Login| Sign Up| Help| Contact|

Patent Searching and Data


Title:
DIVING BOARD WITH COMPOSITE TREAD
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/067197
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A diving board (100) having a shell (105) wrapped around a core (130), the shell (105) including a top surface (110) with one or more pockets (150, 155) formed thereon. The pockets (150, 155) are recessed inwardly from the top surface (110) of the shell (105) and sized to receive a non-slip tread surface (145) therein. The tread surface (145) is made from a composite material primarily comprising cork, and arranged such that the tread surface (145) is substantially flush relative to the top surface (110) of the shell (105) when seated therein. An adhesive layer (160) may be used to adhere the tread surface (145) within the pockets (150, 155) to retain the tread surface 145 on the shell (105).

Inventors:
LAITTA, Richard P. (17641 Cardinal Drive, Lake Oswego, Oregon, 97034, US)
KAIEL, Mikha-el (1606 N. Highland Street, Portland, Oregon, 97217, US)
Application Number:
US2017/021665
Publication Date:
April 12, 2018
Filing Date:
March 09, 2017
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
S.R. SMITH, LLC (1017 SW Berg Parkway, P.O. Box 400Canby, Oregon, 97013, US)
International Classes:
A63B5/08
Foreign References:
US2594459A1952-04-29
US20160220030A12016-08-04
US20110059826A12011-03-10
US20140057757A12014-02-27
JP2001037907A2001-02-13
US3416793A1968-12-17
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
VILLANUEVA, Alfredo (Stoel Rives LLP, 760 SW Ninth Avenue Suite 300, Portland Oregon, 97205-2586, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Claims

1 . A diving board comprising:

a core having a length extending along a longitudinal axis;

a shell wrapped around the core, the shell having a top surface and an opposite bottom surface, the shell having a length extending along a longitudinal axis from a base end to a front end, and a width extending transversely relative to the longitudinal axis from a first side to a second side;

a first pocket formed on the top surface of the shell, the pocket recessed at a depth relative to the top surface of the shell;

a first tread surface seated in the first pocket, the tread surface mounted within the pocket such that the tread surface is substantially flush relative to the top surface of the shell.

2. The diving board of claim 1 , wherein the first tread surface comprises a cork composite tread surface.

3. The diving board of claim 2, wherein the cork composite tread surface includes at least 10% cork by volume of raw materials.

4. The diving board of claim 2, wherein the cork composite tread surface includes between 10% and 40% cork by volume of raw materials.

5. The diving board of claim 2, wherein the cork composite tread surface includes between 15% and 25% cork by volume of raw materials.

6. The diving board of claim 2, wherein the cork composite tread surface includes at least 50% cork by volume of raw materials.

7. The diving board of any of claims 1 -3, wherein the first pocket is recessed to a depth of between 0.1 and 0.3 inches relative to the top surface of the shell.

8. The diving board of any of claims 1 -3, wherein the first pocket is formed proximal to the base end of the shell, the pocket having a first margin offset from the first side of the shell and a second margin offset from the second side of the shell.

9. The diving board of claim 8, wherein the first margin and the second margin are each offset from the first side and the second side, respectively, by a distance ranging between 1 and 2 inches.

10. The diving board of any of claims 1 -3, wherein the core comprises fiberglass.

1 1 . The diving board of any of claims 1 -3, further comprising an adhesive layer between the first tread surface and the first pocket to adhere the first tread surface to the first pocket.

12. The diving board of claim 1 1 , wherein the adhesive layer includes tape.

13. The diving board of any of claims 1 -3, further comprising a second pocket formed on the top surface of the shell, the second pocket recessed at a depth relative to the top surface of the shell.

14. The diving board of claim 13, wherein the second pocket extends from the front end of the diving board and toward the back end, the second pocket offset from the first pocket.

15. The diving board of claim 13, wherein the second pocket further includes a second tread surface seated therein, the second tread surface mounted within the second pocket such that the second tread surface is substantially flush relative to the top surface of the shell.

16. The diving board of claim 15, further comprising an adhesive layer between the second tread surface and the second pocket to adhere the second tread surface to the first pocket.

17. The diving board of claim 15, wherein the second tread surface comprises a cork composite tread surface.

Description:
DIVING BOARD WITH COMPOSITE TREAD

Technical Field

[0001] The field of the present disclosure relates generally to diving boards, and in particular, to diving boards that include a non-slip tread surfaces made of a composite material that includes cork.

Background

[0002] Diving boards have long been used to provide lift for a diver jumping into a swimming pool. Conventional diving boards typically comprise a shell, such as an acrylic shell, that is wrapped around a core made of any one of a variety of suitable materials. For example, diving boards used in diving competitions may include aluminum or aluminum alloy cores, while other diving boards, such as those used for residential purposes, may include fiberglass reinforced cores or other suitable cores. In many diving boards, the upper surface typically includes a non-slip tread that provides grip and suitable traction for a diver walking across the board before diving off the end. In conventional diving boards, the non-slip tread typically comprises a sand tread including sandpaper material that is adhered or otherwise affixed to portions of the upper surface of the diving board shell.

[0003] The present inventors have determined that it would be desirable to have a diving board with a tread surface having improved non-slip characteristics and sufficient flexibility to withstand extended use. Additional aspects and advantages of such a diving board will be apparent from the following detailed description of example embodiments, which proceed with reference to the accompanying drawings. [0004] Understanding that the drawings depict only certain embodiments and are not, therefore, to be considered limiting in nature, these embodiments will be described and explained with additional specificity and detail with reference to the drawings.

Brief Description of the Drawings

[0005] FIG. 1 is a top isometric view of a diving board in accordance with one example embodiment.

[0006] FIG. 2 is a bottom isometric view of the diving board of FIG. 1 .

[0007] FIG. 3 is a front elevation view of the diving board of FIG. 1 .

[0008] FIG. 4 is a rear elevation view of the diving board of FIG. 1 .

[0009] FIG. 5 is a side elevation view of the diving board of FIG. 1 .

[0010] FIG. 6 is a cross-section view of section 6-6 taken from FIG. 5.

[0011] FIG. 6A is an enlarged view of a portion of the cross-section view of FIG. 6.

[0012] FIG. 7 is a top isometric view of the diving board of FIG. 1 , with the tread surfaces of the diving board removed.

[0013] FIG. 8 is a schematic illustration of the diving board of FIG. 1 in an assembled and installed condition.

Detailed Description of Disclosed Embodiments

[0014] With reference to the drawings, this section describes particular embodiments and their detailed construction and operation. The embodiments described herein are set forth by way of illustration only and not limitation. The described features, structures, characteristics, and methods of operation may be combined in any suitable manner in one or more embodiments. In view of the disclosure herein, those skilled in the art will recognize that the various embodiments can be practiced without one or more of the specific details or with other methods, components, materials, or the like. In other instances, well-known structures, materials, or methods of operation are not shown or not described in detail to avoid obscuring more pertinent aspects of the embodiments.

[0015] FIGS. 1 -8 collectively illustrate various embodiments of a diving board 100 for use in commercial pools, residential pools, or other similar environments. The diving board 100 includes a shell 105 wrapped around a core 130 (illustrated in FIG. 6), the shell 105 including one or more recessed areas or pockets 150, 155 formed on a top surface 1 10 of the shell 105. The recessed pockets 150, 155 support a tread surface 145 therein, the tread surface 145 having anti-slip characteristics to provide grip and traction to a diver walking across the tread surface 145. In some embodiments, the tread surface 145 may be made of a composite material that includes a mixture of cork, rubber, and other materials, with the resulting cork-composite tread surface 145 providing non-slip features for the diving board 100. In one embodiment, the tread surface 145 may be mounted within the recessed pockets 150, 155 of the diving board 100, such that the tread surface 145 is entirely or substantially flush relative to the top surface 1 10 of the shell 105 to minimize and/or avoid potential tripping hazards and to prevent injuries that may otherwise occur with raised tread surfaces. With reference to the figures, the following provides additional details of the tread surface 145 and the diving board 100.

[0016] With particular reference to FIGS. 1 -6, the diving board 100 includes a shell 105 having a top surface 1 10, a bottom surface 1 15 opposite the top surface 1 10, a base end 120, and a forward or front end 125. The diving board 100 has a length extending along a longitudinal axis A and a width generally transverse to the

longitudinal axis A. The diving board 100 may have any one of a variety of suitable length and width combinations to create desired flexibility and lift characteristics. For example, in one embodiment, the diving board 100 may have a length of about 8 feet and a width of about 1.5 feet. In other embodiments, the length of the diving board 100 may be any of 6 feet, 10 feet, or 12 feet long with a width ranging between 1 -2 feet. It should be understood that in other embodiments, the length and width of the diving board 100 may be other suitable dimensions than those provided herein. The dimensions provided are for illustration purposes and not meant to be limiting.

[0017] In some embodiments, the thickness of the diving board 1 10 may taper from the base end 120 toward the front end 125. For example, in one embodiment, the diving board 100 may have a thickness of approximately 1 .75 inches at the base end 120 and a thickness of approximately 1 .30 inches at the front end 125, with the diving board 100 gradually tapering from the base end 120 toward the front end 125.

Preferably, the thickness of the diving board 100 tapers linearly and uniformly, but in other embodiments, the diving board 100 may not taper uniformly. In still other embodiments, the diving board 100 may have different suitable thickness that may be based on the length and width dimensions of the diving board 100. In yet other embodiments, the thickness of the diving board 100 may range from approximately 1 -2 inches as measured at the front end 125 and the base end 120, respectively.

[0018] With particular reference to the cross section 6-6 illustrated in FIG. 6, the diving board 100 may include a core 130, with the shell 105 wrapped around the core 130, such that the shell 105 directly contacts the core 130, with no other layers or materials in between. Generally, the core 130 extends from the base end 120 to the front end 125 and across the width of the diving board 105. In other embodiments, the core 130 may terminate just short of the base and front ends 120, 125 and the sides of the board 105. For example, with collective reference to FIGS. 2 and 6, the core 130 may be offset from edges 135 of the diving board 100 by a channel or gap 140 to impart additional flexibility to the edges 135 of the diving board 100 during use. The channel 140 may extend around the entire perimeter of the underside of the diving board 100, thereby offsetting the core 130 from the sides of the diving board 100.

[0019] The core 130 may be made of any one of a variety of suitable materials to generally provide structural stability to the diving board 100, while still being sufficiently light so as to avoid adding significant weight. Generally, suitable cores 130 may have a density ranging from 60 kg/m 3 to 100 kg/m 3 and a compressive strength ranging from about 0.5 MPa to about 2.0 MPa. In some embodiments, the core 130 may comprise a fiberglass reinforced core material, which may include a combination of laminated wood layers and fiberglass mats. In other embodiments, other core materials may be suitable, such as a foam material including polyurethane, polyvinyl chloride,

polyethylene, polystyrene. In still other embodiments, the core 130 may comprise other suitable materials, such as laminated wood, cardboard, aluminum alloys, or polyamides.

[0020] Returning to FIG. 1 , the diving board 100 further includes a tread surface 145 positioned along the top surface 1 10 of the shell 105. The tread surface 145 is a non- slip surface designed to minimize potential slipping or falling by a diver walking across the diving board 100. For example, the tread surface 145 may include a non-slip sanded tread or other suitable non-slip tread material. In other embodiments, the tread surface 145 is a cork composite surface comprising a mixture of cork, rubber, and other additives. In some embodiments, the tread surface 145 may comprise at least 10% cork of the volume of raw materials. In other embodiments, the tread surface 145 may comprise between 10% and 40% cork, or between 10% and 30% cork, or between 15% and 25% cork, or between 25% cork and 40% cork. In still other embodiments, the tread surface 145 may comprise primarily cork. For example, in some embodiments, cork may comprise at least 50% of the volume of raw materials of the tread surface 145. In other embodiments, cork may account for between 50% and 80% of the volume of raw materials comprising the tread surface 145. In other embodiments, the volume of raw materials comprising the tread surface 145 may include between 60% and 75% cork. In still other embodiments, the volume of raw materials may include at least 70% cork. For improved grip and purchase, the tread surface 145 may include raised bumps or studs (not shown), such as in a diamond, round, or other suitable shapes distributed throughout.

[0021] FIG. 7 illustrates the diving board 100 of FIG. 1 with the tread surface 145 removed to illustrate recessed pockets 150, 155 formed on the top surface 1 10. In some embodiments, the recessed pocket 150 may be arranged proximal to the base end 120 of the diving board 100, and the recessed area 155 may be arranged proximal to the front end 125 of the diving board 100, with a small strip of the top surface 1 10 of the shell 105 extending therebetween to provide two distinct recessed pockets 150, 155 separated from one another. It should be understood that although the illustrated diving board 100 includes two distinct recessed pockets 150, 155 of varying sizes, in other embodiments, the diving board 100 may include only a single recessed pocket, or may include multiple recessed pockets of the same or different sizes, or any other suitable arrangement of recessed pockets as desired. Preferably, the recessed pockets 150, 155 comprise the majority (e.g., 50% to 75%) of the top surface 1 10 of the diving board 100 to accommodate a large surface area for the tread surface 145 and provide maximum purchase for divers during use. In other embodiments, the recessed pockets 150, 155 may comprise at least 90% of the top surface 1 10.

[0022] The recessed pockets 150, 155 are each sized and dimensioned to receive a corresponding tread surface 145 for providing a sufficiently large region with suitable traction for a diver when the diving board 100 is assembled. In some embodiments, the recessed pockets 150, 155 may be offset from the peripheral edges 135 of the diving board 100. For example, in one embodiment, the recessed pocket 150 may be offset from the base end 120 by a distance of between 1 -2 inches, and may be offset from the peripheral edges 135 of the diving board by the same distance of between 1 -2 inches. In other embodiments, the recessed pocket 150 may be offset from both the peripheral edges 135 and the base end 120 by between 1.2 and 1.5 inches. In still other embodiments, the recessed pocket 150 may extend closer to the edges 135 and the base end 120 to have a smaller offset than the described dimensions. In yet other embodiments, the recessed pocket 150 may instead extend to the edges 135 and the base end 120 with no offset.

[0023] Similarly, the recessed pocket 155 may be offset from the edges 135 of the diving by a distance of between 1 -2 inches, or by a distance of between 1 .2 and 1.5 inches in other embodiments. Unlike the recessed pocket 150, however, in some embodiments, the recessed pocket 155 may extend all the way to the front end 125 of the diving board 100 with little or no offset to accommodate the tread surface 145 at the front end 125 of the diving board 100 as illustrated in FIG. 1 and as further described in detail below.

[0024] As mentioned previously, the recessed pockets 150, 155 are designed to receive a tread surface 145 of the diving board 100. Preferably, the recessed pockets 150, 155 are formed at a depth substantially equal to the thickness of the tread surface 145 such that the tread surface 145 is flush relative to the top surface 1 10 of the shell 105 when the diving board 100 is assembled. For example, in one embodiment, the recessed pockets 150, 155 may be formed at a depth of between 0.1 and 0.3 inches from the top surface 1 10 of the diving board 100. In other embodiments, the recessed pockets 150, 155 may be formed at a depth of between 0.15 and 0.2 inches from the top surface 1 10. It should be understood that the depth of the recessed pockets 150, 155 provided herein are meant as examples only and not meant to be limiting. As mentioned previously, the depth of the recessed pockets 150, 155 are preferably sufficiently equal to the thickness of the tread surface 145. [0025] With reference to the cross-section in FIG. 6 and FIG. 6A, the tread surface 145 is received in the recessed pockets 150, 155. In some embodiments, an adhesive substance or layer 160 (e.g., glue, epoxy, resins, double-sided tape, or other suitable adhesives) may be used to adhere the tread surface 145 to the recessed pockets 150, 155 and firmly retain the tread surface 145 in position. In other embodiments, the tread surface 145 may be coupled to the diving board 100 using other coupling techniques, such as screws, pins, clips, or other suitable fasteners. In some embodiments, the edges of the tread surface 145 may be slightly smaller than the dimensions of the recessed pockets 150, 155 such that the tread surface 145 is slightly offset from the edges of the recessed pockets 150, 155 when positioned therein. For example, in one embodiment, the edge of the tread surface 145 may be offset from the edge of the recessed pocket 150 by a gap (not shown) measuring between 0.05 and 0.15 inches. In other embodiments, the tread surface 145 may be offset by between 0.05 and 0.10 inches. In some embodiments, this gap may be filled with the adhesive substance 160 to ensure the tread surface 145 is firmly affixed to the recessed pockets 150, 155 with little or no slippage.

[0026] FIG. 8 is a schematic illustration of the diving board 100 shown in an assembled and installed condition in accordance with one example embodiment. With reference to FIG. 8, the diving board 100 may be supported by one or more frame stands 165, 170, with a first frame stand 165 positioned adjacent the base end 120 of the diving board 100 and the second frame stand 170 positioned to achieved a desired fulcrum setting for the diving board 100. The diving board 100 may be coupled to the frame stand 165 via fasteners 175 that extend through the diving board 100 and are received in the frame stand 165. In some embodiments, a fulcrum pad 180 may be positioned between the frame stand 170 and the bottom surface 1 15 of the diving board 100 to support the diving board 100 in a cantilevered configuration over the water. The stands 165, 170 are in turn bolted or otherwise affixed to a concrete slab or other flooring material 185. It should be understood that in other embodiments, the diving board 100 may be installed in other arrangements or using different stands/frame structures to support the diving board 100 in a cantilevered configuration. [0027] It is intended that subject matter disclosed in any one portion herein can be combined with the subject matter of one or more other portions herein as long as such combinations are not mutually exclusive or inoperable. In addition, many variations, enhancements and modifications of the concepts described herein are possible.

[0028] The terms and descriptions used above are set forth by way of illustration only and are not meant as limitations. Those skilled in the art will recognize that many variations can be made to the details of the above-described embodiments without departing from the underlying principles of the invention.