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Title:
DEVICES INCLUDING MAGNETIC TUNNEL JUNCTIONS INTEGRATED WITH SELECTORS
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/136415
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device can include an array of cells. The array of cells can include a plurality of source lines disposed in columns, set of selectors coupled to respective source lines, MJT structures coupled to respective selectors and a plurality of bit lines disposed in rows and coupled to respective sets of MTJ structures. The array of cells can also include buffers coupled between respective selectors and respective MTJ structures. In addition, multiple arrays can be stacked on top of each other to implement vertical three-dimensional (3D) MTJ devices.

Inventors:
KIM, Kuk-Hwan (45500 Northport Loop West, Fremont, CA, 94538, US)
BEERY, Dafna (45500 Northport Loop West, Fremont, CA, 94538, US)
WALKER, Andy (45500 Northport Loop West, Fremont, CA, 94538, US)
LEVI, Amity (45500 Northport Loop West, Fremont, CA, 84538, US)
Application Number:
US2019/012633
Publication Date:
July 11, 2019
Filing Date:
January 08, 2019
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
SPIN TRANSFER TECHNOLOGIES, INC. (45500 Northport Loop West, Fremont, CA, 94538, US)
International Classes:
H01L27/22; H01L43/08; H01L43/10
Foreign References:
US20140209892A12014-07-31
US20160099287A12016-04-07
US20040042261A12004-03-04
US20160005963A12016-01-07
US20160027999A12016-01-28
US20160276028A12016-09-22
US20130168628A12013-07-04
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MURABITO, Anthony, C. (Murabito, Hao & Barnes LLP,2 North Market Street, 3rd Floo, San Jose CA, 95113, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

What is claimed is:

1. A Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device comprising:

a plurality of source lines disposed in columns;

an array of selectors, wherein sets of selectors are coupled to respective source lines; an array of MTJ structures, wherein the MTJ structures are coupled to respective selectors; and

a plurality of bit lines disposed in rows, wherein the bit lines are coupled to respective sets of MTJ structures.

2. The MTJ device according to Claim 1, wherein the array of selectors include a Nickel Oxide (NiOx), Titanium Oxide (TiOx), or Vanadium Oxide (VOx) material.

3. The MTJ device according to Claim 1, further comprising:

an array of buffers, wherein the buffers are coupled between respective selectors and respective MTJ structures.

4. The MTJ device according to Claim 3, wherein the array of buffers include a Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or Titanium Nitride (TiN) material.

5. The MTJ device according to Claim 1, wherein:

the plurality of source lines comprise source line layers disposed in corresponding trenches in a dielectric layer;

the array of selectors are disposed on respective source line layers in the corresponding trenches in the dielectric layer; and

a surface of the source line layers and a surface of the selectors are coplanar with a surface the dielectric layer.

6. The MTJ device according to Claim 3, wherein:

the plurality of source lines comprise source line layers disposed in corresponding trenches in a dielectric layer;

the plurality of selectors are disposed on respective source line layers in the

corresponding trenches in the dielectric layer;

the plurality of buffers are disposed on respective selectors in the corresponding trenches in the dielectric layer; and

a surface of the source line layers, a surface of the selectors and a surface of the buffers are coplanar with a surface of the dielectric layer.

7. The MTJ device according to Claim 1, wherein the MTJ structures comprise:

a first ferromagnetic layer of a Synthetic Antiferromagnetic (SAF);

a first non-magnetic layer of the SAF disposed on the first ferromagnetic layer;

a reference magnetic layer of the MTJ disposed on the first non-magnetic layer;

a non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer of the MTJ disposed on the reference magnetic layer;

a free magnetic layer of the MTJ disposed on the non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer; one or more capping layers disposed on the free magnetic layer.

8. The MTJ device according to Claim 7, wherein:

the first ferromagnetic layer includes one or more of Cobalt (Co), Platinum (Pt), and Ruthenium (Ru);

the first non-magnetic layer includes Magnesium Oxide (MgOx);

the reference magnetic layer includes one or more of Cobalt (Co), Iron (Fe), and Boron (B);

the non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer includes Magnesium Oxide (MgOx);

the free magnetic layer includes one or more of Cobalt (Co), Iron (Fe), Boron (B), and Tungsten (W).

9. A Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device comprising:

a plurality of bit lines disposed in rows;

an array of MTJ structures, wherein sets of MTJ structures are coupled to respective bit lines;

an array of selectors, wherein the selectors are coupled to respective MTJ structures; and a plurality of source lines disposed in columns, wherein the bit lines are coupled to respective selectors.

10. The MTJ device according to Claim 9, wherein the array of selectors include a Nickel Oxide (NiOx), Titanium Oxide (TiOx), or Vanadium Oxide (VOx) material.

11. The MTJ device according to Claim 9, further comprising:

an array of buffers, wherein the buffers are coupled between respective MTJ structures and respective selectors.

12. The MTJ device according to Claim 11, wherein the array of buffers include a Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or Titanium Nitride (TiN) material.

13. The MTJ device according to Claim 9, wherein:

the plurality of bit lines are disposed in corresponding trenches in a dielectric layer; and a surface of the plurality of bit lines is coplanar with a surface of the dielectric layer.

14. The MTJ device according to Claim 9, wherein the MTJ structures comprise:

a first ferromagnetic layer of a Synthetic Antiferromagnetic (SAF);

a first non-magnetic layer of the SAF disposed on the first ferromagnetic layer;

a reference magnetic layer of s MTJ disposed on the first non-magnetic layer;

a non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer of the MTJ disposed on the reference magnetic layer;

a free magnetic layer of the MTJ disposed on the non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer; one or more capping layers disposed on the free magnetic layer.

15. The MTJ device according to Claim 14, wherein:

the first ferromagnetic layer includes one or more of Cobalt (Co), Platinum (Pt), and Ruthenium (Ru);

the first non-magnetic layer includes Magnesium Oxide (MgOx);

the reference magnetic layer includes one or more of Cobalt (Co), Iron (Fe), and Boron (B);

the non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer includes Magnesium Oxide (MgOx);

the free magnetic layer includes one or more of Cobalt (Co), Iron (Fe), Boron (B), and Tungsten (W).

16. The MTJ device according to Claim 9, wherein the MTJ device comprises a Spin Torque Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (ST-MRAM).

17. A Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device comprising:

an array of cells, wherein each cell includes a MTJ structure integrated with selector; a cross-bar including a plurality of source lines disposed in columns and a plurality of bit lines disposed in rows, wherein a cell of the array is coupled between a respective source line and a respective bit line.

18. The MTJ device according to claim 17, wherein each cell of the array includes a buffer coupled between a respective MTJ structure and a respective selector.

19. The MTJ device according to claim 18, wherein the buffer of each cell of the array includes a Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or Titanium Nitride (TiN) material.

20. The MTJ device according to claim 17, further comprising a plurality of the arrays of cells stacked in a vertical three-dimensional (3D) architecture.

21. The MTJ device according to Claim 17, wherein:

the plurality of source lines are disposed in corresponding trenches in a dielectric layer; the selector layer of the plurality of cells is disposed on the plurality of source lines in the corresponding trenches in the dielectric layer.

22. The MTJ device according to Claim 21, wherein:

each cell further includes a buffer disposed between the MTJ structure and the selector, wherein the buffer layer of the plurality of cells is disposed on the selector layer in the corresponding trenches in the dielectric layer.

Description:
DEVICES INCLUDING MAGNETIC TUNNEL JUNCTIONS INTEGRATED WITH

SELECTORS

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] Computing systems have made significant contributions toward the advancement of modem society and are utilized in a number of applications to achieve advantageous results. Numerous devices, such as desktop personal computers (PCs), laptop PCs, tablet PCs, netbooks, smart phones, game consoles, servers, distributed computing systems, and the like have facilitated increased productivity and reduced costs in communicating and analyzing data in most areas of entertainment, education, business, and science. One common aspect of computing systems is the computing device readable memory. Computing devices may include one or more types of memory, such as volatile random-access memory, non-volatile flash memory, and the like.

[0002] An emerging non-volatile memory technology is Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (MRAM). In MRAM devices, data can be stored in the magnetization orientation between ferromagnetic layers of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ). Referring to FIGS. 1 A and 1B, a simplified diagram of a MTJ, in accordance with the convention art, is shown. The MTJ can include two magnetic layers 110, 120, and a magnetic tunnel barrier layer 130. One of the magnetic layers 110 can have a fixed magnetization polarization 140, while the polarization of the magnetization of the other magnetic layer 120 can switch between opposite directions 150, 160. Typically, if the magnetic layers have the same magnetization polarization 140, 150, the MTJ cell will exhibit a relatively low resistance value corresponding to a‘U bit state; while if the magnetization polarization between the two magnetic layers is antiparallel 140, 160 the MTJ cell will exhibit a relatively high resistance value corresponding to a‘0’ bit state. Because the data is stored in the magnetic fields, MRAM devices are non-volatile memory devices. The state of a MRAM cell can be read by applying a predetermined current through the cell and measuring the resulting voltage, or by applying a predetermined voltage across the cell and measuring the resulting current. The sensed current or voltage is proportional to the resistance of the cell and can be compared to a reference value to determine the state of the cell.

[0003] MRAM devices are characterized by densities similar to Dynamic Random- Access Memory (DRAM), power consumption similar to flash memory, and speed similar to Static Random- Access Memory (SRAM). Although MRAM devices exhibit favorable performance characteristics as compared to other memory technologies, there is a continuing need for improved MRAM devices and methods of manufacture thereof.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0004] The present technology may best be understood by referring to the following description and accompanying drawings that are used to illustrate embodiments of the present technology directed toward device including arrays of integrated Magnetic Tunnel Junctions (MTJs) and corresponding selectors.

[0005] In one aspect, a MTJ device can include a plurality of source lines, an array of selectors, and array of MTJ structures and a plurality of bit lines. The plurality of source lines can be disposed in columns. Sets of the selectors can be coupled to respective source lines. The MTJ structures can be coupled to respective selectors. The plurality of bit lines can be disposed in rows, wherein the bit lines are coupled to respective set of MTJ structures. The MTJ device can also include an array of buffers coupled between respective selectors and respective MTJ structures.

[0006] In another aspect, a MTJ device can include a plurality of bit lines, an array of MTJ structures, an array of selectors, and a plurality of source lines. The plurality of bit lines can be disposed in rows. Sets of MTJ structure can be coupled to respective bit lines. The selectors can be coupled to respective MTJ structures. The plurality of source lines can be disposed in columns, wherein the bit lines are coupled to respective selectors. The MTJ device can also include an array of buffers coupled between respective MTJ structures and respective selectors.

[0007] In another aspect, a MTJ device can include an array of cells and a cross-bar.

Each cell in the array can include a MTJ structure integrated with a selector. The cross-bar can include a plurality of source lines disposed in columns and a plurality of bit lines disposed in rows. The cells of the array are coupled between respective source lines and respective bit lines. The cells of the array can further include a buffer coupled between a respective MTJ structure and a respective selector. The MTJ device can further include a plurality of the arrays. The arrays can be stacked on top of each other in a vertical three-dimensional (3D) architecture.

[0008] This Summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described below in the Detailed Description. This Summary is not intended intended to identify key features or essential features of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended to be used to limit the scope of the claimed subject matter.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0009] Embodiments of the present technology are illustrated by way of example and not by way of limitation, in the figures of the accompanying drawings and in which like reference numerals refer to similar elements and in which:

FIGS. 1 A and 1B show a simplified diagram of a MTJ, in accordance with the convention art.

FIG. 2 shows a block diagram of a cell array of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIG. 3 shows a block diagram of a cell array of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIG. 4 shows a block diagram of a cell array of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIG. 5 shows a block diagram of a cell array of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIGS. 6A-6B show a method of fabricating a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIGS. 7A-7F illustrate method of fabricating a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIGS. 8A-8B show a method of fabricating a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIGS. 9A-9G illustrate method of fabricating a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIGS. 10A-10B show a method of fabricating a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIGS. 11 A-l 1F illustrate method of fabricating a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIGS. 12A-12B show a method of fabricating a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology. FIGS. 13A-13D illustrate method of fabricating a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIG. 14 shows a method of fabricating a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIGS. 15A-15D illustrate method of fabricating a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIG. 16 shows a block diagram of a cell array of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIG. 17 shows a block diagram of a memory device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIG. 18 shows a block diagram of a computing system including a memory device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIG. 19 shows a block diagram of a computing system including a memory device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIG. 20 shows a block diagram of a memory sub-system, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

FIG. 21 shows a block diagram of a memory sub-system, in accordance with aspects of the present technology.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0010] Reference will now be made in detail to the embodiments of the present technology, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings. While the present technology will be described in conjunction with these embodiments, it will be understood that they are not intended to limit the invention to these embodiments. On the contrary, the invention is intended to cover alternatives, modifications and equivalents, which may be included within the scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims. Furthermore, in the following detailed description of the present technology, numerous specific details are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding of the present technology. However, it is understood that the present technology may be practiced without these specific details. In other instances, well- known methods, procedures, components, and circuits have not been described in detail as not to unnecessarily obscure aspects of the present technology. [0011] Some embodiments of the present technology which follow are presented in terms of routines, modules, logic blocks, and other symbolic representations of operations on data within one or more electronic devices. The descriptions and representations are the means used by those skilled in the art to most effectively convey the substance of their work to others skilled in the art. A routine, module, logic block and/or the like, is herein, and generally, conceived to be a self-consistent sequence of processes or instructions leading to a desired result. The processes are those including physical manipulations of physical quantities. Usually, though not necessarily, these physical manipulations take the form of electric or magnetic signals capable of being stored, transferred, compared and otherwise manipulated in an electronic device. For reasons of convenience, and with reference to common usage, these signals are referred to as data, bits, values, elements, symbols, characters, terms, numbers, strings, and/or the like with reference to embodiments of the present technology.

[0012] It should be borne in mind, however, that all of these terms are to be interpreted as referencing physical manipulations and quantities and are merely convenient labels and are to be interpreted further in view of terms commonly used in the art. Unless specifically stated otherwise as apparent from the following discussion, it is understood that through discussions of the present technology, discussions utilizing the terms such as“receiving,” and/or the like, refer to the actions and processes of an electronic device such as an electronic computing device that manipulates and transforms data. The data is represented as physical (e.g., electronic) quantities within the electronic device’s logic circuits, registers, memories and/or the like, and is transformed into other data similarly represented as physical quantities within the electronic device.

[0013] In this application, the use of the disjunctive is intended to include the conjunctive. The use of definite or indefinite articles is not intended to indicate cardinality. In particular, a reference to“the” object or“a” object is intended to denote also one of a possible plurality of such objects. It is also to be understood that the phraseology and terminology used herein is for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting.

[0014] Referring to FIG. 2, a block diagram of a cell array of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology, is shown. The MTJ device can be a Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (MRAM), Spin Torque Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (ST-MRAM) or similar memory device. In some aspects, the cell array 200 can include a plurality of source lines 210 disposed in columns on a wafer. In one implementation, the plurality of source lines 210 can include Copper (Cu), Tungsten (W) or other similar conductive material. For conductive material like Copper (Cu) which is characterized by a relatively high solubility and diffusivity in oxide, the plurality of source lines 210 can also include a Titanium Nitride (TiN), a Tantalum Nitride (TaN), Titanium

Nitride/Tantalum Nitride (TiN/TaN) or similar capping layer. In one implementation, one or more dielectric materials can be disposed between the columns of source lines 210. In one example, the plurality of source lines 210 can be a first metalization (Ml) layer.

[0015] In some aspects, the cell array 200 can include an array of selectors 220. Sets of selectors 220 can be coupled to respective source lines 210. The selectors 220 can be two- terminal elements in which the conductivity of a given selector can be controlled by the potential voltage applied across the given selector. For example, the selector 220 can be in a low resistance state when a first voltage is applied across the given selector, and the selector can be in a high resistance state when a second voltage is applied across the given selector. However, unlike the MTJ, the selector 220 does not retain a state. In one implementation, the array of selectors 220 can include a Nickel Oxide (NiOx), Titanium Oxide (TiOx), or Vanadium Oxide (VOx) or other similar material. In one implementation, one or more dielectric materials can be disposed between the array of selectors 220.

[0016] In some aspects, the cell array 200 can include an array of MTJ structures 230.

The MTJ structures 230 can be coupled to respective selectors 220. The MTJ can include two magnetic layers and a magnetic tunnel barrier layer therebetween. One of the magnetic layers can have a fixed magnetization polarization, while the polarization of the magnetization of the other magnetic layer can switch between opposite directions. Typically, if the magnetic layers have the same magnetization polarization, the MTJ cell will exhibit a relatively low resistance value corresponding to a‘ G bit state; while if the magnetization polarization between the two magnetic layers is antiparallel the MTJ cell will exhibit a relatively high resistance value corresponding to a‘0’ bit state. In one implementation, the MTJ structures 230 can include one or more first ferromagnetic layers, one or more non-magnetic layers disposed on the one or more first ferromagnetic layers, and one or more second ferromagnetic layers of a Synthetic

Antiferromagnetic (SAF) portion of the MTJ. The MTJ structures 230 can also include one or more reference magnetic layers, one or more non-magnetic tunneling barrier layers disposed on the one or more reference magnetic layers, and one or more free magnetic layers disposed on the one or more non-magnetic tunneling barrier layers of a MTJ. Some or all of the one or more reference magnetic layers of the MTJ and some or all of the one or more second ferromagnetic layers of the SAF may be shared between both the MTJ and SAF portions of the MTJ structure. The MTJ structure 230 can also include one or more capping layers disposed on the free magnetic layer. In one implementation, a first ferromagnetic layer can include one or more of Cobalt (Co), Platinum (Pt), and Ruthenium (Ru), a first non-magnetic layer can include

Magnesium Oxide (MgOx), a reference magnetic layer can include one or more of Cobalt (Co), Iron (Fe), and Boron (B), a non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer can include Magnesium Oxide (MgOx), and a free magnetic layer can include one or more of Cobalt (Co), Iron (Fe), Boron (B), and Tungsten (W). Each MTJ structure 230 may be implemented in a pillar, with one or more dielectric materials disposed between the array of MTJ pillars. The MTJ structures 230 can also include one or more additional layers, such as one or more seed layers, one or more anti ferromagnetic (AFM) coupling layers, one or more ferromagnetic (FM) coupling layers, one or more Processional Spin Current (PSC) coupling layers, one or more Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy (PMA) layers, and the like.

[0017] In some aspects, the cell array 200 can optionally include an array of buffers 240 disposed between respective selectors 220 and respective MTJ structures 230. The array of buffers can provide a crystallization structure upon which MTJ structures 230 can be fabricate. The array of buffers can also provide a separation for the MTJ structures 230 so that the array of selectors 220 have a reduced effect on the device characteristics of the MTJ structures 230. In one implementation, the array of buffers 240 can include Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or Titanium Nitride (TiN) or similar material. In one implementation, one or more dielectric materials can be disposed between the array of buffers 240. In one example, the array of buffers 240 can be a second metalization (M2) layer. If the array of buffers 240 are not included, the plurality of source lines 230 can include Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or Titanium Nitride (TiN) or similar material.

[0018] In some aspects, the cell array 200 can include a plurality of bit lines 250 disposed in rows. The plurality of bit lines 250 can be coupled to respective sets of MTJ structures 230.

In one implementation, the plurality of bit lines 250 can include Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or Titanium Nitride (TiN) or similar material. In one implementation, one or more dielectric materials can be disposed between the rows of bit lines 250. In one example, the plurality of bit lines 250 can be a third metalization (M3) layer.

[0019] The cell array 200 of the MTJ device can include numerous other layers, structures, and the like that are not germane to an understanding of aspects of the present technology. Therefore, the other layers, structures and the like of the MTJ device are not described herein. [0020] Referring now to FIG. 3 a block diagram of a cell array of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology, is shown. The MTJ device can be a MRAM, ST-MRAM or similar memory device. In some aspects, the cell array 300 can include a plurality of bit lines 310 disposed in rows on a wafer. In one implementation, the plurality of bit lines 310 can include Copper (Cu), Tungsten (W) or other similar conductive material. For conductive material like Copper (Cu) which is characterized by a relatively high solubility and diffusivity in oxide, the plurality of bit lines 310 can also include a Titanium Nitride (TiN), a Tantalum Nitride (TaN), Titanium Nitride/Tantalum Nitride (TiN/TaN) or similar capping layer. In one implementation, one or more dielectric materials can be disposed between the rows of bit lines 310. In one example, the plurality of bit lines 310 can be a first metalization (Ml) layer.

[0021] In some aspects, the cell array 300 can include an array of MTJ structures 320.

Sets of the MTJ structures 320 can be coupled to respective bit lines 310. The MTJ can include two magnetic layers and a magnetic tunnel barrier layer therebetween. One of the magnetic layers can have a fixed magnetization polarization, while the polarization of the magnetization of the other magnetic layer can switch between opposite directions. Typically, if the magnetic layers have the same magnetization polarization, the MTJ cell will exhibit a relatively low resistance value corresponding to a‘ G bit state; while if the magnetization polarization between the two magnetic layers is antiparallel the MTJ cell will exhibit a relatively high resistance value corresponding to a‘0’ bit state. In one implementation, the MTJ structures 320 can include one or more first ferromagnetic layers, one or more non-magnetic layers disposed on the one or more first ferromagnetic layers, and one or more second ferromagnetic layers of a Synthetic

Antiferromagnetic (SAF) portion of the MTJ. The MTJ structures 320 can also include one or more reference magnetic layers, one or more non-magnetic tunneling barrier layers disposed on the one or more reference magnetic layers, and one or more free magnetic layers disposed on the one or more non-magnetic tunneling barrier layers of a MTJ. Some or all of the one or more reference magnetic layers of the MTJ and some or all of the one or more second ferromagnetic layers of the SAF may be shared between both the MTJ and SAF portions of the MTJ structure. The MTJ structure 320 can also include one or more capping layers disposed on the free magnetic layer. In one implementation, a first ferromagnetic layer can include one or more of Cobalt (Co), Platinum (Pt), and Ruthenium (Ru), a first non-magnetic layer can include

Magnesium Oxide (MgOx), a reference magnetic layer can include one or more of Cobalt (Co), Iron (Fe), and Boron (B), a non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer can include Magnesium Oxide (MgOx), and a free magnetic layer can include one or more of Cobalt (Co), Iron (Fe), Boron (B), and Tungsten (W). Each MTJ structure 320 may be implemented in a pillar, with one or more dielectric materials disposed between the array of MTJ pillars. The MTJ structures 320 can also include one or more additional layers, such as one or more see layers, one or more anti ferromagnetic (AFM) coupling layers, one or more ferromagnetic (FM) coupling layers, one or more Processional Spin Current (PSC) coupling layers, one or more Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy (PMA) layers, and the like.

[0022] In some aspects, the cell array 300 can include an array of selectors 330. The selectors 330 can be coupled to respective MTJ structures 320. The selectors 330 can be two- terminal elements in which the conductivity of a given selector can be controlled by the potential voltage applied across the given selector. For example, the selector 330 can be in a low resistance state when a first voltage is applied across the given selector, and the selector 330 can be in a high resistance state when a second voltage is applied across the given selector. In one implementation, the array of selectors 330 can include a Nickel Oxide (NiOx), Titanium Oxide (TiOx), or Vanadium Oxide (VOx) or other similar material. In one implementation, one or more dielectric materials can be disposed between the array of selectors 330.

[0023] In some aspects, the cell array 300 can optionally include an array of buffers 340 disposed between respective MTJ structures 320 and respective selectors 330. The array of buffers can provide a separation for the MTJ structures 320 so that the array of selectors 330 have a reduced effect on the device characteristics of the MTJ structures 320. In one implementation, the array of buffers 340 can include Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or Titanium Nitride (TiN) or similar material. In one implementation, one or more dielectric materials can be disposed between the array of buffers 340. In one example, the array of buffers 340 can be a second metalization (M2) layer.

[0024] In some aspects, the cell array 300 can include a plurality of source lines 350 disposed in columns. The plurality of source lines 350 can be coupled to respective sets of selectors 330. In one implementation, the plurality of source lines 350 can include Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or Titanium Nitride (TiN) or similar material. In one implementation, one or more dielectric materials can be disposed between the columns of source lines 350. In one example, the plurality of source lines 350 can be a third metalization (M3) layer.

[0025] The cell array 300 of the MTJ device can include numerous other layers, structures, and the like that are not germane to an understanding of aspects of the present technology. Therefore, the other layers, structures and the like of the MTJ device are not described herein. [0026] As described above, the MTJ structures 230 can be disposed on top of the selectors 220, relative to the wafer, as illustrated in FIG. 2. Alternatively, the selectors 330 can be disposed on top of the MTJ structures 320, relative to the wafer, as illustrated in FIG. 3. The relative position of the MTJ structures 230, 320 and the selectors 220, 330 can be advantageous in the fabrication of the MTJ device as will be further explained with reference to the methods of manufacturing described herein.

[0027] Referring now to FIG. 4, a block diagram of a cell array of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology, is shown. The MTJ device can be a MRAM, ST-MRAM or similar memory device. In some aspects, the cell array 400 can include a plurality of source line layers 410 disposed in columns. The source line layers 410 can be disposed in corresponding trenches in a dielectric layer 420 of a wafer. In one implementation, the plurality of source line layers 410 can include Copper (Cu), Tungsten (W) or other similar conductive material. For conductive material like Copper (Cu) which is characterized by a relatively high solubility and diffusivity in oxide, the plurality of source line layers 410 can also include a Titanium Nitride (TiN), a Tantalum Nitride (TaN), Titanium Nitride/Tantalum Nitride (TiN/TaN) or similar capping layer. In one example, the plurality of source line layers 410 can be a first metalization (Ml) layer.

[0028] In some aspects, the cell array 400 can include an array of selectors 430. The array of selectors 430 can be disposed on respective source line layers 410 in the corresponding trenches in the dielectric layer 420. The selectors 430 can be two-terminal elements in which the conductivity of a given selector can be controlled by the potential voltage applied across the given selector. For example, the selector 430 can be in a low resistance state when a first voltage is applied across the given selector, and the selector 430 can be in a high resistance state when a second voltage is applied across the given selector. In one implementation, the array of selectors 430 can include a Nickel Oxide (NiOx), Titanium Oxide (TiOx), or Vanadium Oxide (VOx) or other similar material. In some aspects, a surface of the source line layers 410, and a surface of the selectors 430 can be coplanar with a surface of the dielectric layer 420.

[0029] In some aspects, the cell array 400 can include an array of MTJ structures 440.

The MTJ structures 440 can be coupled to respective selectors 430. The MTJ structure 440 can include two magnetic layers and a magnetic tunnel barrier layer therebetween. One of the magnetic layers can have a fixed magnetization polarization, while the polarization of the magnetization of the other magnetic layer can switch between opposite directions. Typically, if the magnetic layers have the same magnetization polarization, the MTJ cell will exhibit a relatively low resistance value corresponding to a‘ bit state; while if the magnetization polarization between the two magnetic layers is antiparallel the MTJ cell will exhibit a relatively high resistance value corresponding to a‘0’ bit state. In one implementation, the MTJ structures 440 can include one or more first ferromagnetic layers, one or more non-magnetic layers disposed on the one or more first ferromagnetic layers, and one or more second ferromagnetic layers of a Synthetic Antiferromagnetic (SAF) portion of the MTJ. The MTJ structures 230 can also include one or more reference magnetic layers, one or more non-magnetic tunneling barrier layers disposed on the one or more reference magnetic layers, and one or more free magnetic layers disposed on the one or more non-magnetic tunneling barrier layers of a MTJ. Some or all of the one or more reference magnetic layers of the MTJ and some or all of the one or more second ferromagnetic layers of the SAF may be shared between both the MTJ and SAF portions of the MTJ structure. The MTJ structure 440 can also include one or more capping layers disposed on the free magnetic layer. In one implementation, a first ferromagnetic layer can include one or more of Cobalt (Co), Platinum (Pt), and Ruthenium (Ru), a first non-magnetic layer can include Magnesium Oxide (MgOx), a reference magnetic layer can include one or more of Cobalt (Co), Iron (Fe), and Boron (B), a non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer can include Magnesium Oxide (MgOx), and a free magnetic layer can include one or more of Cobalt (Co), Iron (Fe), Boron (B), and Tungsten (W). Each MTJ structure 40 may be implemented in a a pillar, with one or more dielectric materials (not shown) disposed between the array of MTJ pillars. The MTJ structures 440 can also include one or more additional layers, such as one or more seed layers, one or more anti-ferromagnetic (AFM) coupling layers, one or more ferromagnetic (FM) coupling layers, one or more Processional Spin Current (PSC) coupling layers, one or more Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy (PMA) layers, and the like.

[0030] In some aspects, the cell array 400 can optionally include an array of buffers 450 disposed between respective selectors 430 and respective MTJ structures 440. The array of buffers 450 can provide a crystallization structure upon which MTJ structures 440 can be fabricate. The array of buffers 450 can also provide a separation for the MTJ structures 440 so that the array of selectors 430 have a reduced effect on the device characteristics of the MTJ structures 230. In one implementation, the array of buffers 450 can include Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or Titanium Nitride (TiN) or similar material. In one implementation, one or more dielectric materials (not shown) can be disposed between the array of buffers 450. In one example, the array of buffers 450 can be a second metalization (M2) layer. [0031] In some aspects, the cell array 400 can include a plurality of bit lines 460 disposed in rows. The plurality of bit lines 460 can be coupled to respective sets of MTJ structures 440.

In one implementation, the plurality of bit lines 460 can include Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or Titanium Nitride (TiN) or similar material. In one implementation, one or more dielectric materials (not shown) can be disposed between the rows of bit lines 460. In one example, the plurality of bit lines 460 can be a third metabzation (M3) layer.

[0032] The cell array 400 of the MTJ device can include numerous other layers, structures, and the like that are not germane to an understanding of aspects of the present technology. Therefore, the other layers, structures and the like of the MTJ device are not described herein.

[0033] Referring now to FIG. 5, a block diagram of a cell array of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology, is shown. The MTJ device can be a MRAM, ST-MRAM or similar memory device. In some aspects, the cell array 500 can include a plurality of source line layers 410 disposed in columns. The source line layers 510 can be disposed in corresponding trenches in a dielectric layer 520 of a wafer. In one implementation, the plurality of source line layers 510 can include Copper (Cu), Tungsten (W) or other similar conductive material. For conductive material like Copper (Cu) which is characterized by a relatively high solubility and diffusivity in oxide, the plurality of source line layers 510 can also include a Titanium Nitride (TiN), a Tantalum Nitride (TaN), Titanium Nitride/Tantalum Nitride (TiN/TaN) or similar capping layer. In one example, the plurality of source line layers 510 can be a first metabzation (Ml) layer.

[0034] In some aspects, the cell array 500 can include an array of selectors 530. The array of selectors 530 can be disposed on respective source line layers 510 in the corresponding trenches in the dielectric layer 520. The selectors 530 can be two-terminal elements in which the conductivity of a given selector can be controlled by the potential voltage applied across the given selector. For example, the selector 530 can be in a low resistance state when a first voltage is applied across the given selector, and the selector can be in a high resistance state when a second voltage is applied across the given selector. In one implementation, the array of selectors 530 can include a Nickel Oxide (NiOx), Titanium Oxide (TiOx), or Vanadium Oxide (VOx) or other similar material.

[0035] In some aspects, the cell array 500 can include an array of buffers 540 disposed on respective selectors 530 in the corresponding trenches in the dielectric layer 520. The array of buffers 540 can provide a crystallization structure upon which MTJ structures 550 can be fabricate. The array of buffers 540 can also provide a separation for the MTJ structures 550 so that the array of selectors 530 have a reduced effect on the device characteristics of the MTJ structures 550. In one implementation, the array of buffers 540 can include Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or Titanium Nitride (TiN) or similar material. In one example, the array of buffers 540 can be a second metalization (M2) layer. In some aspects, a surface of the source line layers 410, a surface of the selectors 430 and a surface of the buffers 540 can be coplanar with a surface of the dielectric layer 520.

[0036] In some aspects, the cell array 500 can include an array of MTJ structures 550.

The MTJ structures 550 can be coupled to respective buffers 540. The MTJ can include two magnetic layers and a magnetic tunnel barrier layer therebetween. One of the magnetic layers can have a fixed magnetization polarization, while the polarization of the magnetization of the other magnetic layer can switch between opposite directions. Typically, if the magnetic layers have the same magnetization polarization, the MTJ cell will exhibit a relatively low resistance value corresponding to a‘ G bit state; while if the magnetization polarization between the two magnetic layers is antiparallel the MTJ cell will exhibit a relatively high resistance value corresponding to a‘0’ bit state. In one implementation, the MTJ structures 550 can include one or more first ferromagnetic layers, one or more non-magnetic layers disposed on the one or more first ferromagnetic layers, and one or more second ferromagnetic layers of a Synthetic

Antiferromagnetic (SAF) portion of the MTJ. The MTJ structures 230 can also include one or more reference magnetic layers, one or more non-magnetic tunneling barrier layers disposed on the one or more reference magnetic layers, and one or more free magnetic layers disposed on the one or more non-magnetic tunneling barrier layers of a MTJ. Some or all of the one or more reference magnetic layers of the MTJ and some or all of the one or more second ferromagnetic layers of the SAF may be shared between both the MTJ and SAF portions of the MTJ structure. The MTJ structure 550 can also include one or more capping layers disposed on the free magnetic layer. In one implementation, a first ferromagnetic layer can include one or more of Cobalt (Co), Platinum (Pt), and Ruthenium (Ru), a first non-magnetic layer can include

Magnesium Oxide (MgOx), a reference magnetic layer can include one or more of Cobalt (Co), Iron (Fe), and Boron (B), a non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer can include Magnesium Oxide (MgOx), and a free magnetic layer can include one or more of Cobalt (Co), Iron (Fe), Boron (B), and Tungsten (W). Each MTJ structure 550 may be implemented in a pillar, with one or more dielectric materials (not shown) disposed between the array of MTJ pillars. The MTJ structures 550 can also include one or more additional layers, such as one or more see layers, one or more anti-ferromagnetic (AFM) coupling layers, one or more ferromagnetic (FM) coupling layers, one or more Processional Spin Current (PSC) coupling layers, one or more Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy (PMA) layers, and the like.

[0037] In some aspects, the cell array 500 can include a plurality of bit lines 560 disposed in rows. The plurality of bit lines 560 can be coupled to respective sets of MTJ structures 550.

In one implementation, the plurality of bit lines 560 can include Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or Titanium Nitride (TiN) or similar material. In one implementation, one or more dielectric materials (not shown) can be disposed between the rows of bit lines 560. In one example, the plurality of bit lines 560 can be a third metabzation (M3) layer.

[0038] The cell array 500 of the MTJ device can include numerous other layers, structures, and the like that are not germane to an understanding of aspects of the present technology. Therefore, the other layers, structures and the like of the MTJ device are not described herein.

[0039] In some aspects, the cell array 200, 300, 400 of the MTJ devices can

advantageously be stacked on top of each other to implement vertical three-dimension (3D) memory architectures, such as cross-point MRAM, cross-point ST-MRAM and the like.

[0040] Referring now to FIGS. 6A and 6B, a method of fabricating a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology, is shown. The method of fabrication will be described with reference to FIGS. 7A-7F, which illustrate the method of fabrication. The MTJ device can be a Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (MRAM), Spin Torque Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (ST-MRAM) or similar memory device. In some aspects, a first dielectric layer 705 can be formed on a wafer 710, at 605. In one implementation, forming the first dielectric layer can include depositing a layer of Silicon Oxide (SiO), Silicon Nitride (SiN) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 10-100 nanometers (nm), by a process such as Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or Plasma

Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition or the like.

[0041] In some aspects, a plurality of source line trenches can be formed in columns in the first dielectric layer, at 610. In one implementation, the plurality of source line trenches can be formed by selectively etching the first dielectric layer exposed by a source line trench mask.

[0042] In some aspects, a plurality of source line conductors 715 can be formed in the plurality of source line trenches, at 615. In one implementation, forming the plurality of source line conductors can include depositing a first conductive layer 715' on the first dielectric layer 705 and filling the plurality of source line trenches. The first conductive layer can be Copper (Cu), Tungsten (W) or other similar conductor deposited by a process such as Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD), Atomic Layer Deposition (ALC) or the like. In addition, a first liner layer can be deposited on the first dielectric layer including the plurality of source line trenches before depositing the first conductive layer. For conductive material like Copper (Cu) which is characterized by a relatively high solubility and diffusivity in oxide, the first liner layer can be Titanium Nitride (TiN), Tantalum Nitride (TaN), Titanium Nitride/Tantalum Nitride (TiN/TaN) or similar material with a thickness of approximately 5-15 nm, by a process such as High- Density Plasma (HDP) deposition or the like. The first conductive layer can then be Chemical- Mechanical Polished (CMP) to remove the first conductive layer on the first dielectric layer and leaving the first conductive layer material in the plurality of source line trenches to form the plurality of source line conductors with a thickness of approximately 100-150 nm. The liner layer on the first dielectric layer can be utilized as a CMP stop. A surface of the source line conductors can be formed to be coplanar with a surface of the first dielectric layer as a result of the CMP process. In addition, a first capping layer can be deposited on the plurality first source line conductors after the CMP process. The first capping layer can be deposited by a process such as electroplating or the like. The first capping layer can be Titanium Nitride (TiN), Tantalum Nitride (TaN), Titanium Nitride/Tantalum Nitride (TiN/TaN) or similar material with a thickness of approximately 5-15 nm, to reduce solubility and diffusivity of the first source line conductor material into the first dielectric layer and other subsequently formed layers. The first capping layer material and thickness can be selected based upon a filing characteristic of the subsequent deposition of selector layer in the array of selector elements, and/or the CMP selectivity of the selector material over the capping layer material.

[0043] In some aspects, a second dielectric layer 720 can be formed on the first dielectric layer and the source line conductors, at 620. In one implementation, the second dielectric layer can be deposited on the first dielectric layer and the source line conductors by a process such as Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), Physical Vapor

Deposition (PVD) or Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition or the like. The second dielectric layer can be Silicon Oxide (SiO), Silicon Nitride (SiN) with a thickness of

approximately about 50 nm.

[0044] In some aspects, an array of selector openings can be formed in the second dielectric layer, at 625. Sets of the selector opening can extended to respective source line conductors. In one implementation, the array of selector openings can be formed by selectively etching the second dielectric layer exposed by a selector opening mask.

[0045] In some aspects, an array of selectors 725 can be formed in the selector openings 630. In one implementation, forming the array of selectors can include depositing a selector layer 725' on the second dielectric layer and filling the array of selector openings. The selector layer can be a Nickel Oxide (NiOx), Titanium Oxide (TiOx), or Vanadium Oxide (VOx) or other similar material deposited by a process such as sputtering or the like. Sputtering of the selector material can be performed in the presence of a strong electromagnetic fields to confine charge plasma particles close to the surface of the plurality of source line conductor targets. Depending on a design current density and rectifying ratio, the thickness of the selector material and composition of the selector material can be tuned and modified. Post-deposition morphology may not be smooth due to the via structure of the selector. The selector layer can then be CMP to remove the selector layer on the second dielectric layer and leaving the selector layer material in the array of selector opening to form the array of selectors with a thickness of approximately 30 - 50 nm. The slurry, pad pressure and speed can be selected to achieve a good selective removal rate of the selector material over the second dielectric material. The good selectivity can minimize loss of stack height. A surface of the selectors can be coplanar with a surface of the second dielectric layer as a result of the CMP process. In addition, a second capping layer can be deposited on the array of selectors after the CMP process. The second capping layer can be deposited by a process such as electroplating or the like. The second capping layer can be Titanium Nitride (TiN), Tantalum Nitride (TaN), Titanium Nitride/Tantalum Nitride (TiN/TaN) or similar material with a thickness of approximately 5-70 nm, to reduce solubility and diffusivity of the selector material into the second dielectric layer and other subsequently formed layers.

[0046] In some aspects, an optional third dielectric layer 730 can be formed on the second dielectric layer and the array of selectors, at 635. In one implementation, the third dielectric layer can be deposited on the second dielectric layer and the array of selectors by a process such as Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition or the like. The third dielectric layer can be Silicon Oxide (SiO), Silicon Nitride (SiN) with a thickness of

approximately 40-60 nm.

[0047] In some aspects, optionally an array of buffer opening in the third dielectric layer can be formed, at 640. The buffer openings can extend to respective selectors. In one implementation, the array of buffer openings can be formed by selectively etching the third dielectric layer exposed by a buffer opening mask.

[0048] In some aspects, an optional array of buffers 735 can be formed in the array of buffer openings when the optional array of buffer openings are formed in the optional third dielectric layer, at 645. In one implementation, forming the array of buffers can include depositing a buffer layer 735' on the third dielectric layer and filling the array of buffer openings. The buffer layer can be Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or other similar material deposited by a process such as High-Density Plasma (HDP) deposition or the like. The buffer layer can then be CMP to remove the buffer layer on the third dielectric layer and leaving the buffer layer material in the array of buffer opening to form the array of buffers with a thickness of approximately 50 nm. A surface of the buffers can be coplanar with a surface of the third dielectric layer as a result of the CMP process. Forming array of buffers before forming the array of MTJs advantageously allows the fabrication of the MTJs without the processes used for forming the selectors affecting the performance parameters of the MTJs.

[0049] In some aspects, an array of MTJ pillars 740 can be formed, at 650. The MTJ pillars can be coupled directly to the array of selectors, or through the array of optional buffers to the array of selectors. In one implementation, a reference magnetic layer can be formed over the first barrier layer. A non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer can be formed over the reference magnetic layer. A free magnetic layer can be formed over the non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer. An array of pillars can be formed from the free magnetic layer, the non-magnetic tunnel barrier layer, and the reference magnetic layer by selective etching the free magnetic layer, the non-magnetic tunnel barrier layer, and the reference magnetic layer exposed by one or more pillar masks 745.

[0050] Fabrication can continue with forming a fourth dielectric layer 750 and forming a plurality of bit lines 755 disposed in rows and coupled to the MTJ pillars 740. The fabrication of the MTJ device can include numerous other processes that are not germane to an understanding of aspect of the present technology. Therefore, the other processes of fabricating the MTJ device are not described herein.

[0051] As described above, two single damascene processes are advantageously utilized in integrate the selector in series with the MTJ device. A first single damascene process is utilized to form source line trenches in the first dielectric layer and then filling the source line trenches with a metal to form the source line conductors. After forming the selector on the source line conductors, a second single damascene process is utilized to form buffer openings in a third dielectric layer and then filling the buffer opening with a metal to form buffers in the buffer openings.

[0052] In some aspects, multiple cell arrays can be fabricated in stacks on top of each other to implement vertical three-dimension (3D) memory architectures, such as cross-point MRAM, cross-point ST-MRAM and the like. The stacked arrays can be formed by repeating the above described processes to form multiple cell arrays stacked upon each other.

[0053] Referring now to FIGS. 8A-8B, a method of fabricating a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology, is shown. The method of fabrication will be described with reference to FIGS. 9A-9G, which illustrate the method of fabrication. The MTJ device can be a MRAM, ST-MRAM or similar memory device. In some aspects, a first dielectric layer 905 can be formed on a wafer 910, at 805. In one implementation, forming the first dielectric layer can include depositing a layer of Silicon Oxide (SiO), Silicon Nitride (SiN) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 40-60 nm, by a process such as Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition or the like.

[0054] In some aspects, a plurality of source line trenches can be formed in columns in the first dielectric layer, at 810. In one implementation, the plurality of source line trenches can be formed by selectively etching the first dielectric layer exposed by a source line trench mask.

[0055] In some aspect, a plurality of source line conductors 915 can be formed in the plurality of source line trenches, at 815. In one implementation, forming the plurality of source line conductors can include depositing a first conductive layer 915' on the first dielectric layer 905 and filling the plurality of source line trenches. The first conductive layer can be Copper (Cu), Tungsten (W) or other similar conductor deposited by a process such as ??? or the like. In addition, a first liner layer can be deposited on the first dielectric layer including the plurality of source line trenches before depositing the first conductive layer. For conductive material like Copper (Cu) which is characterized by a relatively high solubility and diffusivity in oxide, the first liner layer can be Titanium Nitride (TiN), Tantalum Nitride (TaN), Titanium

Nitride/Tantalum Nitride (TiN/TaN) or similar material with a thickness of approximately 5-15 nm, by a process such as High-Density Plasma (HDP) deposition or the like. The first conductive layer can then be Chemical-Mechanical Polished (CMP) to remove the first conductive layer on the first dielectric layer and leaving the first conductive layer material in the plurality of source line trenches to form the plurality of source line conductors with a thickness of approximately 100-150 nm. The liner layer on the first dielectric layer can be utilized as a CMP stop. A surface of the source line conductors can be formed to be coplanar with a surface of the first dielectric layer as a result of the CMP process. In addition, a first capping layer can be deposited on the plurality source line conductors after the CMP process. The first capping layer can be deposited by a process such as electroplating or the like. The first capping layer can can be Titanium Nitride (TiN), Tantalum Nitride (TaN), Titanium Nitride/Tantalum Nitride (TiN/TaN) or similar material with a thickness of approximately 5-15 nm, to reduce solubility and diffusivity of the source line conductor material into the first dielectric layer and other subsequently formed layers. The first capping layer material and thickness can be selected based based upon a filing characteristic of the subsequent deposition of selector layer in the array of selector elements, and/or the CMP selectivity of the selector material over the capping layer material.

[0056] In some aspects, a selector layer 920' can be formed over the first dielectric layer and the plurality of source line conductors, at 820. In one implementation, the selector layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Nickel Oxide (NiOx), Titanium Oxide (TiOx), or Vanadium Oxide (VOx) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 50 nm, by a process such as sputtering or the like. Sputtering of the selector material can be performed in the presence of a strong electromagnetic fields to confine charge plasma particles close to the surface of the target. Depending on a design current density and rectifying ratio, the thickness of the selector material can composition of the selector material can be tuned and modified. Post deposition morphology may not be smooth due to the via structure of the selector.

[0057] In some aspects, a first buffer layer 925' can be formed on the selector layer, at 825. In one implementation, the buffer layer can be formed by deposit a layer of Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 50-100 nm, by a process such as High-Density Plasma (HDP) deposition or the like. The array of buffers disposed between the array of selectors and the subsequently formed array of MTJs

advantageously allow the fabrication of the MTJs without the processes used for forming the selectors affecting the performance parameters of the MTJs.

[0058] In some aspects, a reference magnetic layer can be formed over the first barrier layer, 830. In one implementation, the reference magnetic layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Cobalt-Iron-Boron (Co-Fe-B) alloy or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 1-5 nm, by a process such as Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or the like. [0059] In some aspects, a non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer can be formed over the reference magnetic layer, at 835. In one implementation, the non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Magnesium Oxide (MgOx) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 0.1-1 nm, by a process such as sputtering or the like.

[0060] In some aspects, a free magnetic layer can be formed over the non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer, at 840. In one implementation, the free magnetic layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Cobalt-Iron-Boron (Co-Fe-B) alloy or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 0.5-2 nm, by a process such as Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or the like.

[0061] In some aspects, a first portion of an array of pillars 930 can be formed from the free magnetic layer, the non-magnetic tunnel barrier layer, and the reference magnetic layer, at 845. In one implementation, the first portion of the array of pillars can be formed by selectively etching the free magnetic layer, the non-magnetic tunnel barrier layer, and the reference magnetic layer exposed by one or more pillar masks 935.

[0062] In some aspects, a conformal dielectric layer 945' can be formed on the exposed portion of the free magnetic layer, the non-magnetic tunnel barrier layer, and the reference magnetic layer in the first portion of the pillars and the exposed portion of the first barrier layer, at 850. In one implementation, the conformal dielectric layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Silicon Oxide (SiO), Silicon Nitride (SiN) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 50 nm, by a process such as Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition or the like.

[0063] In some aspects, a second portion of the array of pillars can be formed from the first barrier layer and the select layer, at 855. In one implementation, portions of the conformal dielectric layer 940' on the exposed portion of the first barrier layer, the exposed portions of the barrier layer 925, and the exposed portions of the select layer 920 can be selectively etched to form the second portion of the array of pillars. Portions of the conformal dielectric layer 940 along sidewalls of the first portion of the array of pillars can protect one or more of the free magnetic layer, the non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer and the reference magnetic layer during forming the second portion of the array of pillars. The dielectric layer 940 along the sidewalls of of the first portion of the array of pillars can prevent re-deposition of the barrier layer and/or select layer on the free magnetic, the non-magnetic tunnel barrier layer, and/or the reference magnetic layer, and/or contamination thereof during the etching process. [0064] Fabrication can continue with forming a second dielectric layer 945 and forming a plurality of bit lines 950 disposed in rows and coupled to the MTJ pillars 930. The fabrication of the MTJ device can include numerous other processes that are not germane to an understanding of aspect of the present technology. Therefore, the other processes of fabricating the MTJ device are not described herein.

[0065] In some aspects, multiple cell arrays can be fabricated in stacks on top of each other to implement vertical three-dimension (3D) memory architectures, such as cross-point MRAM, cross-point ST-MRAM and the like. The stacked arrays can be formed by repeating the above described processes to form multiple cell arrays stacked upon each other.

[0066] Referring now to FIGS. 10A-10B, a method of fabricating a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology, is shown. The method of fabrication will be described with reference to FIGS. 11 A-l 1F, which illustrate the method of fabrication. The MTJ device can be a Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (MRAM), Spin Torque Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (ST-MRAM) or similar memory device. In some aspect, a first dielectric layer 1105 can be formed on a wafer 1110, at 1005. In one implementation, forming the first dielectric layer can include depositing a layer of Silicon Oxide (SiO), Silicon Nitride (SiN) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 40-60 nm, by a process such as Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition or the like.

[0067] In some aspects, a plurality of trenches can be formed in columns in the first dielectric layer, at 1010. In one implementation, the plurality of trenches can be formed by selectively etching the first dielectric layer exposed by a trench mask.

[0068] In some aspects, a source line layer 1115' can be formed on the first dielectric layer including in the plurality of trenches, at 1015. In one implementation, forming the first source line layer can include depositing a layer of Copper (Cu), Tungsten (W) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 100-150 nm, by a process such as Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) or the like.

[0069] In some aspects, a select layer 1120' can be formed on the source line layer including in the plurality of trenches, at 1020. In one implementation, the selector layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Nickel Oxide (NiOx), Titanium Oxide (TiOx), or Vanadium Oxide (VOx) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 50 nm, by a process such as sputering or the like. Sputering of the selector material can be performed in the presence of a strong electromagnetic fields to confine charge plasma particles close to the surface of the target. Depending on a design current density and rectifying ratio, the thickness of the selector material can composition of the selector material can be tuned and modified. Post deposition morphology may not be smooth due to the via structure of the selector.

[0070] In some aspects, the select layer 1115' and the source line layer 1120' can be planarized to remove the selector layer and the source line layer on the first dielectric layer and leaving selector layer material and source line layer material in the plurality of trenches 1025. In one implementation, the select layer and the source line layer can be CMPed to remove the selector layer and the source line layer on the first dielectric layer and leaving selector layer material and source line layer material in the plurality of trenches. After CMPing the portions of the selectors, the source lines and the first dielectric layer can be coplanar.

[0071] In some aspects, a first barrier layer can be formed on the coplanar exposed portions of the select layer, source line layer and first dielectric layer, at 1030. In one implementation, the first barrier layer can be formed by deposit a layer of Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 50-100 nm, by a process such as High-Density Plasma (HDP) deposition or the like.

[0072] In some aspects, a reference magnetic layer can be formed over the first barrier layer, 1035. In one implementation, the reference magnetic layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Cobalt-Iron-Boron (Co-Fe-B) alloy or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 1-5 nm, by a process such as Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or the like.

[0073] In some aspects, a non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer can be formed over the reference magnetic layer, at 1040. In one implementation, the non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Magnesium Oxide (MgOx) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 0.1-1 nm, by a process such as sputering or the like.

[0074] In some aspects, a free magnetic layer can be formed over the non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer, at 1045. In one implementation, the free magnetic layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Cobalt-Iron-Boron (Co-Fe-B) alloy or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 0.5-2 nm, by a process such as Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or the like.

[0075] In some aspects, a first portion of an array of pillars 1050 can be formed from the free magnetic layer, the non-magnetic tunnel barrier layer, and the reference magnetic layer, at 1050. In one implementation, the first portion of the array of pillars can be formed by selectively selectively etching the free magnetic layer, the non-magnetic tunnel barrier layer, and the reference magnetic layer exposed by one or more pillar masks.

[0076] In some aspects, a conformal dielectric layer 1155 can be formed on the exposed portion of the free magnetic layer, the non-magnetic tunnel barrier layer, and the reference magnetic layer in the first portion of the pillars and the exposed portion of the first barrier layer, at 1055. In one implementation, the conformal dielectric layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Silicon Oxide (SiO), Silicon Nitride (SiN) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 50 nm, by a process such as Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition or the like.

[0077] In some aspects, a second portion of the array of pillars 1160 can be formed from the first barrier layer and the select layer, at 1060. In one implementation, portions of the conformal dielectric layer on the exposed portion of the first barrier layer, the exposed portions of the barrier layer, and the exposed portions of the select layer can be selectively etched to form the second portion of the array of pillars. Portions of the conformal dielectric layer along sidewalls of the first portion of the array of pillars can protect one or more of the free magnetic layer, the non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer and the reference magnetic layer during forming the second portion of the array of pillars. The dielectric layer along the sidewalls of the first portion of the array of pillars can prevent re-deposition of the barrier layer and/or select layer on the free magnetic, the non-magnetic tunnel barrier layer, and/or the reference magnetic layer, and/or contamination thereof during the etching process.

[0078] In some aspects, a buffer layer can optionally be formed on the selector layer before forming the first barrier layer over the selector layer, at 1065. In one implementation, the buffer layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 50 nm, by a process such as High-Density Plasma (HDP) deposition or the like. When a buffer layer is formed on the selector layer, the second portion of the array of pillars can be formed from the buffer layer, the barrier layer and the selector layer, at 1060. The array of buffers disposed between the array of selectors and the subsequently formed array of MTJs advantageously allow the fabrication of the MTJs without the processes used for forming the selectors affecting the performance parameters of the MTJs. The array of buffers disposed between the array of selectors and the subsequently formed array of MTJs advantageously allow the fabrication of the MTJs without the processes used for forming the selectors affecting the performance parameters of the MTJs.

[0079] Fabrication can continue with forming a second dielectric layer 1165 and forming a plurality of bit lines 1170 disposed in rows and coupled to the MTJ pillars 150. The fabrication of the MTJ device can include numerous other processes that are not germane to an

understanding of aspect of the present technology. Therefore, the other processes of fabricating the MTJ device are not described herein.

[0080] In some aspects, multiple cell arrays can be fabricated in stacks on top of each other to implement vertical three-dimension (3D) memory architectures, such as cross-point MRAM, cross-point ST-MRAM and the like. The stacked arrays can be formed by repeating the above described processes to form multiple cell arrays stacked upon each other.

[0081] Referring now to FIGS. 12A-12B, a method of fabricating a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology, is shown. The method of fabrication will be described with reference to FIGS. 13A-13D, which illustrate the method of fabrication. The MTJ device can be a Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (MRAM), Spin Torque Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (ST-MRAM) or similar memory device. In some aspect, a first dielectric layer 1305 can be formed on a wafer 1310, at 1205. In one implementation, forming the first dielectric layer can include depositing a layer of Silicon Oxide (SiO), Silicon Nitride (SiN) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 40-60 nm, by a process such as Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition or the like.

[0082] In some aspects, a plurality of trenches can be formed in columns in the first dielectric layer, at 1210. In one implementation, the plurality of trenches can be formed by selectively etching the first dielectric layer exposed by a trench mask.

[0083] In some aspects, a source line layer 1315' can be formed on the first dielectric layer including in the plurality of trenches, at 1215. In one implementation, forming the first source line layer can include depositing a layer of Copper (Cu), Tungsten (W) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 100-150 nm, by a process such as Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

[0084] In some aspects, a selector layer 1320' can be formed on the source line layer including in the plurality of trenches, at 1220. In one implementation, the selector layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Nickel Oxide (NiOx), Titanium Oxide (TiOx), or Vanadium Oxide (VOx) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 50 nm, by a process such as sputtering or the like. Sputtering of the selector material can be performed in the presence of a strong electromagnetic fields to confine charge plasma particles close to the surface of the target. Depending on a design current density and rectifying ratio, the thickness of the selector material can composition of the selector material can be tuned and modified. Post deposition morphology may not be smooth due to the via structure of the selector.

[0085] In some aspect, a buffer layer 1325' can be formed on the selector layer including in the plurality of trenches, at 1225. In one implementation, the buffer layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 50 nm, by a process such as High-Density Plasma (HDP) deposition or the like. The array of buffers disposed between the array of selectors and the subsequently formed array of MTJs advantageously allow the fabrication of the MTJs without the processes used for forming the selectors affecting the performance parameters of the MTJs.

[0086] In some aspects, the select layer, the source line layer and the buffer layer can be planarized to remove the selector layer the source line layer and the buffer layer on the first dielectric layer and leaving selector layer material, source line layer material and buffer layer material in the plurality of trenches, at 1230. In one implementation, the select layer, the source line layer and the buffer layer can be CMPed to remove the selector layer, the source line layer and buffer layer on the first dielectric layer and leaving selector layer material, source line layer material and buffer material in the plurality of trenches. After CMPing the portions of the buffer layers 1325, the selectors 1320, the source lines 1315 and the first dielectric layer can be coplanar.

[0087] In some aspects, a first barrier layer can be formed on the coplanar exposed portions of the select layer, source line layer, buffer layer and first dielectric layer, at 1235. In one implementation, the buffer layer can be formed by deposit a layer of Titanium Nitride (TiN), Tantalum Nitride (TaN), Titanium Tungsten (TiW) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 5-15 nm, by a process such as Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) or the like.

[0088] In some aspects, a reference magnetic layer can be formed over the first barrier layer, 1240. In one implementation, the reference magnetic layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Cobalt-Iron-Boron (Co-Fe-B) alloy or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 1-5 nm, by a process such as Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or the like. [0089] In some aspects, a non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer can be formed over the reference magnetic layer, at 1245. In one implementation, the non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Cobalt-Iron-Boron (Co-Fe-B) alloy or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 0.1-1 nm, by a process such as Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or the like.

[0090] In some aspects, a free magnetic layer can be formed over the non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer, at 1250. In one implementation, the free magnetic layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Cobalt-Iron-Boron (Co-Fe-B) alloy or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 0.5-2 nm, by a process such as Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or the like.

[0091] In some aspects, an array of pillars 1350 can be formed from the free magnetic layer, the non-magnetic tunnel barrier layer, and the reference magnetic layer, at 1255. In one implementation, the array of pillars can be formed by selectively etching the free magnetic layer, the non-magnetic tunnel barrier layer, and the reference magnetic layer exposed by one or more pillar masks 1355.

[0092] Fabrication can continue with forming a second dielectric layer 1365 and forming a plurality of bit lines 1370 disposed in rows and coupled to the MTJ pillars 1355. The fabrication of the MTJ device can include numerous other processes that are not germane to an understanding of aspect of the present technology. Therefore, the other processes of fabricating the MTJ device are not described herein.

[0093] In some aspects, multiple cell arrays can be fabricated in stacks on top of each other to implement vertical three-dimension (3D) memory architectures, such as cross-point MRAM, cross-point ST-MRAM and the like. The stacked arrays can be formed by repeating the above described processes to form multiple cell arrays stacked upon each other.

[0094] Referring now to FIG. 14, a method of fabricating a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology, is shown. The method of fabrication will be described with reference to FIGS. 15A-15D, which illustrate the method of fabrication. The MTJ device can be a Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (MRAM),

Spin Torque Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (ST-MRAM) or similar memory device. In some aspects, a first dielectric layer 1505 can be formed on a wafer 1510, at 1405. In one implementation, forming the first dielectric layer can include depositing a layer of Silicon Oxide (SiO), Silicon Nitride (SiN) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 40-60 nm, by a process such as Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition or the like.

[0095] In some aspects, a plurality of bit line trenches can be formed in rows in the first dielectric layer, at 1410. In one implementation, the plurality of bit line trenches can be formed by selectively etching the first dielectric layer exposed by a bit line trench mask.

[0096] In some aspect, a plurality of bit line conductors 1515 can be formed in the plurality of bit line trenches, at 1415. In one implementation, forming the plurality of bit line conductors can include depositing a first conductive layer 1515' on the first dielectric layer and filling the plurality of bit line trenches. The first conductive layer can be Copper (Cu), Tungsten (W) or other similar conductor deposited by a process such as Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) or the like. In addition, a first liner layer can be deposited on the first dielectric layer including the plurality of bit line trenches before depositing the first conductive layer. The first line layer can be deposited by a process such as ??? or the like. For conductive material like Copper (Cu) which is characterized by a relatively high solubility and diffusivity in oxide, the first liner layer can be Titanium Nitride (TiN), Tantalum Nitride (TaN), Titanium Nitride/Tantalum Nitride (TiN/TaN) or similar material with a thickness of approximately 5-15 nm, by a process such as High-Density Plasma (HDP) deposition or the like. The first conductive layer can then be Chemical-Mechanical Polished (CMP) to remove the first conductive layer on the first dielectric layer and leaving the first conductive layer material in the plurality of bit line trenches to form the plurality of bit line conductors with a thickness of approximately 100-150 nm. The liner layer on the first dielectric layer can be utilized as a CMP stop. A surface of the bit line conductors can be formed to be coplanar with a surface of the first dielectric layer as a result of the CMP process. In addition, a first capping layer can be deposited on the plurality bit line conductors after the CMP process. The first capping layer can be deposited by a process such as electroplating or the like. The first capping layer can be Titanium Nitride (TiN), Tantalum Nitride (TaN), Titanium Nitride/Tantalum Nitride (TiN/TaN) or similar material with a thickness of approximately 5-15 nm, to reduce solubility and diffusivity of the bit line conductor material into the first dielectric layer and other subsequently formed layers.

[0097] In some aspects, a free magnetic layer can be formed over the plurality of bit line conductors and the first dielectric layer, at 1420. In one implementation, the free magnetic layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Cobalt-Iron-Boron (Co-Fe-B) alloy or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 0.5-2 nm, by a process such as Physical Vapor Deposition(PVD) or the like. [0098] In some aspects, a non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer can be formed over the free magnetic layer, at 1425. In one implementation, the non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Magnesium Oxide (MgOx) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 0.1-1 nm, by a process such as sputtering or the like.

[0099] In some aspects, a reference magnetic layer can be formed over the non-magnetic tunneling barrier layer, 1430. In one implementation, the reference magnetic layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Cobalt-Iron-Boron (Co-Fe-B) alloy or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 1-5 nm, by a process such as Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or the like.

[00100] In some aspects, a selector layer 1535' can be formed over the reference magnetic layer, at 1435. In one implementation, the selector layer can be formed by depositing a layer of Nickel Oxide (NiOx), Titanium Oxide (TiOx), or Vanadium Oxide (VOx) or other similar material, with a thickness of approximately 40-60 nm, by a process such as sputtering or the like.

[00101] In some aspect, an optional buffer layer 1540' can be formed over the selector laery, at 1440. In one implementation, forming the array of buffers can include depositing a buffer layer on the third dielectric layer and filling the array of buffer openings. The buffer layer can be Tantalum Nitride (TaN) or other similar material deposited by a process such as High- Density Plasma (HDP) deposition or the like.

[00102] In some aspects, an array of pillars can be formed from the optional buffer layer, the selector layer, the free magnetic layer, the non-magnetic tunnel barrier layer, and the reference magnetic layer, at 1445. In one implementation, the array of pillars can be formed by selectively etching the selector layer, the free magnetic layer, the non-magnetic tunnel barrier layer, and the reference magnetic layer exposed by one or more pillar masks.

[00103] Fabrication can continue with forming a second dielectric layer 1550, a plurality of source line trenches, and a plurality of source line conductors 1555 in the plurality of source line trenches. The fabrication of the MTJ device can include numerous other processes that are not germane to an understanding of aspect of the present technology. Therefore, the other processes of fabricating the MTJ device are not described herein.

[00104] In some aspects, multiple cell arrays can be fabricated in stacks on top of each other to implement vertical three-dimension (3D) memory architectures, such as cross-point MRAM, cross-point ST-MRAM and the like. The stacked arrays can be formed by repeating the above described processes to form multiple cell arrays stacked upon each other. [00105] Referring to FIG. 16, a block diagram of a cell array of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology, is shown. The MTJ device can be a Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (MRAM), Spin Torque Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (ST-MRAM) or similar memory device. In some aspects, the cell array 1600 can include a plurality of memory cells 1605, 1610, organized in rows and columns, with a plurality of bit lines 1615-1635 arranged along rows, and a plurality of source lines 1640-1660 arranged along columns of the cell array. The memory cells 1605, 1610 can include an MTJ 1605 and a selector 1610 coupled in series between a respective bit line 1620 and a respective source line 1645. The state of the MTJ 1605 can be written to or read by applying appropriate voltage or currents to a corresponding bit line 1620 and a corresponding source line 1645.

[00106] In some aspects, the cell array of the MTJ device 1600 can advantageously be stacked on top of each other to implement vertical three-dimension (3D) memory architectures, such as cross-point (e.g., cross-gridded) MRAM, cross-point ST-MRAM and the like.

[00107] Referring to FIG. 17. a block diagram of a memory device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology, is shown. The memory device 1700 can be a Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (MRAM), Spin Torque Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (ST-MRAM), 3D cross-point MRAM, 3D cross-point ST-MRAM, or similar memory device.

In some aspects, the memory device 1700 can include a memory cell array 1710, an address buffer 1720, an address decoder circuit 1730, a bit line driver circuit 1740, a source line driver circuit 1750, a sense circuit 1760, a data buffer 1770, and control circuit 1780. The memory device 1700 can also include other well-known circuits that are not necessary for an

understanding of the present technology and therefore are not discussed herein.

[00108] In some aspects, the memory cell array 1710 can include a plurality of memory cells organized in rows and columns, with bit lines and source lines spanning the array of cells. The address buffer 1720 can be configured to receive and buffer a plurality of address signals. The address decoder 1730 can decode the address signals buffered by the address buffer 1720 and output a plurality of decoded address signals. The address decoder 1730 can map a given memory address to a particular row of memory cells in the array. The output of the address decoder 1730 can be input to the bit line driver 1740 and the source line driver 1750. The output of the bit line driver 1740 can drive the bit lines to select a given bit line of the array 1710. [00109] In some aspect, the source line driver 1750 and the sense circuit 1760 utilize the source lines of the array 1710 to read from and write to memory cells of a selected source line of the array 1710. The data read from and written to the memory cells can be buffered in the data buffer 1770. The control circuit 1780 can generate one or more control signals for the control of one or more of the address buffer 1720, the address decoder circuit 1730, the bit line driver circuit 1740, the source line driver circuit 1750, the sense circuit 1760, the data buffer 1770.

[00110] Referring now to FIG. 18, a block diagram of a computing system including a memory device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology, is shown. The computing system 1800 can, for example, be a cellular telephone, smart phone, e-reader, table personal computer (PC), laptop PC, desktop PC, gaming console, workstation, server computer, or other similar computing device. The computing system 1800 can include one or more processors 1810, one or more memory controllers 5180, one or more memory devices 1830, and one or more input/output devices 1840. The one or more input/output device 1840 can include, for example, a display 1850, a wireless transceiver 1860 and the like. The computing system 1800 can also include other sub-circuits that are not necessary for an understanding of the present technology and therefore are not discussed herein.

[00111] The one or more memory controllers 1820 can be operable to control access to data stored in the one or more memory devices 1830 for use by the one or more processors 510, one or more input/output devices 1840 and/or other sub-systems of the computing system 1800 communicatively coupled together by one or more buses 1870-1890. The one or more memory controllers 1820 can generate commands for reading and writing of data in the one or more memory devices 1830 in response to memory requests received from the one or more processors 1810, one or more input/output devices 1840 and/or other sub-systems. One or more of the memory devices 1830 can include the MTJ cell array as described herein. In one

implementation, the one or more memory devices 1830 can be a Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (MRAM), cross-point MRAM, Spin Torque Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (ST-MRAM), cross-point ST-MRAM or the like.

[00112] Referring now to FIG. 19, a block diagram of a computing system including a memory device, in accordance with aspects of the present technology, is shown. The computing system 1900 can, for example, be a cellular telephone, smart phone, e-reader, table personal computer (PC), laptop PC, desktop PC, gaming console, workstation, server computer, or other similar computing device. The computing system 1900 can include one or more processors 1910, one or more memory controllers 1920, one or more memory devices 1930, and one or more input/output devices 1940 that can be communicatively coupled together by one or more input/output controller hubs 1950 through one or more buses 1960-1990. The computing system system 1900 can also include other sub-circuits that are not necessary for an understanding of the present technology and therefore are not discussed herein.

[00113] The one or more memory controllers 1920 can be integral to one or more other sub-circuits such as the one or more input/output controller hubs 1950 and/or memory devices 1930, or can be implemented as a separate sub-circuit. The one or more memory controllers 1920 can be operable to control access to data stored in the one or more memory devices 1930 for use by the one or more processors 1910, one or more input/output devices 1940 and/or other sub-systems of the computing system 1900. The one or more memory controllers 1920 can generate commands for reading and writing of data in the one or more memory devices 1930 in response to memory requests received from the one or more processors 1910, one or more input/output devices 1940 and/or other sub-systems. One or more of the memory devices 1930 can include the MTJ cell array as described herein. In one implementation, the one or more memory devices 1930 can be a Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (MRAM), cross-point MRAM, Spin Torque Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (ST-MRAM), cross-point ST- MRAM, or the like.

[00114] Referring now to FIG. 20, a block diagram of a memory sub-system, in accordance with aspects of the present technology, is shown. The memory sub-system 2000 can include one or more memory controllers 2010 and one or more memory devices 2020. The memory sub-system 2000 can be a memory expansion card, Solid State Drive (SSD), or the like that is configurable to be coupled to a host device 2030 such as a cellular telephone, smart phone, e-reader, table personal computer (PC), laptop PC, desktop PC, gaming console, workstation, server computer, or other similar computing device. The memory sub-system 2000 can be coupled to the host device 2030 as in internal or external peripheral device.

[00115] The one or more memory controllers 2010 can be operable to control access to data stored in the one or more memory devices 2020 for use by the host device 2030. The one or or more memory controllers 2010 can generate commands for reading and writing of data in the one or more memory devices 2020 in response to memory requests received from the host device 2030. One or more of the memory devices 2020 can include the MTJ cell array as described herein. In one implementation, the one or more memory devices 2020 can be a Magnetoresistive Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (MRAM), cross-point MRAM, Spin Torque

Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (ST-MRAM), cross-point ST-MRAM, or the like [00116] Referring now to FIG. 21, a block diagram of a memory sub-system, in accordance with aspects of the present technology, is shown. The memory sub-system 2100 can include one or more memory devices 2110. The memory sub-system 2100 can be a memory expansion card, Solid State Drive (SSD), or the like that is configurable to be coupled to a host device 2120 such as a cellular telephone, smart phone, e-reader, table personal computer (PC), laptop PC, desktop PC, gaming console, workstation, server computer, or other similar computing device. The host device 2120 can include one or more memory controllers 2130.

The memory sub-system 2100 can be coupled to the host device 2120 as in internal or external peripheral device.

[00117] The one or more memory controllers 2130 can be operable to control access to data stored in the one or more memory devices 2110 for use by the host device 2120. The one or more memory controllers 2130 can generate commands for reading and writing of data in the one or more memory devices 2110 in response to memory requests received from the host device 2120. One or more of the memory devices 2110 can include the MTJ cell array as described herein. In one implementation, the one or more memory device 2110 can be a Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (MRAM), cross-point MRAM, Spin Torque Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (ST-MRAM), cross-point ST-MRAM or the like.

[00118] The computing systems and memory sub-systems of FIG. 18-21 are illustrative of exemplary embodiments, and are not intended to limit aspects of the present technology. The cell array of MTJ devices as described herein can be readily applied to any number of conventional memory devices, memory sub-systems, and/or computing systems, along with memory devices, memory sub-systems, and/or computing systems to be developed in the future.

[00119] The foregoing descriptions of specific embodiments of the present technology have been presented for purposes of illustration and description. They are not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise forms disclosed, and obviously many modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teaching. The embodiments were chosen and described in order to best explain the principles of the present technology and its practical application, to thereby enable others skilled in the art to best utilize the present technology and various embodiments with various modifications as are suited to the particular use contemplated. It is intended that the scope of the invention be defined by the claims appended hereto and their equivalents.