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Title:
DEVICE, SYSTEM, AND METHOD FOR ELIMINATING AIR POCKETS, ELIMINATING AIR STRATIFICATION, MINIMIZING INCONSISTENT TEMPERATURE, AND INCREASING INTERNAL AIR TURNS
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2016/077268
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Devices, systems, and methods for managing air flow within a volume and/or within device throw area or range, wherein the device includes an air transfer component, an entrance, air induction ports, directional vanes, and three exit zones that incorporate lattices. The devices, systems, and methods minimize or eliminate air pockets, air stratification, inconsistent temperature, and increases interior air turns within the volume of air to be managed.

Inventors:
PRICE, Roy, H. (1 Hickory Lane, Amelia Island, FL, 32034, US)
FIORINI, Albert, E. (4420 Brynwood Drive, Naples, FL, 34119, US)
PRICE, Mark, A. (5174 McGinnis Ferry Road, Suite 145Alpharetta, GA, 30005, US)
Application Number:
US2015/059825
Publication Date:
May 19, 2016
Filing Date:
November 10, 2015
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
INTERNAL AIR FLOW DYNAMICS, LLC (1 Hickory Lane, Amelia Island, FL, 32034, US)
International Classes:
F24F7/06; F04D25/08; F24F13/02; F24F13/10; F24F13/20
Foreign References:
US6955596B12005-10-18
US6168517B12001-01-02
US20070060039A12007-03-15
KR20060010534A2006-02-02
US5624311A1997-04-29
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
GLASGOW, JiNan (Triangle Patents, PO Box 52546Durham, NC, 27717, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

The invention claimed is:

1. A device for creating substantially continuous circulation within a volume to be managed comprising:

a housing;

at least one air transfer component;

air induction ports;

at least one entrance to the device; and

at least three exit zones to the device,

wherein the at least one air transfer component draws air transfer component driven air from outside the device;

wherein the air induction ports draw induced air from outside the device to mix with the air transfer component driven air;

wherein the device does not include a connection to an HVAC system; and

wherein the device does not include a connection to an air duct.

2. The device of claim 1 wherein each of the at least three exit zones to the device include at least one exit lattice, wherein the at least one exit lattice directs air through the at least three exit zones to the device.

3. The device of claim 1 wherein the at least one air transfer component includes at least one fan and the at least one fan includes a plurality of blades joined together by a hub, wherein the leading edges of the blades include tubercles.

4. The device of claim 1, wherein the device further comprises a nozzle, wherein the nozzle is positioned between the at least one air transfer component and the at least three exit zones to the device such that the nozzle aids the at least one air transfer component in pushing the air transfer component driven air from outside the device through the at least three exit zones to the device.

5. The device of claim 1, wherein the device further comprises at least one directional vane for guiding the air through the device, wherein the at least one directional vane is positioned between the at least one air transfer component and the at least three exit zones to the device.

6. The device of claim 1 wherein each of the at least three exit zones to the device include at least one exit louver, wherein the at least one exit louver directs air through the at least three exit zones to the device.

7. A device for creating substantially continuous circulation within a volume to be managed, the device including at least one housing, wherein each of the at least one housing comprises: at least one air transfer component;

at least one entrance through which air enters the device; and

at least three exit zones through which air exits the device,

wherein the at least one air transfer component pulls air through the at least one entrance, pulls air through the at least one air transfer component, and pushes the air through the at least three exit zones

wherein the device does not include a connection to an HVAC system; and

wherein the device does not include a connection to an air duct.

8. The device of claim 7, wherein the at least one housing has at least one rounded corner and at least one rounded edge to aid air flow.

9. The device of claim 7, further comprising at least one directional vane for guiding the air through the device, wherein the at least one directional vane is positioned between the at least one air transfer component and the at least three exit zones to the device.

10. The device of claim 7, wherein at least one of the at least three exit zones include at least one lattice for directing the air through the at least one of the three exit zones.

11. The device of claim 7 wherein:

the at least one housing further includes a top and a bottom and

the at least three exit zones include a substantially open exit zone side and two partially open exit zone sides,

at least about 90% of the substantially open exit zone side includes louvers operable for directing the air through the substantially open exit zone side and

at least about 50% of the two partially open exit zone sides includes louvers operable for directing the air through the two partially open exit zone sides.

12. The device of claim 7 wherein the at least one housing comprises two adjacent housings, the at least three exit zones for each housing are at least three exit zone sides, the at least one entrance for each housing is at least one bottom entrance, and each adjacent housing includes a side that is not one of the at least three exit zone sides or the at least one bottom entrance, wherein the side of the first adjacent housing that is not one of the at least three exit zone sides or the at least one bottom entrance faces the side of the second adjacent housing that is not one of the at least three exit zone sides or the at least one bottom entrance.

13. The device of claim 7 further comprising air induction ports, wherein the air induction ports draw induced air from outside the device to mix with the air pulled by the at least one air transfer component through the at least one entrance.

14. The device of claim 13 further comprising a nozzle, wherein the nozzle is positioned between the at least one air transfer component and the at least three exit zones to the device such that the nozzle aids the at least one air transfer component in pushing the air transfer component driven air from outside the device through the at least three exit zones to the device.

15. The device of claim 14, wherein the at least one air transfer component includes at least one fan and the at least one fan includes a plurality of blades joined together by a hub, wherein the leading edges of the blades include tubercles.

16. A method for designing a system for increasing internal air turns in a volume of air to be managed within a facility using one or more devices that are neither HV AC -based nor duct- based, wherein the method comprises the steps of:

determining an approximate volume of air to be managed within the facility;

determining the locations of HVAC system components within the facility; and based on the approximate volume of air to be managed within the facility and the

locations of the HVAC system components within the facility, determining the number of the one or more devices to install in the facility and at least one preferred location for each of the one or more devices within the facility to increase the internal air turns within the volume of air to be managed within the facility.

17. The method of claim 16, further comprising determining the locations of objects, internal loads, windows, and/or doors within the facility,

wherein the step of determining the number of the one or more devices to install in the facility and the at least one preferred location for each of the one or more devices within the facility to increase the internal air turns within the volume of air to be managed is also based on the locations of the objects, the internal loads, the windows, and/or the doors within the facility.

18. The method of claim 17, further comprising determining at least one preferred location for at least one sensor within the facility based on the at least one preferred location for the one or more devices within the facility, the locations of the objects, the internal loads, the windows, and/or the doors within the facility, the approximate volume of air to be managed within the facility, and the locations of the HVAC system components within the facility, wherein the at least one sensor measures at least one of temperature, humidity, particulate concentration, and air flow of the environment.

19. The method of claim 18, further comprising:

entering the approximate volume of air to be managed within the facility into a graphical user interface (GUI) on a computing device;

entering the locations of HVAC system components within the facility into the GUI; and displaying at least one recommendation for the number of one or more devices to install in the facility and the at least one preferred location for the one or more devices within the facility to increase the internal air turns within the volume of air to be managed within the facility.

20. The method of claim 16, further comprising determining a desired reduction in tonnage utilized in the facility,

wherein the step of determining the number of the one or more devices to install in the facility and the at least one preferred location for the one or more devices within the facility to increase the internal air turns within the volume of air to be managed within the facility is also based on the desired reduction in tonnage utilized in the facility.

21. A system for creating substantially continuous circulation within a volume to be managed comprising one or more devices that are neither HVAC -based nor duct-based,

wherein the one or more devices are operable to continuously draw air into at least one of the one or more devices, continuously process the air that is drawn into the at least one of the one or more devices, and continuously push air through at least three exit zones of the at least one of the one or more devices,

wherein the air pushed through the at least three exit zones is pushed in at least three different directions and mixed with itself and other air, thereby achieving substantially continuous circulation within the volume to be managed.

22. The system of claim 21 further comprising at least one controller and at least one sensor, wherein the at least one sensor is operable to measure at least one of a temperature, humidity, particulate concentration, and air flow,

wherein the at least one controller, in response to a measurement by the at least one sensor, is operable to adjust the location of the at least one of the one or more devices and/or at least one of the volume, speed, direction, and angle of air that is

continuously drawn into the at least one of the one or more devices, continuously processed by the at least one of the one or more devices, and/or continuously pushed through the at least three exit zones of the at least one of the one or more devices.

23. The system of claim 21 further comprising a profile including a minimum and/or a maximum temperature and/or a minimum and/or a maximum airflow,

wherein the at least one controller is further operable to compare at least one of the

measured temperature, and air flow to the minimum and/or the maximum

temperature, and/or the minimum and/or the maximum airflow,

wherein in response to the comparison, the at least one controller is operable to adjust the location of the at least one of the one or more devices and/or at least one of the volume, speed, direction, and angle of air that is continuously drawn into the at least one of the one or more devices, continuously processed by the at least one of the one or more devices, and/or continuously pushed through the at least three exit zones in the at least one of the one or more devices.

24. The system of claim 21, wherein at least three exit zones include louvers such that the air pushed through the at least three exit zones is pushed over the louvers.

25. The system of claim 21, wherein at least three exit zones include lattices such that the air pushed through the at least three exit zones is pushed over the lattices.

26. The system of claim 25, wherein each of the one or more devices include a nozzle, wherein the nozzle is positioned between at least one air transfer component and the at least three exit zones of each of the one or more devices such that the nozzle aids the at least one air transfer component in pushing the air from outside the one or more devices through the at least three exit zones to the one or more devices.

27. The system of claim 25, wherein each of the one or more devices include at least one directional vane for guiding the air through the one or more devices, wherein the at least one directional vane is positioned between the at least one air transfer component and the at least three exit zones to the one or more devices.

Description:
DEVICE, SYSTEM, AND METHOD FOR ELIMINATING AIR POCKETS,

ELIMINATING AIR STRATIFICATION, MINIMIZING INCONSISTENT

TEMPERATURE, AND INCREASING INTERNAL AIR TURNS

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[001] The present application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 62/077,582, filed November 10, 2014, U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 62/077,588, filed November 10, 2014, U.S. Patent Application No. 14/934,735, filed November 6, 2015, U.S. Patent Application No. 14/934,778, filed November 6, 2015, each of which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[002] 1. Field of the Invention

[003] The present invention relates generally to devices, systems, and methods for eliminating air pockets, eliminating air stratification, minimizing inconsistent temperature, and increasing internal air turns within a facility.

[004] 2. Description of the Prior Art

[005] Systems, methods, and devices for air distribution and circulation management within facilities are well-known in the prior art. In particular, HVAC systems and area fans are well- known in the prior art for distributing and circulating air within facilities. Conventional HVAC systems introduce hot, cool, or ventilation air into a facility - typically through a costly system of ductwork or via ductwork to a diffuser box. Significant temperature fluctuations are caused by walk and loading, doors, windows, hot or cold walls, hot and cold roof, the number of occupants, and equipment inside of a facility. Due to intermittent run time and duct and diffuser box air distribution systems, conventional systems tend to create air stratification and hot zones. In effect, these systems are relying on the system fans, with large hp motors, to generate intermittent air circulation. Until the HVAC system restarts, still air develops into pockets of different temperatures. This change in temperature, in addition to hot and cold spots, creates bands of warm and cool air throughout a facility, known as air stratification. A traditional HVAC system runs when the air differential varies from the set temperature at the thermostat location and turns off when the temperature reaches what is called for on the thermostat. By design, a traditional HVAC system is never at the exact 'right' temperature, but works to stay within a range of expected temperatures. Area fans also do not eliminate air pockets or thermal stratification in a facility, nor are they capable of minimizing temperature fluctuations in a facility. Accordingly, a need exists for methods, systems, and devices which sufficiently reduce or eliminate air pockets, thermal stratification, and temperature fluctuations. These methods, systems, and devices should be cost-effective, and allow for a consistent temperature (within 2 degrees Fahrenheit of the desired

temperature) to be maintained.

[006] One example of a prior art solution to the above-stated problems can be found at: http://www.everairtech.com/solution.html. This solution shows a unit with a simple fan encased in a rectangular housing. Each unit requires a short supply and a return duct from a package or split system FJVAC unit.

[007] Other relevant art includes the following US Patent documents:

[008] US Patent Application Pub. No. 2010/0202932 for "Air movement system and air cleaning system" by Danville, filed February 10, 2010 and published August 12, 2010, describes an air movement and air cleaning system which includes an air movement system preferably including fan and fan housing to prevent thermal gradients in a building or room, in combination with an air cleaning surface of at least titanium dioxide, to react with moisture in the air and an ultraviolet light source in close proximity to the air cleaning surface, such that as humidity in the air passes through the air movement system over the titanium dioxide, the ultraviolet light creates hydroxyl radicals in the presence of the titanium oxide catalytic surface thereby purifying the air that passes there through.

[009] US Pub. No. 2010/0291858 for "Automatic control system for ceiling based on temperature differentials" by Toy, filed July 28, 2010 and published November 18, 2010, describes a fan which includes a hub, several fan blades, and a motor that is operable to drive the hub. A motor controller is in communication with the motor, and is configured to select the rate of rotation at which the motor drives the hub. The fan is installed in a place having a floor and a ceiling. An upper temperature sensor is positioned near the ceiling. A lower temperature sensor is positioned near the floor. The temperature sensors communicate with the motor controller, which includes a processor configured to compare substantially contemporaneous temperature readings from the upper and lower temperature sensors. The motor controller is thus configured to automatically control the fan motor to minimize the differences between substantially contemporaneous temperature readings from the upper and lower temperature sensors. The fan system may thus substantially destratify air in an environment, to provide a substantially uniform temperature distribution within the environment.

[0010] US Pat. No. 6,955,596 for "Air flow producer for reducing room temperature gradients" by Walker, et al, filed on August 26, 2004 and issued on October 18, 2005, describes an air flow producer mounted at the ceiling of a room generates an air flow toward the floor, reducing temperature gradients and improving heating and cooling efficiency. A housing defines a circular cylindrical, vertical flow passage that receives the air flow. A discharge chamber discharges the air flow through a grill toward the floor. The discharge chamber has a cross-section that expands progressively from the outlet of the flow passage to the outlet of the discharge chamber. The air flow through the housing is produced by a fan with a rotary blade assembly, and the blade assembly extends partially into the discharge chamber. The position of the blade assembly and the expanding cross-section of the discharge chamber cooperate to increase air flows through the housing. Optionally, an air intake chamber of generally inverted frustoconical shape may be mounted at the upper inlet end of the cylindrical flow passage to smooth flows further.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0011] The present invention provides devices, systems, and methods for eliminating air stratification, eliminating air pockets, minimizing inconsistent temperature, and increasing interior air turns within a facility. The device of the present invention also reduces the amount of tonnage and/or BTU's of HVAC systems necessary to eliminate air stratification, eliminate air pockets, minimize inconsistent temperature, and increase interior air turns within a facility.

[0012] One aspect of the present invention involves a device for eliminating air stratification, eliminating air pockets, minimizing inconsistent temperature, and increasing interior air flow within a facility. The device includes a housing with at least one entrance, at least one air transfer component in the form of a fan, a nozzle to increase the velocity of the air from the fan, air induction ports around the opening of the nozzle that draws additional air from outside of the unit (The Bernoulli Effect) to mix with the fan driven air, directional vanes to direct a portion of the air to the left and right and three exits (in one embodiment left, right and center) that incorporate lattices. Preferably, the nozzle is constructed of sheet metal. In one embodiment, the air induction ports are preferably in front of the fan blades. The air first passes over the blades, through the nozzle and then through the air induction ports zone, over directional vanes, and then exits through lattices.

[0013] Another aspect of the present invention involves a device for eliminating air stratification, eliminating air pockets, minimizing inconsistent temperature, and increasing interior air flow, within a facility. The device includes at least one air transfer component, at least one entrance to the device which includes at least one lattice, and at least three exit zones to the device.

[0014] Another aspect of the present invention involves a device for creating substantially continuous circulation within a volume to be managed including a housing, at least one air transfer component, air induction ports, at least one entrance to the device, and at least three exit zones to the device, wherein the at least one air transfer component draws air transfer component driven air from outside the device, wherein the air induction ports draw induced air from outside the device to mix with the air transfer component driven air, wherein the device does not include a connection to an HVAC system, and wherein the device does not include a connection to an air duct.

[0015] Another aspect of the present invention involves a device for creating substantially continuous circulation within a volume to be managed, the device including at least one housing, wherein each of the at least one housing includes at least one air transfer component, at least one entrance through which air enters the device, and at least three exit zones through which air exits the device, wherein the at least one air transfer component pulls air through the at least one entrance, pulls air through the at least one air transfer component, and pushes the air through the at least three exit zones, wherein the device does not include a connection to an HVAC system; and wherein the device does not include a connection to an air duct.

[0016] Another aspect of the present invention involves a method for providing a system, a method for designing or specifying requirements for a system, and a system for eliminating air stratification, eliminating air pockets, minimizing inconsistent temperature, and increasing internal air turns within a facility. The method includes continuously drawing air into at least one of one or more devices, continuously processing air in at least one of the one or more devices, and continuously pushing air through at least three exit zones in at least one of the one or more devices. The method for designing the system includes determining the approximate volume of the facility, determining the location of HVAC system components within the facility, and based on the approximate volume and location of the HVAC system components, determining the number and type of the one or more devices to install in the facility and at least one preferred location for the one or more devices within the facility. The system includes one or more devices that are neither HVAC -based nor duct-based operable to continuously draw air into at least one of the one or more devices, continuously process the air that is drawn into the at least one of the one or more devices, and continuously push air through at least three exit zones of the at least one of the one or more devices.

[0017] Another aspect of the present invention involves a system for creating substantially continuous circulation within a volume to be managed comprising one or more devices that are neither HVAC -based nor duct-based, wherein the one or more devices are operable to continuously draw air into at least one of the one or more devices, continuously process the air that is drawn into the at least one of the one or more devices, and continuously push air through at least three exit zones of the at least one of the one or more devices, wherein the air pushed through the at least three exit zones is pushed in at least three different directions and mixed with itself and other air, thereby achieving substantially continuous circulation within the volume to be managed.

[0018] These and other aspects of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art after a reading of the following description of the preferred embodiment when considered with the drawings, as they support the claimed invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0019] FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a device that includes a housing 100, at least one air transfer component (a fan) 101, at least one entrance 103, directional vanes, and at least three exit zones 105, 107, and 109 that incorporate lattices or louvers. [0020] FIG. 2 shows a side view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a device that includes a housing 100, at least one air transfer component (a fan), at least one entrance 103, directional vanes, and at least three exit zones 105, 107, and 109 that incorporate lattices or louvers.

[0021] FIG. 3 shows a flow trajectory diagram of a simulation of flow trajectories coming from a single fan with a single exit zone after 30 minutes of the fan running in a 50' x 200' building.

[0022] FIG. 4 illustrates the flow trajectories 111 of a device utilizing three exit zones.

[0023] FIG. 5 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention including a housing 100, air induction ports 301, lattices 303, and a nozzle 305.

[0024] FIG. 6 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating an air transfer component 117, an entrance to the device including a lattice 119, three exit zones to the device 121, 123, and 125 including louvers, and an induction collar with a lattice 311.

[0025] FIG. 7 shows a side view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating an air transfer component 117, an entrance to the device including a lattice 119, three exit zones to the device 121, 123, and 125 including louvers, and an induction collar with a lattice 311.

[0026] FIG. 8 is an exploded view of two embodiments of a component of the present invention, namely a typical 10-blade one-piece hub (left) 131 next to a 6-blade hybrid hub (right) 133.

[0027] FIG. 9 shows a frontal view of one embodiment of the present invention where the leading edges of the blades include tubercles 135.

[0028] FIG. 10 shows a frontal view of one embodiment of the present invention where the leading edges of the blades include slots 137. [0029] FIG. 11 shows an exploded view of two fans configured to rotate in opposite directions 141 and 143 in order to produce a cohesive air flow exiting the device.

[0030] FIG. 12 shows a flow trajectory diagram of a simulation of flow trajectories coming from two fans configured to rotate in opposite directions with a grid and induction collar after 30 minutes of the fans running in a 50' x 300' building.

[0031] FIG. 13 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a housing having rounded corners 151 and rounded edges 153 with a top 155 and bottom 157, an entrance side 159, a substantially open exit zone side 161, two partially open exit zone sides 163 and 165, a first set of louvers 167, and a second set of louvers 169.

[0032] FIG. 14 shows a side view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a housing having rounded corners 151 and rounded edges 153 with a top 155 and bottom 157, an entrance side 159, a substantially open exit zone side 161, two partially open exit zone sides 163 and 165, a first set of louvers 167, and a second set of louvers 169.

[0033] FIG. 15 shows a directional vane 171 positioned between an air transfer component 173 and three exit zones 175, 177, and 179.

[0034] FIG. 16 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of vibration isolators 181 mounted between an air transfer component and a housing.

[0035] FIG. 17 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating two adjacent housings 191 and 193, and for each housing, three exit zone sides 195, 197, and 199, a bottom entrance 201, and one side that is not one of the three exit zone sides or bottom entrance 203.

[0036] FIG. 18 shows a side view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating two adjacent housings 191 and 193, and for each housing, three exit zone sides 195, 197, and 199, a bottom entrance 201, and one side that is not one of the three exit zone sides or bottom entrance 203. [0037] FIG. 19 shows a side view of a mount 211, swivel 213, first arm 215, upper adjustment assembly 217, second arm 219, and lower adjustment assembly 221 of one embodiment of the invention.

[0038] FIG. 20 shows a frontal view of one embodiment of the at least one sensor 231 for detecting changes in air flow and temperature in the environment of the device.

[0039] FIG. 21 shows a frontal view of one embodiment of the controller 241 of the present invention.

[0040] FIG. 22 shows a frontal view of one embodiment of the sanitation component 251 of the present invention.

[0041] FIG. 23 shows a frontal view of one embodiment of the dehumidifier 261 of the present invention.

[0042] FIG. 24 shows a perspective view of a noise reduction component 271 of one embodiment of the present invention.

[0043] FIG. 25 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention including a housing 100, air induction ports 321, and louvers 323 in one embodiment of the present invention.

[0044] FIG. 26 shows a top view of one embodiment of the present invention including a housing 100, air induction ports 321, louvers 323, and air flow 325 in one embodiment of the present invention.

[0045] FIG. 27 shows a side view of one embodiment of the present invention including a housing 100, air induction ports 321, and louvers 323 in one embodiment of the present invention.

[0046] FIG. 28 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a system for creating substantially continuous circulation within a volume to be managed. The system includes one or more devices 101 that are operable for continuously drawing in, processing, and pushing out air through at least three exits.

[0047] FIG. 29 is a side view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a system for creating substantially continuous circulation within a volume to be managed. The system includes the one or more devices 101 that are operable for continuously drawing in, processing, and pushing out air through at least three exits.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0048] None of the prior art addresses the longstanding need for eliminating air pockets, eliminating air stratification, minimizing inconsistent temperature, and increasing interior air turns in an open ceiling or 20' clear drop ceiling environment independent of traditional HVAC systems and system components, such as ducts. Thus, there remains a need for methods, systems, and devices which provide energy efficient air circulation to remove stratified air columns and air pockets, and maintain a stable and consistent temperature, namely within 2 degrees Fahrenheit of the desired temperature.

[0049] The present invention provides a device, a method, and a system for eliminating air stratification, eliminating air pockets, minimizing inconsistent temperature, and increasing interior air turns within a facility. In another embodiment, the present invention provides a device, a method, and a system for minimizing air stratification, minimizing air pockets, minimizing inconsistent temperature, and increasing interior air turns within a facility.

[0050] While the present invention is effective at eliminating air pockets, eliminating air stratification, minimizing inconsistent temperature, and increasing interior air turns in many facilities, it is particularly effective at doing so in open ceiling facilities and 20' clear drop ceiling. Air turns refers to the number of times air completely rotates or turns over within a facility. Facilities where a consistent temperature is desired or necessary, such as industrial buildings, distribution centers, retail operations, food storage facilities, and pharmaceutical storage facilities will benefit greatly from the present invention.

[0051] One aspect of the present invention involves a device for creating substantially continuous circulation within a volume to be managed including a housing, at least one air transfer component, air induction ports, at least one entrance to the device, and at least three exit zones to the device, wherein the at least one air transfer component draws air transfer component driven air from outside the device, wherein the air induction ports draw induced air from outside the device to mix with the air transfer component driven air, wherein the device does not include a connection to an HVAC system, and wherein the device does not include a connection to an air duct.

[0052] Another aspect of the present invention involves a device for creating substantially continuous circulation within a volume to be managed, the device including at least one housing, wherein each of the at least one housing includes at least one air transfer component, at least one entrance through which air enters the device, and at least three exit zones through which air exits the device, wherein the at least one air transfer component pulls air through the at least one entrance, pulls air through the at least one air transfer component, and pushes the air through the at least three exit zones, wherein the device does not include a connection to an HVAC system; and wherein the device does not include a connection to an air duct.

[0053] Another aspect of the present invention involves a method for designing a system for increasing internal air turns in a volume of air to be managed within a facility using one or more devices that are neither HVAC -based nor duct-based, wherein the method comprises the steps of determining an approximate volume of air to be managed within the facility, determining the locations of HVAC system components within the facility, and based on the approximate volume of air to be managed within the facility and the locations of the HVAC system components within the facility, determining the number of the one or more devices to install in the facility and at least one preferred location for each of the one or more devices within the facility to increase the internal air turns within the volume of air to be managed within the facility.

[0054] Another aspect of the present invention involves a system for creating substantially continuous circulation within a volume to be managed comprising one or more devices that are neither HV AC -based nor duct-based, wherein the one or more devices are operable to continuously draw air into at least one of the one or more devices, continuously process the air that is drawn into the at least one of the one or more devices, and continuously push air through at least three exit zones of the at least one of the one or more devices, wherein the air pushed through the at least three exit zones is pushed in at least three different directions and mixed with itself and other air, thereby achieving substantially continuous circulation within the volume to be managed.

[0055] Referring now to the drawings in general, the illustrations are for the purpose of describing a preferred embodiment of the invention and are not intended to limit the invention thereto.

[0056] FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a device that includes a housing 100, at least one air transfer component (a fan) 101, at least one entrance 103, directional vanes, and at least three exit zones 105, 107, and 109 that incorporate lattices or louvers. The air first passes over the blades of the fan 101, over directional vanes, and then exits through the exit zones 105, 107, and 109 and over lattices or louvers.

[0057] FIG. 2 shows a side view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a device that includes a housing 100, at least one air transfer component (a fan), at least one entrance 103, directional vanes, and at least three exit zones 105, 107, and 109 that incorporate lattices or louvers. The air first passes over the blades of the fan, over directional vanes, and then exits through the exit zones 105, 107, and 109 and over lattices or louvers.

[0058] In one embodiment, the device of the present invention includes at least three exit zones. By including at least three exit zones in the device, the mixing of air within the volume of air to be managed is maximized. Air flows out of the device from three exit zones, which allows for the air to be mixed in many more different directions than in a device containing only one exit zone. Preferably, the three exit zones provide for air to flow substantially horizontally out of the device. This minimizes or eliminates air pockets that develop when only one exit zone is used. FIG. 3, particularly the bottom right corner and upper two corners, illustrates how air pockets form when only one exit zone is utilized in a device. On the other hand, FIG. 4 illustrates how air pockets are minimized or eliminated when three exit zones are utilized in the device.

[0059] The uniform lattice in the exit zones is made of rectangles. In another embodiment, the uniform lattice is made of circles. In yet another embodiment, the uniform lattice is made of pentagons. In a further embodiment, the uniform lattice is made of hexagons, or a honey combed lattice. In another embodiment, the uniform lattice is made of heptagons. In yet another embodiment, the uniform lattice is made of octagons. Alternatively, the lattice is made of unequally spaced pockets. In one embodiment, the lattice is angled. In yet another embodiment, the lattice is tapered. In another embodiment, the lattice is finished with a material such as epoxy to reduce friction and dust build up. The lattice is not a filter, but rather directs air flow. In another embodiment, the lattice is located in the entrance zone of the device.

[0060] In another embodiment, the device contains an air induction port. The air induction port aids air flow into the device and produces a more cohesive air flow exiting the device by providing surfaces for air to travel along as the air enters the device. [0061] FIG. 5 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention including a housing 100, air induction ports 301, lattices 303, and a nozzle 305. The air induction ports draw air from outside of the unit to mix with the fan driven air. The air induction ports are in front of the fan blades. The air first passes over the blades of the fan, through the nozzle, through the air induction ports zone, over directional vanes, and then exits through the lattices. Preferably, the nozzle is constructed out of sheet metal. Notably, the nozzle increases the speed of air through the unit. In one embodiment, the nozzle increases the speed of air through the unit by about 10%. In another embodiment, multiple nozzles are utilized.

[0062] In another embodiment, at least one exit zone to the device includes at least one lattice for directing air through at least one of the at least three exit zones of the device.

[0063] FIG. 6 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating an air transfer component 117, an entrance to the device including a lattice 119, three exit zones to the device 121, 123, and 125 including louvers, and an induction collar with a lattice 311._At least one power source or power supply is desired to power the at least one air transfer component.

[0064] FIG. 7 shows a side view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating an air transfer component 117, an entrance to the device including a lattice 119, three exit zones to the device 121, 123, and 125 including louvers, and an induction collar with a lattice 311.

[0065] In one embodiment the air transfer component of the device is at least one fan. The at least one fan is preferably made of blades joined together by a hub or any other means. The device preferably contains a hub keyed to a fan shaft. In one embodiment, the hub is a typical hub used in the prior art, such as a 10-blade one-piece cast aluminum hub. However, preferably the hub is the new 6-blade hybrid hub. FIG. 8 shows a typical 10-blade one-piece hub (left) next to the 6-blade hybrid hub (right). In one embodiment, the hub is finished with a material such as epoxy to reduce friction and dust build up. In one embodiment, the fan is 30", ½ hp, and 115/1-12 amps. In another embodiment, the fan is 42", ¾ hp, and 115/1-14 amps. The noise level from the 30" and 42" fans does not exceed 12 sones or 64 dba.

Alternatively, the fan is a Dyson fan.

[0066] The blades of the fan preferably operate as both discharge blades and intake blades. Alternatively, the blades of the fan are specifically either discharge blades or intake blades. In one embodiment, the blades are 4-way 20 gauge 360 degree blades. The blades of the fan are preferably made of galvanized G90 steel minimum 16 gauge. The blades are preferably epoxy coated. The blades should be anchored with insert nuts and bolts to eliminate loosening. The insert nuts and bolts are preferably nylon. In a preferred embodiment, the insert nuts and bolts are ¼ inch. In another embodiment, the insert nuts and bolts and blades of the fan are finished with a material such as epoxy to reduce friction and dust build up.

[0067] In one embodiment, the blades of the fan contain tubercles on the leading edge to increase performance. In a further embodiment, the tubercles are incorporated into the blade. In another embodiment, the tubercles are attached to the blade. The tubercles are preferably made out of the same material as the blade. Tubercles have the effect of channeling air into smaller areas of the blade, resulting in a higher speed through the channels. Furthermore, the tubercles eliminate the tendency of air to run down the length of the blade's edge and fly off at the tip, which causes noise, instability, and decreased efficiency. Examples of blades with tubercles are illustrated in US Pat. No. 8,535,008 for "Turbine and compressor employing tubercle leading edge rotor design" by Dewar, et al, filed on October 18, 2005 and issued on September 17, 2013, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. FIG. 9 shows a frontal view of one embodiment of the present invention where the leading edges of the blades include tubercles.

[0068] In another embodiment, the blades of the fan are slotted to increase performance. Specifically, slotted blades help increase power generation and therefore increase the throw distance of the device compared to traditional blades. The air throw of prior art devices is limited to about 50 feet. However, the air throw of the devices of the present invention is preferably at least about 100 feet. In another embodiment, the air throw of the devices of the present invention is preferably about 150 feet. In another embodiment, the air throw of the devices of the present invention is preferably about 200 feet. However, it should be appreciated that the air throw of the devices of the present invention are adjustable anywhere from about 25 feet to about 200 feet. The present invention includes FIG. 10 shows a frontal view of one embodiment of the present invention where the leading edges of the blades include slots.

[0069] In another embodiment, the blades of the fan contain winglets. In one embodiment, the winglets are incorporated into the blade. In another embodiment, the winglets are attached to the blade. The winglets are preferably made out of the same material as the blade.

Examples of blades with winglets are illustrated in US Pat. No. 6,776,578 for "Winglet- enhanced fan" by Belady, filed on November 26, 2002 and issued on August 17, 2004, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

[0070] In another embodiment, the at least one air transfer component includes at least two fans configured to counter rotate. This counter rotation produces a cohesive air flow from at least one of the at least three exit zones to the device when the fans are oriented in a parallel configuration. By producing a more cohesive air flow through the use of counter rotating fans, the device has a greater throw distance compared to a device with only one rotating fan. The greater throw distance maximizes the mixing of air within the volume of air to be managed. FIG. 11 shows an exploded view of two fans configured to rotate in opposite directions in order to produce a cohesive air flow exiting the device. FIG. 3 shows a flow trajectory diagram of a simulation of flow trajectories coming from a single fan after 30 minutes of the fan running in a 50' x 200' building. FIG. 12 shows a flow trajectory diagram of a simulation of flow trajectories coming from two fans configured to rotate in opposite directions with a grid and induction collar after 30 minutes of the fans running in a 50' x 300' building. As can be seen from FIGS. 3 and 12, the counter rotating fans produce a much more cohesive flow trajectory with a greater throw distance than the single fan.

[0071] In one embodiment, the device includes guards. In a further embodiment, the guards are front guards. Preferably, the front guards are located near the at least three exit zones to the device. In another embodiment, the guards are back guards. Preferably, the back guards are located near the at least one entrance to the device. In one embodiment, the back guards are finished with a material such as epoxy to reduce friction and dust build up.

[0072] In another embodiment, the device includes at least one housing, at least one air transfer component, at least one entrance through which air enters the device, and at least three exit zones through which air exits the device.

[0073] In one embodiment, the housing of the device includes side walls, a top, and a bottom. Ideally, the housing allows for air to exit the device from every direction to maximize the mixing of air within the volume of air to be managed. In one embodiment, the housing has edges and corners. In another embodiment, the housing has rounded edges and rounded corners. In a further embodiment, the housing has rounded sides. In one embodiment, the housing is cylindrical. In another embodiment, the housing is cubic. In a preferred

embodiment, the housing is a rectangular prism. In another preferred embodiment, the housing is approximately a rectangular prism with rounded edges and rounded corners. In another embodiment, the housing is a pentagonal prism. In another embodiment, the housing is a hexagonal prism. In another embodiment, the housing is a heptagonal prism. In another embodiment, the housing is an octagonal prism. In another embodiment, the side walls of the housing are not uniform in length. Preferably, the housing is constructed of approximately 20 gauge pre -painted Sierra Color-Klad metal with PVC protective coating. The PVC protective coating is operative to prevent scratching during installation. In another embodiment, the housing is finished with a material such as epoxy to reduce friction and dust build up.

[0074] In one embodiment, the corners and edges of the housing are roll formed.

Alternatively, the corners and edges of the housing are pressed. In one embodiment, the edges and corners are screwed together with the flat sides of the housing. Alternatively, the edges and corners are glued together with the flat sides of the housing. In a further embodiment, a gasket is placed between the edges, corners, and/or flat sides of the housing to dampen sound.

[0075] In a further embodiment, the housing contains two or more air transfer components within the same housing to pull air into the device and push air out of the device.

[0076] In one embodiment, the housing of the device includes louvers through which air flows through. The louvers are adjustable between open and closed positions, and are selectively adjustable in partially open positions. The louvers also protect living beings and inanimate objects from the other components of the device. By way of illustration, the louver sizes of 32" x 5", 12" x 5", 34" x 5", 42" x 5", 19" x 5", and 46" x 5" are suitable for use in the device. In another embodiment, the louvers are finished with a material such as epoxy to reduce friction and dust build up.

[0077] In another embodiment, the at least three exit zones include louvers and air flows out of the housing through the louvers. The louvers direct air flow out of the housing, and the louvers are selectively adjustable in partially open positions that modify the angle of air direction exiting the device to change the air mixing within the air volume to be managed. The louvers are adjustable to the closed position to reduce or eliminate air coming out of the housing. The louvers also ideally protect the other components of the device while allowing air to flow into or out of the device. The louvers also protect living beings and inanimate objects from the other components of the device. By way of illustration, the louver sizes of 32" x 5", 12" x 5", 34" x 5", 42" x 5", 19" x 5", and 46" x 5" are suitable for use in the device. In another embodiment, the louvers are finished with a material such as epoxy to reduce friction and dust build up.

[0078] In another embodiment, the at least three exit zones include lattices and air flows out of the housing through the lattices The lattices direct air flow out of the housing. The lattices also protect living beings and inanimate objects from the other components of the device. In another embodiment, the louvers are finished with a material such as epoxy to reduce friction and dust build up.

[0079] In one embodiment, the device includes an air transfer component and a housing with a substantially open exit zone side which is at least 90% open, two partially open exit zone sides which are at least about 50% open, an entrance side, and a top and bottom. Preferably the substantially open exit zone side and the two partially open exit zone sides include louvers. The louvers also preferably extend to cover at least about 50% of the partially open exit zone sides. The louvers are considered as part of the at least about 50% that is open in the two partially open exit zone sides. FIG. 13 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a housing having rounded corners and rounded edges with a top and bottom, an entrance side, a substantially open exit zone side, two partially open exit zone sides, a first set of louvers, and a second set of louvers. FIG. 14 shows a side view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a housing having rounded corners and rounded edges with a top and bottom, an entrance side, a substantially open exit zone side, two partially open exit zone sides, a first set of louvers, and a second set of louvers.

[0080] Having at least about 50% of the partially open exit zone sides open allows for better mixing of the air within the air volume to be managed. Air enters the device through the entrance side and exits the device through the substantially open exit zone side and two partially open exit zone sides. By having partially open exit sides, air pockets in the volume of air to be managed are minimized or eliminated while the greater throw distance from the substantially open exit zone side is preserved. The louvers of the substantially open exit zone side and partially open exit zone sides are adjustable between the open and closed positions, and are selectively adjustable in partially open positions that modify the angle of air direction exiting the device to change the air mixing within the air volume to be managed.

[0081] In one embodiment, the device includes an air transfer component and a housing with an exit zone. The two side exit zone side and the open exit zone include lattices. The lattices are considered as part of the exit zone. FIG. 13 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a housing having rounded corners and rounded edges with a top and bottom, an entrance side, a substantially open exit zone side, two partially open exit zone sides, a first set of louvers, and a second set of louvers. FIG. 14 shows a side view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a housing having rounded corners and rounded edges with a top and bottom, an entrance side, a substantially open exit zone side, two partially open exit zone sides, a first set of louvers, and a second set of louvers.

[0082] Having at least about 50% of the partially open exit zone sides open allows for better mixing of the air within the air volume to be managed. Air enters the device through the entrance side and exits the device through the substantially open exit zone side and two partially open exit zone sides. By having partially open exit sides, air pockets in the volume of air to be managed are minimized or eliminated while the greater throw distance from the substantially open exit zone side is preserved.

[0083] In a further embodiment, the device includes at least one directional vane for guiding air through the device. The at least one directional vane is operable for creating a more cohesive air flow exiting the device by guiding air in directions which achieve this effect. Furthermore, the at least one directional vane is operable for creating more directional outputs or strengthening the existing directional outputs of the device by guiding air in directions which achieve this effect. In one embodiment, the at least one directional vane is positioned between the at least one air transfer component and the at least three exit zones through which air exits the device. The at least one directional vane is adjustable among various directional positions in a preferred embodiment. In another embodiment, the at least one directional vane is rounded to facilitate air flow over and around the at least one directional vane. In another embodiment, the directional vane is finished with a material such as epoxy to reduce friction and dust build up. FIG. 15 shows a directional vane positioned between an air transfer component and three exit zones.

[0084] In one embodiment, the device contains vibration isolators mounted between the at least one air transfer component and the at least one housing. The vibration isolators reduce the vibrations of the device, allowing for a quieter and more efficiently running device. FIG. 16 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of vibration isolators mounted between an air transfer component and a housing. In another embodiment, the vibration isolators are mounted between the at least one housing and frame. In a further embodiment, the vibration isolators are finished with a material such as epoxy to reduce friction and dust build up.

[0085] In another embodiment, the device includes two adjacent housings, wherein each adjacent housing includes at least one air transfer component, at least one bottom entrance, at least three exit zones, and a side that is not one of the at least three exit zone sides or the at least one bottom entrance. The side of the first adjacent housing that is not one of the at least three exit zone sides or the at least one bottom entrance faces the side of the second adjacent housing that is not one of the at least three exit zone sides or the at least one bottom entrance. Air is pulled through the at least one bottom entrance and pushed by the air transfer component out the at least three exit zone sides of each housing. FIG. 17 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating two adjacent housings, and for each housing, three exit zone sides, a bottom entrance, and one side that is not one of the three exit zone sides or bottom entrance. FIG. 18 shows a side view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating two adjacent housings, and for each housing, three exit zone sides, a bottom entrance, and one side that is not one of the three exit zone sides or bottom entrance.

[0086] The device preferably also includes a mount for mounting the device to a ceiling, floor, or wall. The mount preferably allows for rotation of the device, such as by use of a swivel. In one embodiment, the mount is also angled. In another embodiment, the mount allows for vertical and/or horizontal movement of the device with respect to the mount. It is advantageous to be able to adjust the angle and position of the device to account for the characteristics of the volume of air to be managed. Also, the characteristics of the volume of air to be managed may change over time, and it is preferable to be able to change the angle and position of the device to account for those changes in the volume of air to be managed. In one embodiment, the mount is permanently affixed to the device. However, in another embodiment, device is detachable from the mount. In a further embodiment, the mount fits onto a track affixed to a ceiling, wall, or floor, and is movable on that track. Preferably, the mount contains arms and adjustment assemblies for adjusting the angle and position of the housing, air transfer component, or device generally. In one embodiment, the mount is adjustable via a controller which allows the user of the controller to swivel, angle, or reposition the device. Preferably, the controller is a remote controller. One example of a preferred mount is a vibration-resistant free floating mount. This mount can be mounted at nearly any angle and can be adapted for beams of various sizes and construction. FIG. 19 shows a side view of a mount, swivel, first arm, upper adjustment assembly, second arm, and lower adjustment assembly of one embodiment of the invention. In another embodiment, the mount is finished with a material such as epoxy to reduce friction and dust build up. [0087] In one embodiment, the device includes at least one temperature sensor. The at least one temperature sensor communicates with the at least one controller to control the functioning of the device. In one embodiment, the at least one temperature sensor is a programmable thermostat. The programmable thermostat is a thermostat where a desired temperature or range of temperatures is selected. In one embodiment, the programmable thermostat is a 7 day 24 hour programmable thermostat. The programmable thermostat is preferably a 24 volt programmable thermostat.

[0088] In another embodiment, the device includes at least one sensor which detects changes in air flow of the environment. The at least one sensor which detects changes in air flow of the environment communicate with the at least one controller to control the functioning of the device. FIG. 20 shows a frontal view of one embodiment of a sensor for detecting changes in air flow and temperature in the environment of the device.

[0089] The device preferably includes at least one controller for controlling the operation of the device. In one embodiment, the at least one controller is at least one control panel. In a further embodiment, the at least one control panel is operable for controlling the mount of the device. Preferably, the control panel operable for controlling the mount of the device is operable for controlling the angle and position of the device. In another embodiment, the control panel is operable for controlling the angle and position of the louvers. In a further embodiment, the control panel is operable for controlling the at least one air transfer component. The at least one control panel preferably operates in conjunction with at least one profile. The at least one profile is at least one automatic setting for the controller of the device. Preferably, the at least one profile is an automatic setting which specifies a minimum temperature and maximum temperature. In another embodiment, the at least one profile is an automatic setting which specifies a maximum allowable change in temperature. In yet another embodiment, the at least one profile is an automatic setting which specifies a maximum humidity and minimum humidity. The profile may be set by a user. Alternatively, the device comes with pre-set profiles. In another embodiment, the profile is a default profile. Preferably, the at least one control panel is at least one remote control panel. In one embodiment, the remote control panel is enclosed by an electrical enclosure. One preferred size for the electrical enclosure is approximately 10" by 8" by 4". In another embodiment, the remote control panel includes a fan toggle switch. The fan toggle switch is preferably 24 volts. The toggle switch also preferably has an operating light, preferably a 24 volt operating light.

[0090] In another embodiment, the at least one control panel is mounted to the device.

Preferably, the at least one control panel mounted to the device is constructed out of pre- painted color-Klad metal. The at least one control panel mounted to the device is also preferably mounted to the unit by bolts. Furthermore, the at least one control panel mounted to the device preferably includes a service switch mounted on the housing, wherein the service switch is wired so that it communicates with the at least one air transfer component and/or the at least one power source or power supply. In one embodiment, the service switch is a 120/1 service switch. In one embodiment, the at least one control panel mounted to the device also contains a transformer. Preferably, the transformer is a 120/1 to 24 volt transformer. The at least one control panel mounted to the device preferably also contains a motor fuse to protect the motor from over-load. In one embodiment, the fuse is 15 amps. FIG. 21 shows a frontal view of one embodiment of a controller of the present invention.

[0091] The device preferably also include features designed to improve the safety of the operation of the device. Such features include failure detection and management, as well as detecting adverse conditions such as fires or undesired temperature differences.

[0092] In one embodiment, the device also includes a heater. By way of example, any type/make unit heater, HVAC unit, package or split as a source for either heating the facility or heating and cooling. In one embodiment, the heater includes a frame. In a further embodiment, the frame is finished with a material such as epoxy to reduce friction and dust build up. Preferably, the frame is a primed and painted 3/16" welded angle iron frame. In a further embodiment, the frame of the heater has holes punched in the frame. The heater preferably also include vibration isolators. In one embodiment, the vibration isolators are mounted between the heater and the frame

[0093] In another embodiment, the device also includes a cooling unit. The cooling unit preferably includes a housing. One preferred housing is constructed of approximately 20 gauge pre -painted Sierra Color-Klad metal with PVC protective coating. The PVC protective coating prevents scratching during installation. In one embodiment, the housing for the cooling unit has an inlet. One preferred location for the inlet is on the top of the housing. A preferred size for the inlet is 48" x 20". In one embodiment, the cooling unit includes a back panel for isolating discharged air. A preferred size for the back panel is approximately 36" x 22". A preferred material for the back panel is approximately 20 gauge pre-painted Sierra Color-Klad metal with PVC protective coating, where the PVC protective coating is operable for preventing scratching during installation. In one embodiment, the cooling panel also includes a deflector panel for deflecting air. A preferred composition for the deflector panel is approximately 20 gauge pre-painted Sierra Color-Klad metal with PVC protective coating, where the PVC coating prevents scratching during installation.

[0094] In one embodiment, the device also includes a sanitation component. In one embodiment, the sanitation component is a purifier which filters undesirable particles from the air. Such undesirable particles could include oil, dust, germs, or other particulates. In another embodiment, the sanitation component is a film on the blades of the fan which prevents particulates from touching or adhering to the blades. In a further embodiment, sanitation occurs without the use of a separate component, such as by the Venturi effect. FIG. 22 shows a frontal view of one embodiment of a sanitation component of the present invention.

[0095] In one embodiment, the device also includes a humidification and/or dehumidification component. Colder air is generally less humid than warmer air. Thus, colder air may need to be humidified to maintain the desired humidity. However, colder air may need to be dehumidified to maintain the desired humidity as well. Similarly, warmer air is generally more humid than colder air. Thus, warmer air may need to be dehumidified to maintain the desired humidity. However, warmer air may need to be humidified to maintain the desired humidity as well. FIG. 23 shows a frontal view of one embodiment of a humidity regulator of the present invention.

In one embodiment, the device does not include a compressor.

[0096] In a further embodiment, the device includes a noise reduction component for dampening the sound made by the device. FIG. 24 shows a perspective view of a noise reduction component of one embodiment of the present invention.

[0097] FIG. 25 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a housing with at least one entrance, air induction ports, and louvers. The air induction ports draw air from outside of the unit to mix with the fan driven air. The air induction ports are in front of the fan blades. The air first passes over the blades and the air induction ports zone, over directional vanes, and then exits through the louvers.

[0098] FIG. 26 is a top view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a housing with at least one entrance, air induction ports, and louvers. The air induction ports draw air from outside of the unit to mix with the fan driven air. The air induction ports are in front of the fan blades. The air first passes over the blades and the air induction ports zone, over directional vanes, and then exits through the louvers. The arrows indicate air flow into the device. [0099] FIG. 27 is a side view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a housing with at least one entrance, air induction ports, and louvers. The air induction ports draw air from outside of the unit to mix with the fan driven air. The air induction ports are in front of the fan blades. The air first passes over the blades and the air induction ports zone, over directional vanes, and then exits through the louvers.

[00100] FIG. 28 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a system for creating substantially continuous circulation within a volume to be managed. The system includes one or more devices that are operable for continuously drawing in, processing, and pushing out air through at least three exits.

[00101] FIG. 29 shows a side view of one embodiment of the present invention, illustrating a system for creating substantially continuous circulation within a volume to be managed. The system includes the one or more devices 101 that are operable for continuously drawing in, processing, and pushing out air through at least three exits.

[00102] The method of the present invention includes continuously drawing air into at least one of one or more devices, continuously processing air in the at least one of the one or more devices, and continuously pushing air through the at least three exit zones in at least one of the one or more devices. The air pushed through the at least three exit zones in one device will intersect and/or join air pushed through the same device and/or any other devices. The air is then drawn into the one or more devices again. In this fashion, the air is continuously cycled throughout the volume to be managed. By continuously moving air in the volume of air to be managed, air stratification and air pockets are minimized or eliminated. Furthermore, temperature variations are minimized because of the continuous movement and mixing of air.

[00103] The one or more devices utilized in the present invention include at least three exit zones. By including at least three exit zones in the one or more device, the mixing of air within the volume of air to be managed is maximized. Air is pushed out of the one or more devices from at least three exit zones, which allows for the air to be mixed in many more different directions than in a device containing only one exit zone. Preferably, the three exit zones provide for air to flow substantially horizontally out of the device. This minimizes or eliminates air pockets that develop when only one exit zone is used.

[00104] Another preferred embodiment of a device utilized in the present invention includes curved directional vanes between the air induction ports and the at least three exit zones for directing the air through the at least three exit zones with lattices. In yet another preferred embodiment of a device utilized in the present invention, the housing contains rounded corners and edges for increased airflow purposes.

[00105] Preferably, the one or more devices are controllable via a controller.

Preferably, the controller is a remote controller. In one embodiment, the controller is a control panel.

[00106] In another embodiment, the controller is mounted to the one or more devices.

Preferably, the controller mounted to the one or more devices is constructed out of pre- painted color-Klad metal. The controller mounted to the one or more devices is also preferably mounted to the unit by bolts. Furthermore, the controller mounted to the one or more devices preferably includes a service switch mounted on the one or more devices, wherein the service switch is wired so that it communicates with at least one air transfer component and/or at least one power source or power supply. In one embodiment, the service switch is a 120/1 service switch. In one embodiment, the controller mounted to the device also contains a transformer. Preferably, the transformer is a 120/1 to 24 volt transformer. The controller mounted to the one or more devices preferably also contains a motor fuse to protect the motor from over- load. In one embodiment, the fuse is 15 amps.

[00107] In another embodiment, the controller is operable for controlling a mount of the one or more devices. Preferably, the controller is operable for controlling the angle and position of the one or more devices by controlling the mount. In one embodiment, a user inputs control commands into the controller.

[00108] In another embodiment, the controller operates in conjunction with at least one profile. Preferably, the profile is set by a user. Alternatively, the profile is a default profile or a pre-set profile. Preferably, the profile contains a setting which specifies a minimum and maximum value for certain parameters. In one embodiment, the parameter is temperature. In another embodiment, the parameter is humidity. In a further embodiment, the parameter is air flow. In one embodiment, the profile specifies a maximum allowable change in temperature, air flow, and/or humidity from a predefined temperature, air flow, and/or humidity value. A profile determines the performance of the steps of continuously drawing air into the one or more devices, continuously processing air in the one or more devices, and/or continuously pushing air through at least three exit zones in one or more devices are performed according to a profile in one embodiment of the present invention.

[00109] Preferably, the controller operates in conjunction with at least one profile by communicating with at least one sensor.

[00110] In one embodiment, the at least one sensor is at least one temperature sensor which communicates with the controller to control the functioning of the one or more devices. Preferably, the method includes comparing a current temperature to a desired temperature or desired temperature range. If the current temperature is not equal to the desired temperature or not within the desired temperature range, then one or more of a variety of variables is adjusted. Preferably, the current temperature is measured using the at least one temperature sensor. Preferably, the at least one temperature sensor is a programmable thermostat. The programmable thermostat is a thermostat where a desired temperature or range of temperatures is selected. In one embodiment, the programmable thermostat is a 7 day 24 hour programmable thermostat. The programmable thermostat is preferably a 24 volt programmable thermostat.

[00111] In another embodiment, the at least one sensor is at least one humidity sensor which communicates with the controller to control the functioning of the one or more devices. A humidity regulator is included in at least one of the one or more devices in one embodiment of the present invention. Colder air is generally less humid than warmer air. Thus, colder air may need to be humidified to maintain the desired humidity. However, colder air may need to be dehumidified to maintain the desired humidity as well. Similarly, warmer air is generally more humid than colder air. Thus, warmer air may need to be dehumidified to maintain the desired humidity. However, warmer air may need to be humidified to maintain the desired humidity as well. Preferably, a current humidity within the facility is compared to a desired humidity or desired humidity range within the facility. If the current humidity is not equal to the desired humidity or not within the desired humidity range, then one or more variables is adjusted, or the humidity regulator adjusts the humidity.

[00112] In another embodiment, at least one sensor is an air flow sensor which communicates with the controller to control the functioning of one or more devices.

Preferably, a current air flow within the facility is compared to a desired air flow or desired air flow range within the facility. In one embodiment, the air flow sensor measures the speed and/or direction of the air flow. If the current air flow is not equal to the desired air flow or not within the desired air flow range, then one or more variables is adjusted.

[00113] In yet another embodiment of the present invention, the method includes determining that the volume to be managed has changed. In one embodiment, determining that the volume to be managed has changed involves a user identifying a new volume to be managed or approximate new volume to be managed. Preferably, the user inputs this information into the controller which will adjust for the change in volume to be managed. Alternatively, the user adjusts one or more variables to account for the change in volume to be managed. If the volume to be managed has changed, one or more variables is preferably adjusted to account for the change in the volume to be managed.

[00114] In one embodiment, the variables that are adjusted to obtain a desired temperature or desired air flow include at least one of the speed of the air that is drawn into the one or more devices, the speed of air that is pushed out of the one or more devices, the direction of air that is drawn into the one or more devices, the direction of air that is pushed out of the one or more devices, the location of the one or more devices, the angle of the air that is pushed out of the one or more devices, the angle of air that is drawn into the one or more devices, the volume of the air that is pushed out of the one or more devices, and the volume of air that is drawn into the one or more devices. Preferably the variables that are adjusted are adjusted by controlling one or more devices. The one or more devices are preferably controlled using the controller.

[00115] Preferably, the speed of air that is pushed out of the one or more devices is adjusted by adjusting the air transfer component and/or at least one of the at least three exit zones of the one or more devices. In the preferred embodiments of the device, this preferably includes adjusting the louvers of the device.

[00116] Preferably, the location is adjusted using a mount. The mount preferably allows for rotation, vertical movement, and horizontal movement of the one or more devices. The one or more devices are preferably mounted to a ceiling, floor, or wall. In one embodiment, the mount is also angled. It is advantageous to be able to adjust the angle and position of the one or more devices to account for the characteristics of the volume of air to be managed. Also, the characteristics of the volume of air to be managed may change over time, and it is preferable to be able to change the angle and position of the one or more devices to account for those changes in the volume of air to be managed. In one embodiment, the mount is permanently affixed to the one or more devices. However, in another embodiment, the one or more devices are detachable from the mount. In a further

embodiment, the mount fits onto a track affixed to a ceiling, and is movable on that track. Preferably, the mount contains arms and adjustment assemblies for adjusting the angle and position of the housing, air transfer component, or one or more devices generally. In one embodiment, the mount is adjustable via the controller which allows the user of the controller to swivel, angle, or reposition the one or more devices. One example of a preferred mount is a vibration-resistant free floating mount. This mount can be mounted at nearly any angle and can be adapted for beams of various sizes and construction. Preferably, the mount is finished with a material such as epoxy to reduce friction and dust buildup.

[00117] The direction of air that is pushed out of the one or more devices is preferably adjusted by adjusting at least one of at least three exit zones to the one or more devices. In the preferred embodiments of the device, the louvers are adjusted to adjust the direction of air that is pushed out of the device. In another embodiment, the direction of air that is pushed out of the one or more devices is adjusted by adjusting the location of the one or more devices. Preferably, the location is adjusted using the mount described above.

[00118] Preferably, the angle of the air that is pushed out of the one or more devices is adjusted by adjusting at least one of the at least three exit zones to the one or more devices. In the preferred embodiments of the device, the louvers are adjusted to adjust the direction of air that is pushed out of the device. In another embodiment, the direction of air that is pushed out of the more devices is adjusted by adjusting the location of the one or more devices.

Preferably, the location is adjusted using the mount described above.

[00119] Preferably, the volume of the air that is pushed out of the one or more devices is adjusted by adjusting at least one of the at least three exit zones to the device. In the preferred embodiment of the device, the louvers are adjusted to adjust the volume of air that is pushed out of the device. In another embodiment, the speed of the fan is adjusted to adjust the volume of air that is pushed out of the device.

[00120] In one embodiment, the step of continuously drawing air into at least one of the one or more devices includes drawing air over at least one louver. Preferably, the louvers are curved directional louvers. In another embodiment, the louvers are dimpled to aid air flow through the device while decreasing the noise levels of the device. In one embodiment, the entrance of the device includes louvers and air flows into the device through the louvers. The louvers direct air flow into the device, and the louvers are selectively adjustable in partially open positions that modify the angle of air direction entering the device to change the air mixing within the air volume to be managed. The louvers are adjustable to the closed position to reduce or eliminate air coming into the device. The louvers also ideally protect the other components of the device while allowing air to flow into or out of the device. The louvers also protect living beings and inanimate objects from the other components of the device. By way of illustration, the louver sizes of 32" x 5", 12" x 5", 34" x 5", 42" x 5", 19" x 5", and 46" x 5" are suitable for use in the device. In another embodiment, the louvers are finished with a material such as epoxy to reduce friction and dust buildup.

[00121] In one embodiment, the step of continuously processing air in at least one of the one or more devices includes sanitizing the air. Preferably, sanitizing the air is performed by using a sanitation component. In one embodiment, the sanitation component is a film on the blades of the fans which prevents particulates from touching or adhering to the blades. In another embodiment, the sanitation component is a purifier which filters undesirable particles from the air. Such undesirable particles could include oil, dust, germs, or other particulates. Alternatively, sanitizing the air is performed by the Venturi effect.

[00122] In yet another embodiment, the step of continuously processing air in at least one of the one or more devices further includes at least one directional vane processing air in the at least one of the one or more devices. The at least one directional vane is operable for creating a more cohesive air flow exiting the device by guiding air in directions which achieve this effect. Furthermore, the at least one directional vane is operable for creating more directional outputs or strengthening the existing directional outputs of the device by guiding air in directions which achieve this effect. In one embodiment, the at least one directional vane is positioned between at least one air transfer component of the device and the at least three exit zones through which air exits the device. The at least one directional vane is adjustable among various directional positions in a preferred embodiment. In another embodiment, the at least one directional vane is curved to facilitate air flow over and around the at least one directional vane. In another embodiment, the directional vane is finished with a material such as epoxy to reduce friction and dust buildup. In yet another embodiment, the directional vanes are able to be rotated. Preferably, the controller is able to control the rotation of the directional vanes.

[00123] In another embodiment, the method includes detecting a failure related to the steps of continuously drawing air into at least one of the one or more devices, continuously processing air in at least one of the one or more devices, and/or continuously pushing air through at least three exit zones in at least one of the one or more devices. Preferably, the failure is then remedied.

[00124] Another embodiment of the present invention includes a method for designing a system for creating substantially continuous circulation of a volume of air to be managed within a facility using one or more devices that are neither HV AC -based nor duct-based which continuously push air through at least three exit zones in at least one of the one or more devices so that the air pushed through the at least three exit zones is pushed in at least three different directions. The method includes determining the approximate volume of the facility; determining the location of any HVAC system components within the facility; and based on the approximate volume of the facility and the location of the HVAC system components within the facility, determining the number and type of the one or more devices to install in the facility and a preferred location for the one or more devices within the facility to achieve substantially continuous circulation within the volume of air to be managed. In one embodiment, the method for designing the system includes deploying air movement devices at a ratio of approximately 0.00006 to 0.00009 hp per square foot. Cubic feet per minute (CFM) from each air movement device is preferably a minimum of 19,000 CFM per 10,000 square feet. One embodiment of designing the system includes deploying air movement devices as close to the perimeter of the facility as feasible. Another embodiment includes deploying one air movement device for each 200 foot by 100 foot pattern. In yet another embodiment, the "primary throw" of the air movement device includes the wall opposite to the closest wall where the air movement device is located. In another embodiment, the air movement device has multiple significant "throws." Preferably, the throws are towards at least some or all of the other walls other than the wall or walls to which the air movement device is closest. In another embodiment, the primary air throw or significant throws are horizontal as opposed to down drafts. One embodiment provides for the primary air throw or significant air throws to align with product racks or other obstacles within the facility. The design of the system preferably eliminates the need for any diffuser system within the facility.

[00125] Preferably, the present systems and methods provide for optimizing HVAC tons to heat and cool the facility yielding a ton requirement about 20% to about 40% lower than conventionally recognized or calculated tons while increasing the horse power required to do so by no more than about 2.25 hp per about 20,000 square feet. In another embodiment, the present invention provides about a 60% lower tonnage requirement that conventional systems while increasing the horse power required to do so by no more than about 2.25 hp per 20,000 square feet. During the cooling season, the design of the systems and methods will preferably not allow for humid or hot air to accumulate near the ceiling. There is therefore less latent and sensible heat to remove by an HVAC system. During the heating season, a design will preferably maintain consistent temperature by utilizing all of the interior loads in conjunction with RTU and heat sources thus optimizing the efficiency of heating solution.

[00126] In one embodiment, the facility has at least a 20 foot ceiling with an open ceiling to roof deck, a 20' clear drop ceiling, rooftop mounted equipment without a ducted supply/return system, is at least 20,000 square feet, and has 0.5 CFM/square foot outside air. However, the methods of the present invention are operable to work in a variety of facilities with varying ceiling heights and areas.

[00127] In one embodiment, a baseline is set at 1100 SF/ton at 78 degrees Fahrenheit /

95 degrees Fahrenheit (17 degrees Fahrenheit change in temperature). A straight line is used for the difference in temperature vs SF/ton, i.e. if the design change in temperature changes to 23 degrees Fahrenheit, the difference would be 23/17 x tons to get the new tonnage.

Generally, 6 air changers are used in lieu of air conditioning. Exhaust fans can affect the load if used, as the exhaust fans affect equilibrium. In this embodiment, it is assumed that R-19 insulation is used on the roof. If the insulation is less, it will affect the load, particularly in older buildings. Infiltration is included and is minimum. Lighting is 1 kw/SF - if different, it will affect the load in tons. People load is assumed to be minimal. Circulation for a 38 foot high ceiling is 2 air turns per hour. Circulation for a 25 foot high ceiling is 3 air turns per hour. Note that conventional job will run 50% less.

[00128] In one embodiment where the facility is a distribution center of 1100 SF/ton at

78 degrees Fahrenheit / 95 degrees Fahrenheit, the center has an area of 110,000 SF, and the ceiling height is 30 feet, the calculation for tons would be 110,000 SF/1100 SF/ton = 100 tons. Two preferred devices of the present invention are a 18,000 CFM device and a 32,000 CFM device. A formula for determining the air turns per hour is: CFM/vol. cu. ft. x 60 min/hr = air turns per hour. With a goal of approximately 3 air turns per hour and using 4 18,000 CFM devices, there would be a total of 72,000 CFM. Using the formula produces 72,000 CFM/(110,000 SF x 30 feet) x 60 min/hr = 1.3 air turns/hr. Using 4 32,000 CFM devices would yield 4 x 32,000 CFM = 128,000 CFM. Using the formula with the 4 32,000 CFM devices produces 128,000 CFM/(110,000 SF x 30 feet) x 60 min/hr = 2.56 air turns/hr.

Therefore, in one embodiment 4 25 ton RTU w/ 4 32,000 CFM devices would be utilized because both tonnage and CFM is met giving 2.56 air turns per hour vs. 3.0 air turns per hour. It should be noted that tonnage could change with a change in temperature (either up or down), internal load could change the load if large, if lighting varies vs 1 kw/SF it will affect the load in tons, and people load increasing could also vary the tonnage.

[00129] In another embodiment, the facility is a retail center (ex: Home Depot, Sam's,

Costco, Lowes, etc.) with a 25 foot ceiling, open ceiling to roof deck, rooftop maintained equipment without a ducted system / return system, 7000 SF, 0.12 CFM/SF, assuming 7.5 CFM per person of outside air. If the people load is different than the values may change. With a base line at 550 SF/ton at 78 degrees Fahrenheit / 95 degrees Fahrenheit, a change in temperature of 17 degrees Fahrenheit, with a 550 SF/ton, use a straight line for the difference in temperature vs. SF/ton, i.e. if design change in temperature changes then new change in temperature / old change in temperature x tons = new tons. People load is assumed to be 15 / 1000 SF unless actual people are known. Lighting load design up to 1.5 kw/hr. Outdoor air requirement is 0.12 CFM/SF plus 7.5 CFM per person. R-19 is assumed to be used on the roof - if it is a lower R factor, it could affect the load. Infiltration in retail could be less than in the distribution center depending on door opening and the time the door is left open .20 AC/hr. With a 25 foot HT ceiling 3 air turns per hour is desired. [00130] For a retail application with 550 SF/ton at 78 degrees Fahrenheit / 95 degrees

Fahrenheit, a size of 94,000 SF, a ceiling height of 28 feet, and needing close to 3 air turns per hour, the tonnage required with one or more devices is 94,000 SF divided by 550 SF/ton = 170 tons. Note that if any of the values above are different, the tonnage would be adjusted. With an air turn per hour / 60 x vol = CFM, 3/60 x 94,000 SF x 28 = 131,600 CFM. Using 24 ton and 20 ton units the number of devices needs to be determined. It should be noted that if 131,600 CFM is needed and 4 32,000 CFM devices are used, the needed CFM is covered with 4 devices at 32,000 CFM for 128,000 CFM but tonnage will be short with 4 AC units. If 18,000 CFM devices at 131,600 CFM, the number of devices is calculated by dividing 131,600 CFM by 18,000 CFM to get 7.31 devices needed. In one embodiment in a retail facility, like units are replaced with like A/C units. Five 24 ton A/C units = 120 tons and 3 20 ton A/C units = 60 tons, giving a total of 180 tons. Each A/C unit gets 1-18,000 CFM device unit. Seven devices (device with package RT 20 ton) are enough to create the desired amount of air turns in one embodiment. It can be determined if an 8 th device is needed by setting the stat for the 8 th device higher than the other 7 devices. The facility can then use their control system to determine if the 8 th device is ever needed.

[00131] In one embodiment for retail facilities, divide the SF of the building and divide by 550 SF/ton to determine the tonnage. Tonnage can then be adjusted for: change in temperature design different than 17 degrees Fahrenheit (straight increase or decrease), adjust for outside air change above 0.12 CFM/SF and 7.5 CFM/person, adjust tonnage for lighting above 1.5 kW/SF, adjust if people load is different than 15 people/1000 SF, and adjust load if roof insulation is less than R-19.

[00132] Preferably, the approximate volume of the facility is determined by determining the approximate dimensions of the facility. The approximate dimensions of the facility are preferably determined by conventional methods, such as measuring the dimensions. The approximate dimensions of the facility alternatively are determined by consulting a blueprint, floor plan, or any other document containing approximate dimensions of the facility.

[00133] Determining the location of any HVAC system components is preferably performed by consulting a blueprint, floor plan, or any other document containing the location of HVAC system components. Alternatively, determining the location of any HVAC system component is performed by observation.

[00134] Based on the approximate volume of the facility and the location of the HVAC system components within the facility, the number and type of the one or more devices to install in the facility are determined. Generally, the larger the facility, the more devices are installed. Also, the larger the facility, the more high-powered devices are installed.

[00135] In a further embodiment, the method for designing the system for creating substantially continuous circulation of a volume of air to be managed within a facility includes the step of determining an approximate volume or actual volume of the air to be managed within the facility. This step is preferably performed by subtracting the approximate or actual volume of matter (machinery, objects, goods, etc.) within the facility from the approximate or actual volume of the facility. This calculation yields the actual or approximate volume of air to be managed within the facility. Based on the actual or approximate volume of air to be managed within the facility, the number and type of one or more devices to install in the facility is determined. Additionally, based on the location of the matter within the facility, a preferred location for the one or more devices within the facility is determined.

[00136] In another embodiment, the method for designing the system for creating substantially continuous circulation of a volume of air to be managed within a facility includes the step of determining the location of any windows and/or doors in the facility. This step is preferably performed by physical observation and measurement. Alternatively, this step is performed by consulting a blueprint, floor plan, or any other document containing the location of any windows and/or doors in the facility. Based on the location of any windows and doors and the number and type of devices to install in the facility, a preferred location for the one or more devices within the facility is determined.

[00137] In another embodiment, the method includes the step of determining a preferred location for at least one sensor within the facility. Preferably, this step is based on the preferred location for the one or more devices, any windows and/or doors, and any HVAC system components within the facility. The at least one sensor preferably measures a property of the environment of the facility. Preferably, the property of the environment of the facility is at least one of temperature, air flow, and humidity. Preferably, the at least one sensor is at least one of the temperature sensor, the air flow sensor, and the humidity sensor.

[00138] In yet another embodiment, the method includes determining the location of internal loads within the facility, and based on the location of the internal loads within the facility, determining at least one preferred location for the at least one sensor and/or the one or more devices. Internal loads include machinery, equipment, lighting, and/or any other heat producing objects.

[00139] In another embodiment of the present invention, the invention includes a system for creating substantially continuous circulation within a volume to be managed. The system includes one or more devices that are neither HVAC -based nor duct-based, wherein air is continuously drawn into at least one of the one or more devices, continuously processed by at least one of the one or more devices, and continuously pushed through at least three exit zones in at least one of the one or more devices so that the air pushed through the at least three exit zones is pushed in at least three different directions. The air that is pushed in at least three different directions is mixed with itself and other air, which consequentially achieves substantially continuous circulation within the volume to be managed. [00140] In another embodiment of the present invention, the system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor measures at least one of a temperature, humidity, and air flow, and in response to the sensor measuring at least one of the temperature, humidity, and air flow, the controller adjusts the location of at least one of the one or more devices and/or at least one of the volume, speed, direction, and angle of air that is continuously drawn into at least one of the one or more devices, continuously processed by at least one of the one or more devices, and/or continuously pushed through at least three exit zones in at least one of the one or more devices.

[00141] In yet another embodiment of the present invention, the system further includes a profile including a minimum and/or maximum temperature, minimum and/or maximum humidity, and/or minimum and/or maximum airflow. The sensor compares at least one of the measured temperature, humidity, and air flow to the minimum and/or maximum temperature, humidity, and/or airflow, and in response to the comparison, the controller adjusts the location of at least one of the one or more devices and/or at least one of the volume, speed, direction, and angle of air that is continuously drawn into at least one of the one or more devices, continuously processed by at least one of the one or more devices, and/or continuously pushed through at least three exit zones in at least one of the one or more devices.

[00142] Certain modifications and improvements will occur to those skilled in the art upon a reading of the foregoing description. By way of example and not limitation, the following may be incorporated into any of the described embodiments: dimpling as a feature of the fan blade and interior surfaces of the unit and duct work, which could be used in conjunction with fan blade and other interior surfaces coatings (epoxy coating reference); curbed directional louvers; and/or unit fan guard to prevent airborne objects from being sucked into the unit. [00143] The above-mentioned examples are provided to serve the purpose of clarifying the aspects of the invention and it will be apparent to one skilled in the art that they do not serve to limit the scope of the invention. All modifications and improvements have been deleted herein for the sake of conciseness and readability but are properly within the scope of the present invention.