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Title:
DOWN-HOLE GAS SEPARATION SYSTEM
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/013441
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An apparatus for gas and solids separation from down-hole fluids having an inner tube and an outer tube disposed about the inner tube. The annular region between the tubes contain a plurality of chambers, separated by fluid barriers. The chambers include an intake chamber to receive fluids from outside of the outer tube through an orifice, and processing chambers. Fluid communication between the intake and processing chambers is restricted to fluid flow through sets of tubes. Fluid communication between a lowermost processing chamber below the intake chamber and a lower processing chamber above the intake chamber is restricted to fluid flow through the inner tube. A block restricts fluid communication within the inner tube to other chambers above the intake chamber. Orifices in the inner tube of the processing chambers on either side of the block provide fluid communication across the block.

Inventors:
MARSHALL, Gary (3900 Crestline Ave, Middland, TX, 79707, US)
Application Number:
US2017/041283
Publication Date:
January 18, 2018
Filing Date:
July 09, 2017
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
MODICUM, LLC (46 Dolores Ct, Odessa, TX, 79765, US)
International Classes:
B01D19/00; B01D53/22; B01D61/00; D02G3/00; E21B43/00; E21B43/12; E21B43/16; E21B43/38; F04B47/12
Domestic Patent References:
WO2016112155A12016-07-14
Foreign References:
US20130025687A12013-01-31
US20090008092A12009-01-08
US20060153695A12006-07-13
US20070114020A12007-05-24
US2652130A1953-09-15
US5127803A1992-07-07
US6755251B22004-06-29
US6494258B12002-12-17
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
KNOBLOCH, Charles et al. (Knobloch & Tripp, PLLC4265 San Felipe, Suite 110, Houston TX, 77027, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

1. An apparatus for gas and solids separation from down-hole fluids comprising:

an inner tube having a length in a longitudinal direction;

an outer tube disposed about the inner tube;

a plurality of chambers, wherein each chamber is defined by an annular region between the outer tube, the inner tube, and a first fluid barrier and a second fluid barrier, each fluid barrier disposed in an annular region between the inner tube and the outer tube; wherein one of the plurality of chambers comprises an intake chamber, in fluid communication with the outside of the outer tube through an orifice;

wherein one of the plurality of chambers comprises a first processing chamber (ML) disposed longitudinally adjacent to the intake chamber;

wherein one of the plurality of chambers comprises a second processing chamber (H) disposed longitudinally adjacent to the first processing chamber, opposite from the intake chamber;

wherein one of the plurality of chambers comprises a third processing chamber (CL) disposed longitudinally adjacent to the second processing chamber (H), opposite from the first processing chamber (ML);

wherein one of the plurality of chambers comprises a fourth processing chamber (Rl) disposed longitudinally adjacent to the intake chamber, opposite from the first processing chamber (ML);

wherein one of the plurality of chambers comprises a fifth processing chamber (R2) disposed longitudinally adjacent to the fourth processing chamber (Rl), opposite from the intake chamber; wherein fluid communication between the intake chamber and the first processing chamber (ML) is restricted to fluid flow through a first set of a plurality of tubes;

wherein fluid communication between the first processing chamber (ML) and the second processing chamber (H) is restricted to fluid flow through a second set of a plurality of tubes;

wherein fluid communication between the second processing chamber (H) and the third processing chamber (CL) is restricted to fluid flow through a third set of a plurality of tubes;

wherein a block restricts fluid communication within the inner tube between the fourth processing chamber (Rl) and the fifth processing chamber (R2);

wherein fluid communication between the third processing chamber (CL) and the fourth processing chamber (Rl) is restricted to fluid flow through the inner tube;

wherein an orifice in the inner tube is disposed in the fourth processing chamber (Rl), proximate to the fifth processing chamber (R2) and on a first side of the block, providing fluid communication between fourth processing chamber (Rl) and the inner tube;

wherein an orifice in the inner tube is disposed in the fifth processing chamber (R2), proximate to the fourth processing chamber (Rl) and on the opposite side of the block, providing fluid communication between fifth processing chamber (R2) and the inner tube; and

wherein fluid communication between the fourth processing chamber (Rl) and the fifth processing chamber (R2) is restricted to fluid flow through a fourth set of a plurality of tubes.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein a second orifice is disposed on the outer tube of the first processing chamber, proximate to the intake chamber.

3. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein a second orifice disposed on the outer tube placing the first processing chamber in fluid communication with the exterior surface of the outer tube.

4. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the first processing chamber (ML) is in fluid communication with the outside of the outer tube through an orifice.

5. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the second processing chamber (H) is in fluid communication with the outside of the outer tube through an orifice.

6. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the third processing chamber (CL) is in fluid communication with the outside of the outer tube through an orifice.

7. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the fourth processing chamber (Rl) is in fluid communication with the outside of the outer tube through an orifice.

8. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the fifth processing chamber (R2) is in fluid communication with the outside of the outer tube through an orifice.

9. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the tubes of the sets of tubes comprise polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE).

Description:
DOWN-HOLE GAS SEPARATION SYSTEM

In the United States Patent and Trademark Office

Receiving Office

Application for Letters Patent

Inventor: Gary V. Marshall

Midland, Texas

Citizenship: United States

DESCRIPTION

This Application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application 62/360,379 of filing date 9 July 2016. This Application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application 62/360,382 of filing date 9 July 2016.

Technical Field.

Disclosed herein are improvements to down-hole gas separation method, apparatus, and system.

Background Art.

To provide further explanation of the art, reference is made to the disclosures of U.S. Provisional Application 62/101,937 of filing date 9 January 2015, entitled "Down- Hole gas Separation System" and PCT Application PCT/US16/12419 of filing date 7 January 2016. Disclosure of the Invention.

Disclosed is an apparatus for gas and solids separation from down-hole fluids. The apparatus includes: an inner tube having a length in a longitudinal direction; an outer tube disposed about the inner tube; and a plurality of chambers, wherein each chamber is defined by an annular region between the outer tube, the inner tube, and a first fluid barrier and a second fluid barrier, each fluid barrier disposed in an annular region between the inner tube and the outer tube. One of the plurality of chambers comprises an intake chamber, in fluid communication with the outside of the outer tube through an orifice. One of the plurality of chambers comprises a first processing chamber (ML) disposed longitudinally adjacent to the intake chamber. One of the plurality of chambers comprises a second processing chamber (H) disposed longitudinally adjacent to the first processing chamber, opposite from the intake chamber. One of the plurality of chambers comprises a third processing chamber (CL) disposed longitudinally adjacent to the second processing chamber (H), opposite from the first processing chamber (ML). One of the plurality of chambers comprises a fourth processing chamber (Rl) disposed longitudinally adjacent to the intake chamber, opposite from the first processing chamber (ML). One of the plurality of chambers comprises a fifth processing chamber (R2) disposed longitudinally adjacent to the fourth processing chamber (Rl), opposite from the intake chamber. Fluid communication between the intake chamber and the first processing chamber (ML) is restricted to fluid flow through a first set of a plurality of tubes. Fluid communication between the first processing chamber (ML) and the second processing chamber (H) is restricted to fluid flow through a second set of a plurality of tubes. Fluid communication between the second processing chamber (H) and the third processing chamber (CL) is restricted to fluid flow through a third set of a plurality of tubes. A block restricts fluid communication within the inner tube between the fourth processing chamber (Rl) and the fifth processing chamber (R2). Fluid communication between the third processing chamber (CL) and the fourth processing chamber (Rl) is restricted to fluid flow through the inner tube. An orifice in the inner tube is disposed in the fourth processing chamber (Rl), proximate to the fifth processing chamber (R2) and on a first side of the block, providing fluid communication between fourth processing chamber (Rl) and the inner tube. An orifice in the inner tube is disposed in the fifth processing chamber (R2), proximate to the fourth processing chamber (Rl) and on the opposite side of the block, providing fluid communication between fifth processing chamber (R2) and the inner tube. Fluid communication between the fourth processing chamber (Rl) and the fifth processing chamber (R2) is restricted to fluid flow through a fourth set of a plurality of tubes.

In one example, the tubes of the sets of tubes are made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE).

Brief Description of the Drawings.

Fig. D-100 illustrates a configuration for gas separation that includes an intake chamber, chamber beneath the intake chamber having a plurality of overlapping tubes, chamber beneath the overlapping tube chamber also called a "huddle stage", and a loading stage chamber beneath the "huddle stage" chamber.

Fig. D-101 illustrates detail of pack-off, isolation detail, shown at the top of the apparatus. Fig. D-102 illustrates detail of isolation structure between the chambers, providing orifices for tubes to pass there through. Fig. D-103 illustrates threaded collar detail for attachment of the apparatus to other pipe or tools.

Fig. D-104 illustrates detail of the intake and free gas chamber with intake slots. Detail of the isolation structure at bottom of the intake and free gas chamber (and top of overlapping tube chamber) is also shown.

Fig. D-105 illustrates detail of the placement of the overlapping tubes in the "overlapping tube" chamber. Fig. D-106 illustrates detail of the placement of the tubes in the "huddle" chamber.

Fig. D-107 illustrates detail of the placement of tubes in the loading stage chamber. As shown, the bottom of the inner pipe is open in this chamber. The set of tubes from the chamber above terminate into this chamber. Detail of the isolation structure at the top of the chamber is shown. In one example, the bottom of the chamber is closed.

Fig. D-108 illustrates detail of a graduated multi-stage chamber system. Details of the isolations structures between the chambers is also shown, including relative placement of the openings for the sets of tubes. In one example, the lengths of the chambers are varied, or, for example, graduated.

Fig. D-109 illustrates a reverse flow Marshall Loop.

Fig. D-110 illustrates a schematic sketch, showing one example configuration with relative placement of the chambers and the relative placement of the sets of tubes communicating between the chambers.

Mode(s) for Carrying out the Invention.

In one example, Fig. D-100 discloses a configuration for gas separation that includes an intake chamber (Fig. D-104 for detail view), chamber beneath the intake chamber having a plurality of overlapping tubes (Fig. D-105 for detail view), chamber beneath the overlapping tube chamber also called a "huddle stage" (Fig. D-106 for detail view), and a loading stage chamber (Fig. D-107 for detail view) beneath the "huddle stage" chamber. In one example, exhaust port(s) are placed in the shroud near the tops of one or more of these chambers. In the example shown, there are two overlapping tube chambers and two "huddle stage" chambers. In one example, the overlapping tubes are made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE).

In one example, Fig. D-101 discloses detail of pack-off, isolation detail, shown at the top of the apparatus.

In one example, Fig. D-102 discloses detail of isolation structure between the chambers, providing orifices for tubes to pass there through.

In one example, Fig. D-103 discloses threaded collar detail for attachment of the apparatus to other pipe or tools.

In one example, Fig. D-104 discloses detail of the intake and free gas chamber with intake slots. Detail of the isolation structure at bottom of the intake and free gas chamber (and top of overlapping tube chamber) is also shown.

In one example, Fig. D-105 discloses detail of the placement of the overlapping tubes in the "overlapping tube" chamber. Detail of the top isolation structure and bottom isolation structure is also shown. In the example shown, the set of tubes entering from the top are disposed on one side of the chamber (approximately 0 to 180 degrees) and the set of tubes exiting the bottom are disposed on the other side of the chamber (approximately 180 to 360 degrees). As shown in this example, the tubes projecting from the top (from the chamber above) terminate into this overlapping tube chamber. Likewise, the tubes projecting from the bottom (from the chamber below) terminate into this overlapping chamber. The tubes from the top terminate at a position lower than the position where the tubes from the bottom terminate: hence, the term "overlapping tube".

In one example, Fig. D-106 discloses detail of the placement of the tubes in the "huddle" chamber. Detail of the top isolation structure and bottom isolation structure is also shown. In the example shown, the set of tubes entering from the top are disposed on one side of the chamber (approximately 0 to 180 degrees) and the set of tubes exiting the bottom are disposed on the other side of the chamber (approximately 180 to 360 degrees). As shown in this example, the tubes projecting from the top (from the chamber above) terminate into this "huddle" chamber. Likewise, the tubes projecting from the bottom (from the chamber below) terminate into this "huddle" chamber. The tubes from the top terminate at a position higher than the position where the tubes from the bottom terminate: in this example, they do not "overlap".

In one example, Fig. D-107 discloses detail of the placement of tubes in the loading stage chamber. As shown, the bottom of the inner pipe is open in this chamber. The set of tubes from the chamber above terminate into this chamber. Detail of the isolation structure at the top of the chamber is shown. In one example, the bottom of the chamber is closed.

In one example, Fig. D-108 discloses detail of a graduated multi-stage chamber system. Details of the isolations structures between the chambers is also shown, including relative placement of the openings for the sets of tubes. In one example, the lengths of the chambers are varied, or, for example, graduated.

In one example. Fig. D-109 discloses a reverse flow Marshall Loop. In the example as shown, two chambers are placed above the intake chamber ("reverse flow" chambers). The inner pipe is blocked by a plugged coupling in such a way that flow from the loading stage chamber exits the inner pipe and flows into the lower of "reverse flow" chambers. As shown, ports on the inner pipe, near the top of the lower chamber, enable the flow from the inner pipe (from the loading stage chamber) into the lower "reverse flow" chamber. A tube or set of tubes are placed in such as way as to allow flow from the lower "reverse flow" chamber into the upper "reverse flow" chamber. As shown, these tubes terminate near the bottom of the lower "reverse flow" chamber and near the top of the upper "reverse flow" chamber. The upper "reverse flow" chamber has slots into the inner pipe (above the plugged coupling) which enables the flow to exit the upper "reverse flow" chamber into the inner pipe, continuing upward to ultimately exit the well as produced fluids. As shown, the slots in the inner pipe in the upper "reverse flow" chamber are disposed near the bottom of the upper "reverse flow" chamber. In one example, the inner pipe is made of fiberglass. As shown, the isolation structure of the bottom of the lower "reverse flow" chamber is a pack-off (in one example, with a threaded collar), as there is no flow communication between the intake chamber and the lower "reverse flow" chamber in the annular region between the shroud and the inner pipe. Detail of the isolation structure between the upper "reverse flow" chamber and the lower "reverse flow" chamber is also shown.

A schematic sketch is also disclosed, Fig. D-110, showing one example configuration with relative placement of the chambers and the relative placement of the sets of tubes communicating between the chambers.

Additional detail and examples are as follows:

Intake Chamber (see Fig. D-104, 5/11 and Fig. D-108, 9/11).

In one example, Fluid and Gaseous and/or Solids-laden Fluid enters slotted intake of apparatus (Fig. D-104).

In one example, an alternate intake chamber configuration is shown (Fig. D-108), with slots along the shroud for intake of fluids. In one example, one or more intake chambers or cascading intake chambers are utilized, Each chamber having an orifice communicating with the annulus of the well. One of more of the first ends of the plurality of tubes is positioned and arrange in the bottom of each respective intake chamber and the second open ends of such are arranged and positioned in Marshall Loop Chamber, so that each intake chamber does not communicate with any other intake chamber and that each intake chamber separately communicates with the Marshall Loop Chamber.

When a pressure drop occurs in the Marshall Loop Chamber, pressure drop is recognized by all intake chambers.

Additional description of Cascading Intake.

In further example, one or more first chambers or series of chambers includes (Alternate a series of intervening chambers where the first open end or ends of the plurality of tubes of the respective intervening chamber is positioned in the respective intervening chamber and the second open ends of the plurality of tubes of the respective intervening chamber is positioned and arranged in the overlapping tube chamber. Free Gas Chamber (see Fig. D-104, 5/11).

In one example, an area is provided between the Orifice in the Intake Chamber and the top of the Marshall Loop Chamber ("overlapping tube" chamber) wherein free/broken gas is allowed to express or escape through intake slots as Gaseous and solids-laden fluid travels through the annulus (area between the inside of the shroud of apparatus and outside of the dip tube) of Free Gas Chamber.

Marshall Loop Chamber (see Fig. D-105, 6/11). In one example, a plurality of tubes by which gaseous and solids-laden fluids enter chamber; a second plurality of tubes, the entry point of which is above the exit point of the first plurality of tubes forcing the gaseous and solids-laden fluids to reverse direction of flow; free gas rises to the top of the chamber and is expelled from chamber through an orifice in the top of the chamber by way of displacement. Gas free fluids and solids flows into the second plurality of tubes and enters the next chamber.

Marshall Loop Chamber - Reversed Flow Regime.

In another example flow can be reversed through the Marshall Loop Chamber creating a "sump affect" within the chamber. In a Reversed Flow Regime, fluid enters through the Lower Tubes, with Gas free fluid flowing downward and entering Upper Tubes. Upper Tubes remain "sumped" in fluid, while free/broken gas bubbles accumulate above Lower Tubes. As with other configurations, accumulated gas expresses or exits the apparatus through a Gas Port located above the Lower Tubes.

How the Marshall Loop works - one example.

A. Entry Tubes of Marshall Loop Chamber

As Gaseous and solids-laden fluid travels through Free Gas Chamber, Gaseous and/or solids-laden fluid then enters Entry Tubes of Marshall Loop Chamber. As Gaseous and/or solids-laden fluid travel through Entry Tubes of Marshall Loop Chamber, velocity increases and pressure decreases, precipitating entrained gas to break and form free gas bubbles. Gaseous and/or solids-laden fluid are further subjected to centrifugal effect, causing one or all of the following to occur, to wit; (1) entrained gas to break and form free gas bubbles, (2) bond between Solids and Gas broken resulting in Gas free solids and (3) coalescence of free/broken gas bubbles thereby creating larger and faster rising gas bubbles.

B. Marshall Loop Chamber

Free/broken Gas bubbles and Gaseous and/or solids-laden fluid exits Entry Tubes of Marshall Loop Chamber into the Marshall Loop Chamber. Velocity decreases and Free/broken Gas bubbles and Gaseous and/or solids-laden fluid are forced to reverse direction and travel to top of Marshall Loop Chamber.

C. Gas Pocket

Free/broken Gas bubbles accumulates and forms a gas pocket in portion of Marshall Loop Chamber above Exit Tubes.

D. Gas Port

A Gas Port may be provided, in one example, above Exit Tubes. Fluid exiting Entry Tubes forces, by virtue of displacement, accumulated free/broken gas to express or exit Apparatus through Gas Port located in top of chamber.

E. Exit Tubes-Marshall Loop Chamber

Gas Free Fluid and Gaseous and/or solids-laden fluid enters Exit Tubes of Marshall Loop Chamber and travels into the next Chamber.

F. Reversed Flow Regime-Marshall Loop Chamber

In another example, flow is reversed through the Marshall Loop Chamber creating a "sump affect" within the chamber. In a Reversed Flow Regime, fluid enters through the Lower Tubes, with Gas free fluid flowing downward and entering Upper Tubes. Upper Tubes remain "sumped" in fluid, while free/broken gas bubbles accumulate above Lower Tubes. As with other configurations, accumulated gas expresses or exits the apparatus through a Gas Port located above the Lower Tubes.

Huddle Chambers (see Fig. D-106, 7/11).

In one example, a plurality of tubes is provided by which gaseous and solids- laden fluids enter chamber; the first plurality of tubes opposing a second plurality of tubes, whereby fluid does not change direction of flow; free gas rises to the top of the chamber and gas free fluids and solids flows into the second plurality of tubes and enters the next chamber. Free gas is expelled from chamber through an orifice in the top of the chamber by way of displacement How the Huddle works - one example.

A. Entry Tubes of Huddle Chamber- Gas Free Fluid and Gaseous and/or solids- laden fluid enters the Entry Tubes of a Huddle Chamber, velocity increases and pressure decreases, precipitating entrained gas to break and form free gas bubbles. Gaseous and/or solids-laden fluid are further subjected to centrifugal effect, causing one or all of the following to occur, to wit; (1) entrained gas to break and form free gas bubbles, (2) bond between Solids and Gas broken resulting in Gas free solids and (3) coalescence of free/broken gas bubbles thereby creating larger and faster rising gas bubbles.

B. Huddle Chamber

Free/broken Gas bubbles, Gas Free Fluid and Gaseous and/or solids-laden fluid exits Entry Tubes of Huddle Chamber into the Huddle Chamber. Velocity decreases and Free/broken Gas bubbles rise to top of the Huddle Chamber and Accumulate in the Huddle Area. Gas Free Fluid and Gaseous and/or solids-laden fluid enter Exit Tubes of Huddle Chamber.

C. Huddle Area

Length of Entry Tubes creates a gas huddle area wherein Free/broken gas bubbles rise out of fluids and accumulate into the top of the Huddle Chamber.

D. Gas Port

A Gas Port, in one example, is provided in upper portion of Huddle Chamber. Fluid exiting Entry Tubes forces, by virtue of displacement, accumulated free/broken gas to express or exit Apparatus through Gas Port.

E. Exit Tubes of Huddle Chamber

Gas Free Fluid and Gaseous and/or solids-laden fluid enters Exit Tubes of Huddle Chamber and travels into the next Chamber.

F. Gas Free Fluid and Gaseous and/or solids-laden fluid enters Exit Tubes of Huddle Chamber and travels into the next Chamber or exits apparatus through Dip Tube, depending upon location of Chamber within the configuration of apparatus. Clean Fluid Loading Chamber (see Fig. D-107, 8/11).

How the Loading Chamber works - one example.

A. Entry Tubes

Gas Free Fluid and/or solids-laden fluid enters Entry Tubes of Loading Chamber. Gas Free Fluid and/or solids-laden fluid are further subjected to centrifugal effect, causing one or all of the following to occur, to wit; (1) entrained gas to break and form free gas bubbles, (2) bond between Solids and Gas broken resulting in Gas free solids and (3) coalescence of free/broken gas bubbles thereby creating larger and faster rising gas bubbles.

B. Loading Chamber

Free/broken Gas bubbles, Gas Free Fluid and Gaseous and/or solids-laden fluid exits Entry Tubes of Clean Fluid Loading Chamber into the Loading Chamber. Velocity decreases and Free/broken Gas bubbles rise to top of the Loading Chamber and Accumulate in the Huddle Area. Solids drop out of fluid into Solids Chamber.

C. Gas Port

A Gas Port, in one example, is provided in upper portion of Clean Fluid Loading Chamber. Fluid exiting Entry Tubes forces, by virtue of displacement, accumulated free/broken gas to express or exit Apparatus through Gas Port.

Dip Tube or Inner Tube..

Gas Free Fluid and Solids Free Fluid from the Loading Chamber enters Dip Tube (the inner pipe) and travels through Dip Tube to a point at which Gas Free Fluid and Solids Free Fluid exits Apparatus.

Reversed Flow Chambers (see Fig. D-109, 10/11)..

In another example, fluid from loading chamber flows though Dip Tube past isolation above intake and enters one or more additional Reverse Flow Chambers (see Fig. D-109, 10/11). Fluid exits Dip Tube through Orifice located in the upper portion of the Bottom Reverse Flow Chamber. Any remaining gas rises above the orifice into the top of the Bottom Reverse Flow Chamber and Gas Free liquid flows to the lower portion of the Bottom Reverse Flow chamber and enters the first open ends of a plurality of tubes. Fluid flows from the lower portion of the Bottom Reverse Flow chamber through a plurality of tubes into the upper portion of the Top Reverse Flow chamber. Any remaining gas rises above the second open ends of a plurality of tubes into the upper portion of the Top Reverse Flow Chamber and Gas Free liquid flows to the lower portion of the Top Reverse Flow chamber and enters an Orifice in the Dip Tube in the lower portion of the Top Reverse Flow Chamber. Fluid flows from the lower portion of the Top Reverse Flow chamber through the Dip tube and exits apparatus.

In another example, Two chambers positioned and arranged above the Intake chamber, a plurality of tubes whereby fluid communicates between the two chambers; first an orifice in the top of the Bottom Reverse Flow chamber positioned and arranged to expel gases; an orifice into the inner tube, positioned and arranged in the top of the Bottom Reverse Flow chamber; and where the first open ends of the plurality of tubes is positioned and arranged in the bottom of the Bottom Reverse Flow chamber and below the orifice into the Bottom Reverse Flow chamber inner tube; and where the Bottom Reverse Flow chamber orifice for expelling gases is positioned and arranged above both the first open ends of the plurality of tubes and an orifice into the Bottom Reverse Flow chamber inner tube.

The Top Reverse Flow chamber positioned and arranged above the Bottom Reverse Flow chamber; where the second open ends of the plurality of tubes are positioned and arranged in the upper portion of the Top Reverse Flow chamber; an orifice in the Top Reverse Flow chamber positioned and arranged to expel gases; an orifice into an inner tube, positioned and arranged in the lower portion of the Top Reverse Flow chamber; and where the second open ends of the plurality of tubes is positioned and arranged above the orifice into the Top Reverse Flow chamber inner tube; and where an orifice into the Top Reverse Flow chamber inner tube is positioned and arranged below the second open ends of the plurality of tubes; and where the Top Reverse Flow chamber orifice for expelling gases is positioned and arranged above both the second open ends of the plurality of tubes and an orifice into the Top Reverse Flow chamber inner tube. Examples.

One example of the apparatus for gas and solids separation from down-hole fluids is described as follows:

an inner tube having a length in a longitudinal direction;

an outer tube disposed about the inner tube;

a plurality of chambers, wherein each chamber is defined by an annular region between the outer tube, the inner tube, and a first fluid barrier and a second fluid barrier, each fluid barrier disposed in an annular region between the inner tube and the outer tube; wherein one of the plurality of chambers comprises an intake chamber, in fluid communication with the outside of the outer tube through an orifice;

wherein one of the plurality of chambers comprises a first processing chamber (ML) disposed longitudinally adjacent to the intake chamber;

wherein one of the plurality of chambers comprises a second processing chamber (H) disposed longitudinally adjacent to the first processing chamber, opposite from the intake chamber;

wherein one of the plurality of chambers comprises a third processing chamber (CL) disposed longitudinally adjacent to the second processing chamber (H), opposite from the first processing chamber (ML);

wherein one of the plurality of chambers comprises a fourth processing chamber (Rl) disposed longitudinally adjacent to the intake chamber, opposite from the first processing chamber (ML);

wherein one of the plurality of chambers comprises a fifth processing chamber (R2) disposed longitudinally adjacent to the fourth processing chamber (Rl), opposite from the intake chamber;

wherein fluid communication between the intake chamber and the first processing chamber (ML) is restricted to fluid flow through a first set of a plurality of tubes; wherein fluid communication between the first processing chamber (ML) and the second processing chamber (H) is restricted to fluid flow through a second set of a plurality of tubes;

wherein fluid communication between the second processing chamber (H) and the third processing chamber (CL) is restricted to fluid flow through a third set of a plurality of tubes;

wherein a block restricts fluid communication within the inner tube between the fourth processing chamber (Rl) and the fifth processing chamber (R2);

wherein fluid communication between the third processing chamber (CL) and the fourth processing chamber (Rl) is restricted to fluid flow through the inner tube;

wherein an orifice in the inner tube is disposed in the fourth processing chamber (Rl), proximate to the fifth processing chamber (R2) and on a first side of the block, providing fluid communication between fourth processing chamber (Rl) and the inner tube;

wherein an orifice in the inner tube is disposed in the fifth processing chamber

(R2), proximate to the fourth processing chamber (Rl) and on the opposite side of the block, providing fluid communication between fifth processing chamber (R2) and the inner tube; and

wherein fluid communication between the fourth processing chamber (Rl) and the fifth processing chamber (R2) is restricted to fluid flow through a fourth set of a plurality of tubes.

In a further example, a second orifice is disposed on the outer tube of the first processing chamber, proximate to the intake chamber. In a further example, a second orifice disposed on the outer tube placing the first processing chamber in fluid communication with the exterior surface of the outer tube. In a further example, the first processing chamber (ML) is in fluid communication with the outside of the outer tube through an orifice. In a further example, the second processing chamber (H) is in fluid communication with the outside of the outer tube through an orifice. In a further example, the third processing chamber (CL) is in fluid communication with the outside of the outer tube through an orifice. In a further example, the fourth processing chamber (Rl) is in fluid communication with the outside of the outer tube through an orifice. In a further example, the fifth processing chamber (R2) is in fluid communication with the outside of the outer tube through an orifice. Industrial Applicability.

The method(s), apparatus, and system(s) disclosed herein have direct industrial applicability in the oil & gas extraction industry. In summary, herein disclosed are particular structural means for forcing the degassing of the gaseous liquid, including means for changing the velocity of the gaseous liquid (speed changes on each exit from the tubes owing to the volume difference between the tubes and the chamber), means for changing the direction of the gaseous liquid (owing to the flow changing direction from exiting one set of tubes to travel to the opening to enter the next set of tubes), and means for changing the pressure of the gaseous liquid (owing perhaps in part to evolution of gas upon entering increased volume).

These and other objectives, features, and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed drawings and associated description that accompanying the drawings.

Although the present invention is described herein with reference to a specific preferred embodiment s), many modifications and variations therein will readily occur to those with ordinary skill in the art. Accordingly, all such variations and modifications are included within the intended scope of the present invention as defined by the reference numerals used.

From the description contained herein, the features of any of the examples, especially as set forth in the claims, can be combined with each other in any meaningful manner to form further examples and/or embodiments. The foregoing description is presented for purposes of illustration and description, and is not intended to limit the invention to the forms disclosed herein. Consequently, variations and modifications commensurate with the above teachings and the teaching of the relevant art are within the spirit of the invention. Such variations will readily suggest themselves to those skilled in the relevant structural or mechanical art. Further, the embodiments described are also intended to enable others skilled in the art to utilize the invention and such or other embodiments and with various modifications required by the particular applications or uses of the invention.