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Title:
DISPLAY MOUNTING SYSTEM AND METHOD
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2021/006987
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A display mounting system including a support column, a moving bracket, an arm assembly, and a tilt assembly is described. The display mounting system includes one or more display attachment brackets to support one or more electronic displays. The display mounting system is used to hold one or more electronic displays over a worksurface or in front of a wall, and it allows the user of the display mounting system to easily change the orientation of one or more electronic displays according to user's preferences.

Inventors:
JANECHEK MATTHEW J (US)
BLOMSTROM KENNETH JOHN (US)
APOLLONI MICHAEL ANTHONY (US)
WAITE JOHN (US)
LINDBLAD SHAUN CHRISTOPHER (US)
WALLS PETER LEE LAFLEUR (US)
PRINCE DAVID JAMES (US)
ASAMARAI SAEB SALIH (US)
Application Number:
US2020/037006
Publication Date:
January 14, 2021
Filing Date:
June 10, 2020
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
ERGOTRON INC (US)
International Classes:
A47B23/04; F16M11/04; F16M11/18
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ARORA, Suneel et al. (US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
THE CLAIMED INVENTION IS:

1. An electronic display mounting system comprising:

an electronic display interface;

a support assembly adapted to couple to a fixed structure, the support assembly including:

a support column, wherein the support column is vertically oriented; and

a mounting portion movably coupled to the support column; and an articulating arm assembly operably coupled between the display

interface and the mounting portion, wherein the articulating arm assembly includes at least one pair of arms;

wherein the mounting portion is configured to translate the display

interface in a vertical direction through a range of travel; wherein the articulating arm assembly is configured to translate the

display interface between a first position proximate the support assembly and a second position spaced apart from the support assembly; and

wherein the articulating arm assembly is configured to change an angle of the display interface relative to the support assembly.

2. The electronic display mounting system of claim 1 , further comprising a base, wherein the base is adapted to rest on a generally horizontal support surface.

3. The electronic display mounting system of claim 1, further comprising a wall mounting interface, wherein the wall mounting interface is adapted to attach to a generally vertical support surface.

4. The electronic display mounting system of claim 1, wherein the

articulating arm assembly comprises:

a first pair of pivotally connected arms having a first end configured to be pivotally connected with the display interface and a second end configured to be pivotally connected with the moving portion; and a second pair of pivotally connected arms having a first end configured to be pivotally connected with the display interface and a second end configured to be pivotally connected with the moving portion.

5. The electronic display mounting system of claim 1, wherein the

electronic display interface comprises:

one or more display interface brackets adapted to be coupled to one or more electronic displays; and

one or more tilt assemblies adapted to be coupled to the one or more display interface brackets;

wherein the one or more tilt assemblies are configured to tilt the

electronic display relative to the support assembly around a horizontal axis.

6. The electronic display mounting system of claim 5, wherein the

electronic display interface further comprises a bow assembly, and wherein the one or more tilt assemblies are adapted to be coupled to the bow assembly.

7. The electronic display mounting system of claims 5, wherein the one or more display interface brackets are removably coupled to the one or more tilt assemblies.

8. The electronic display mounting system of claim 2 further comprising a cable management channel including:

a first end rotatingly coupled to the mounting portion;

a second end rotatingly coupled to the base; and

a middle portion connecting the first end and the second end;

wherein the middle portion is configured to flex and allow translation of the first end between a first position proximate the second end and a second position spaced apart from the second end; and

wherein the cable management channel is configured to house one or more cables between the mounting portion and the base.

9. The electronic display mounting system of claim 8, further comprising a first cover adapted to be removably coupled to the cable management channel proximate to the first end; and

a second cover adapted to be removably coupled to the cable

management channel proximate to the second end; wherein the first cover and the second cover are configured to conceal at least a portion of cables housed inside the cable management channel.

10. The electronic display mounting system of claim 2, further comprising a cable management clip, including:

a base portion, wherein the base portion is configured to couple to the base; and

a clamp portion rotatingly coupled to the base portion;

wherein the clamp portion is configured to rotate relative to the base portion between a closed configuration where the clamp portion is parallel to the base portion and an open configuration where the clamp portion is positioned at an angle relative to the base portion; and

wherein the cable management clip, in a closed configuration, is

configured to retain the one or more cables.

11. The electronic display mounting system of claim 1, further comprising a counterbalance mechanism, the counterbalance mechanism including: an energy storage member coupled to the support column;

a wheel assembly rotatingly coupled to the support column;

a first tensile member connecting the energy storage member to the

wheel assembly; and

a second tensile member connecting the wheel assembly to the mounting portion;

wherein the first tensile member and the second tensile member ate

configured to transfer at least a portion of the force generated by the energy storage member to the mounting portion to balance forces between the support column and the mounting portion to assist translation of the mounting portion relative to the support column.

12. The electronic display mounting system of claim 11, wherein the

counterbalance mechanism further comprises:

a weight adjustment mechanism; and

a weight adjustment indicator coupled to the weight adjustment

mechanism; wherein the weight adjustment mechanism is configured to translate an end of the energy storage member to adjust a tension of the energy storage member; and

wherein the weight adjustment indicator is configured to translate with the weight adjustment mechanism.

13. The electronic display mounting system of claim 12, wherein the support column comprises a weight adjustment indicator window;

wherein a portion of the weight adjustment indicator is visible through the weight adjustment indicator window; and

wherein the visible portion of the weight adjustment indicator is

configured to represent a magnitude of the tension of the energy storage member.

14. The electronic display mounting system of claim 1, wherein the

mounting portion further comprises:

a mounting body, including:

a front wall;

a rear wall;

a first side wall; and

a second side wall;

wherein the first side wall and the second side wall are adapted to connect the front wall and the rear wall to form a hollow cross- section; and

a plurality of wheel assemblies, including:

a wheel having a concave profile; wherein the wheel is rotatingly coupled to the mounting body;

one or more bearings adapted to be coupled to an inside diameter of the wheel; and

an axle having a first end and a second end;

wherein the axle is at least partially located inside the hollow cross- section; and

wherein the wheel and the one or more bearings are concentric with the axle;

wherein the support column at least partially located inside the hollow cross-section; and wherein the concave profile of each wheel of plurality of wheel assemblies contacts an outside surface of the support column.

15. The electronic display mounting system of claim 14, further comprising: a plurality of slots formed on a wall of the mounting body configured to receive a first cutout and a second cutout formed on the first end and the second end of the axle, respectively, to couple the plurality of wheel assemblies to the mounting body; and

a plurality of wheel clamps,

wherein the plurality of wheel clamps are coupled to the mounting body such that the plurality of wheel clamps push against the first aid and the second end of the axle of the plurality of wheel assemblies to secure the plurality of wheel assemblies to the mounting body.

16. The electronic display mounting system of claim 15, wherein the one or more of the plurality of slots are formed at an angle inclined towards the support column, and wherein the plurality of wheel assemblies are configured to translate towards the support column as the one or more axles are inserted in to the one or more slots.

17. The electronic display mounting system of claim 14, wherein the axle is a stud having a stud head on one end and a threaded hole on the other end, wherein the stud is coupled to one of the front wall or the rear wall and secured in place by a screw, wherein the screw is coupled to the other one of the front wall or the rear wall, and wherein the screw is threadingly engaged with the threaded hole.

18. The electronic display mounting system of claim 14, wherein the axle is a stud having a stud axis, wherein the stud includes a through hole having a hole axis positioned away from the stud axis, wherein the hole axis is parallel to the stud axis, wherein the axle is adapted to be rotatable around the hole axis, wherein the through hole is threaded proximate to the first end and the second end of the axle, wherein the through hole has a hexagonal shape proximate to a colter of the axle, wherein the axle is coupled to the mounting body via a first screw and a second screw, wherein the first screw is coupled to the front wall and threadingly engaged with the threaded hole located proximate to the first end of the axle, and wherein the second screw is coupled to the rear wall and threadingly engaged with the threaded hole located proximate to the second end of the axle.

19. The electronic display mounting system of claim 17, wherein the wheel comprises:

a first wheel portion; and

a second wheel portion concentric with the first wheel portion;

wherein the first wheel portion is slidably engaged with the second wheel portion;

wherein the stud is at least partially located inside the first wheel portion and tiie second wheel portion; and

wherein the first wheel portion is adapted to translate towards the second wheel portion as the screw is tightened against the stud.

20. The electronic display mounting system of claim 1, further comprising a holder; the holder including:

one or more shelves, wherein the one or more shelves are configured to hold one or more portable electronic devices;

one or more storage compartments, wherein the one or more storage compartments are configured to hold one or more electronic components; and

a mount, wherein the mount is configured to be coupled to the display interface portion;

wherein the holder is adapted to position the one or more portable

electronic devices proximate to a display coupled to the display mounting system.

Description:
DISPLAY MOUNTING SYSTEM AND METHOD

CLAIM OF PRIORITY

This patent application claims the benefit of priority of Janechek, et al. U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial Number 62/872,574, entitled “DISPLAY MOUNTING SYSTEM AND METHOD,” filed on July 10, 2019 (Attorney Docket No 5983.448PRV), which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

TECHNICAL FIELD

This document pertains generally, but not by way of limitation, to electronic display mounting systems.

BACKGROUND

Electronic displays, e.g., flat panel displays, can be supported by a mounting system to make them easily accessible by a user (e.g., to locate them over a desk surface). The mounting system can be freestanding (e.g., supported by a floor or by a desktop), coupled to a structure (e.g., a wall), or mobile (e.g., attached to a wheeled base). Mounting system can allow the user to easily alter the orientation of the electronic display (e.g., change a height, change and angle around a vertical axis, change an angle around a horizontal axis, or change a distance from the user) to accommodate users varying postures during the use of the electronic display.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The following drawings are illustrative of particular non-limiting example configurations of the present invention and therefore do not limit the scope of the invention. The drawings are not to scale and are intended for use in conjunction with the explanations in the following detailed description. Example configurations of the present invention will hereinafter be described in conjunction with the appended drawings. The drawings illustrate generally, by way of example, but not by way of limitation, various configurations discussed in the present document.

Figure 1 is a perspective view of an example of a display mounting system for a single display.

Figure 2 is a perspective view of another example of a display mounting system for two displays.

Figure 3 is a perspective view of an example of a display mounting system for holding a single display over a desktop.

Figure 4 is an exploded view' of the display mounting system of Figure 3.

Figure 5 is a perspective view of another example of a display mounting system for holding two displays over a desktop.

Figure 6 is an exploded view of the display mounting system of Figure 5.

Figure 7 is a side view of an example of a display mounting system in elevated position.

Figure 8 is a side view of the display mounting system of Figure 7 in lowered position.

Figure 9 is a perspective view of the riser and the truck assemblies of the display mounting system of Figure 5.

Figure 10 is a top view of the riser and the truck assemblies of Figure 9.

Figure 11 is a front view of the riser and the truck assemblies of Figure 9 as viewed according to cross-section A-A of Figure 10.

Figure 12 is a front view of the riser assembly of Figure 11 with the front face of the support column removed to show the counterbalance mechanism.

Figure 13 is a front view' of the riser and the truck assemblies of Figure 9 as viewed according to cross-section A-A of Figure 10 with the front face of the support column removed to show the counterbalance mechanism in elevated orientation. Figure 14 is a front view of the riser and the truck assemblies of Figure 13 in lowered orientation.

Figure 15 is a close-up view of the upper portion of the riser and the truck assemblies of Figure 13.

Figure 16A is a front view of an example of a weight adjustment indicator window at a low weight setting.

Figure 16B is a front view of an example of a weight adjustment indicator window at a high weight setting.

Figure 17 a front perspective view of an example of a base of the display mounting system of Figure 9.

Figure 18 a rear perspective view of the base of Figure 17.

Figure 19 a bottom view of the base of Figure 17.

Figure 20 is a side view of the base and support column assembly of the display mounting system of Figure 9 as it is viewed according to the cross- section C-C of Figure 19.

Figure 21 is a perspective view of an example of a truck assembly. Figure 22 is a side view of the truck assembly of Figure 21.

Figure 23 is a perspective view of the riser and truck assembly of Figure

11.

Figure 24 is an exploded view of the truck assembly of Figure 21.

Figure 25 is a perspective view of an example of a wheel assembly. Figure 26 is an exploded view of the wheel assembly of Figure 25. Figure 27 is a top view of the riser and the truck assembly as it is viewed according to the cross-section B-B of Figure 15.

Figure 28 is a front view of the upper portion of the riser and truck assembly as it is viewed according to the cross-section D-D of Figure 27.

Figure 29 is a top view of the riser and the truck assembly of Figure 9. Figure 30 is a perspective view of an example of an arm assembly. Figure 31 is a top view of the arm assembly of Figure 30.

Figure 32 is an exploded view of the arm assembly of Figure 30.

Figure 33 is a close-up view of the rear end of the arm assembly of Figure 30 as it is viewed according to the cross-section E-E of Figure 31. Figure 34 is a close-up view of the rear end of the arm assembly of Figure 30 coupled to the truck assembly as it is viewed according to the cross- section E-E of Figure 31.

Figure 35 is a close-up perspective view of the front end of the arm assembly of Figure 30.

Figure 36 is a perspective view of an example of a bow assembly.

Figure 37 is an exploded view of the bow assembly of Figure 36.

Figure 38 is a close-up view of the center portion of the crossbow of the bow assembly of Figure 36.

Figure 39 is a side view of an example of a tilt assembly.

Figure 40 is a perspective view of the tilt assembly of Figure 39 as it is coupled to the crossbow of the bow assembly of Figure 36.

Figure 41 is a perspective view of an example of a display attachment bracket.

Figure 42 is a perspective view of another example of a tilt assembly. Figure 43 is a perspective view of an assembly of the display attachment bracket of Figure 41 with the tilt assembly of Figure 42.

Figure 44 is a side view of an example of a cable management bracket assembly.

Figure 45 is an exploded view of the cable management bracket assembly of Figure 44.

Figure 46 is a close-up perspective view of an example of a coupling between the cable management channel and the truck assembly of Figure 3.

Figure 47 is a close-up perspective view of an example of a coupling between the cable management channel and the base of Figure 3.

Figure 48 is a front perspective view of an example of a cable management clip in an open configuration.

Figure 49 is a rear perspective view of the cable management clip of Figure 48 in an open configuration.

Figure 50 is a rear perspective view of the cable management clip of Figure 48 in a closed configuration.

Figure 51 is a perspective view of another example of a display mounting system for two displays and a portable electronic device holding bracket. Figure 52 is a perspective view of yet another example of a display mounting system for a single display and a portable electronic device holding bracket.

Figure 53 is a perspective view of an example of a display mounting system for a wall mount.

Figure 54 is a side view of the display mounting system of Figure 53. Figure 55 is a top view of an example of a riser assembly and a base. Figure 56 is a perspective view of an example of a truck assembly. Figure 57 is a perspective view of an example of a wheel assembly. Figure 58 is a cross-sectional side view of an example of a wheel assembly as attached to the truck assembly of Figure 56.

Figure 59 is a cross-sectional side view of another example of a wheel assembly as attached to the truck assembly of Figure 56.

Figure 60 is a perspective view of an example of a spacer.

Figure 61 is a cross-sectional view of the spacer of Figure 60.

Figure 62 is a perspective view of an example of an axle.

Figure 63 is a cross-sectional view of the axle of Figure 62.

Figure 64 is a cross-sectional side view of another example of a wheel assembly as attached to the truck assembly of Figure 56.

Figure 65 is a cross-sectional side view of yet another example of a wheel assembly as attached to the track assembly of Figure 56.

Figure 66 is a perspective view of an example of a portable electronic device holding bracket of Figures 51 and 52.

Figure 67 is a side view' of the portable electronic device holding bracket of Figure 66.

Figure 68 is a perspective view of a portion of the portable electronic device holding bracket of Figure 67.

OVERVIEW

This disclosure is directed to a display mounting system to position one or more electronic display's relative to a structure, a desk, or a cart. More particularly, the display mounting system can include a height adjustable portion, and an articulating arm coupled to the height adjustable portion. DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The following detailed description is exemplary in nature and is not intended to limit the scope, applicability, or embodiment of the invention in any w r ay. Rather, the following description provides some practical illustrations for implementing exemplary configurations of the present invention. Examples of constructions, materials, dimensions, and manufacturing processes are provided for selected elements, and all other elements employ' that which is known to those of ordinary skill in the field of the invention. Those skilled in tire art will recognize that many of tire noted examples have a variety of suitable alternatives.

An electronic display device can be used for presentation of information (e.g., images, text, or video) which can be transmitted electronically. Electronic display devices can include television sets, computer monitors, digital signage, and others. In some example configurations, tire electronic display device can be wired or wirelessly connected to an information source (e g., a computer, a computing network, a cloud-based software, and others). In other example configurations, tire electronic display device can have a computer included inside the display housing.

The electronic display device can be positioned in a location where its content (e.g., images) can be easily visible to a viewer. For example, in some example configurations, the electronic display device can be located proximate to a workstation and it can be connected to a computer located proximate to the workstation. A user of the workstation can perform various computing functions (e.g., writing, drawing, calculating, and the like) while viewing images displayed on the electronic display' device by' the computer. In other example

configurations, electronic display' can be positioned over a wall, on a floor stand or on a wheeled base. A display mounting system can be used to couple the electronic display to a structure in these various configurations.

The display mounting system can provide both height adjustment and articulation (e.g., tilt, pan, side motion, and forward or backward motion) for the electronic display. The present inventors have recognized that it would be desirable to isolate these motions (e.g., height adjustment can be independent of forward or backward motion) to provide better control of the display mounting system functions. Existing solutions which include a counterbalanced height adjustable arm coupled to an extension arm can combine height adjustment (e.g., tilting the arm up/down) and articulation (e.g., panning the height adjustable arm relative to the extension arm) functions, and thus, they make it difficult to manipulate the orientation of the electronic display. This disclosure describes various techniques to isolate the height adjustment from the articulation of displays. These techniques will make it easy to manipulate the display mounting system and encourage users to adjust an orientation of one or more electronic display frequently throughout the day to match their varying postures and create more ergonomic work environment.

This disclosure describes the construction of a display mounting system (e.g., the display mounting system 100 of Figures 1-2, and the display mounting system 1100 of Figures 51-52) in Figures 1-10 according to some example configurations of the current disclosure.

The display mounting system 100 can include a counterbalance mechanism (e.g., the counterbalance mechanism 55 of Figure 12). This disclosure describes the construction and attachment of the counterbalance mechanism 55 to the display mounting system 100 in Figures 11-16 in an example configuration.

The display mounting system 100 can be mounted on a desk (e.g., the display mounting system 100 of Figure 1). This disclosure describes the construction of a base 20 and mounting of the display mounting system 100 on a desk surface in Figures 17-20 in an example configuration.

The display mounting system 100 can include a vertically translating portion (e.g., truck assembly 70 of Figure 21, and truck assembly 1070 of Figure 56) to adjust a height of one or more electronic displays. This disclosure describes the construction of the truck assembly 70 in Figures 21-29, and the construction of the truck assembly 1070 in Figures 55-65 in some example configurations.

The display mounting system 100 can include an articulating arm assembly (e.g., the arm assembly 60 of Figure 30) to change an orientation of one or more displays. This disclosure describes the construction of the articulating arm assembly 60 in Figures 30-35 in some example configurations. The display mounting system 100 can include a mounting portion for coupling one or more electronic displays (e.g., the bow assembly 90 of Figure 36, and the tilt assembly 40 of Figure 43) to the display mounting system 100. This disclosure describes the construction of the mounting portion in Figures 36- 43 in some example configurations.

The display mounting system 100 can include a cable management system (e.g., the cable management bracket assembly 80 of Figure 44, and the cable clip 85 of Figure 47). This disclosure describes the construction of the cable management system in Figures 44-50 in some example configurations.

The display mounting system 100 can be mounted on a wall (e.g., display mounting system 100 of Figure 53). This disclosure describes the construction of the wall mounted display mounting system in Figures 53-54 in an example configuration.

The display mounting system (e.g., display mounting system 1100 of Figure 51) can include aholder (e.g., the holding block 1080 of Figure 66) to hold one or more portable electronic devices proximate the electronic displays. This disclosure describes the construction and attachment of the holding block 1080 to the display mounting system 1100 in Figures 66-68 in an example configuration.

Figures 1-2 are perspective views of a display mounting system 100. One or more electronic display devices (e.g., display 10 of Figure 1) can be coupled to the display mounting system 100. In other configurations, a first electronic display 1 1 , and a second electronic display 12 can be coupled to the display mounting system 100. The display mounting system 100 can be configured to hold the first electronic display 11 and the second electronic display 12 side by side in close proximity as illustrated in Figure 2.

In some example configurations, the display mounting system 100 can include a riser assembly 50 and a base 20. The base can be useful to couple the display mounting system 100 to a workstation (e.g., a desk). In other example configurations, the display mounting system 1 105 can include a riser assembly 1050 and wall mounting plates 1110 and 1120 to couple it to a wall 1035 (shown in Figures 53-54).

Figure 3 is a perspective view of a display mounting system of Figure 1. The display mounting system 100 can be coupled to a structure (e.g., a desk surface 30) to hold an electronic display device (for example to hold an electronic display device over a desk surface 30). Figure 4 is an exploded view' of main sub-assemblies of the display mounting system 100. The display mounting system 100 can include a base 20, a riser assembly 50, a truck assembly 70, an arm assembly 60, a cable management bracket assembly 80, a cable management clip 85, atilt assembly 40, and a display attachment bracket

45.

The base 20 can be placed over a desk surface 30 and it can be coupled to the riser assembly 50. An elongated riser assembly 50 can extend upward from the base 20. In some example configurations, the base 20 can be freestanding over the desk surface 30. In other examples, a clamp can be coupled to the base 20 to fixedly attach the display mounting system 100 to an edge of the desk surface 30. In yet other configurations, the display mounting system 100 can be mounted to the desk surface 30 through a hole (e.g., grommet mount) located on the desk surface 30.

The truck assembly 70 can be movingly coupled to the riser assembly 50. The truck assembly 70 can move along at least a portion of the riser assembly 50. A counterbalance mechanism (e.g., a counterbalance mechanism similar to the counterbalance mechanism 55 shown in Figure 12) can be included in the riser assembly 50. The counterbalance mechanism 55 can be coupled to the riser assembly 50 and to the truck assembly 70. The counterbalance mechanism 55 can lift at least a portion of the combined weight of all components (e.g., electronic display 10, arm assembly 60, and others) coupled to the truck assembly 70. In some example configurations, the truck assembly 70 can provide height adjustment for the display attachment bracket 45 relative to the desk surface 30.

The arm assembly 60 can be coupled to the truck assembly 70. The arm assembly 60 can provide articulation for the display attachment bracket 45 relative to the riser assembly 50. The position of the display attachment bracket 45 can be adjusted relative to the riser assembly 50 by moving tire arm assembly

60.

In some example configurations, a tilt assembly 40 can be coupled to the arm assembly 60. In some example configurations, the tilt assembly 40 can further include a detachable display attachment bracket 45. The display' attachment bracket can be coupled to a display (e.g., the display 10 of Figure 1). The tilt assembly 40 can be configured to accept the display attachment bracket 45. The tilt assembly 40 can adjust an angle of the display attachment bracket 45 relative to the riser assembly 50 around a horizontal first axis (not shown), and it can provide rotation of the display attachment bracket 45 relative to the desk surface 30 around a vertical second axis (not shown).

Figure 5 is a perspective view' of the display mounting system 100 of Figure 2. In some example configurations, a bow assembly 90, and one or more tilt assemblies 35 can be coupled to the display mounting system 100 to hold one or more electronic displays. Figure 6 is an exploded view of main sub- assemblies of the display mounting system 100 including a bow assembly 90. The display mounting system 100 with the bow assembly 90 can provide height adjustment and articulation for the one or more displays coupled to the display mounting system 100.

In some example configurations, a handle 95 can be coupled to the display' mounting system 100 as illustrated in Figure 5. The handle 95 can help the user to easily manipulate the display mounting system 100 to change an orientation of the one or more electronic display's.

In some example configurations, the display mounting system 100 of Figures 3 and 5 can include a cable management bracket assembly 80, and one or more cable covers 65. The one or more cable covets 65 can be coupled to the arm assembly 60 to route the cables between the one or more electronic display's (e.g., electronic display' 10 of Figure 1) and the truck assembly 70. The cable management bracket assembly 80 can be coupled to the truck assembly 70 and it can be coupled to the base 20. The cable management bracket assembly 80 can route the cables between the truck assembly 70 and the base 20. One or more electronic cables (e.g., pow'er cable, video cable, or the like) can be routed through the one or more cable covers 65 and the cable management bracket assembly 80. The one or more cable covers 65 and the cable management bracket assembly 80 can at least partially conceal the cables from outside view, and they can control the orientation of the one or more cables during height adjustment of the one or more displays.

Figures 7-8 are side views of the display' mounting sy stem 100 of Figure 3. The arm assembly 60 is shown in extended orientation. A clamp bracket 25 can be coupled to the base 20. The clamp bracket 25 can couple the display mounting system 100 to the desk surface 30, (for example, it can fixedly attach the display mounting system 100 to an edge of the desk surface 30). The truck assembly 70 can be configured to move along at least a portion of the riser assembly. In some example configurations, the track assembly can transfer between an elevated position (as illustrated in Figure 7) and lowered position (as illustrated in Figure 8).

Figures 9-10 are a perspective view and a top view of the riser assembly 50 together with the track assembly 70, respectively. The riser assembly 50 can include a support column 200. The support column 200 can be coupled to the base 20. In some example configurations, the support column 200 can extend upw'ard from the base 20 in perpendicular direction to the lower surface of the base 20. In other example configurations, tiie support column 200 can extend upwards from the lower surface of the base 20 in an angular orientation (e.g., in an obtuse angle).

The support column 200 can include a front face 201 and a rear face 202 opposite tiie front face 201. The front face 201 and the rear face 202 of the support column 200 can be coupled to each other by a first side surface 210 and a second side surface 220 opposite the first side surface 218. The front face 201 , tiie rear face 202, the first side surface 210, and the second side surface 220 of the support column 200 can form an elongated tubular structure. The support column 200 can be elongated in the axial direction 209 (shown in Figure 11). The first side surface 210 and the second side surface 220 of the support column 200 can form the first guide surface 218 and the second guide surface 228, respectively.

The track assembly 70 can be slidably engaged with the support column 200. The track assembly 70 can at least partially overlap with the support column 200. Track assembly can translate relative to the support column in the axial direction 209. The track assembly 70 can include one or more guiding components (e.g., glides, wheels, or the like). The one or more guiding components of the track assembly 70 (e.g., the wheel assemblies 320 and 330 of Figure 23) can be in contact with the first 218 and the second 228 guide surfaces of the support column 200 to guide the track assembly 70 during its translation relative to the support column 200. In some example configurations, the first guide surface 218 and the second guide surface 228 can be in a circular contour as illustrated in Figure 10. In other example configurations, the first 218 and the second 228 guide surfaces can be in other shapes including (but not limited to) oval, flat, and other shapes. Outside contour of the one or more guiding components of the truck assembly 70 (e.g., outside profile of the wheel 324 of Figure 25) can match the contour of the first 218 and the second 228 guide surfaces.

Figure 11 is a front view of the riser and truck assemblies. In some example configurations, the front face 201 of the support column support column 200 can further include an opening (e.g., a slot 203). The slot 203 can be an elongated opening formed in parallel to the axial direction 209. The slot 203 can provide access to an internal space of the support column 200 where the counterbalance mechanism 55 (shown in Figure 12) can be located. A component of the truck assembly 70 (e.g., a hook, or the like) can penetrate through the slot 203 to couple with the counterbalance mechanism 55.

Figures 12-14 are front views of the riser assembly 50 in various configurations. The riser assembly 50 can include a support column 200. The front face 201 of the support assembly 50 is removed in Figures 12-14 to show the components located inside the support column 200. A mounting bracket 280 can be coupled to the lower end of the support column 200, and a top bracket 230 can be coupled to the upper end of the support bracket 200. The span between the top bracket 230 and the mounting bracket 280 can define a length of the support bracket 200. A counterbalance mechanism 55 can be included inside the support column 200 between the top bracket 230 and the mounting bracket 280. The counterbalance mechanism 55 can be coupled to the support column 200 and to the truck assembly 70. The counterbalance mechanism 55 can include one or more energy storage members (e.g., one or more extension springs 260) and a wheel assembly 235. The counterbalance mechanism 55 can further include an adjustment screw 255, an adjustment bracket 250, and a connecting bracket 265. The adjustment bracket 250 and the connecting bracket 265 can be adapted to translate in the axial direction 209. The one or more springs 260 can be coupled to the adjustment bracket 250 on one end and coupled to the connecting bracket 265 on the other end. Additional information regarding this conversion can be found in commonly assigned U.S. Patent No. US8286927 to Sweere et al., which is incorporated by reference in its entirety.

In some example configurations, the adjustment screw 255 can be coupled to the top bracket 230. The adjustment screw 255 can include a head (not shown) and a threaded shaft. The threaded shaft of the adjustment screw 255 can extend from the head along an axial direction (not shown) of the adjustment screw 255. The head of the adjustment screw 255 can be supported by the top bracket 230. The axial direction of the adjustment screw 255 can be parallel to the axial direction 209 of the support column 200.

The adjustment bracket 250 can have a threaded hole. The adjustment screw 255 can be threadingly engaged with the adjustment bracket 250 through the threaded hole of the adjustment bracket 250. The adjustment bracket 250 can be guided by the support column 200 to prevent it from rotating relative to the support column 200 as the adjustment screw 255 rotates around its axis. The adjustment bracket 250 can be configured to translate along the axial direction of the adjustment screw 255. The adjustment screw 255 can be used in combination with the adjustment bracket 250 to adjust a tension of the one or more springs 260.

A low-tension configuration of the one or more springs 260 is illustrated in Figure 12. In the low-tension orientation, the adjustment bracket 250 can be located at a first distance 251 A from the top bracket 230. A high-tension configuration of the one or more springs 260 is illustrated in Figure 13. The adjustment bracket 250 can be translated closer to the top bracket in high- tension orientation. In the high-tension orientation, the adjustment bracket 250 can be located at a second distance 251B from the top bracket 230 where the second distance 25 IB is smaller than the first distance 251 A. As the tension is increased on the one or more springs 260 (e.g., configuration shown in Figure 13), the counterbalance mechanism 55 can lift a larger weight coupled to the wheel assembly 70.

Figure 15 is a close-up view of the upper portion of the riser 50 and the truck 70 assemblies. In some example configurations, a weight adjustment indicator strip 256 can be coupled to the adjustment bracket 250. The indicator strip 256 can have a first edge 257 and a second edge 258 opposite the first edge 257. The indicator strip 256 can further include a third edge 253 and a fourth edge 254 opposite the third edge 253. The first edge 257, the second edge 258, the third edge 253, and the fourth edge 254 can form a planar surface with a width between the first edge 257 and the second edge 258, and a length between the third edge 253 and the fourth edge 254. The indicator strip 256 can have an elongated shape where the length is substantially larger than the width. The indicator strip 256 can be coupled to the adjustment bracket 250 proximate its third edge 253. The indicator strip 256 can be adapted to move with the adjustment bracket 250 during the adjustment of the tension of one or more springs 260.

A lift force indicator line 259 can be formed on the planar surface of the indicator strip 256 as illustrated in Figure 15 according to an example configuration of the current disclosure. The indicator line 259 can be at an angle relative to the first side 257 and the second side 258 of the indicator strip 256. The indicator line 259 can be inclined from the first side 257 towards the second side 258 of the indicator strip 256 so that a distance measured between the first side 257 and the indicator line 259 in a direction that is perpendicular to the first side 257 can be larger if the measurement location is further away from the third side 253 of the indicator strip 256.

In an example configurations, a window 204 can be formed on the front face 201 of the support column 200 as illustrated in Figure 11. The window 204 can be configured to at least partially overlap with the indicator strip 256. The planar surface of the indicator strip 256 (e.g., the surface on which the indicator line 259 is formed) can face towards the front face 201 of the support column 200 such that the indicator line 259 can be at least partially visible through the window 204. The location of the window 204 can be stationary relative to the support column 200. The adjustment bracket 250 and the indicator strip 256 can move relative to tire support column 200 during tire adjustment of the tension of one or more springs 260.

Some example configurations of tire indicator line 259 as it can be visible through the window 204 are illustrated in Figures 16A-16B. The orientation of the indicator line 259 visible through the window 204 can be adapted to indicate a relative magnitude (e.g., low, high) of the lift force generated by the counterbalance mechanism 55. In some example configurations when the tension is lowered on the one or more springs 260 (e.g., the adjustment bracket 250 is moved away from the upper end of the support column 200 and towards the window 204 as illustrated in Figure 12), a lift force generated by the counterbalance mechanism 55 can be low. In this configuration, the indicator strip 256 can also move with the adjustment bracket 250 aw'ay from the upper end of tire support column 200, and a portion of the indicator line 259 proximate the third side 253 of the indicator strip 256 (e.g., the indicator line 259 can be close to the first side 257) can be visible through the window 204 as illustrated in Figure 16A.

In other example configurations, when the torsion is increased on the one or more springs 260 (e.g., the adjustment bracket 250 is moved closer to the upper end of the support column 200 and aw'ay from the window 204 as illustrated in Figure 13), a lift force generated by the counterbalance mechanism 55 can be high. In this configuration, the indicator strip 256 can also move with the adjustmeit bracket 250 towards the upper end of the support column 200, and a portion of the indicator line 259 proximate the fourth side 254 of the indicator strip 256 (e.g., the indicator line 259 can be farther away from to the first side 257) can be visible through the window 204 as illustrated in Figure 16B.

In some example configurations, a magnitude of the lift force can be indicated by one or more numbers (e.g., numbers from 1 to 10) instead of an indicator line. The one or more numbers can be printed on the indicator strip 256, and depending on the spring adjustment, a number can be visible through the window 204. The number visible through the window 204 can be adapted to correspond to a level of adjustment (e.g., 1 being a lower lift force than 10).

In other configurations, a movement of the adjustment bracket 250 (and thus, a movement of the indicator strip 256) can be adapted to correlate to an actual lift force provided by the counterbalance mechanism 55. The movement of the adjustment bracket 250 can be an indication of the spring tension. The spring tension can be converted to a spring force using the spring parameters (e.g., spring stiffness, and initial tension). The calculated spring force can be converted to a lift force using the known cam and wheel geometry. The calculated lift force corresponding to a movement of the adjustment bracket 250 can be printed on the indicator strip 256, and it can be visible through the window 204.

The wheel assembly 235 can include a wheel 240 and a cam 245. In some example configurations, the wheel 240 and the cam 245 can be formed as integral parts of the wheel assembly 235. In other configurations, the wheel 240 and tiie cam 245 can be formed separately and coupled to each other to form the wheel assembly 235. An axle 283 can be coupled to the mounting bracket 280. The wheel assembly 235 can be coupled to the mounting bracket 280 through the axle 283. The wheel assembly 235 can be configured to rotate around the axle 283.

In an example configuration, the counterbalance mechanism 55 can include a tensile member 270 (e.g., a rope, wire, cord, or the like). One end of tiie rope 270 can be coupled to the connecting bracket 265. The rope 270 can engage with a portion of the wheel assembly 235 and extend towards an idler pulley 285 coupled to the top bracket 230 proximate tiie upper end of the support column 200. The rope 270 can further wrap around the idler pulley 285 to change direction and extend towards the lower end of the support column 200. A loop 275 can be formed at the other end of the rope 270. The loop 275 can be coupled to tiie truck assembly 70.

In another example configuration, the counterbalance mechanism 55 can include two or more tensile members as illustrated in Figures 13-14. For instance, a first tensile member 271 can be coupled between the cam 245 and the connecting bracket 265. A second tensile member 272 can have a loop 275 on one end. The loop 275 can be coupled to tiie truck assembly 70. The second tensile member 272 can be routed around the idler pulley 285 and the other end of the second tensile member 272 can be coupled to the wheel assembly 235.

Figure 13 illustrates an orientation of the truck assembly 70 located proximate the upper end of the height adjustment range (e.g., the truck assembly 70 is proximate the upper end of the support column 200). In this orientation, the first tensile member 271 can be coupled between the connecting bracket 265 and the cam 245, and the second tensile member 272 can be coupled between tiie wheel 240 and the truck assembly 70 (e.g., the loop 275 located at the end of the second tensile member 272 can engage with a component, e.g., hook, of the truck assembly 70). In this orientation, the second tensile member 272 can be wrapped around the wheel 240.

Figure 14 illustrates an orientation of the truck assembly 70 located proximate the lower end of the height adjustment range (e.g., the truck assembly 70 is proximate the lower end of the support column 200). As the truck assembly 70 translates towards the lower end of the height adjustment range, the loop 275 translates with the truck assembly 70, and thus, increasing the distance between the idler pulley 285 and the loop 275. Increased length of the second tensile member 272 betw'een the idler pulley 285 and the loop 275 can be provided by the rotation (e.g., in clockwise direction) of the wheel assembly 235 (e.g., by unwrapping a portion of the second tensile member 272 that was wrapped around the wheel 240). The cam 245 can also rotate with the w'heel assembly 235, therefore, a portion of the first tensile member 271 can be wrapped around the cam 245. Wrapping a portion of the first tensile member 271 can pull the connecting bracket 265 towards the wheel assembly 235 by further stretching the one or more springs 260 as illustrated in Figure 14.

Further stretching the springs 260 can increase the spring force. However, increasing spring force can be adapted to be converted to a constant lift force applied to the truck assembly 70 via the loop 275 by varying the radius of the cam 245 continuously at the contact point between the cam 245 and the first tensile member 271.

Referring again to Figure 12, the one or more springs 260, the rope 270, and the wheel assembly 235 can cooperate to help counterbalance a force applied to the truck assembly 70. Counterbalancing the force applied to the truck assembly 70 can help maintain the amount of force required to translate the truck assembly 70 with respect to the support column 200. Stated another w r ay, the counterbalance mechanism 55 can be adapted to support the truck assembly 70 such that the amount of force necessary to translate the truck assembly 70 with respect to the support column 200 remains substantially constant, despite increasing force created by the springs 260 during translation. Additionally, the counterbalance mechanism 55 can help maintain a position of the track assembly 70 with respect to the support column 200, such as by providing a lift force equivalent to the combined weight of the track assembly 70 and all the components coupled to it, including (but not limited to) one or more displays (shown in Figures 1-2).

In an example configuration, the truck assembly 70 can be operationally coupled to the counterbalance mechanism 55 and coupled to the electronic display 10 (shown in Figure 1). The counterbalance mechanism 55 can help maintain the position (e.g., height) of the truck assembly 70 (and thereby the display 10) with respect to the desk surface 30. Moreover, if the user desires to change the position (e.g., raise or lower) of the display 10, the counterbalance mechanism 55 can help maintain the amount of force necessary' to change the position of the truck assembly 70 (and thereby the display 10) such that the amount of force necessary- to change the position of the truck assembly 70 with respect to the desk surface 30 can be substantially constant.

Figures 17-19 are perspective views of the base 20 according to an example configuration of the current disclosure. The base 20 can include a flat bottom surface 29. The bottom surface 29 can be adapted to be placed on a desk surface 30. The base 20 can include a front end 21 and a rear end 22. The front end 21 and the rear end 22 of the base 20 can be connected by right-side wall 23 and the left-side w r all 24. In some example configurations, tire base 20 can have a hollow portion 19 between the front end 21, the rear end 22, the right-side wall 23, and the left-side wall 24. One or more features can be formed in and around the hollow portion 19 of the base 20 to secure the cable management components (e.g., cable management bracket assembly 80 and cable management clip 85 of the display mounting system 100 of Figure 3) as it will be apparent in the following sections of this disclosure.

In some example configurations, a first clip 26 can be formed proximate the rear end 22, and a second clip 28 can be formed proximate the front end 21 of the base 20. One or more recesses 27 can be formed on the leftside wall 24 of the base 20. The one or more recesses 27 can initiate from the bottom surface 29 of the base 20 and extend upwards into the left-side wall 24. The one or more recesses 27 can merge with the hollow portion 19 of the base 20. In some configurations, the one or more recesses 27 can also be formed on the right-side wall 23 of the base 20. A shallow cavity 18 can be formed proximate the rear end 22 of the base 20. One or more apertures 17 can be formed inside the shallow cavity 18. The shallow cavity 18 can be adapted to receive the lower end of the riser assembly 50 (e.g., the mounting bracket 280 of Figure 12 can be located inside the shallow cavity 18). One or more screws (not shown) can be inserted through the one or more apertures 17 to engage with the mounting bracket 280 to secure the mounting bracket 280 to the base 20.

A clamp screw housing 205 can be located proximate the rear end of the base 20, and it can extend upwards from the base 20. In some example configurations, the clamp screw' housing 205 can be formed as an integral part of the base 20. In other example configurations, the clamp screw housing 205 can be formed as a stand-alone component and coupled to the base 20 during the assembly process. In yet other configurations, the clamp screw housing 205 can be formed as an integral part of the support column 200.

One or more tabs (e.g., the first tab 206 and the second tab 207) can be formed on to the front face 208 of the support clamp screw housing 205. The one or more tabs 206 can be adapted to receive a portion of the rear face 202 of the support column 200. A portion of the rear face 202 of the support column 200 can be inserted between the one or more tabs 206 and the front face 208 of the clamp screw housing 205 to further secure the riser assembly 50 to the base

20.

Figure 20 is a cross-sectional view' of the lower end of the riser assembly 50. An L-shaped clamp bracket 25 can be coupled to the clamp screw housing 205. A clamp nut 295 can be fixedly attached to the clamp bracket 25. The clamp nut 295 can have a threaded hole. A clamp screw 290 can be coupled to the clamp screw housing 205. The clamp screw 290 can be threadingly engaged with the clamp nut 295. As the clamp screw 290 is rotated, the clamp bracket 25 can be pulled towards the bottom surface of the base 20. The base can be located proximate an edge of the desk surface 30. The edge of the desk surface 30 can be located between the base 20 and the L-shaped clamp bracket 25 as illustrated in Figure 15 according to an example configuration of the current disclosure. The desk surface 30 can be clamped betw'een the base 20 and the clamp bracket 25 to fixedly attach the riser assembly 50 proximate to the edge of the desk surface 30.

Figures 21 and 22 are a perspective view and a side view of the truck assembly 70, respectively. The truck assembly 70 can include a truck body 71. The truck body 71 can include a front plate 300 and rear plate 305 opposite to the front plate 300. The truck body 71 can further include a first side plate 310 and a second side plate 315 opposite the first side plate 310. The first side plate 310 and the second side plate 315 can connect the front plate 300 and the rear plate 305. In some example configurations, the front plate 300 and the rear plate 305 can be substantially flat, and the first side plate 310 and the second side plate 315 can be substantially rounded. In some example configurations, the truck body 71 can be formed in one piece (e.g., the front plate 300, the rear plate 305, the first side plate 310, and the second side plate 315 can be formed as an integral parts of the truck body 71). In other configurations, the front plate 300, the rear plate 305, the first side plate 310, and the second side plate 315 can be formed separately and they can be configured to be coupled together during the assembly process to form the truck body 71.

In some example configurations, one or more threaded holes 302 can be formed on the truck body 71 (for example, threaded holes 302 can be formed over the front plate 300). The one or more threaded holes 302 can be used to couple tiie cable management bracket assembly 80 to the truck assembly 70. The one or more threaded holes 302 can be located proximate to the first 310 and the second side 315 plates to couple the cable management bracket assembly 80 to either side of the truck body 71.

Figures 23 and 24 are a perspective view and an exploded view of the truck assembly 70, respectively. Figure 23 shows a partial cross-section of the truck assembly 70 to show the internal components. The truck assembly 70 can include a first wheel assembly 320, a second wheel assembly 330, a third wheel assembly 340, and a fourth wheel assembly 350. Wheel assemblies 320, 330, 340, and 340 can be coupled to the truck body 71. The first wheel assembly 320 and the third wheel assembly 340 can be located on one side of the support column 200. The first wheel assembly 320 and the third wheel assembly 340 can be configured to be in contact with the first guide surface 218 of the support column 200. The second wheel assembly 330 and the fourth wheel assembly 350 can be located on the other side of the support column 200. The second wheel assembly 330 and the fourth wheel assembly 350 can be configured to be in contact with the second guide surface 228 of the support column 200. The wheel assemblies 320, 330, 340, and 350 can guide the truck assembly 70 over the support column 200 during the translation of the truck assembly 70 relative to the support column 200.

The truck assembly 70 can further include a hook bracket 360 and an arm attachment bracket 370. The hook bracket 360 can be fixedly attached to the front plate 300 of the truck body 71. An aperture 301 can be formed on the front plate 300. The hook bracket 360 can be formed in various shapes (e.g., an L-shape as illustrated in Figure 24). One end of the hook bracket 360 can be inserted through the aperture 301 to penetrate into the space between the front plate 300 and the rear plate 305.

In an example configuration, the hook bracket 360 can be inserted through the slot 203 located on the front face 201 of the support column 200 when the riser assembly 50 is coupled with the truck assembly 70 as shown in Figure 9. The hook bracket 360 can be configured to be coupled to the loop 275 of the tensile member 270 to provide lift assist for the truck assembly 70. The rope 270 can lift the truck assembly 70 towards the upper end of the support column 200. A counterbalancing force created by the counterbalance mechanism 55 can be applied to the truck assembly 70 to counter at least a portion of the combined weight of the truck assembly 70 and all the

components (e.g., an electronic display' 10 of Figure 1, and others) coupled to tiie truck assembly 70.

The arm attachment bracket 370 can be fixedly attached to the front plate 300 of the truck assembly 70. A tip 371 can be formed on the upper end of the arm attachment bracket 370. The tip 371 can be useful to couple the arm assembly 60 to the truck assembly 70 as it will be apparent in the following sections.

Figures 25 and 26 are a perspective view and an exploded view of the first wheel assembly 320, respectively. In an example configuration, the first wheel assembly 320 can have a first wheel 321, one or more bearings 325, and an axle 327. The first wheel can have a first end 322 and a second end 323. The first wheel 321 can have an opening along its axis between the first end 322 and the second end 323. An outside diameter of the first wheel 321 can vary between the first end 322 and the second end 323. The first wheel 321 can have a larger outside wheel diameter proximate to the first end 322 and the second end 323 as shown in Figure 25. The first wheel 321 can have a concave profile 324 between the first end 322 and the second end 323. In some example configurations, the smaller wheel diameter can be located proximate the center of the first wheel 321. The concave profile 324 of the first wheel 321 can approximately match the outside profile of the first guide surface 218.

All wheel assemblies can be constructed the same as the first wheel assembly 320. Wheel assemblies can include wheels having an outside profile to match the shape of the guide surfaces located on the sides of the support column 200. Outside profile of the wheels can be any shape including (but not limited to) tapered, round, oval, flat, and others.

In an example configuration, the one or more bearings 325 can be placed inside the first wheel 321 proximate the first end 322 and the second end 323.

An outside diameter of the bearing 325 can be tight fit to an inside diameter of tiie first wheel 321. The one or more bearings 325 can have a center opening. An axle 327 can be inserted through the openings on the one or more bearings 325. The axle 327 can be partially located inside the center opening of the first wheel 321. The axle 327 can form the rotation axis for the wheel assembly 320. The one or more bearings 325 can provide rotation assistance for the wheel assembly 320 during the translation of the truck assembly 70 relative to the support column 200. In other example configurations, the first wheel assembly 320 can be built without having the one or more bearings 325. Flat bushings or grease can be applied to an inside diameter of the first wheel 321 (e.g., at the first wheel and axle interface) to reduce the friction and provide rotation assistance.

The axle 327 can have a round cross-section in its middle section. The first wheel 321 and the one or more bearings 325 can be located over the middle section of the axle 327. IN an example configuration, at least one flat section

(e.g., a first flat section 328 and a second flat section 329) can be formed proximate to one or both ends of the axle 327. At least one flat section (e.g., the first flat section 328) can extend out of the bearing 325 as illustrated in Figure

25.

Figure 27 is a cross-sectional top view of the truck assembly 70. Figure 28 is a cross-sectional front view of the truck assembly 70. The truck body 71 can be formed as an elongated hollow body including the front plate 300, the rear plate 305, the first side plate 310, and the second side plate 315. The truck body 71 can be an elongated structure (e.g., it can be elongated in an axial direction 309) between an upper end 303 and a lower end 304. The axial direction 309 of the truck body 71 and the axial direction 209 of the support column 200 can be parallel.

In an example configuration, the support column 200 can be located inside the hollow section of the truck body 71 as illustrated in Figure 27. The first wheel assembly 320 and the third wheel assembly 340 can be coupled to the truck body 71 proximate the first side plate 310. The third wheel assembly 330 and the fourth wheel assembly 350 can be coupled to the truck body 71 proximate the second side plate 315 as illustrated in Figure 28. The concave profile 324 of the wheel (e.g., the first wheel 321) can substantially match the outside profile of the guide surface (e.g., the first guide surface 218).

A first set of slots 311-312 and a second set of slots 313-314 can be formed into the front plate 300 and the rear plate 305 of the truck body 71 proximate the first side plate 310 and the second side plate 315, respectively. The first set of slots 311 and 312 can be separated from each other in the axial direction 309 of the truck body 71 and they can be formed proximate the upper end 303 and the low'er end 304 of the truck body 71, respectively. Similarly, the second set of slots 313 and 314 can be separated from each other in the axial direction 309 of the truck body 71 and they can be formed proximate the upper end 303 and the lower end 304 of the truck body 71, respectively. The first flat section 328 and the second flat section 329 of the axle 327 can be configured to fit inside the first set of slots (e.g., slots 311-312) and the second set of slots (e.g., slots 313-314).

The first set of slots (e.g., slots 311-312) can be configured as a tight fit around the first flat section 328 and the second flat section 329 of the axle 327. After the axle 327 is inserted in to the first set of slots, the axle 327 cannot move relative to the truck body 71. The second set of slots (e.g., slots 313-314) can include at least one edge that can be built at an angle 335 with the axial direction 309 of the truck body 71 as illustrated in Figure 28. There can be a clearance inside the second set of slots 313-314 such that when the axle 327 is translated against the inclined edge (e.g., against the inclined edge of the slot 313), the axle 327, and thus, the wheel assembly (e.g., second wheel assembly 330) can be translated towards the center of the truck body 71. The truck body 71 can further include one or more apertures 308 proximate the first side plate 310 and the second side plate 315. The one or more apertures 308 can be formed proximate to upper end 303 and the lower end 304 of the truck body 71. In some example configurations, the one or more apertures can be elongated along the entire length of the truck body 71 from the upper end 303 to the lower end 304.

Figure 29 is a top view of the truck assembly 70. The support column 200 can be located inside the hollow section of the truck body 71. The truck assembly can further include a first clamp 316, a second clamp 317, a third clamp 318, and a fourth clamp 319. The first clamp 316, the second clang) 317, the third clamp 318, and the fourth clamp 319 can be configured to secure the first wheel assembly 320, the second wheel assembly 330, the third wheel assembly 340, and the fourth wheel assembly 350 on to the truck body 71, respectively. One or more screws 307 can be inserted through one or more apertures (not shown) located on the clamps (e.g., the first clamp 316). The one or more screws 307 can threadingly engage with the one or more apertures 308 located on the truck body 71 to press the clamps (e.g., the first clamp 316) on to the truck body 71.

A section of the clamps (e.g., the first clamp 316) can be configured to press against the axle 327 to trap the axle inside the slots (e.g., the first slot 311). During the assembly, the first wheel assembly 320 and the third wheel assembly 340 can be securely coupled to the truck both' 71 by using the first clamp 316 and the third clamp 318, respectively. The support column 200 can be inserted into the hollow' section of the truck body 71 between the wheel assemblies. The first guiding surface 218 of the support column 200 can be rested against the concave surfaces 324 of the first 320 and the third 340 wheel assemblies. Then, the screws 307 coupled to the second clamp 317 and the fourth clamp 319 can be tightened to press the second 317 and the fourth 319 clamps against the axles 327 of the second 330 and fourth 350 wheel assemblies, respectively. The axles 327 of the second 330 and fourth 350 wheel assemblies can translate against the inclined edges of slots 313 and 314, and thus, the second 330 and fourth 350 wheel assemblies can translate towards the center of the truck body 71 until the concave surfaces 324 of the second 330 and the fourth 350 wheel assemblies contact the second guiding surface 228 of the support column 200.

Figures 30-31 show a perspective view and top view of the arm assembly 60 of Figure 5 in an expanded configuration, respectively. Figure 32 is an exploded view of the main components of the arm assembly 60. The arm assembly 60 can include a first arm 510, a second arm 520, a third arm 530, and a fourth arm 540. The arm assembly 60 can further include a rear bracket 550 and a front bracket 560. The first arm 510 and the second arm 520 can be rotatingly coupled to the rear bracket 550 (e.g., at a first hinge 515), and the third arm 530 and the fourth arm 540 can be rotatingly coupled to the front bracket 560 (e.g., at a third hinge 535.)

In some example configurations, the first arm 510 and the second arm 520 can be configured to rotate relative to the rear bracket 550 around the same axis (e.g., a first axis 580). In other example configurations, the first arm 510 and the second arm 520 can be configured to rotate relative to the rear bracket 550 around two separate axes (not shown) that can be away from each other. Similarly, in some example configurations, the third arm 530 and the fourth arm 540 can be configured to rotate relative to the front bracket 560 around the same axis (e.g., a third axis 585). In other example configurations, the third arm 530 and the fourth arm 540 can be configured to rotate relative to the front bracket 560 around two separate axes (not shown) that can be away from each other.

The second arm 520 and the third arm 530 can be rotatingly coupled at a second hinge 525. The second arm 520 and the third arm 530 can be configured to rotate relative to each other around a second axis 582. The first arm 510 and the fourth arm 540 can be rotatingly coupled at a fourth hinge 545. The first arm 510 and the fourth arm 540 can be configured to rotate relative to each other around a fourth axis 583. The first axis 580, the second axis 582, the third axis 585, and the fourth axis 583 can be parallel to the axial direction 209 of the support column 200 of Figure 11.

In some example configurations, the rear bracket 550 of the arm assembly 60 can be coupled to a height adjustable truck assembly (e.g., the truck assembly 70 of Figure 3). Accordingly, the first arm 510 and the second arm 520 can be rotatably coupled to the truck assembly 70 (e.g., at the first hinge 515). In other configurations, the rear bracket 550 can be built an integral part of the front plate 300 of the truck assembly 70.

Figure 33 is a cross-sectional view of the first hinge 515, and Figure 34 is a cross-sectional view of the first hinge 515 as the rear bracket 550 is coupled to the arm attachment bracket 370 of the truck assembly 70 of Figure 7. The rear bracket 550 can have a front portion 551 and a rear portion 552. The rear portion 552 can be configured to be coupled to the arm attachment bracket 370. The front portion 551 can include a first bracket 553 and a second bracket 554 extending from the body of the rear bracket 550 in transverse direction. The first bracket 553 and the second bracket 554 can be parallel to each other and they can be spaced apart from each other. In some example configurations, the first bracket 553 and the second bracket 554 can be formed as an integral part of the rear bracket 550. In other configurations, the first bracket 553 and the second bracket 554 can be formed separately, and they can be coupled to the rear bracket 550 during the assembly operation.

One end of the first arm 510 and the second arm 520 can be placed between the first bracket 553 and the second bracket 554 of the rear bracket 550 in stacked up fashion as illustrated in Figure 33. A known mechanical component 516 (e.g., a rivet, screw, or the like) can be inserted through apertures located on the first bracket 553, the first arm 510, the second arm 520, and the second bracket 554 to form the first hinge 515. In some example configurations, a hollow bushing 517 can be located inside the second bracket 554 to provide support for the first hinge 515.

In some configurations, an elongated first ridge 555 can be formed on the rear portion 552 of the rear bracket 550. The first ridge 555 can be adapted to engage with the tip 371 of the arm attachment bracket 370 as illustrated in Figure 34. One or more apertures 556 can be formed on the rear portion 552 of the rear bracket 550. One or more mechanical fasteners (e.g., screws) can be inserted through one or more apertures 556. The one or more mechanical fasteners can engage with the arm attachment bracket 370 to secure the rear bracket 550 on the arm attachment bracket 370.

Figure 35 is a close-up perspective view of the third hinge 535. The front bracket 560 can have a front portion 561 and a rear portion 562. The front portion 561 can be configured to be coupled to a display mounting assembly (e.g., the tilt assembly 40 of Figure 4). The rear portion 562 can include a first bracket 563 and a second bracket 564 extending from the body of the front bracket 560 in transverse direction. The first bracket 563 and the second bracket 564 can be parallel to each other and they can be spaced apart from each other. In some example configurations, the first bracket 563 and the second bracket 564 can be formed as an integral part of the front bracket 560. In other

configurations, the first bracket 563 and the second bracket 564 can be formed separately, and they can be attached to the front bracket 560 during the assembly operation.

One end of the third arm 530 and the fourth arm 540 can be placed between the first bracket 563 and the second bracket 564 of the front bracket 560 in stacked up fashion as illustrated in Figure 35. A known mechanical fastener 536 (e.g., a rivet, screw; or the like) can be inserted through apertures located on the first bracket 563, the third arm 530, the fourth arm 540, and the second bracket 564 to form the third hinge 535. In some example configurations, a hollow bushing 537 can be located inside the second bracket 564 to provide support for the third hinge 535.

In some example configurations, the front portion 561 of the front bracket 560 can include an elongated second ridge 565 proximate the upper end of the front bracket 560. A bead 566 can be formed in transverse direction to the second ridge 565. The bead 566 can be connected the second ridge 565 to divide the second ridge 565 in to two sections along its length. The front portion 561 of the front bracket can further include one or more threaded holes 567. The second ridge 565, the bead 566 and the one or more threaded holes 567 can be useful for coupling a display mounting assembly (e.g., the tilt assembly 40 of Figure 4) to the front bracket 560 as it will be apparent in the following sections of this disclosure.

In some example configurations, a display mounting assembly (e.g., the tilt assembly 40 and the display attachment bracket 45 of Figure 3, or the tilt assembly 35 and the bow assembly 90 of Figure 5) can be coupled to the front bracket 560. The rear bracket 550 can be coupled to the truck assembly 70 of the display mounting system 100. The display mounting system 100 can be configured to change an orientation of the one or more displays (e.g., display 10 of Figure 1, or displays 11-12 of Figure 2) coupled to the display mounting system 100.

Figures 36 and 37 are a perspective view and an exploded view of the bow assembly 90, respectively, according to an example configuration of the current disclosure. The bow assembly 90 can include a crossbar 590. The crossbar 590 can be an elongated component between a first end 592 and a second end 593. The crossbar 590 can be formed in various shapes (including one or more flat sections, one or more curved sections, or a combination of one or more flat and curved sections) between the first end 592 and the second end 593. In some example configurations, a recess 591 can be formed into the crossbar 590 proximate to its center. The front bracket 560 can be configured to be at least partially located inside the recess 591 when the bow assembly 90 is coupled to the arm assembly 70.

The crossbar 590 can be formed in various cross-sections (e.g., U-shaped as illustrated in Figures 36-37, C-shaped, oval, flat, or the like). The crossbar 590 can be formed from various materials known in engineering (e.g., stamped sheet metal, cast aluminum, fiber reinforced plastic, or the like).

In some example configurations, the bow assembly 90 can include a stiffener bracket 596. The stiffener bracket can have a center portion 597 and side wings 596A and 596B. The side wings 596A and 596B can be coupled to the center portion 597 of the stiffener bracket 596. The center portion 597 of the stiffener bracket 596 can be located proximate the center of the crossbar 590 (e.g., at least partially located inside the recess 591). The side wings 596A and 596B can be located inside the cross-section of the crossbar 590. The crossbar 590 and the stiffener bracket 596 can be coupled by various methods known in engineering (e.g., welding, mechanical fasteners, or the like).

In some example configurations, the bow assembly 90 can include a handle assembly 95. The handle assembly 95 can provide assistance for the user of the display mounting system 100 to easily change an orientation of the displays coupled to the display mounting system 100.

The handle assembly 95 can be coupled to the crossbar 590 proximate to its center. The handle assembly 95 can include a handle bracket 600, a brace 606, and a knob 604. The handle bracket 600 can be formed in any shape (e.g., L- shape as illustrated in Figure 37). The crossbar 590 can further include one or more bosses 594 and a threaded hole 595 formed proximate to its center (e.g., across the recess 591). An elongated slot 602 can be formed on the handle bracket 600. In an assembled configuration, the one or more bosses 594 of the crossbar 590 can be located inside the elongated slot 602 of the handle bracket 600. The handle bracket 600 can translate relative to the crossbar 590 along the elongated slot 602.

The handle assembly 95 can include a brace 606. The brace 606 can be formed in any cross-section (e.g., U-shaped). The handle bracket 600 can be at least partially located inside the cross-section of the brace 606. The brace 606 can include an aperture 607. In some example configurations, the handle assembly 95 can further include a knob 604. The knob 604 can include a handle portion and a threaded boss coupled to the handle portion. The threaded boss of tiie knob 604 can be inserted through the aperture 607 of the brace 606 and it can be inserted through the elongated slot 602 of the handle bracket 600. The threaded boss of the knob 604 can threadingly engage with the threaded hole 595 of the crossbar 590 to secure the handle assembly 95 to the crossbar 590.

The handle assembly 95 can include a user interface portion 601. The user interface portion 601 can be coupled to the handle bracket 600. In an assembled configuration, the user interface portion 601 can be exposed below tiie one or more displays coupled to the bow assembly 90. User can easily access the user interface portion to change an orientation of the one or more displays coupled to the display mounting system 100.

The bow assembly 90 can further include one or more clips 97. The one or more clips 97 can be coupled to the crossbar 590. One or more cables (e.g., power cables, video cables, or the like) connected to the one or more displays can be coupled to tiie one or more clips 97 to route the one or more cables along tiie crossbar 590. The one or more clips 97 can be formed to match tiie profile of the crossbar 590. The one or more clips 97 can be adapted to be coupled to the crossbar 590 anywhere along the length of the crossbar 590.

Figure 38 is a close-up view of the center portion of tiie bow assembly 90. The center portion 597 of the stiffening bracket 590 can at least partially overlap with the crossbar 590. An upper section 610 of the center portion 597 of the stiffening bracket 5% can extend above the crossbar 590. One or more apertures 599 can be formed on tiie center portion 597 of the stiffening bracket 596, and one or more apertures 598 can be formed on the crossbar 590 proximate to its center. In some example configurations, at least some apertures 598 located on the crossbar 590 can overlap with at least some of the apertures 599 located on the center portion 597 of the stiffening bracket 596.

In some example configurations, a tab 612 can be formed in the upper section 610 of the center portion 597 of the stiffening bracket 596. The tab 612 can be formed in an angle from the center portion 597. A notch 614 can be formed on the tab 612. When the bow' assembly 90 is coupled with the arm assembly 60, the tab 612 can be configured to engage with the ridge 565 formed on the front portion 561 of the front bracket 560. The bead 566 can be inserted into the notch 614 to locate the bow assembly 90 over the front bracket 560. After the bow assembly 90 is positioned over the front bracket 560, one or more mechanical fasteners (e.g., screws, not shown) can be inserted through the one or more apertures 598 located on the crossbar 590 and the one or more apertures 599 located on the stiffening bracket 596. One or more mechanical fasteners can engage with the one or more threaded holes 567 located on the front bracket 560 to secure the bow assembly 90 on the arm assembly 60.

In some example configurations, the one or more tilt assemblies 35 can be coupled to the bow assembly 90 to hold one or more electronic displays as illustrated in Figure 5. In some example configurations, the tilt assembly 35 can include an upright 620. The upright 620 can include an upper section 621 and a lower section 622 coupled to the upper section 621. The lower section 622 can include a receptacle with an opening 623. The opening 623 can be in any shape including (but not limited to) C -shaped, oval, flat, or the like. The opening 623 can be configured to receive at least a portion of the crossbar 593.

The tilt assembly 35 can include a tilt mount 624. The tilt mount 624 can be rotatingly coupled to the upper section 621 of the upright 620 around a hinge 625. The tilt assembly 35 can further include a display mount 626. The display' mount 626 can be coupled to the tilt mount 624. The display' mount 626 can have a planar surface and it can be configured to be coupled to an electronic display (e.g., electronic display' 11 or 12 of Figure 2). The display mount 626 and the tilt mount 624 can be adapted to rotate around a horizontal axis defined by' the hinge 625 to change an angle of the display relative to the upright 620. In some example configurations, the upper section 621 of the upright 620 can be made of two portions (not shown). One portion of the upper section 621 can be configured to rotate relative to the other portion of the upper section around a vertical axis (not shown) to change an orientation of the display coupled to the tilt assembly 35.

In yet other example configurations, the display mount 626 can be rotatingly coupled to the tilt mount 624 around a tilt axis that is perpendicular to the face of the display mount 626. The display mount 626 can be configured to rotate relative to the tilt mount 624 to change an orientation of the display.

Figure 41 is a perspective view of the display attachment bracket 45. The display attachment bracket can have a front face 700 and a rear face 702 opposite to the front face 700. The front face 700 of the display attachment bracket 45 can face a forward direction 703 towards an electronic display (e.g., the display 10 of Figure 1), and rear face 702 of the display attachment bracket 45 can face a backward direction 705 opposite the forward direction 703. An electronic display (e.g., the display 10 of Figure 1) can be attached to the front face 700. A wedge section 704 can be formed in the rear face 702 of the display attachment bracket 45. The wedge section 702 can be adapted to receive a quick connect bracket 710. A flexible tab 706 can be coupled to the display attachment bracket 45. The flexible tab 706 can include one or more hooks 708. The one or more hooks 708 can extend away from the flexible tab 706 in backwards direction 705.

Figure 42 is a perspective view of the tilt assembly 40. The tilt assembly 40 can include atilt bracket 716 and a connecting bracket 720. The tilt bracket 716 can be rotatably coupled to the connecting bracket 720. The tilt bracket 716 can rotate around a tilt axis 719. The tilt axis 719 can be in a horizontal plane (e.g., in a plane parallel to the desk surface 30 of Figure 3).

In some example configurations, the tilt assembly 40 can include a quick connect bracket 710. The quick connect bracket 710 can be rotatingly coupled with the tilt bracket 716 at a rotation hinge 714. The quick connect bracket 710 can rotate around a rotation axis 713 relative to the tilt bracket 716. The rotation axis 713 can be perpendicular to the face of the quick connect bracket 710. An extension tab 718 can be formed at an edge of the quick connect bracket 710. On or more notches 715 can be formed on the extension tab 718. In some example configurations, the quick attach bracket 45 can include one or more tapered edges 712. The one or more tapered edges 712 can be configured to engage with the wedge section 704 of the display attachment bracket 45. The tapered edges 712 of the quick connect bracket 710 can slide into the wedge section 704 of the display attachment bracket 45. The one or more hooks 708 located on the flexible tab 706 of display attachment bracket 45 can engage with the one or more notches 715 located on the extended tab 718 of the quick connect bracket 710 to secure the display attachment bracket 45 to the tilt assembly 40. The one or more hooks 708 engaged with the one or more notches 715 can prevent the removal of the display attachment bracket 45 from the tilt assembly 40. User of the display mounting system 100 can selectively bend the flexible tab 706 in forward direction 703 to disengage the one or more hooks 708 from the one or more notches 715 to disconnect the display attachment bracket 45 from the tilt assembly 40.

In some example configurations, the connecting bracket 720 can include side walls 721 and 722. The side walls 721 and 722 can be formed as an integral part of the connecting bracket 720. The connecting bracket 720 can further include one or more apertures 727. The connecting bracket 720 can be adapted to receive the front bracket 560 of the arm assembly 70 between the side walls 721 and 722.

Figure 43 is a perspective view showing the coupling of the display attachment bracket 45 with the tilt assembly 40. In some example configurations, a tab 724 can be formed on the connecting bracket 720. A notch 725 can be formed on the tab 724. When the tilt assembly 40 is coupled with the arm assembly 60, the tab 724 can be configured to engage with the ridge 565 formed on the front portion 561 of the front bracket 560. The bead 566 can be configured to enter into the notch 725 to locate the tilt assembly 40 over the front bracket 560. After the tilt assembly 40 is positioned over the front bracket 560, one or more mechanical fasteners (e.g., screws, not shown) can be inserted through the one or more apertures 727 located on the connecting bracket 720.

The one or more mechanical fasteners can engage with the one or more threaded holes 567 located on the front bracket 560 to secure the tilt assembly 40 on the arm assembly 60. Figure; 44 and 45 are the side view' and exploded view' of the cable management bracket assembly 80, respectively. The cable management bracket assembly 80 can include a cable routing channel 800. The cable routing channel 800 can include a first end 801 and a second end 802. The cable routing channel 800 can further include a first section 804 proximate the first end 801 and a second section 806 proximate the second end 802. The first section 804 can have side walls 804A and 804B, and the second section 806 can have side walls 806A and 806B.

The cable routing channel 800 can have a flexible middle section 805 between the first section 804 and the second section 806. The first section 804, the second section 806, and the middle section 805 of the cable routing channel 800 can be formed as integral parts of the same component. The middle section 805 can be made in a thin cross-section so that it can be configured to flex and change a distance between the first end 801 and the second end 802 of the cable routing channel 800. In some example configurations, the first section 804 and the second section 806 of tire cable routing channel 800 can be rotatingly coupled at a mechanical hinge (e g., eliminating the need for the flexible section).

A hinge assembly 810 can be coupled to the cable routing channel 800 proximate to the first end 801. The hinge assembly 810 can include a hollow hinge housing 811 and a hollow bushing 812. The hinge housing 811 can be formed as an integral part of the cable routing channel 800. In some example configurations, the hinge housing 811 can be formed as a separate component and attached to the cable routing channel 800 in an assembly operation.

Figure 46 is a close-up view of the coupling of cable management bracket assembly 80 with the truck assembly 70. The cable management bracket assembly 80 can be coupled to the truck body 71 through the threaded hole 302 located on the front plate 300. The hollow bushing 812 can be at least partially inserted into the hinge housing 811. A mechanical fastener 815 (e.g., a screw) can be inserted through the hinge housing 811 and the bushing 812. The mechanical fastener 815 can be adapted to threadingly engage with the threaded hole 302 located on the front plate 300 of the truck body 71 to secure the first end 801 of the cable routing channel 800 to the truck assembly 70. The first end 801 of the cable management bracket assembly 80 can be adapted to rotate relative to the truck assembly 70 as the truck assembly 70 translates relative to the support column 200.

A flexible section 807 can be formed as part of the cable routing channel 800 proximate to the second end 802. The cable routing channel 800 can further include one or more tabs 808. The one or more tabs 808 can be coupled to the cable routing channel 800 proximate to the second and 802. The one or more tabs 808 can be inserted in to the one or more recesses 27 (shown in Figure 17) to couple the second end 802 of the cable routing channel 800 to the base 20. The flexible section 807 can be configured to flex and allow' the second section 806 to rotate relative to the base 20. In some example configurations, the flexible section 807 can be replaced by a mechanical hinge.

Figure 47 is a close-up view' of the coupling of cable management bracket assembly 80 with the base 20. A flexible section 807 can be formed proximate to a second end 802 of the cable management bracket assembly 80. The second end 802 of the cable management bracket assembly 80 can be coupled to the base 20 through the one or more recesses 27. The flexible section 807 can allow the second end 802 of the cable management bracket assembly 80 to rotate relative to the base 20 as the track assembly 70 translates relative to the support column 200.

In some example configurations, the cable management bracket assembly 80 can further include a first cover 820 and a second cover 825. The first cover 820 and the second cover 825 can have a U-shaped cross-section. The first cover 820 can be coupled to the side walls 804A and 804B of the first section 804 to form a first tubular passageway 822 over the first section 804. The second cover 825 can be coupled to the side walls 806A and 806B of the second section 804 to form a second tubular passageway 827 over the second section 806.

The one or more cables (e.g., power cables, video cables, or the like, connected to the electronic display 10 of Figure 1) can be routed from the electronic display 10 towards the truck assembly 70 through the cable covers 65 (shown in Figure 3). The one or more cables can exit the cable covers 65 proximate the track assembly 70 and enter in to the first passageway 822 proximate to the first end 801 of the cable routing channel 800. The one or more cables can be concealed under the first cover 820 until they exit the first passageway 822 proximate to the middle section 805 of the cable routing channel 800. The one or more cables can be exposed over the middle section 805 until they enter in to the second passageway 827 proximate the middle section 805. The one or more cables can be concealed under the second cover 825 until they exit the second passageway 827. The one or more cables can exit the second passageway 827 proximate the second end 802 of the cable routing channel 800.

In some example configurations, a cable management clip 85 (e.g., the cable management clip 85 of Figures 3 and 5) can be used to tightly hold the one or more cables proximate to the base 20. In some example configurations, the cable management clip 85 can be located inside the hollow portion 19 of the base 20.

Figures 48-49 are front and rear perspective views of the cable management clip 85 of Figure 3 and Figure 5 in an open configuration, respectively, according to an example configuration of the current disclosure. Figure 50 is a rear perspective view of the cable management clip 85 of Figure 49. The cable management clip 85 can include a base portion 900 and a clamp portion 920. The base portion 900 can be adapted to be coupled to the base 20 of the display mounting system 100.

The base portion can include a first end 901 and a second end 902 opposite the first end. The base portion 900 can be an elongated component between the first end 901 and the second end 902. The base portion 900 can further include a lower surface 906 and an upper surface 907. The lower surface 906 can be placed over a desk surface 30.

The base portion can include a rear wall 903, a middle wall 904, and a front w'all 905. In some example configurations, a recessed section 910 can be formed on the upper surface 907 of the base portion 900 between the rear wall 903 and the middle wall 904. A bridge section 911 can be formed between the middle wall 904 and the front wall 905 of the base portion 900. In some example configurations, a compressible block 915 (e g., a rubber pad, or the like) can be located inside the recessed section 910.

A first hook 912 and a second hook 913 can be formed proximate the rear end 901 and the front end 902 of the base portion 900, respectively. The base portion 900 can be coupled to the base 20 of the display' mounting system 100 using the first hook 912 and the second hook 913. The first hook 912 can be adapted to engage with the first clip 26 proximate the rear end 22 of the base 20, and the second hook 913 can be adapted to engage with the second clip 28 proximate the front end 21 of the base 20.

The clamp portion 920 can be rotatingly coupled with the base portion 900 via a hinge 909. In some example configurations, the hinge 909 can be formed from a flexible material (e.g., plastic, ABS, or the like). The base portion 900, the clamp portion 920, and the hinge 909 can be formed together as integral parts of tiie same component. In other example configurations, a mechanical hinge (e.g., door hinge with a pin) can be used to rotatingly couple the clamp portion 920 with the base portion 900.

The clamp portion 920 can have a rear end 921, a front end 922, an upper surface 923, and a lower surface 924. The clamp portion 920 can be an elongated structure between the rear end 921 and the front end 922. The clamp portion 920 can further include a third hook 926 and a fourth hook 927 proximate to the front end 922. In the closed orientation as illustrated in Figure 50, the third hook 926 and the fourth hook 927 can be adapted to engage with the bridge section 911 of the base portion 900 to keep the clamp portion 920 in closed orientation. A first lever 928 can be coupled to the third hook 926, and a second lever 929 can be coupled to the fourth hook 927. The first lever 928 and the second lever 929 can deflect together with the third hook 926 and the fourth hook 927, respectively. The user of the display mounting system 100 can manipulate the first lever 928 and the second lever 929 to disengage the third hook 926 and the fourth hook 927 from the bridge section 911, respectively, to return the clamp portion 920 to an open configuration as illustrated in Figures 48-49.

One or more beads 925 can be formed on the lower surface 924 of the clamp portion 920. The one or more beads 925 can press against the one or more cables located inside the cable management clip 85 (e.g., located between the rear wall 903 and middle wall 904 of the base portion 900). The one or more cables can be clamped betw'een the one or more beads 925 and the compressible block 915 to tightly hold the one or more cables inside the cable management clip 85 when the cable management clip 85 is in closed orientation as illustrated in Figure 50. Figures 51-52 shows the display mounting system 1100 with an auxiliary equipment holding block 1080. In some configurations, the holding block 1080 can be coupled to the display mounting system 100 (for example, to hold an auxiliary' equipment such as a portable electronic device, phone, tablet, or the like) between the first display 1011 and the second display 1012 as illustrated in Figure 53. In other sample configurations, the holding block 1080 can be coupled to the display mounting system 100 on the side of the display 1010 as illustrated in Figure 54.

In some example configurations, a handle 1090 can be coupled to the display' mounting system 1100 to help the user to easily manipulate the display mounting system 1100 to change an orientation of the one or more electronic displays.

In some example configurations, the display mounting system 1105 can be attached to a structure (e.g., a wall). Figures 53-54 are a perspective view and a side view of a display mounting system 1105, respectively. The display mounting system 1105 can include an upper wall mounting plate 1 110, and a lower wall mounting plate 1120. The upper wall mounting plate 1110 can be coupled to the upper end of the riser assembly 1050. The lower wall mounting plate 1120 can be coupled to the lower end of the riser assembly 1050. The upper wall mounting plate 1110 and the lower wall mounting plate 1120 can be fixedly attached to a structure (e.g., a wall) to secure the display mounting system 1105 to the structure 1035. The upper 1110 and lower 1120 wall mounting plates can be offset from the riser assembly 1050 not to interfere with the truck assembly 1070 as it translates between elevated position and lowered position.

Figure 55 is a top view of a support column 1200 and a base 1020 according to an example configuration of the current disclosure. The support column 1200 can be coupled to the base 1020. The support column 1200 can extend upward from the base 1020. The support column 1200 can include a front face 1201 and a rear face 1202 opposite the front face 1201.

In an example configuration, the support column 1200 can further include tapered side faces 1210, 1215, 1220, 1225 on either side of the support column 1200 between the front face 1201 and the rear face 1202. A first tapered face 1210 can be coupled to the rear face 1202, and a second tapered face 1215 can be coupled to the front face 1201. The first tapered face 1210 and the second tapered face 1215 can extend from the rear face 1202 and the front face 1201, respectively, at an angle away from the support column 1200 towards each other. The first tapered face 1210 and the second tapered face 1215 can merge to form a first V-shaped guide surface 1218 on one side of the support column 1200.

A third tapered face 1220 can be coupled to the rear face 1202, and a fourth tapered face 1225 can be coupled to the front face 1201. The third tapered face 1220 and the fourth tapered face 1225 can extend from the rear face 1202 and the front face 1201, respectively, at an angle away from the support column 1200 towards each other. The third tapered face 1220 and the fourth tapered face 1225 can merge to form a second V-shaped guide surface 1228 on the other side of the support column 1200. The front face 1201, the rear face 1202, the first V- shaped guide surface 1218, and the second V-shaped guide surface 1228 can extend along the entire length of the support column 1200.

In other example configurations, profile of the guide surfaces can be any shape including (but not limited to) tapered, round, oval, flat, and others.

Figure 56 is a perspective view of the truck assembly 1070 according to an example configuration of the current disclosure. The track assembly 1070 can include a front plate 1300 and rear plate 1305 opposite to the front plate 1300. The track assembly 1070 can further include a first side plate 1310 and a second side plate 1315. The first side plate 1310 and the second side plate 1315 can couple the front plate 1300 with the rear plate 1305.

The track assembly 1070 can further include a first wheel assembly 1320, a second wheel assembly 1330, a third wheel assembly 1340, and a fourth wheel assembly 1350. The wheel assemblies 1320, 1330, 1340, and 1350 can be coupled to the front plate 1300 and to the rear plate 1305. The track assembly 1070 can be adapted to receive the support column 1200 between the front plate 1300, rear plate 1305, and the wheel assemblies 1320, 13020, 1340, 1350.

The first wheel assembly 1320 and the third wheel assembly 1340 can be located on one side of the support column 1200. The first wheel assembly 1320 and the third wheel assembly 1340 can be configured to contact the first V- shaped guide surface 1218 of the support column 1200. The second wheel assembly 1330 and the fourth wheel assembly 1350 can be located on the other side of the support column 1200. The second wheel assembly 1330 and the fourth wheel assembly 1350 can be configured to contact the second V-shaped guide surface 1228 of the support column 1200. The wheel assemblies 1320, 1330, 1340, and 1350 can roll over the respective V-shaped guide surfaces 1218 and 1228 during translation of the truck assembly 1070 relative to the support column 1200.

Figure 57 is a perspective view of a wheel assembly (e.g., the first wheel assembly 1320) according to an example configuration of the current disclosure. In an example configuration, the first wheel assembly 1320 can have a first tapered wheel 1321 and one or more bearings 1327. The first tapered wheel 1321 can have a larger wheel diameter 1325 proximate to both ends of the first tapered wheel 1321. The first tapered wheel 1321 can have a smaller wheel diameter 1326 proximate to its center. A first tapered wheel face 1323 and a second tapered wheel face 1324 can connect the larger wheel diameter 1321 to the smaller wheel diameter 1326 on both sides of the smaller wheel diameter 1326. The first tapered wheel face 1323 and the second tapered wheel face 1324 can be formed as outer surfaces of a partial cones. The first tapered wheel face 1323 and the second tapered wheel face 1324 jointly can form a V-shaped groove 1328.

All wheel assemblies can be constructed the same as the first wheel assembly 1320. Wheel assemblies can include wheels having an outside profile to match the shape of the guide surfaces located on the sides of tire support column 1200 (e.g., the first and second guide surfaces 1218 and 1228 of Figure 55). Outside profile of the wheels can be any shape including (but not limited to) tapered (e.g., the first tapered wheel 1321 shown in Figure 57), round, oval, flat, and others.

Figure 58 is a cross-sectional view of a wheel assembly (e.g., the first wheel assembly 1320) as coupled to the truck assembly 1070 according to an example configuration of the current disclosure. The wheel assembly 1320 can be located between the front plate 1300 and the rear plate 1305. In an example configuration, the wheel assembly 1320 can include a tapered wheel 1321 and one or more bearings 1327. The one or more bearings can be located proximate to the ends of the tapered wheel 1321. In other example configurations, if the width of the tapered wheel 1321 is small, a single bearing 1327 can be use.

In some example configurations, the truck assembly 1070 of Figure 56 can include a stud 1336. One end of the stud 1336 can have a stud head 1337, and the other end of the stud 1336 can have a threaded hole 1339. The stud 1336 can be inserted through an aperture located on one of the front plate 1300 or the rear plate 1305. The stud 1336 can also be inserted through the center opening 1329 of the one or more bearings 1327. The track assembly 1070 can further include a screw 1334. The screw 1334 can have a screw head 1335 on one end, and a threaded shaft 1331 on the other end. The screw 1334 can be inserted through an aperture located on the other one of the front plate 1300 or the rear plate 1305. The threaded shaft 1331 of the screw 1334 can be adapted to threadingly engage with the threaded hole 1339 of the stud 1336. One or more washers 1332 can be located between the wheel assembly 1320 and both the front plate 1300 and the rear plate 1305. The one or more washers 1332 can be concentric with the stud 1336 and the stud 1336 can go through the center opening of the one or more washers 1332. The assembly of the front plate 1300, washer 1332, wheel assembly 1320, washer 1332, and the rear plate 1305 can be tightened between the stud head 1337 and the screw head 1335 by rotating the screw' 1334 relative to the stud 1336.

Figure 59 is a cross-sectional view of a wheel assembly (e.g., the first wheel assembly 1320) as attached to the track assembly 1070 according to another example configuration of the current disclosure. The track assembly 1070 can have one or more spacers (e.g., the spacer 1345 of Figures 60-61) and an axle (e.g., the axle 1342 of Figures 62-63). The track assembly 1070 can include a first screw 1346 and a second screw 1349. The first screw 1346 can be inserted through an aperture located on the front plate 1300. The first screw 1346 can also be inserted through an inside diameter 1356 of a first spacer 1345. The second screw 1349 can be inserted through an aperture located on the rear plate 1305. The second screw can also be inserted through an inside diameter of a second spacer 1345. Both the first screw' 1346 and the second screws 1349 can be adapted to threadingly engage with the axle 1342 from both ends. The assembly of the front plate 1300, the first spacer 1345, wheel assembly 1320, the second spacer 1345, and the rear plate 1305 can be tightened between heads of the first 1346 and the second 1349 screws by rotating the first and second screws relative to the axle 1342.

Figures 60-61 are the perspective and cross-sectional views of the spacer 1345 according to an example configuration of the current disclosure. The spacer 1345 can have a first outer diameter 1352 and a second outer diameter 1354 smaller than the first outer diameter 1352. The smaller outer diameter 1354 of the spacer 1345 can be slightly smaller than the diameter of the center opening 1329 of the bearing 1327. A portion of the spacer 1345 with the smaller outer diameter 1354 can be at least partially located inside the bearing 1327 as shown in Figure 59. The larger outer diameter 1352 and the smaller outer diameter 1354 of the spacer 1345 can be centered around a first axis 1358. The spacer 1345 can further include a through hole with a diameter 1356. The inner diameter 1356 of the spacer 1345 can be centered around a second axis 1359. The second axis 1359 can be slightly shifted relative to the first axis 1358 (e.g., the through hole

1356 is not concentric with the first 1352 and the second 1354 outer diameter of the spacer 1345).

Figures 62-63 are the perspective and cross-sectional views of the axle 1342 according to an example configuration of the current disclosure. The axle 1342 can have a larger outer diameter 1362 proximate to its center portion and a smaller outer diameter 1364 proximate to its one or both ends. The smaller outer axle diameter 1364 can be slightly smaller than the diameter of the center opening 1329 of the bearing 1327. A portion of the axle 1345 with the smaller outer diameter 1364 can be at least partially located inside the bearing 1327 as shown in Figure 59. The larger outer diameter 1362 and the smaller outer diameter 1364 of the axle 1342 can be centered around a third axle 1368.

The axle 1342 can further include a through hole 1366. The through hole 1366 can be centered around a fourth axis 1369. The fourth axis 1369 can be slightly shifted relative to the third axis 1368 (e.g., the through hole 1366 is not concentric with the first 1362 and the second 1364 outer diameter of the axle 1342). A portion of an inside surface of the axle 1342 can have a hexagonal cross-section 1344. The hexagonal hole 1344 can be located proximate the center of the axle 1342. A threaded hole 1343 can be located on either side of the hexagonal hole 1344. Both the threaded holes 1343 and the hexagonal hole can be centered around the fourth axis 1369. A threaded shaft 1348 of the first and the second screws 1346 can be adapted to threadingly engage with the threaded holes 1343 of the axle 1342 to couple the wheel assembly 1320 to the truck assembly 1070. In an example configuration of the truck assembly (e.g., the truck assembly 1070 of Figure 59), the first axis 1358 of the spacer 1345 can coincide with the third axis 1368 of the axle 1342. The first axis 1358 and the third axis 1368 can also coincide with the center of rotation of the wheel assembly 1320. Similarly, the second axis 1359 of the spacer 1345 can coincide with the fourth axis 1369 of the axle 1342. The second axis 1359 and the fourth axis 1369 can also coincide with the axes of the first and the second screw 1346. The entire wheel assembly (e.g., the first w'heel assembly 1320) can be configured to rotate around the screw axis (e.g., around the fourth axis 1360), and thereby, can shift the wheel assemblies (e.g., the first wheel assembly 1320) towards the guide surfaces (e.g., the first 1210 and the second 1215 tapered faces) of the support column 1200 to close any gaps that might occur between the guide surfaces and tiie wheel assemblies during the assembly of the display mounting system 1100.

Going back to the Figure 59, the wheel assembly 1320 can be attached to the track assembly 1070 in various ways to bias the w'heel assemblies (e.g., the first wheel assembly 1320) towards the guide surfaces (e.g., the first V-shaped guide surface 1218) of the support column 1200 to take up any gap that might occur between the guide surfaces and the wheel assemblies. An assembly of the front plate 1300, the first spacer 1345, the wheel assembly 1320, the second spacer 1345, and the rear plate 1305 can be put together, and a first screw 1346 can be inserted through an aperture located on the front plate 1300. The first screw 1346 can be further inserted through the inside diameter 1356 of the second spacer 1345 and threadingly engage with the threaded hole 1343 located on one end of the axle 1342. A tool (for example a hexagonal wrench, or the like, not shown) can be inserted through an aperture located on the rear plate

1305. The wrench can be further inserted through the inside diameter 1356 of the second spacer 1345 and engage with the hexagonal hole 1344 located proximate the center of the axle 1342. Using the wrench, the wheel assembly 1320 can be rotated around the second axis 1359 to bias the first wheel assembly 1320 towards the first V-shaped guide surface 1218. After a contact is established between the first wheel assembly 1320 towards the first V-shaped guide surface 1218, the first screw 1346 can be tightened, and the wrench can be removed from tiie assembly. A second screw 1349 can be subsequently inserted through tiie aperture located on the rear plate 1305 and through the second spacer 1345, and threadingly engage with the threaded hole 1343 located on the other end of the axle 1342 to further tighten the first wheel assembly 1320 on to the truck assembly 1070.

Figure 64 is a cross-sectional view of a wheel assembly (e.g., the first wheel assembly 1320) as attached to the truck assembly 1070 according to another example configuration of the current disclosure. A wheel assembly 1320 and the one or more spacers 1345 can be attached to the front plate 1300 and the rear plate 1305 using the first 1346 and the second 1349 screw's inserted through apertures located on the front plate 1300 and rear plate 1305, respectively. The screws 1346, 1349 can engage with the threaded holes 1343 without being tightened. The tapered wheel 1321 can further have a first access hole 1372, and the axle can have a second access hole 1374. In an assembled configuration, the first access hole 1372 can be configured to coincide with the second access hole 1374 to form an access channel. A tool (e.g., a pin, wrench, or the like, not shown) can be inserted through the first access hole 1372 and the second access hole 1374. Using the tool, the wheel assembly 1320 can be rotated around the second axis 1359 to bias the wheel assembly 1320 towards the guide surfaces (e.g., the first V-shaped Guide surface 1218) of the support column 1200. After a contact is established between the wheel assembly 1320 and the first V-shaped guide surface 1218, the first 1346 and the second 1349 screws can be tightened, and the tool can be removed from the assembly.

Figure 65 is a cross-sectional view of a wheel assembly as attached to the truck assembly 1070 according to yet another example configuration of the current disclosure. A wheel assembly 1400 can include a first conical wheel 1410 and a second conical wheel 1420. The first conical wheel 1410 and the second conical wheel 1420 can be formed separately. The first conical w'heel 1410 can have a first outer wheel diameter 1412 on one end and a recess 1416 can be formed on the other end. A diameter of the recess 1416 can be smaller than the first outer wheel diameter 1412. The first conical wheel 1410 can further have a first tapered face 1414 connecting the first outer wheel diameter 1412 to the recess 1416. A bearing 1430 can be located inside the first conical wheel.

The second conical wheel 1420 can have a second outer wheel diameter 1422 on one end and an elongated section with an inner wheel diameter 1426 can be formed at the other end. The inner wheel diameter 1426 can be smaller than the second outer wheel diameter 1422. The second conical wheel 1420 can further have a second tapered face 1424 connecting the second outer diameter 1422 to the inner wheel diameter 1426. A bearing 1430 can be located inside the second conical wheel 1420.

The inner wheel diameter 1426 can be slightly smaller than tire diameter of the recess 1416. The section of the second conical wheel 1420 with the inner wheel diameter 1426 can be at least partially located inside the recess 1416 in an assembled configuration. The first conical wheel 1410 and file second conical wheel 1420 can be slidingly engaged.

The wheel assembly 1400 can include a stud 1450. The stud 1450 can have a stud head 1452 on one end, and a threaded hole on the other end. During file assembly process, the stud 1450 can be inserted through an aperture located on one of the front plate 1300 or the rear plate 1305. The stud 1450 can be further inserted through a first washer 1440, the first bearing 1430, the first conical wheel 1410, the second conical wheel 1420, the second bearing 1430, and a second washer 1440 as illustrated in Figure 65.

The wheel assembly 1400 can further have a screw 1460. The screw can have a screw head 1462 on one end, and a threaded shaft on the other end. The screw 1460 can be inserted through an aperture located on the other one of file front plate 1300 or the rear plate 1305. The threaded shaft of the screw 1460 can be configured to threadingly engage with the threaded hole located on the stud 1450.

In some sample configurations, after file support column 1200 is located inside the truck assembly 1070, the wheel assembly 1400 can be tightened between the head of the stud 1452 and file head of the screw 1462 by rotating the screw 1460 relative to the stud 1450. By tightening the wheel assembly 1400, a good contact can be achieved between the tapered surfaces of the wheels (e.g., the first conical wheel 1410 and file second conical wheel 1420) and the tapered surfaces of the V-shaped guide 1470 (e.g., the first tapered face 1414 of the first conical wheel 1410 can be in contact with the first tapered face 1472 of file V- shaped guide 1470, and the second tapered face 1424 of the second conical wheel 1420 can be in contact with file second tapered face 1474 of the V-shaped guide 1470). Various configurations of wheel assemblies discussed above in relation to Figures 58, 59, 64, and 65 can be used in place of any one of the wheel assemblies shown in Figure 56 (e.g., they can be used in place of any one of the first wheel assembly 1320, the second wheel assembly 1330, the third wheel assembly 1340, and the fourth wheel assembly 1350). In some example configurations, different types of wheel assemblies can be used in combination, for example, the wheel assembly shown in Figure 58 can be used on one side of the track assembly 1070 (e.g., used in place of the second 1330 and the fourth 1350 wheel assemblies) and the wheel assembly shown in Figures 59 or 65 can be used on the other side of the track assembly 1070 (e.g., used in place of the first 1320 and the third 1340 wheel assemblies). In other example configurations, various wheel assemblies can be used in other combinations as well.

Figures 66 and 67 are perspective and sides views of the device holding block 1080, respectively. The device holding block 1080 can have a front face 1600 and a rear face 1610 opposite the front face 1600. The front face 1600 and the rear face 1610 of the device holding block 1080 can be connected with one or more ribs 1605. At least one cable storage compartment 1640 can be located between the front face 1600 and the rear face 1610 of the device holding block 1080. At least a portion of cables connected to the portable electronic devices can be stored in the cable storage compartment 1640.

One or more shelves 1620 can be coupled to the front face 1600 of the device holding block 1080. One or more portable electronic devices can be placed on the one or more shelves 1620. The device holding block 1080 can further have one or more cable access holes 1630 proximate the one or more shelves 1620. One or more cables (e.g., power cables or data cables) can be coupled to the portable electronic devices and routed to the cable storage compartment 1640 via the cable access hole 1630.

In some example configurations, a charging device (e.g., a Qi charger 1650 as illustrated in Figure 67) can be coupled to the device holding block 1080. The Qi charger 1650 can be connected to a power source and it can be used to wirelessly charge a portable electronic device placed on the device holding block 1080. In other example configurations, the charger may include a wired connection port (eg., a USB port, and the like) for wired connection of the portable electronic device to the charger. In some example configurations, the device holding block 1080 can include a coupling assembly 1660. Figure 68 shows a perspective view of the coupling assembly 1660. The coupling assembly 1660 can include atilt bracket 1662 and an attachment bracket 1664. The tilt bracket 1662 can be coupled to the rear face 1610 of the device holding block 1080. In some configurations, the tilt bracket 1662 can be formed as an integral part of the rear face 1610 of the device holding block 1080. The attachment bracket 1664 can be coupled to the crossbar (e.g., the crossbar 590 of Figure 36) anywhere along its length. The attachment bracket 1664 can be secured to the crossbar 590 by various known methods including (but not limited to) a screw 1668, a lever, a detent, a latch, or the like. The tilt bracket can be rotatingly coupled to the attachment bracket at a hinge 1666. The user of the display mounting system 1100 can tilt the device holding block 1080 relative to the crossbar 590 (for example to adjust the viewing angle of the portable electronic device located on the device holding block 1080).

Additional Notes and Aspects

Aspect 1 may include or use subject matter (such as an apparatus, a system, a device, a method, a means for performing acts, or a device readable medium including instructions that, when performed by the device, may cause the device to perform acts), such as may include or use an electronic display mounting system comprising: an electronic display interface; a support assembly adapted to couple to a fixed structure, the support assembly including: a support column, wherein the support column is vertically oriented; and a mounting portion movably coupled to the support column; and an articulating arm assembly operably coupled between the display interface and the mounting portion, wherein the articulating arm assembly includes at least one pair of arms; wherein the mounting portion is configured to translate the display interface in a vertical direction through a range of travel; wherein the articulating arm assembly is configured to translate the display interface between a first position proximate the support assembly and a second position spaced apart from the support assembly; and wherein the articulating arm assembly is configured to change an angle of the display interface relative to the support assembly. Aspect 2 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 1, to optionally include or use a base, wherein the base is adapted to rest on a generally horizontal support surface.

Aspect 3 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 1, to optionally include or use a wall mounting interface, wherein the wall mounting interface is adapted to attach to a generally vertical support surface.

Aspect 4 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 1 , to optionally include or use wherein the articulating arm assembly comprises: a first pair of pivotally connected arms having a first end configured to be pivotally connected with the display interface and a second end configured to be pivotally connected with the moving portion; and a second pair of pivotally connected arms having a first end configured to be pivotally connected with the display interface and a second end configured to be pivotally connected with the moving portion.

Aspect 5 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 1, to optionally include or use wherein the electronic display interface comprises: one or more display interface brackets adapted to be coupled to one or more electronic displays; and one or more tilt assemblies adapted to be coupled to the one or more display interface brackets; wherein the one or more tilt assemblies are configured to tilt the electronic display relative to the support assembly around a horizontal axis.

Aspect 6 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 5, to optionally include or use wherein the electronic display interface further comprises a bow assembly, and wherein the one or more tilt assemblies are adapted to be coupled to the bow assembly.

Aspect 7 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 5, to optionally include or use wherein the one or more display interface brackets are removably coupled to the one or more tilt assemblies.

Aspect 8 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 2, to optionally include or use further comprising a cable management channel including: a first end rotatingly coupled to the mounting portion; a second end rotatingly coupled to the base; and a middle portion connecting tiie first end and the second end; wherein the middle portion is configured to flex and allow translation of the first end between a first position proximate the second end and a second position spaced apart from the second end; and wherein the cable management channel is configured to house one or more cables between the mounting portion and the base.

Aspect 9 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 8, to optionally include or use a first cover adapted to be removably coupled to the cable management channel proximate to the first end; and a second cover adapted to be removably coupled to the cable management channel proximate to the second end; wherein the first cover and the second cover are configured to conceal at least a portion of cables housed inside the cable management channel.

Aspect 10 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 2, to optionally include or use a cable management clip, including: a base portion, wherein the base portion is configured to couple to the base; and a clamp portion rotatingly coupled to the base portion; wherein the clamp portion is configured to rotate relative to the base portion between a closed configuration where the clamp portion is parallel to the base portion and an open configuration where the clamp portion is positioned at an angle relative to the base portion; and wherein the cable management clip, in a closed configuration, is configured to retain the one or more cables.

Aspect 11 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 1 , to optionally include or use a counterbalance mechanism, the counterbalance mechanism including: an energy storage member coupled to the support column; a wheel assembly rotatingly coupled to the support column; a first tarsi le member connecting the energy storage member to tire wheel assembly; and a second tensile member connecting the wheel assembly to the mounting portion; wherein the first tensile member and the second tensile member ate configured to transfer at least a portion of the force generated by the energy- storage member to the mounting portion to balance forces between the support column and the mounting portion to assist translation of the mounting portion relative to the support column.

Aspect 12 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 11, to optionally include or use wherein the counterbalance mechanism further comprises: a weight adjustment mechanism; and a weight adjustment indicator coupled to the weight adjustment mechanism; wherein the weight adjustment mechanism is configured to translate an end of the energy storage member to adjust a tension of the energy storage member; and wherein the weight adj ustment indicator is configured to translate with the weight adjustment mechanism.

Aspect 13 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 12, to optionally include or use wherein the support column comprises a w'eight adjustment indicator window; wherein a portion of the weight adjustment indicator is visible through the weight adjustment indicator window; and wherein the visible portion of the weight adjustment indicator is configured to represent a magnitude of the tension of the energy storage member.

Aspect 14 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 1 , to optionally include or use wherein the mounting portion further comprises: a mounting body, including: a front wall; a rear wall; a first side wall; and a second side wall; wherein the first side wall and the second side wall are adapted to connect the front wall and the rear wall to form a hollow cross-section; and a plurality of wheel assemblies, including: a wheel having a concave profile; wherein the wheel is rotatingly coupled to the mounting body; one or more bearings adapted to be coupled to an inside diameter of the wheel; and an axle having a first end and a second end; wherein the axle is at least partially located inside the hollow cross-section; and wherein the wheel and the one or more bearings are concentric with the axle; wherein the support column at least partially located inside the hollow cross-section; and wherein the concave profile of each wheel of plurality of wheel assemblies contacts an outside surface of the support column.

Aspect 15 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 14, to optionally include or use a plurality' of slots formed on a wall of the mounting body configured to receive a first cutout and a second cutout formed on the first aid and the second end of the axle, respectively, to couple the plurality of wheel assemblies to the mounting body; and a plurality of wheel clamps, wherein the plurality' of wheel clamps are coupled to the mounting body such that the plurality of wheel clamps push against the first end and the second end of the axle of the plurality of wheel assemblies to secure the plurality of wheel assemblies to the mounting body.

Aspect 16 max' include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 15, to optionally include or use wherein the one or more of the plurality of slots are formed at an angle inclined towards the support column, and wherein the plurality of wheel assemblies are configured to translate towards the support column as the one or more axles are inserted in to the one or more slots.

Aspect 17 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 14, to optionally include or use wherein the axle is a stud having a stud head on one end and a threaded hole on the other end, wherein the stud is coupled to one of the front wall or the rear wall and secured in place by a screw', wherein the screw is coupled to the other one of the front w'all or the rear wall, and wherein the screw is threadingly engaged with the threaded hole.

Aspect 18 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 14, to optionally include or use wherein the axle is a stud having a stud axis, wherein the stud includes a through hole having a hole axis positioned away from the stud axis, wherein the hole axis is parallel to the stud axis, wherein the axle is adapted to be rotatable around the hole axis, wherein the through hole is threaded proximate to the first end and the second end of the axle, wherein the through hole has a hexagonal shape proximate to a center of the axle, wherein the axle is coupled to the mounting body via a first screw' and a second screw', wherein the first screw is coupled to the front wall and threadingly engaged with the threaded hole located proximate to the first end of the axle, and wherein the second screw is coupled to the rear wall and threadingly engaged with the threaded hole located proximate to the second end of the axle.

Aspect 19 may include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 17, to optionally include or use wherein the wheel comprises: a first wheel portion; and a second wheel portion concentric with the first wheel portion; wherein the first wheel portion is slidably engaged with the second wheel portion; wherein the stud is at least partially located inside the first wheel portion and the second wheel portion; and wherein the first wheel portion is adapted to translate towards the second wheel portion as the screw is tightened against the stud.

Aspect 20 max' include or use, or may optionally be combined with the subject matter of Aspect 1, to optionally include or use a holder; the holder including: one or more shelves, wherein the one or more shelves are configured to hold one or more portable electronic devices; one or more storage compartments, wherein the one or more storage compartments are configured to hold one or more electronic components; and a mount, wherein the mount is configured to be coupled to the display interface portion; wherein the holder is adapted to position the one or more portable electronic devices proximate to a display coupled to the display mounting system.

Each of these non-limiting examples can stand on its own, or can be combined in any permutation or combination with any one or more of the other examples.

The above detailed description includes references to the accompanying drawings, which form apart of the detailed description. The drawings show, by way of illustration, specific configurations in which the present subject matter can be practiced. These configurations are also referred to herein as“examples.” Such examples can include elements in addition to those shown or described. However, the present inventors also contemplate examples in which only those elements shown or described are provided. Moreover, the present inventors also contemplate examples using any combination or permutation of those elements shown or described (or one or more aspects thereof), either with respect to a particular example (or one or more aspects thereof), or with respect to other examples (or one or more aspects thereof) shown or described herein.

In the event of inconsistent usages between this document and any documents so incorporated by reference, the usage in this document controls.

In the following claims, the terms“including” and“comprising” are open-ended, that is, a system, device, article, composition, formulation, or process that includes elements in addition to those listed after such a term in a claim are still deemed to fall within the scope of that claim. Moreover, in the following claims, the terms“first,”“second,” and“third,” etc. are used merely as labels, and are not intended to impose numerical requirements on their objects. The above description is intended to be illustrative, and not restrictive. For example, the above-described examples (or one or more aspects thereof) may be used in combination with each other. Other embodiments can be used, such as by one of ordinary skill in the art upon reviewing the above description. The Abstract is provided to comply with 37 C.F.R. §1.72(b), to allow the reader to quickly ascertain the nature of the technical disclosure. It is submitted with the understanding that it will not be used to interpret or limit the scope or meaning of the claims. Also, in the above Detailed Description, various features may be grouped together to streamline the disclosure. This should not be interpreted as intending that an unclaimed disclosed feature is essential to any claim. Rather, inventive subject matter may lie in less than all features of a particular disclosed embodiment. Thus, the following claims are hereby incorporated into the Detailed Description as examples or embodiments, with each claim standing on its own as a separate embodiment, and it is contemplated that such embodiments can be combined with each other in various combinations or permutations. The scope of tiie present subject matter should be determined with reference to the appended claims, along with the full scope of equivalents to which such claims are entitled.