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Patent Searching and Data


Title:
DESK WITH STABILITY FEATURE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/170012
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A desk includes a desktop at a top end; a leg including an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk; and a gas spring connecting the leg to the desktop.

Inventors:
ATKINS WILLIAM (US)
Application Number:
US2018/022255
Publication Date:
September 20, 2018
Filing Date:
March 13, 2018
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
ARGOSY CONSOLE INC (US)
International Classes:
A47B9/18; A47B9/02; A47B9/10; A47B9/14; A47B17/02; A47B21/02
Foreign References:
US6354227B12002-03-12
US5823120A1998-10-20
US5197393A1993-03-30
US20110141672A12011-06-16
US6609465B22003-08-26
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
CZERWONKY, Bradford, R. (US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

That which is claimed is:

1. A desk comprising:

a desktop;

a leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the attachment portion of the leg configured to move with respect to the foot portion of the leg along an axis of the leg to adjust a height of the desktop about and between a lower position and an upper position, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk; and

a gas spring extending from the leg to the desktop, the gas spring angled with respect to the leg by an angle of at least 5 degrees and with respect to the desktop by an angle of at least 5 degrees.

2. The desk of claim 1 , wherein the attachment portion of the leg is movable with respect to the foot portion of the leg in a substantially vertical direction.

3. The desk of claim 2, wherein the leg comprises a telescoping feature configured to

adjust the height of the desktop.

4. The desk of claim 1 , wherein the gas spring is angled with respect to the leg by an angle of between about 10 degrees and about 80 degrees in at least one direction.

5. The desk of claim 1 , wherein the gas spring is angled with respect to the leg by an angle of between about 10 degrees and about 80 degrees in at least two directions.

6. The desk of claim 1 , wherein the gas spring is angled with respect to the leg by an angle of between about 10 degrees and about 80 degrees in three directions.

7. The desk of claim 1 , wherein a joint of the gas spring is secured to the foot portion of the leg, an angle of the gas spring measured with respect to the leg varying with the height of the desktop.

8. The desk of claim 1 , wherein the leg is a first leg, the desk further comprising a second leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the second leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the attachment portion of the second leg configured to move with respect to the foot portion of the second leg along an axis of the second leg, the first leg and the second leg thereby configured in combination to adjust the height of the desktop about and between the lower position and the upper position.

9. The desk of claim 8, further comprising a leg stabilizer extending from the first leg to the second leg.

10. The desk of claim 1 , wherein a secondary portion of the desktop is offset in a vertical direction with respect to a main portion of the desktop.

11. The desk of claim 1 , wherein the gas spring is secured to each of the leg and the

desktop without tools.

12. The desk of claim 11 , wherein the gas spring is secured to each of the leg and the

desktop with a ball and socket joint, a joint of the gas spring defining a socket and the desktop defining a ball.

13. A desk comprising:

a desktop;

a leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk, a position of the desktop fixed with respect to the foot portion of the leg; and

a gas spring connecting the leg to the desktop, the gas spring angled with respect to the leg by an angle of at least 5 degrees and with respect to the desktop by an angle of at least 5 degrees.

14. The desk of claim 13, wherein the gas spring is angled with respect to the leg by an angle of between about 10 degrees and about 80 degrees in at least one direction.

15. The desk of claim 13, wherein the gas spring is angled with respect to the leg by an angle of between about 10 degrees and about 80 degrees in at least two directions.

16. The desk of claim 13, wherein the leg is a first leg, the desk further comprising a second leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the second leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop.

17. The desk of claim 13, wherein the gas spring is secured to each of the leg and the desktop without tools.

18. A method of assembling a desk, the method comprising:

attaching a first joint of a gas spring of the desk to an attachment point on a desktop; and

attaching a second joint of the gas spring to an attachment point on a leg, the leg

secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk;

wherein after attaching the gas spring to the desktop and to the leg the gas spring is angled with respect to the leg by an angle of at least 5 degrees and with respect to the desktop by an angle of at least 5 degrees.

19. The method of claim 18, wherein the leg is a first leg, the desk further comprising a

second leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the second leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the method further comprising attaching a leg stabilizer to the first leg and to the second leg, the leg stabilizer extending from the first leg to the second leg and fixing a distance therebetween.

20. The method of claim 18, further comprising stabilizing the desk with the gas spring by dampening the movement of the desktop with respect to the leg with the gas spring after applying a force to the desk, the force angled with respect to a vertical orientation.

21. A desk comprising:

a desktop;

a leg secured to the desktop; and

a gas spring connecting the leg to the desktop.

Description:
DESK WITH STABILITY FEATURE

TECHNICAL FIELD

Field of Use

[0001] This disclosure relates to desks. More specifically, this disclosure relates to

adjustable sit-stand desks with a stability feature.

Related Art

[0002] A desk that allows a user to stand while working, or that allows the user to alternate between sitting and standing postures throughout the day, can provide a variety of health, productivity, and other benefits. Commonly referred to as a "standing desk," a "sit-to-stand" desk, a "stand up" desk, a "sit-stand" desk, or a workstation, such a piece of furniture, while yielding these benefits, can at the same time be significantly more unstable than a desk behind which the user would merely sit. Such instability can result from the center of gravity of such a desk being significantly higher off the floor and from the inherent looseness in the moving parts of an adjustable version of such a desk. Loading the desk with heavy objects or with impact forces sufficient to jar the desktop can further impact stability.

SUM MARY

[0003] It is to be understood that this summary is not an extensive overview of the

disclosure. This summary is exemplary and not restrictive, and it is intended to neither identify key or critical elements of the disclosure nor delineate the scope thereof. The sole purpose of this summary is to explain and exemplify certain concepts of the disclosure as an introduction to the following complete and extensive detailed description.

[0004] In one aspect, disclosed is a desk comprising: a desktop at a top end; a leg

comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk; and a gas spring connecting the leg to the desktop.

[0005] In a further aspect, disclosed is a method of using a desk comprising: securing a gas spring to a desktop of the desk and a leg of the desk; and raising the desktop from a lower position to an upper position located above the lower position.

[0006] In another aspect, disclosed is a desk comprising: a desktop; a leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the attachment portion of the leg configured to move with respect to the foot portion of the leg along an axis of the leg to adjust a height of the desktop about and between a lower position and an upper position, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk; and a gas spring extending from the leg to the desktop, the gas spring angled with respect to the leg by a non-90- degree angle and with respect to the desktop by a non-90-degree angle.

[0007] In another aspect, disclosed is a desk comprising: a desktop; a leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk, a position of the desktop fixed with respect to the foot portion of the leg; and a gas spring connecting the leg to the desktop, the gas spring angled with respect to the leg by a non-90-degree angle and with respect to the desktop by a non- 90-degree angle.

[0008] In another aspect, disclosed is a method of assembling a desk, the method

comprising: attaching a first joint of a gas spring to an attachment point on a desktop; and attaching a second joint of the gas spring to an attachment point on a leg, the leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk; wherein after attaching the gas spring to the desktop and to the leg, the gas spring is angled with respect to the leg by a non-90-degree angle and with respect to the desktop by a non-90-degree angle.

[0009] In another aspect, disclosed is a desk comprising: a desktop; a leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the attachment portion of the leg configured to move with respect to the foot portion of the leg along an axis of the leg to adjust a height of the desktop about and between a lower position and an upper position, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk; and a gas spring extending from the leg to the desktop, the gas spring angled with respect to the leg by an angle of at least 5 degrees and with respect to the desktop by an angle of at least 5 degrees.

[0010] In another aspect, disclosed is a desk comprising: a desktop; a leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk, a position of the desktop fixed with respect to a foot portion of the leg; and a gas spring connecting the leg to the desktop, the gas spring angled with respect to the leg by an angle of at least 5 degrees and with respect to the desktop by an angle of at least 5 degrees. [0011] In another aspect, disclosed is a method of assembling a desk, the method comprising: attaching a first joint of a gas spring of the desk to an attachment point on a desktop; and attaching a second joint of the gas spring to an attachment point on a leg, the leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk; wherein after attaching the gas spring to the desktop and to the leg the gas spring is angled with respect to the leg by an angle of at least 5 degrees and with respect to the desktop by an angle of at least 5 degrees.

[0012] Various implementations described in the present disclosure may comprise additional systems, methods, features, and advantages, which may not necessarily be expressly disclosed herein but will be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art upon examination of the following detailed description and accompanying drawings. It is intended that all such systems, methods, features, and advantages be included within the present disclosure and protected by the accompanying claims. The features and advantages of such implementations may be realized and obtained by means of the systems, methods, features particularly pointed out in the appended claims. These and other features will become more fully apparent from the following description and appended claims, or may be learned by the practice of such exemplary implementations as set forth hereinafter.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0013] The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification, illustrate several aspects of the disclosure and together with the

description, serve to explain various principles of the disclosure. The drawings are not necessarily drawn to scale. Corresponding features and components throughout the figures may be designated by matching reference characters for the sake of consistency and clarity.

[0014] Figure 1 is a front top perspective view of an adjustable sit-stand desk in accordance with one aspect of the current disclosure.

[0015] Figure 2 is a front view of the desk of Figure 1 in a lower position.

[0016] Figure 3 is a front view of the desk of Figure 1 in an upper position.

[0017] Figure 4 is a rear view of the desk of Figure 3.

[0018] Figure 5 is a side perspective view of the desk of Figure 2 taken along line 5-5 of Figure 7 with the desktop positioned at the lower position shown in Figure 2.

[0019] Figure 6 is a side perspective view of the desk of Figure 3 taken along line 5-5 of Figure 7 with the desktop positioned at the upper position shown in Figure 3.

[0020] Figure 7 is a side view of the desk of Figure 3 with the desktop positioned at the

upper position shown in Figure 3. [0021] Figure 8 is a bottom plan view of the desk of Figure 3.

[0022] Figure 9 is a rear bottom perspective view of the desk of Figure 3.

[0023] Figure 10 is a front bottom perspective view of the desk of Figure 3.

[0024] Figure 1 1 is a detail view of a connection between a gas spring and a leg of the desk of Figure 3 taken from detail 11 of Figure 9.

[0025] Figure 12 is a detail view of a connection between the gas spring and the leg of the desk of Figure 3 taken from detail 12 of Figure 10.

[0026] Figure 13 is a detail view of a connection between the gas spring and the leg of the desk of Figure 3 taken from detail 13 of Figure 10.

[0027] Figure 14 is a connecting fastener of the desk of Figure 1.

[0028] Figure 15 is the gas spring of Figure 1 1 secured to the connecting fastener of Figure 14.

[0029] Figure 16 is a perspective view of a first gas spring being connected to a first

connecting fastener of the desktop of the desk of Figure 1.

[0030] Figure 17 is a perspective view of a second gas spring being connected to a second connecting fastener of the desktop of the desk of Figure 1.

[0031] Figure 18 is a perspective view of the first gas spring of Figure 16 being connected to a connecting fastener of a first leg of a pair of legs of the desk of Figure 1.

[0032] Figure 19 is a perspective view of the second gas spring of Figure 17 being

connected to a connecting fastener of a second leg of a pair of legs of the desk of Figure

1.

[0033] Figure 20 is the desk of Figure 1 with a pair of simulated speakers secured to the desktop in accordance with another aspect of the current disclosure, the desk shown being pushed with a horizontal force.

[0034] Figure 21 is side perspective view of the desk of Figure 19 with the simulated

speakers and gas springs removed.

[0035] Figure 22 is a detail view of a desk adjustment controller of the desk of Figure 1 taken from detail 22 of Figure 21.

[0036] Figure 23 is a side perspective view of the adjustable sit-stand desk of Figure 1 comprising an accessory mounting bracket in accordance with another aspect of the current disclosure.

[0037] Figure 24 is a side perspective view of the desk of Figure 1 comprising a pair of speakers and a display monitor in accordance with another aspect of the current disclosure.

[0038] Figure 25 is a left front top perspective view of a version of the desk of Figure 1 comprising a keyboard on a keyboard shelf in accordance with another aspect of the current disclosure, the desk shown being not adjustable with respect to height. [0039] Figure 26 is a front perspective view of the adjustable sit-stand desk of Figure 25 with the keyboard of Figure 25 removed in accordance with another aspect of the current disclosure.

[0040] Figure 27 is a right front top perspective view of the adjustable sit-stand version of the desk of Figure 25 with the keyboard of Figure 25 shown in accordance with another aspect of the current disclosure.

[0041] Figure 28 is a front right bottom perspective view of the desk of Figure 25 with the keyboard of Figure 25 removed and the gas springs angled towards a front end of the desk in accordance with another aspect of the current disclosure.

[0042] Figure 29 is a front view of the desk of Figure 28.

[0043] Figure 30 is a bottom plan view of the desk of Figure 28.

[0044] Figure 31 is a side view of the desk of Figure 28.

[0045] Figure 32 is a sectional view of the desk of Figure 28 taken from line 32-32 of Figure 29 comprising a leg stabilizer and a bracket in accordance with another aspect of the current disclosure.

[0046] Figure 33 is a sectional view of the desk of Figure 28 comprising a leg stabilizer and a bracket in accordance with another aspect of the current disclosure combining the bracket of the leg stabilizer with the bracket to which the gas spring is secured.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0047] The present disclosure can be understood more readily by reference to the following detailed description, examples, drawings, and claims, and their previous and following description. However, before the present devices, systems, and/or methods are disclosed and described, it is to be understood that this disclosure is not limited to the specific devices, systems, and/or methods disclosed unless otherwise specified, as such can, of course, vary. It is also to be understood that the terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular aspects only and is not intended to be limiting.

[0048] The following description is provided as an enabling teaching of the present devices, systems, and/or methods in their best, currently known aspect. To this end, those skilled in the relevant art will recognize and appreciate that many changes can be made to the various aspects described herein, while still obtaining the beneficial results of the present disclosure. It will also be apparent that some of the desired benefits of the present disclosure can be obtained by selecting some of the features of the present disclosure without utilizing other features. Accordingly, those who work in the art will recognize that many modifications and adaptations to the present disclosure are possible and can even be desirable in certain circumstances and are a part of the present disclosure. Thus, the following description is provided as illustrative of the principles of the present disclosure and not in limitation thereof.

[0049] As used throughout, the singular forms "a," "an" and "the" include plural referents unless the context clearly dictates otherwise. Thus, for example, reference to a quantity of one of a particular element can comprise two or more such elements unless the context indicates otherwise.

[0050] Ranges can be expressed herein as from "about" one particular value, and/or to "about" another particular value. When such a range is expressed, another aspect comprises from the one particular value and/or to the other particular value. Similarly, when values are expressed as approximations, by use of the antecedent "about" or "substantially," it will be understood that the particular value forms another aspect. It will be further understood that the endpoints of each of the ranges are significant both in relation to the other endpoint, and independently of the other endpoint.

[0051] For purposes of the current disclosure, a material property or dimension measuring about X or substantially X on a particular measurement scale measures within a range between X plus an industry-standard upper tolerance for the specified measurement and X minus an industry-standard lower tolerance for the specified measurement. Because tolerances can vary between different materials, processes and between different models, the tolerance for a particular measurement of a particular component can fall within a range of tolerances.

[0052] As used herein, the terms "optional" or "optionally" mean that the subsequently

described event or circumstance may or may not occur, and that the description comprises instances where said event or circumstance occurs and instances where it does not.

[0053] The word "or" as used herein means any one member of a particular list and also comprises any combination of members of that list.

[0054] To simplify the description of various elements disclosed herein, the conventions of "left," "right," "front," "rear," "top," "bottom," "upper," "lower," "inside," "outside," "inboard," "outboard," "horizontal," and/or "vertical" may be referenced. Unless stated otherwise, "front" describes that end of the desk nearest to and occupied by a user of the desk or facing in a positive Z-direction shown; "rear" is that end of the side that is opposite to or distal from the front or facing in a negative Z-direction; "left" is that which is to the left of or facing left from a person directly facing towards the front of the desk or facing in a negative X-direction; and "right" is that which is to the right of or facing right from that same person or facing in a positive X-direction. "Horizontal" or "horizontal orientation" describes that which is in a plane extending from left to right and aligned with the horizon. "Vertical" or "vertical orientation" describes that which is in a plane that is angled at 90 degrees to the horizontal or facing in a positive Y-direction shown.

[0055] In one aspect, a desk and associated methods, systems, devices, and various

apparatuses are disclosed herein. In one aspect, the desk can comprise a desktop, legs, and a gas spring.

[0056] Figure 1 shows a desk 100, which can be an adjustable sit-stand desk. The desk 100 can comprise a desktop 110 proximate to a top end 101. The desk 100 can also comprise a first leg 200a, a second leg 200b, and a leg stabilizer 250. The desktop 1 10 can define a desktop surface 1 11. The first leg 200a and the second leg 200b can define a bottom end 102 of the desk 100. In one aspect, the desktop 1 10 can comprise a first accessory opening 122a in a first accessory frame 120a and a second accessory opening 122b in a second accessory frame 120b. In another aspect, the desktop 1 10 can comprise one or no accessory openings. In yet another aspect, the desktop 1 10 can comprise more than two accessory openings. The accessory openings 122a, b, each of which can be a "rack bay" in a pro audio setting (typically 19 inches or approximately 483 mm high and having a rack unit or "RU" height measuring in increments of 1.75 inches), can be sized and configured to receive equipment such as, for example and without limitation, rack shelves, audio mixing hardware, computer storage devices, and audio and/or video recording and/or playback devices. In another aspect, the desktop 110 and the desk 100 generally can be used with or without any particular kind of equipment of can be used for any one of a variety of purposes and is not limited to use with audio and/or video equipment. The desktop 110 can optionally comprise a padded armrest 115, which can extend vertically, horizontally, or both vertically and horizontally from a surface of the desk 100 such as the desktop surface 11 1. In some aspects, the desktop 110 can itself be oriented in a horizontal or X-direction as shown. In other aspects, the desktop can be oriented in another direction.

[0057] The desktop surface 1 11 of the desktop 1 10 can be stepped such that a secondary portion 1 13 is positioned above or below the desktop surface 1 11 or such that the accessory frames 120a, b extend above or below a main portion 1 12 as shown. In one aspect, the desktop surface 1 11 can be configured to receive a monitor 81 (shown in Figure 24), a musical instrument such as an electronic keyboard 82 (shown in Figure 25), a mixing board (not shown), or any other equipment as desired by the user. The desktop surface can define cable grommets and can comprise a surface texture and material suited for writing, cleaning, and general durability.

[0058] Each leg 200a, b can comprise an attachment portion 210a,b, respectively, which can be secured to the desktop 1 10 and can extend away from the desktop 110 in a direction angled with respect to the desktop 110— and specifically the desktop surface 1 11— at an angle 1 18a, b, respectively (shown in Figure 2). Each leg 200a, b can further comprise a foot portion 230a, b, respectively, which can each comprise a foot 235a, b, respectively, together defining the bottom end 102 of the desk 100 and each foot 235a, b extending from an axis 201a, b, respectively, of the leg 200a, b in a substantially horizontal direction towards a front and a rear of the desk 100. Each leg 200a, b can further comprise an intermediate portion 220a, b, respectively, which can connect the attachment portion 210a, b to the foot portion 230a, b as shown. The legs 200a, b and other components of the desk 100 can be formed from a material such as, for example and without limitation, steel or aluminum and can be finished with paint, powdercoating, anodizing, or any other finish as desired.

[0059] The attachment portion 210a,b of each leg 200a, b can be configured to move with respect to the foot portion 230a, b of the respective leg 200a, b along the respective axis 201 a, b of the legs 200a, b. Likewise, the intermediate portion 220a, b of each leg 200a, b can also be configured to move with respect to the foot portion 230a, b of the respective leg 200a, b along the respective axis 201a, b. In one aspect, the movement and structure of each leg 200a, b can be telescopic. As shown, the attachment portion 210a, b can nest and move within the intermediate portion 220a, b, which can nest and move within the foot portion 230a, b. In another aspect, the movement of each leg 200a, b can be substantially along the respective axis 201a, b. The movement of each leg 200a, b can be substantially linear along the respective axis 201a, b. In one aspect, as shown, the movement of the legs 200a, b and the axes 201 a, b can be in a substantially vertical orientation. In another aspect, the movement of the legs 200a, b and the axes 201a, b can be angled with respect to a substantially vertical orientation.

[0060] As shown in Figures 2 and 3, aspects of which will be discussed in further detail below, the height of the desktop surface 1 11 of the desk 100 can be adjustable between a lower position A (shown in Figure 2) and an upper position B (shown in Figure 3) and anywhere in between the lower position A and the upper position B, which together can define an adjustment distance 90 measured from the lower position A to the upper position B. In some aspects, the lower position A can be set at a height H of 27 inches from a floor surface 500 (shown in Figures 5 and 6). In other aspects, the lower position A can be set at a height H of 24 inches from a floor surface 500. In other aspects, the lower position A can be set at any one of a range of ergonomic positions at which a user of the desk 100 is in a sitting position. In some aspects, the upper position B can be set at a height H of 42 inches from the floor. In other aspects, the upper position B can be set at a height H of 48 inches from the floor. In other aspects, the upper position B can be set at any one of a range of ergonomic positions at which a user of the desk 100 is in a standing position. Due to the flexibility of being able to sit or stand while using the desk 100, the desk 100 can be considered a "sit-stand" desk (and can also be described with the other names previously mentioned).

[0061] In one aspect, also as shown in Figures 2 and 3, the desk 100 can further comprise a pair of gas springs 300a, b connecting at least one of the pair of legs 200a, b to the desktop 1 10. In another aspect, only a single gas spring 300 or more than two gas springs 300 can be assembled to the desk 100. The gas springs 300a, b can be configured to both resist movement of the desk when jarred and also quickly dampen and stop any movement that does occur, even when the desktop 1 10 is loaded such that as much as 100 pounds or more in addition to the weight of the desktop 1 10 itself is supported by the desk 100. The gas springs 300a, b can be secured to a cross rail 130 extending below the desktop surface 11 1 of the desktop 110 at attachment points 131 and 132, respectively, which can be positioned proximate to and equidistant about a centerline 105 of the desk 100. The cross rail 130 can be, for example and without limitation, an extruded aluminum frame sized to extend the entire length of the desk 100 or, as shown, can be sized to extend only from the accessory frame 120a to the accessory frame 120b.

[0062] The attachment points 131 , 132 can be permanent or fixed or can be adjustable along a range of discrete or infinitely variable positions inside, for example and without limitation, a groove 135 defined in the cross rail 130. In one aspect, as shown, the attachment points 131 , 132 can be positioned on a front side of the cross rail 130. In another aspect, the attachment points 131 , 132 can be positioned on a rear side of the cross rail 130.

[0063] As shown in Figure 4, the leg stabilizer 250 can be secured to and can extend from the first leg 200a to the second leg 200b to, for example and without limitation, resist horizontal movement of one leg 200a, b with respect to the other leg 200a, b, including when the gas springs 300a, b exert outward forces on the legs 200a, b. In one aspect, as shown, a first end 260a of the leg stabilizer 250 is secured to the foot portion 230a of the first leg 200a, and a second end 260b of the leg stabilizer 250 is secured to the foot portion 230b of the second leg 200b. The gas springs 300a, b can be attached to attachment points 205a, b on the respective legs 200a, b. In one aspect, the attachment points 205a, b can be part of the respective foot portion 230a, b of each leg 200a, b. In another aspect, the attachment points 205a, b can be incorporated into another portion of the leg 200a,b.

[0064] The attachment points 205a, b can be permanent or fixed or can be adjustable along a range of discrete or infinitely variable positions on the leg 200a, b. In one aspect, as shown, each of the attachment points 205a, b can be positioned on a rear side of each of the respective legs 200a, b. In another aspect, each of the attachment points 205a, b can be positioned on a front side of each of the legs 200a, b.

[0065] In one aspect, each of the gas springs 300a, b can be a gas-filled spring, a gas strut, a gas cylinder, or a shock absorber, any of which can define one or more inner chambers filled and sealed with a compressed gas that allows— with resistance— extension and contraction of a shaft 320a, b of the gas spring 300a, b with respect to a body 310a,b of the gas spring 300a, b. Thus a length L of the gas springs 300a, b can automatically lengthen during raising of the desktop 110 and shorten during lowering of the desktop 110. As will be described further below, each of the gas springs 300a, b can be configured to snap onto the desk 100 without tools using simple mechanical connections. The shaft 320a, b can also be a rod, and the body 310a,b can also be a tube.

[0066] The placement and symmetry of the gas springs 300a, b can be beneficial to the performance of the desk 100. For example, symmetry of the attachment points 131 , 132 and the attachment points 205a, b about the centerline 105, and symmetric orientation of the gas springs 300a, b about the centerline 105, for example as shown by angles Θ and Φ (more specifically, angles 0 a and 0b and angles Φ 3 and 0b), can result in improved operation of the gas springs 300a, b. In addition, the lifting actuators (not shown due to their being located inside the legs 200a, b) can comprise a motor-driven screw-style actuator and are generally designed to push loads, not pull loads. Thus correct matching of the gas spring 300a, b to the desk 100 can also be beneficial. For example, sufficiently strong gas springs 300a, b can help offset the tare weight of the superstructure of the desk 100, which can enable the actuators inside the legs 200a, b to work more efficiently. Over-sizing the compression specification of the gas springs 300a, b, however, such that the resistance created inside the gas spring 300a, b is more than necessary to create the beneficial effects described herein, can cause the actuators inside the legs 200a, b to strain to lower the desk 100 from its standing height or from the upper position B.

[0067] With the desk 100 at its full height proximate to the upper position B and with the gas springs 300a, b fully extended, depending on the placement of the load, the first gas spring 300a can act as a rigid brace for the first leg 200a while the second gas spring 300b can act as a shock absorber for the other leg 200b, or vice versa. At all height settings or any height H (shown in Figures 5 and 6) of the desk 100, the gas springs 300a, b can act as shock absorbers to minimize sympathetic or harmonic movement from side to side. Also, where loads such as speakers 600a, b (shown in Figure 20) are placed higher on the desk 100, the gas springs 300a, b can dampen the inertia created when the desk 100 is bumped. Even if the desk 100 does move, the desk 100 can quickly return to a neutral or equilibrium position instead of continuing to shake, bounce, or sway. [0068] For the desk 100, in various aspects, gas springs 300a, b substantially matching the specifications of, for example and without limitation, a LIFT-O-MAT® gas spring from STABILUS Inc. of Gastonia, North Carolina, USA, or from STABILUS GmbH of Koblenz, Germany, can be used successfully (for example and without limitation, a gas spring with the designation "1141 EA 0250N 178/16 A R" and having a compression load setting of approximately 250 N or 50 pounds and an uncompressed length L of approximately 900 mm or 35.5 inches can be used). In other aspects, including aspects involving other desks 100 of different sizes or weights or qualities, gas springs with larger or smaller compression load settings or shorter or longer uncompressed lengths can be used.

[0069] Either of the gas springs 300a, b can be angled with respect to the respective leg 200a, b by a non-90-degree angle and with respect to the desktop 110 by a non-90- degree angle. The angles 0 a and 0b can describe an angular position of each of the gas springs 300a, b with respect to the respective leg 200a, b in the X-Y plane shown in Figure 4. More specifically, the angle 0 a and 0b can describe an angular position of the respective gas springs 300a, b with respect to a vertical orientation or the Y-direction (shown in Figure 1) defining, for example and without limitation, the axes 201a, b (shown in Figure 2).

[0070] As shown in Figures 5 and 6, as described above, the desk 100 can be configured to adjust the desktop surface 11 1 of the desktop 110 from the lower position A to the upper position B. Such adjustment can effectively adjust in the Y-direction (shown in Figure 1) the height H between a floor surface 500 and the desktop surface 11 1.

[0071] As shown in Figure 7, the angles a a and cib (c¾ not shown) can describe an angular position of each of the gas springs 300a, b with respect to a transverse direction of the desk 100 such as defined by, for example and without limitation, the X-Y plane shown in Figure 2. The gas springs 300a, b thus need not be aligned with the transverse direction of the desk (i.e., the X-direction) and can thus extend at least partially in the Z-direction as shown. As shown, the gas springs 300a, b can be angled towards a rear of the desk 100 (or in a negative Z-direction).

[0072] As shown in Figure 8, the desk 100 can comprise a drive unit 400a, b proximate to each leg 200a, b and configured to drive the lengthening or shortening of the legs 200a, b via the aforementioned actuators. Each of the drive units 400a, b can be secured to a bottom side or underside of the desktop 1 10. In one aspect, each of the drive units 400a, b can be positioned between the desktop 110 and the attachment portion 210a, b of the leg 200a, b. In another aspect, both the drive units 400a, b and the attachments portions 210a,b of the legs 200a, b can be secured directly to the desktop 110. Also shown is the orientation of the previously defined front and rear directions of the desk 100. The angles 0a and 0b can describe an angular position of the respective gas springs 300a, b with respect to a transverse direction of the desk 100 such as defined by, for example and without limitation, the cross rail 130 or in the X-Z plane shown in Figure 8. The gas springs 300a, b thus need not be aligned with the transverse direction of the desk (i.e., the X-direction) and can thus extend at least partially in the Z-direction as shown.

[0073] Figures 9-13 show additional views of the bottom side of the desk 100a including each of the desktop 1 10, the legs 200a, b, and the drive units 400a, b. As shown, the leg stabilizer 250 can be connected to each of the legs 200a, b with a bracket 270a, b.

[0074] As shown in Figure 11 , each of the gas springs 300a, b can comprise a joint 330a, b (330b not shown), which can comprise a socket joint defining a spherically shaped inside cavity, at the end of the shaft 320a, b. The joint 330a, b can then be secured to a connecting fastener 190, which can be assembled to the leg 200a through the bracket 270a through any desired connection such as, for example and without limitation, a threaded connection. As shown, the bracket 270a can be secured to the leg 200a (and similarly the bracket 270b to the leg 200b) with a fastener 290a.

[0075] As shown in Figures 12 and 13, each of the gas springs 300a, b can comprise a joint 340a, b, respectively, which can be a socket joint, at the end of the shaft 320a. Each joint 330a can then be secured to the connecting fastener 190, which can be assembled to the cross rail 130. Optionally, a nut (not shown) riding inside the groove 135 of the cross rail 130 can be used to secure the connecting fastener 190 to the cross rail 130, including when, for example and without limitation, the groove 135 defines an internal channel in which the nut can be received that can prevent rotation of the nut and also a channel for the connecting fastener 190 that will not allow axial movement of the nut out of the groove 135 (i.e., it is sized to retain the nut).

[0076] Figure 14 shows the connecting fastener 190, which can be a ball stud comprising a ball portion 192 defining at least in part a spherical shape, a hex portion 194 to facilitate installation and tightening of the connecting fastener 190, and a threaded portion 196.

[0077] Figure 15 shows the connecting fastener 190 received within the joint 330 or the joint 340 of the gas spring 300.

[0078] Figures 16-19 show a method of assembling the desk 100 comprising securing the gas springs 300a, b between the desktop 1 10 and the legs 200a, b of the desk 100. More specifically, Figure 16 shows a user attaching the joint 340a of the gas spring 300a to the connecting fastener 190 positioned at the attachment point 131 by simply pressing or snapping the joint 340a onto the connecting fastener 190. Likewise, Figure 17 shows a user attaching the joint 340b of the gas spring 300b to the connecting fastener 190 positioned at the attachment point 132 by simply pressing or snapping the joint 340b onto the connecting fastener 190. Figure 18 shows a user attaching the joint 330a of the gas spring 300a to the connecting fastener 190 positioned at the attachment point 205a by simply pressing or snapping the joint 330a onto the connecting fastener 190.

Likewise, Figure 19 shows a user attaching the joint 330b of the gas spring 300b to the connecting fastener 190 positioned at the attachment point 205b by simply pressing or snapping the joint 330b onto the connecting fastener 190. As shown, the connections between each of the gas springs 300a, b and the desktop 1 10 or the legs 200a, b can be made secure and also serviceable without tools. After attaching the gas springs 300a, b to the desk 100, a method of using the desk 100 can comprise raising the desk from the lower position A to the upper position B. The method of using the desk 100 can further comprise lowering the desk from the upper position B to the lower position A.

[0079] As shown in Figure 20, the method of using the desk 100 can further comprise

pushing the desk 100 in a substantially horizontal direction with a force such as a push force F shown that will tend to cause rocking, swaying, or vibration of the desk 100. As shown, for example and without limitation, the speakers 600a, b— represented in Figure 20 by a box weighing as much as 50 pounds or more— can be attached to each of the accessory frames 120a, b. Even with a strong push, the presence of the gas springs 300a, b can cause the desk 100 and everything attached to it to resist movement and can dampen any movement that occurs. As shown in both Figures 20 and 21 , the speakers 600a, b can be separated from the balance of the desk 100 by mounts 690a, b, which can be configured to isolate the vibration of the speakers and can be supported by speaker mount brackets (not shown). The mounts 690a, b can comprise, for example and without limitation, the IsoAcoustics® speaker platform available from IsoAcoustics Inc. of Markham, Ontario, Canada. Figure 21 shows the desk 100 without the gas springs 300a,b installed.

[0080] As shown in Figures 21 and 22, the desk 100 can comprise a desk adjustment

controller 700 comprising a user interface with input controls configured to adjust the extension or contraction of the legs 200a, b via control of the drive units 400a, b. Using the drive units 400a, b, various positions of the desktop surface 1 11 can be programmed and physically achieved.

[0081] Figures 23-26 show various configurations of the desk 100 with various equipment on the desktop 1 10. In one aspect, as shown in Figures 23 and 26, the gas springs 300a, b can be attached to an adjustable sit-stand desk such as the desk 100. In another aspect, the gas springs 300a, b can be attached to a stationary, non-adjustable desk that permanently maintains the desktop surface 11 1 at a single height. While the swaying of the desk 100 can be reduced by the substitution of rigid legs for telescoping legs, it is contemplated that benefits can be achieved on any desk 100 by the use of the gas springs as described herein and not only their use on adjustable desks. In another aspect, the gas springs 300a, b can be used on any flat desk and on legs, desktops, tabletops, or countertops of different shapes, sizes, and configurations— including a desk without a superstructure— to achieve similar benefits as described herein. In addition, in various aspects, other methods of attachment of the gas springs 300a, b to the desktop 1 10 or the legs 200 can be used. As shown in Figures 23 and 26, the desk 100 can comprise a bracket 86 configured to support additional structures such as, for example and without limitation, the monitor 81. As shown in Figure 25, the desktop 110 of the desk 100 can support equipment such as the keyboard 82. More specifically, as shown in Figure 26, a second portion 1 10b offset from a first portion 110a of the desktop 110 can function as a keyboard shelf for supporting the keyboard 82.

[0082] In some aspects, the disclosed gas springs 300a, b are not needed and are not used to adjust the height of the desktop 110 or otherwise move the components of the desk 100 with respect to each other and are used only for stability and to prevent such movement.

[0083] As shown in Figure 27, the second portion 1 10b (shown in Figure 26) of the desk 100 can support the aforementioned keyboard 82 proximate to a front end 103 (shown in Figure 28) of the desk 100. As shown, a keyboard tray 84 can be secured to an underside of the desk 100 and to the desktop 1 10 and can itself hold a keyboard 85. Also as shown, the brackets 86 of the desk 100 can mount to a support panel 87. In some aspects, the support panel 87 can support material such as, for example and without limitation, sheet music for a musician playing the keyboard 82. In other aspects, the support panel 87 can support an electronic device (not shown) comprising a graphical user interface (GUI) display data such as, for example and without limitation, the sheet music in digital form or a program for production or post-production of audio data by the writing, recording, editing, and/or mixing of the audio data. Moreover, the desk 100 can comprise a CPU (central processing unit) support device 88, which can support a CPU 89 for powering the electronic device or other audio equipment such as the audio equipment supported by the desk 100.

[0084] In some aspects, as described above and shown in Figure 7, each of the gas springs 300a, b can be angled towards a rear end 104 (shown in Figure 30) of the desktop 110 (i.e., in the negative Z-direction as shown in Figure 30). In other aspects, as shown in Figure 34, each of the gas springs 300a, b can be angled towards the front end 103 of the desk 100 (i.e., in the positive Z-direction as shown in Figure 30). The respective joints 340a, b (shown in Figure 30) of each of the gas springs 300a, b can thus be positioned proximate to the desktop 110 at the respective attachment points 131 , 132 towards the front end 103 or the rear end 104 of the desktop 110 with respect to the joints 330a, b proximate to the legs 200a, b. More specifically, a fastener such as the connecting fastener 190 of each of the joints 340a, b can be secured to the respective brackets 140a, b shown. In some aspects, as shown, the brackets 140a, b can mount to an underside of the desktop 1 10 and can extend from a position proximate to the rear end 104 of the desktop 1 10 and towards a position proximate to the front end 103 of the desktop 1 10. In other aspects, the brackets 140a, b can extend from a position proximate to the front end 103 of the desktop 1 10 and towards a position proximate to the rear end 104 of the desktop 1 10. In other aspects, the brackets 140a, b can extend in another direction (such as partially or solely in the X-direction or the Y-direction shown in Figure 27). As also shown, brackets 280a, b (280b shown in Figure 29) can be used to fix the respective joints 330a, b (shown in Figure 30) at the attachment points 205a, b (shown in Figure 29).

[0085] Figure 29 is a front view of the desk of Figure 28. As noted above, the second portion 1 10b can be offset from the first portion 1 10a of the desktop 1 10. More specifically, the respective portions 1 10a,b of the desktop 1 10 can define upper surfaces 1 1 1 a,b and lower surfaces 1 12a,b. Angles 0 a and 0b can describe an angular position of each of the gas springs 300a, b with respect to the respective leg 200a, b in the X-Y plane shown. More specifically, each of the angles 0 a and 0b can describe an angular position of the respective gas springs 300a, b with respect to a vertical orientation or the Y-direction defining, for example and without limitation, the axes 201 a, b. In some aspects, the angles 0 a and 0b can have the same angular measurement. In other aspects, the angles 0a and 0b can have different angular measurements.

[0086] Figure 30 is a bottom plan view of the desk of Figure 28. As shown, an inboard end of each of the brackets 140a,b can be positioned facing respective ends 136a,b of the cross rail 130. The gas springs 300a, b can be angled at respective angles Φ 3 and Φύ with respect to the X-direction of the desk 100. Angles Φ 3 and Φb can describe an angular position of each of the gas springs 300a, b with respect to the X-direction shown. In some aspects, the angles Φ 3 and 0b can have the same angular measurement. In other aspects, the angles Φ 3 and 0b can have different angular measurements. As shown, the brackets 140a,b can themselves be angled with respect to the X-direction to position the joints 330a, b further inboard (or outboard) with respect to the ends 136a,b of the cross rail 130.

[0087] Figure 31 is a side view of the desk of Figure 28 with the first portion 1 10a of the desktop 1 10 raised to the upper position B. Angles a a and a b (a b not shown) can describe an angular position of each of the gas springs 300a, b with respect to the respective leg 200a, b. More specifically, each of the angles a a and ¾ can describe an angular position of the respective gas springs 300a, b with respect to a vertical orientation or the Y- direction. In some aspects, the angles a a and cib can have the same angular measurement. In other aspects, the angles a a and cib can have different angular measurements.

[0088] In some aspects, in the lower position A or the upper position B or any position

between the lower position A and the upper position B, any of the angles 0 a and 0 b , the angles Φ 3 and Φ^ or the angles a a and cib can measure in a range from and including about 5 degrees to about 85 degrees. In other aspects, any of the angles 0 a and 0b, the angles Φ 3 and Φ^ or the angles a a and cib can measure in a range from and including about 10 degrees to about 80 degrees. In other aspects, any of the angles 0 a and 0b, the angles Φ 3 and Φ^ or the angles a a and cib can measure in a range from and including about 20 degrees to about 70 degrees. In other aspects, any of the angles 0 a and 0b, the angles Φ 3 and Φ^ or the angles a a and cib can measure in a range from and including about 30 degrees to about 60 degrees. In some aspects, with the respective joints 330a, b, 340a, b fixed with respect to the legs 200a, b and the desktop 110, any of the angles 0 a and 0b or the angles Φ 3 and Φb can decrease when the desktop 110 is raised from the lower position A to the upper position B.

[0089] In some aspects, with the respective joints 330a, b, 340a, b fixed with respect to the legs 200a, b and the desktop 1 10, any of the angles a a and ci b can also increase or decrease when the desktop 1 10 is raised from the lower position A to the upper position B, at least when such raising of the desktop 1 10 causes movement of the joints 340a, b in either the X or Z directions, such as the case when the desktop 110 moves at least partially in the X or Z directions when raised such as when, for example and without limitation, the legs 200a, b or the axes 201 a, b are angled with respect to the Y-direction.

[0090] In some aspects, in either the lower position A or the upper position B, any of the angles 0 a and 0b, the angles Φ 3 and Φ^ or the angles a a and cib can measure about 30 degrees. In other aspects, in either the lower position A or the upper position B, any of the angles 0 a and 0b, the angles Φ 3 and Φ^ or the angles a a and cib can measure about 45 degrees. In some aspects, in either the lower position A or the upper position B, any of the angles 0 a and 0b, the angles Φ 3 and Φ^ or the angles a a and cib can measure about 60 degrees. When, in either the lower position A or the upper position B, any of the angles 0 a and 0b, the angles Φ 3 and Φ^ or the angles a a and cib measures zero degrees, the force F acts in a direction perpendicular to the gas springs 300a, b, the force F may not be dampened by the gas springs 300a, b because the gas springs 300a, b do not extend even partially in a direction parallel to the direction in which the force F acts.

[0091] In some aspects, the gas springs 300a, b are effective in providing stability of the desk 100 through their dampening effect when one or more of the angles 0 a and 0 b , the angles Φ 3 and Φ^ or the angles a a and cib measure at least 25 to 30 degrees (i.e., the gas springs 300a, b can be angled at an angle of less than or equal to about 60 to about 65 degrees from the horizontal or X-direction or Z-direction, as applicable). In other aspects, the gas springs 300a, b are effective in providing stability of the desk 100 through their dampening effect when one or more of the angles 0 a and 0 b , the angles Φ 3 and 0b, or the angles a a and cib measure at least 20 degrees (i.e., the gas springs 300a, b can be angled at an angle of less than or equal to about 70 degrees from the horizontal or X-direction or Z-direction, as applicable). In other aspects, the gas springs 300a, b are effective in providing stability of the desk 100 through their dampening effect when one or more of the angles 0 a and 0b, the angles Φ 3 and Φύ, or the angles a a and cib measure at least 10 degrees (i.e. , the gas springs 300a, b can be angled at an angle of less than or equal to about 80 degrees from the horizontal or X-direction or Z-direction, as applicable). In some aspects, the desk 100 will benefit more from the gas springs when raised above the lower position A due to the extension of the legs 200a, b and play in the various parts of the desk 100 that permits for increased movement (and therefore less stability) as the height H increases. In some aspects, the angles 0 a and 0b, the angles 0a and 0b, or the angles a a and cib measure 90 degrees or greater than 90 degrees (i.e. , the gas springs 300a, b can be aligned with the horizontal or X-direction or Z-direction, as applicable, or the gas springs can be angled down below the horizontal). In other aspects, the gas springs 300a, b can be positioned above the desktop 1 10.

[0092] In some aspects, the desired dampening effect for increased stability of the desk 100 can be achieved whenever the components of the desk such as the leg 200a, b, the desktop 1 10, and the gas spring 300a, b form a triangular "truss" shape naturally resisting movement (as a triangular truss resists movement and thus collapse in a structural member of a bridge, for example). In the case of the gas springs 300a, b, however, allows controlled or dampened movement in at least one of the three "legs" of the triangular structure created. In other aspects, the structured need not resemble a triangular shape and still provide an effective dampening effect.

[0093] In some aspects, the gas springs 300a, b can be angled with respect to the legs

200a, b in any of the X-direction, the Y-direction, or the Z-direction. Depending on how the weight of the desk 100— including any equipment the desk 100 supports— is concentrated, joints such as the joints 330a, b, 340a, b of the gas springs 300a, b can be distributed in an area proximate to those weight concentrations.

[0094] In some aspects as shown, the desk 100 can comprise a pair of gas springs 300a, b.

In other aspects, the desk 100 can comprise only a single gas spring 300a, b. In other aspects, the desk 100 can comprise more than two gas springs 300a, b.

[0095] As shown in Figure 32, the leg stabilizer 250 and the gas springs 300a, b (300b

shown in Figure 27) can be secured to the leg 200a, b (200b shown in Figure 27). A member of the leg 200 can define a front side 203, a rear side 204, an inboard side 206, and an outboard side 207. More specifically, the leg stabilizer 250 can extend from the aforementioned bracket 270a (and similarly from the bracket 270b at an opposite end of the desk 100), which can secured to the rear side 204 of the leg 200a, b. Instead of being secured to the brackets 270a, b as shown in Figure 9, the gas springs 300a, b can be secured to the brackets 280a, b (280b shown in Figure 29). Each of the brackets 280a, b can comprise a first portion 282, a second portion 284, which can be angled with respect to the first portion 282 by an angle 3010, and a third portion 286, which can be angled with respect to the second portion 284. In other aspects, any of the brackets 270a, b or the brackets 280a, b can be positioned to the front side 203, the inboard side 206, or the outboard side 207. As shown, the second portion 284 and the third portion 286 of the bracket 280a can face the inboard side 206 of the leg 200a to facilitate positioning of the joints 330a, b (330b shown in Figure 30) such that, for example and without limitation, the gas springs 300a, b can freely extend or retract in any position of the desk 100 without interference with the bracket 280a, b, the leg 200a, b, or any other portion of the desk 100. As shown, the bracket 270a and the bracket 280a, b can be secured to the leg 200 with the fastener 290a.

[0096] As shown in Figure 33, the leg stabilizer 250 can extend from the bracket 280a (and similarly from the bracket 280b at an opposite end of the desk 100 as shown in Figure 29). As shown, in some aspects the leg stabilizer 250 can be angled with respect to the X-direction (shown in Figure 30). In other aspects, the leg stabilizer 250 need not be angled with respect to the X-direction. As shown, the bracket 280a, b can be secured to the leg 200 with the aforementioned fastener 290a.

[0097] In one exemplary aspect, a desk can comprise: a desktop; a leg comprising an

attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the attachment portion of the leg configured to move with respect to the foot portion of the leg along an axis of the leg to adjust a height of the desktop about and between a lower position and an upper position, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk; and a gas spring extending from the leg to the desktop, the gas spring angled with respect to the leg by a non-90- degree angle and with respect to the desktop by a non-90-degree angle.

[0098] In a further exemplary aspect, the attachment portion of the leg can be movable with respect to the foot portion of the leg in a substantially vertical direction. In a further exemplary aspect, the leg can comprise a telescoping feature configured to adjust the height of the desktop. In a further exemplary aspect, the desk can further comprise an accessory frame defining an accessory opening configured to receive pro audio equipment. In a further exemplary aspect, the desk can further comprise a cross rail secured to an underside of the desktop, a joint of the gas spring secured to the cross rail. In a further exemplary aspect, the cross rail can be oriented in a transverse direction of the desk. In a further exemplary aspect, a joint of the gas spring can be secured to the foot portion of the leg, an angle of the gas spring measured with respect to the leg varying with the height of the desktop. In a further exemplary aspect, wherein the leg is a first leg, the desk can further comprise a second leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the second leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the attachment portion of the second leg configured to move with respect to the foot portion of the second leg along an axis of the second leg, the first leg and the second leg thereby configured in combination to adjust the height of the desktop about and between the lower position and the upper position. In a further exemplary aspect, the desk can further comprise a leg stabilizer extending from the first leg to the second leg. In a further exemplary aspect, a secondary portion of the desktop can be offset in a vertical direction with respect to a main portion of the desktop. In a further exemplary aspect, the gas spring can be secured to each of the leg and the desktop without tools. In a further exemplary aspect, the gas spring can be secured to each of the leg and the desktop with a ball and socket joint, a joint of the gas spring defining a socket and the desktop defining a ball.

[0099] In another exemplary aspect, a desk can comprise: a desktop; a leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk, a position of the desktop fixed with respect to the foot portion of the leg; and a gas spring connecting the leg to the desktop, the gas spring angled with respect to the leg by a non-90-degree angle and with respect to the desktop by a non- 90-degree angle.

[00100] In a further exemplary aspect, the desk can further comprise an accessory frame defining an accessory opening configured to receive pro audio equipment. In a further exemplary aspect, the desk can further comprise a cross rail secured to an underside of the desktop, a joint of the gas spring secured to the cross rail. In a further exemplary aspect, wherein the leg is a first leg, the desk can further comprise a second leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the second leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop. In a further exemplary aspect, the gas spring can be secured to each of the leg and the desktop without tools.

[00101] In another exemplary aspect, a method of assembling a desk can comprise:

attaching a first joint of a gas spring to an attachment point on a desktop; and attaching a second joint of the gas spring to an attachment point on a leg, the leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk; wherein after attaching the gas spring to the desktop and to the leg, the gas spring can be angled with respect to the leg by a non-90-degree angle and with respect to the desktop by a non-90-degree angle.

[00102] In a further exemplary aspect, wherein the leg is a first leg, the desk can further comprise a second leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the second leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the method further comprising attaching a leg stabilizer to the first leg and to the second leg, the leg stabilizer extending from the first leg to the second leg and fixing a distance therebetween. In a further exemplary aspect, the method can further comprise stabilizing the desk with the gas spring by dampening the movement of the desktop with respect to the leg with the gas spring after applying a force to the desk, the force angled with respect to a vertical orientation.

[00103] In one exemplary aspect, a desk can comprise: a desktop; a leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the attachment portion of the leg configured to move with respect to the foot portion of the leg along an axis of the leg to adjust a height of the desktop about and between a lower position and an upper position, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk; and a gas spring extending from the leg to the desktop, the gas spring angled with respect to the leg by an angle of at least 5 degrees and with respect to the desktop by an angle of at least 5 degrees.

[00104] In a further exemplary aspect, the attachment portion of the leg can be movable with respect to the foot portion of the leg in a substantially vertical direction. In a further exemplary aspect, the leg can comprise a telescoping feature configured to adjust the height of the desktop. In a further exemplary aspect, the gas spring can be angled with respect to the leg by an angle of between about 10 degrees and about 80 degrees in at least one direction. In a further exemplary aspect, the gas spring can be angled with respect to the leg by an angle of between about 10 degrees and about 80 degrees in at least two directions. In a further exemplary aspect, the gas spring can be angled with respect to the leg by an angle of between about 10 degrees and about 80 degrees in three directions. In a further exemplary aspect, a joint of the gas spring can be secured to the foot portion of the leg, an angle of the gas spring measured with respect to the leg varying with the height of the desktop. In a further exemplary aspect, wherein the leg is a first leg, the desk can further comprise a second leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the second leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the attachment portion of the second leg configured to move with respect to the foot portion of the second leg along an axis of the second leg, the first leg and the second leg thereby configured in combination to adjust the height of the desktop about and between the lower position and the upper position. In a further exemplary aspect, the desk can further comprise a leg stabilizer extending from the first leg to the second leg. In a further exemplary aspect, a secondary portion of the desktop can be offset in a vertical direction with respect to a main portion of the desktop. In a further exemplary aspect, the gas spring can be secured to each of the leg and the desktop without tools. In a further exemplary aspect, the gas spring can be secured to each of the leg and the desktop with a ball and socket joint, a joint of the gas spring defining a socket and the desktop defining a ball.

[00105] In another exemplary aspect, a desk can comprise: a desktop; a leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk, a position of the desktop fixed with respect to the foot portion of the leg; and a gas spring connecting the leg to the desktop, the gas spring angled with respect to the leg by an angle of at least 5 degrees and with respect to the desktop by an angle of at least 5 degrees.

[00106] In a further exemplary aspect, the gas spring can be angled with respect to the leg by an angle of between about 10 degrees and about 80 degrees in at least one direction. In a further exemplary aspect, the gas spring can be angled with respect to the leg by an angle of between about 10 degrees and about 80 degrees in at least two directions. In a further exemplary aspect, wherein the leg is a first leg, the desk further comprising a second leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the second leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop. In a further exemplary aspect, the gas spring can be secured to each of the leg and the desktop without tools.

[00107] In another exemplary aspect, a method of assembling a desk can comprise:

attaching a first joint of a gas spring of the desk to an attachment point on a desktop; and attaching a second joint of the gas spring to an attachment point on a leg, the leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the foot portion of the leg defining a bottom end of the desk; wherein after attaching the gas spring to the desktop and to the leg the gas spring can be angled with respect to the leg by an angle of at least 5 degrees and with respect to the desktop by an angle of at least 5 degrees.

[00108] In a further exemplary aspect, wherein the leg is a first leg, the desk further

comprising a second leg comprising an attachment portion and a foot portion, the attachment portion of the second leg secured to the desktop and extending away from the desktop, the method can further comprise attaching a leg stabilizer to the first leg and to the second leg, the leg stabilizer extending from the first leg to the second leg and fixing a distance therebetween. In a further exemplary aspect, the method can further comprise stabilizing the desk with the gas spring by dampening the movement of the desktop with respect to the leg with the gas spring after applying a force to the desk, the force angled with respect to a vertical orientation.

[00109] In another exemplary aspect, the desk can comprise: a desktop; a leg secured to the desktop; and a gas spring connecting the leg to the desktop.

[00110] One should note that conditional language, such as, among others, "can," "could," "might," or "may," unless specifically stated otherwise, or otherwise understood within the context as used, is generally intended to convey that certain aspects include, while other aspects do not include, certain features, elements and/or steps. Thus, such conditional language is not generally intended to imply that features, elements and/or steps are in any way required for one or more particular aspects or that one or more particular aspects necessarily comprise logic for deciding, with or without user input or prompting, whether these features, elements and/or steps are included or are to be performed in any particular aspect.

[00111] It should be emphasized that the above-described aspects are merely possible examples of implementations, merely set forth for a clear understanding of the principles of the present disclosure. Any process descriptions or blocks in flow diagrams should be understood as representing modules, segments, or portions of code which comprise one or more executable instructions for implementing specific logical functions or steps in the process, and alternate implementations are included in which functions may not be included or executed at all, may be executed out of order from that shown or discussed, including substantially concurrently or in reverse order, depending on the functionality involved, as would be understood by those reasonably skilled in the art of the present disclosure. Many variations and modifications may be made to the above-described aspect(s) without departing substantially from the spirit and principles of the present disclosure. Further, the scope of the present disclosure is intended to cover any and all combinations and sub-combinations of all elements, features, and aspects discussed above. All such modifications and variations are intended to be included herein within the scope of the present disclosure, and all possible claims to individual aspects or combinations of elements or steps are intended to be supported by the present disclosure.