1. A depioyable f food-gate comprising: a flexible door comprising at ieast one member selected from the group consisting of a textile, a membrane and combinations thereof; a rigid perimeter structure that supports loading on the door; a perimeter structure that guides deployment and sealing against hydrostatic pressure; and, a storage container with deployment and retraction mechanisms.

2. The dep!oyabie f!ood-gate of claim 1, wherein the flexible door is comprised of one or multiple layers of materia! to provide structural support and pressure retention,

3. The depioyable flood-gate of claim 2, wherein the flexible door has a concave sha e to reduce stress in the structure.

4. The depioyable flood-gate of claim 2, wherein the flexible door is comprised of at ieast one component selected from the group consisting of fabric, webbings, straps, belts, tapes and combinations thereof, for structural support.

5. The depioyable flood-gate of claim 4, wherein the at least one component selected from the group consisting of fabric, webbings, straps, belts, tapes and combinations thereof, are woven such that they provide damage tolerance via friction if a portion of them are damaged.

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6. The depioyable flood-gate of claim 4, wherein the at least one component seiected from the group consisting of fabric, webbings, straps, belts, tapes and combinations thereof, are connected to one another by stitching, welding, bonding or similar means.

7. The depioyable flood-gate of claim 2, wherein the flexible door is comprised of a coated fabric or membrane for pressure retention.

8. The depioyable flood-gate of claim 8, wherein one or more additional fabric layers is included in the flexible door to provide resiliency or redundancy.

9. The depioyable flood-gate of claim 2, wherein the flexible door consists of a single layer.

10. The depioyable flood-gate of claim 2, wherein at least some of the perimeter of the flexible door is comprised of a flexible "deadman" which is connected to the structure and pressure retention layers.

11. The depioyable fiood-gate of claim 9, wherein the "deadman" is comprised of a flexible rope, cable, or assembly of flexible material,

12. The depioyable flood-gate of claim 9, wherein the "deadman" is covered in an

impermeable material that seals against the guide rails.

13. The depioyable flood-gate of claim 9, wherein the "deadman" is comprised of flexible compliant materials that conform to the shape of the guide rails and seal

14. The depioyable f od-gate of claim 1, wherein the perimeter structure which guides deployment is shaped to capture the "deadman" such that it can't be pulled out when tensioned.

15. The deployabie flood-gate of claim 1, wherein the perimeter structure which guides deployment is manufactured from a rigid material.

16. The deptoyab!e flood-gate of claim 1, wherein the perimeter structure which guides deployment is manufactured from a rigid materia! and includes a compliant surface to aid in sealing.

17. The deployabie flood-gate of claim 9, wherein the "deadman" provides a seai against hydrostatic pressure.

IS. The deployabie flood-gate of ciaim 9, wherein the "deadman" transmits the load from the door into the rigid perimeter structure.

19. The deployabie flood-gate of claim 9, wherein the "deadman" slides inside a shaped raii in an untensioned state during deployment and retraction.

20. The deployabie flood-gate of claim 2, where the flexible nature of the door tensions the "deadman" inside its deployment track.

21. The deployabie f!ood-gate of claim 2, where the "deadman" can be compressed and sealed with mechanisms inside its deployment track.

22. The deployabie flood-gate of ciaim 2, where the flexible nature of the door facilitates rolling or folding for storage.

23. The deployabie flood-gate of claim 2, wherein the door has a rigid plate at its ends

(perpendicular to its guides) to facilitate sealing features and be load bearing.

24. The depioyable flood-gate of claim 2, wherein the door can be manufactured so that load transfer to the perimeter frame can be parallel to the guide rails, perpendicular to the guide rails, or a combination of both.

25. The depioyable fiood-gate of claim 1, wherein the flexible door is trapezoidal to

facilitate sealing from an interference fit when deployed,

26. The depioyable flood-gate of claim 1, wherein the flood-gate can be challenged by a fluid from either side,

27. The deployabie flood-gate of claim 1, wherein the flood-gate can be positioned in any orientation.

28. The depioyable flood-gate of claim 1, wherein the flood-gate can be manually operated or motorized.

29. The depioyable flood-gate of claim 1, wherein the flood-gate can be used to stop any fluid including liquids or gasses.

30. The depioyable flood-gate of claim 1, wherein the flexible door can be integral with the guide rails and deployed via a sliding motion.

31. The deployabie flood-gate of claim 1, wherein the flexible door can be deployed by attaching the door to the guide rails.

Description:
DepSoyabie Flexible Flood Mitigation Device

DESCRIPTION

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention re!ates to a Flexible Flood Mitigation Device system that is scalable in size, shape, and orientation to a wide variety of openings. The invention can be used to seal part or all of an opening from flood water or other fluid threats,

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Flooding events can be precipitated by natu ral and manmade inputs. These events can be particularly challenging for buildings and infrastructure located at or near a body of water. Transportation systems or buildings in these areas that are below the normal wateriine are particularly vulnerable. Severe storms with high tidal surges or flash floods, rising sea levels, and seismic activity are some of the challenges posed by nature. Accidents, terrorism, and mechanical failures are manmade threats that can cause flooding, or magnify flooding from natural events.

Many subway and vehicular tunnels that operate below wateriine around the world have experienced flooding. Hurricane Sandy was particularly devastating to New York City in 2012 because a significant portion of the subway system was flooded and economic losses were unprecedented. Water entrance points included subway portals, stairwell entrance points, ventilation shafts, emergency exits, and elevator shafts. Vehicular tunnels were also flooded, as well as many buildings. This was one of the worst flooding events in history, but it was just one in a string of events in subway systems in major cities around the world.

There are many types of flood mitigation systems available commercially, This includes Flexible Flood Mitigation Devices, stop logs, and flood doors. These are designed to withstand significant hydrostatic pressures (up to tens of feet of water} and do so with rigid components and mechanisms to deploy them. These systems often require significant modification to the infrastructure during installation, a considerable amount of storage space, frequent maintenance,, and are costiy to install because of the im pact on the system. Because of this, they are often found to be unacceptable in transit and other applications.

Textile & membrane based Flexible Flood Mitigation Devices offer significant benefits over the rigid devices. Most notable is the ability to pack the material into a small volume for storage. This not only allows the Flexible Flood Mitigation Device to be stored in a small volume that is easily fit into existing spaces, but it minimizes the modifications required on the infrastructure to install it. The membrane door itself is shaped to minimize stress in the door {governed by pressure multiplied by radius of curvature). The door is attached to tracks with a "deadman" which guides deployment and also seals the door when the door is tensioned. The deadman is an assembly which is larger than the slot in the guide rail and therefore prevents extraction when the door is tensioned by water pressure. The base of the membrane door has a plate to guide deployment and support an e!astomeric seal that seals that edge of the door. The membrane door can be packed via rolling or folding, and can be deployed manually or automatically from a spool with a motor. The design has very few moving parts and requires little to no regular maintenance, and is survivable in many harsh environments.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The Flexible Flood Mitigation Device is deployabie doo or wail that leverages the unique advantages of textile & membrane materials to advance the state of the art in flood mitigation devices.

The Flexible Fiood Mitigation Device is comprised of a textile & membrane door, side rails for deployment and attachment of the door, a base plate for guiding deployment and sealing, a spool or other guide to facilitate stowage & deployment, and a container. The system may also Include electric motors and mechanisms, or manually operated devices, to facilitate or assist deployment & retraction. The textile door is rolled or folded into the container and stowed until a potential flooding event is identified. At this time, the container is opened and the door is deployed such that its installation portal is blocked and can prevent the passage of vvater under significant hydrostatic pressure (from zero to tens of feet of pressure head). The deadman attachment of the textile door to a track inside the guide raii provides the seal via compression of the deadman when the door is tensioned with pressure. The deadman is also a textile and membrane assembly and is constructed such that tension of the door pulls it into the sliding rail causing it to conform to its shape and present a broad sealing area to the guide rail. The deadman is larger than the opening in the guide rail and therefore cannot be pulled out.

The door can be positioned vertically or horizontally. The container can be located on any side of a vertical door (above, below, or on a side), with the guide rails extending perpendicular to the container. When placed horizontally, the container can be placed wherever is convenient. In the case of a subway stairwell, it can be located inside the top stair or at the opposite end of the opening away from the top stair.

Another feature of a textile & membrane door is that it is flexible and the guide rails can be angled, curved, or formed to fit around objects. This can further reduce Infrastructure modifications during installation, or enhance functionality of the system. For example, if the door and deadman assembly were trapezoidal in shape, and the guide rails and support frame were a similar trapezoidal shape, then the two would provide an interference fit at the final portion of deployment travel thus sealing and tensioning the deadman assembly. Deployable clamping devices can also be used to compress and seal the deadman assembly as a primary means of sealing or for redundancy in the tensioned sealing approach if desirable.

It is possible that the door can be loaded from either side thus increasing functionality over standard flood gates. This is possible because of how the deadman interfaces with the guide rail. Furthermore, it is possible to construct a textile & membrane flood gate door such that the loads imparted back into the supporting structure are either longitudinal, vertical, or a combination of both. This can be beneficial in the design of structural reinforcements which dictate the level of infrastructure modification required for installation of a flood gate. A second aspect of the invention is the use of a similar but less structural version to be used in the containment of smoke from fire, chemical or biological agents, or other transient media. The functionality of the system is the same, but the forces on the system are lower with a smaller delta pressure across the boundary so thinner materials can be used.

Another expression of the invention Is a separable textile & membrane door assembly that can be stored remotely from its point of use. It can be transported to its use location when needed and installed into a preinstalled support frame, The frame would be able to accept the deadman assembly through clamping, or sliding an intermittent deadman into segmented slots. This approach may be of interest for oddly shaped tunnels/shafts such as a circular underwater subway tunnel where excavation of the infrastructure is not possible, or encroachment upon the interior space Is not allowable.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF FIGURES

FIG, 1 illustrates the assembly as applied in a horizontal orientation, with the door deployed FIG, 2 illustrates the assembly as applied in a horizontal orientation, with the door stowed F!G. 3 illustrates the attachment of the fabric door to the frame, and sealing feature FIG. 4 illustrates the deadman

FIGS. 5A-5D illustrates the various embodiments in construction of the fabric door

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIG, 1 illustrates perspective views of a Flexible Flood Mitigatio Device with the door in the deployed position 100 according to an embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 2 illustrates the Flexible Flood Mitigation Device 100 in its stowed condition, FIGS, 3 through 5A-5D respectively, illustrate detailed views of critical features of the Flexible Flood Mitigation Device 100. The flexible Flood Mitigation Device is also referred to as the Fiex-Gate.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the Flexible Flood Mitigation Device 100 is comprised of a textile & membrane door 101, guide rails 102, an end plate 103, a spool 104, and a container 105.

The door 101 is movable through the guide rails 102 and can be moved from a stowed to a deployed position and visa-versa, When the Flexible Flood Mitigation Device 100 is activated as shown in FIG. 1, the door 101 is positioned such that, it can hold back hydrostatic pressure from zero to tens of feet of hydrostatic pressure head of water or other fluids. When the Flexible Flood Mitigation Device is stowed as shown in FIG. 2 the intended traffic {people, air, automobiles, trains, etc.} can pass through the opening. The Flexible Flood Mitigation Device 100 can be sized and shaped to fit any opening. The membrane door can also be configured to conform to features in a tunnel, such as conduits on a wall, by having curved guide rails 102 that conform to the feature. The membrane door 101 is manufactured to be concave such that the stresses in the door 101 and the guide rails 102 are minimized.

The membrane door 101 has a deadman 106 feature on two sides of its perimeter that engage the guide rails 102 to facilitate deployment and sealing. The end plate 103 has sealing features 107 on any of its exposed faces to provide a seal against the mating surface when the Flexible Flood Mitigation Device is ciosed and a fluid impinges upon it. The guide rails 102 incorporated a feature 108 near the end where the end piate 103 comes to rest to engage and seal the deadman 105 on the membrane door 101. The feature 108 applies tension to the deadman 106 in this area to seal the deadman 106 in the guide rails 102 which are unable to be tensioned when the membrane door 10 is engaged with water because the end plate is rigid. The end plate 103 is then locked into place with a latching mechanism 109. The latching mechanism 108 can take many forms and could be located in various areas on the assembly.

The end of the membrane door 101 that is opposite the end plate 103 can be terminated in a number of ways. The method shown here is to include a deadman 106 as on the sides of the membrane door 101, However, clamping, fixed termination in the spool 104 or container 105, or a termination similar to the end plate 103 end is also possible, in some cases where the container 105 is placed above water fevei, sealing in this area will not be necessary.

The membrane door 101 can be stowed in a number of ways including rolling or folding. If roiling is selected, a spool 104 can be used to control the packing of the material and assist deployment/ retraction. If a more compact assembly is required, then the material can be stored without the aid of a spool 104 via folding. The spool 104 can be motorized or equipped with a manuai crank for deployment and retraction.

FIG.3 illustrates the interface of the deadman 106 with the guide rails 102 during deployment when the membrane door 101 is un-tensioned, and when it is tensioned. The deadman 106 is un-tensioned during deployment to eliminate friction and reduce deployment forces. The deadman 106 or guide rails 102 may have coatings or finishes to reduce friction during deployment The deadman 106 conforms to the shape of the guide rails 102 and provides an enlarged seal area compared to cable or rod constructions because of it is manufactured with compliant materials, such as textile assemblies including ropes and webbings. The deadman 106 does not require any lubricant when used in this way. A seal 107 is positioned adjacent deadman 106.

As shown in FIG. 4, the deadman 106 is comprised of an inner core 110, a membrane door webbing 114, membrane door membrane 115, and a deadman protective covering. The inner core 110 provides strength and a geometric feature that cannot be compressed through the slot in the guide rails 102. The membrane door webbing 114 is an extension of the webbing structure of the membrane door 101. The webbings wrap around the inner core 110 and are sewn to create a loop. This junction provides a path for loads from the membrane door 101 to the guide rails 102. The membrane door membrane 115 is an extension of the impervious layer of the membrane door 101, The membrane door membrane wraps around the inner core 110 to extend the seal from the membrane door 101 into the guide rails 102. An optional protective covering 116 (Fig. SA) may be added to add resiliency to the assembly or enhance sealing by nature of its compliance. FIGS. SA-5D iHustrates the parts of the membrane door in the various embodiments according to the invention. The webbing 114 (Rgs. 5 A, 5C, 5D) is the structural component of the membrane door 101. It is manufactured by weaving webbings together to create a macro- fabric. Other flat materia! sections can be substituted for webbings. The interweaving of the webbings provides structural resiliency to the assembly because the assembly will not come apart, even if one webbing is fully severed. The friction between the webbings prevents webbing shift in this event. The webbings 114 can be left unconnected, or they can be joined at regular intervals, via stitching, sealing, bonding or some similar activity. The webbing 114 can be coated or impregnated with plastic or e!astomeric coatings, or it can be uncoated. Joining the webbings 114 prevents gaps in the webbing that can leave the membrane 115 exposed to potential damage from debris, or unequal loading due when the assembly is tensioned. The webbings 114 can be assembled in such a way so as to transmit the loads in the membrane door 101 either axiaSly or longitudinally, or a combination of both. This is accomplished by lengthening the webbings in the direction you wish to prevent load transmission.

The membrane 115 is positioned adjacent to the webbing 114 assembly and is oversized to ensure load transfer i the webbing 114 assembly. The membrane 115 prevents water transmission past the membrane door 101. The membrane can be any formed from a number of materials, including polymer coated fabrics, elastomenc sheets, plastic films, etc.

A protective layer 116 (Fig. 5A) can be added to the assembly between the webbing 114 layer and the membrane 115 layer to provide additional structural redundancy and resiliency. This can be desirable if and there is any potential for impact from floating debris or other threats. The protective layer can also be applied on the water side in such a way as to protect the membrane 115 itself.