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Title:
DUAL CATALYST SYSTEMS FOR PRODUCING POLYMERS WITH A BROAD MOLECULAR WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION AND A UNIFORM SHORT CHAIN BRANCH DISTRIBUTION
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2015/179628
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Disclosed herein are ethylene-based polymers having a melt index less than 50 g/10 min, a ratio of Mw/Mn from 4 to 20, a density from 0.90 to 0.945 g/cm3, and a substantially constant short chain branch distribution. These polymers can be produced using a dual catalyst system containing a boron bridged metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl group and an indenyl group, and a single atom bridged metallocene compound with a fluorenyl group.

Inventors:
YANG, Qing (2917 Montrose Drive, Bartlesville, OK, 74006, US)
GRECO, Jeffrey, F (4022 S Columbia PL, Tulsa, OK, 74105, US)
MCDANIEL, Max, P (1601 Melmart Drive, Bartlesville, OK, 74006, US)
YU, Youlu (1532 Whitney Lane, Bartlesville, OK, 74006, US)
GLASS, Gary, L. (12600 N 3980 Road, Dewey, OK, 74029, US)
CRAIN, Tony, R (474 Rd 30, Niotaze, KS, 67355, US)
Application Number:
US2015/031952
Publication Date:
November 26, 2015
Filing Date:
May 21, 2015
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
CHEVRON PHILLIPS CHEMICAL COMPANY LP (10001 Six Pines Drive, The Woodlands, TX, 77380, US)
International Classes:
C08F210/16
Domestic Patent References:
2015-05-28
2000-04-13
Foreign References:
EP0743324A21996-11-20
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Other References:
"IUPAC Compendium of Chemical Terminology", 1997
"Chemical and Engineering News", vol. 63, 1985, pages: 27
"Modern Plastics Encyclopedia", vol. 72, November 1995
"Film Extrusion Manual - Process, Materials, Properties", 1992, TAPPI PRESS
JANZEN; COLBY, J. MOL. STRUCT., vol. 485/486, 1999, pages 569 - 584
J. PHYS. CHEM., vol. 84, 1980, pages 649
Y. YU; D. C. ROHLFING; G. R HAWLEY; P. J. DESLAURIERS, POLYMER PREPRINT, vol. 44, 2003, pages 50
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HUSEMAN, Cheryl, L (45392) (Chevron Phillips Chemical Company LP, 10001 Six Pines DriveThe Woodlands, TX, 77380, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

1. An olefin polymer having a melt index of less than or equal to about 50 g/10 min, a ratio of Mw/Mn in a range from about 4 to about 20, a density in a range from about 0.90 g/cm3 to about 0.945 g/cm3, and a substantially constant short chain branch distribution (SCBD).

2. The polymer of claim 1, wherein the olefin polymer has:

a Mn in a range from about 8,000 to about 30,000 g/mol; and

a ratio of Mw/Mn in a range from about 4 to about 10.

3. The polymer of claim 1, wherein the olefin polymer has:

a density in a range from about 0.91 to about 0.94 g/cm3;

a ratio of HLMI/MI in a range from about 10 to about 100;

a Mw in a range from about 50,000 to about 300,000 g/mol; and

a ratio of Mz/Mw in a range from about 2 to about 5.

4. The polymer of claim 1, wherein the olefin polymer is an ethylene/ 1-butene copolymer, an ethylene/ 1-hexene copolymer, or an ethylene/ 1-octene copolymer.

5. An article comprising the olefin polymer of claim 4.

6. The polymer of claim 1, wherein the olefin polymer has:

a melt index in a range from about 0.1 to about 10 g/10 min;

a ratio of Mw/Mn in a range from about 4.1 to about 8;

a density in a range from about 0.915 g/cm3 to about 0.945 g/cm3; and a substantially constant short chain branch distribution (SCBD).

7. The polymer of claim 6, wherein the olefin polymer is an ethylene/ 1-butene copolymer, an ethylene/ 1-hexene copolymer, or an ethylene/ 1-octene copolymer.

8. The polymer of claim 7, wherein the olefin polymer has:

less than about 0.008 long chain branches per 1000 total carbon atoms; and a bimodal molecular weight distribution.

9. The polymer of claim 7, wherein the olefin polymer has:

a ratio of HLMI/MI in a range from about 10 to about 250; and

a ratio of Mz/Mw in a range from about 2 to about 4.

10. An article comprising the olefin polymer of claim 7.

11. A polymerization process, the process comprising: contacting a catalyst composition with an olefin monomer and an optional olefin comonomer in a polymerization reactor system under polymerization conditions to produce an olefin polymer, wherein the catalyst composition comprises catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator, and an optional co-catalyst, wherein: catalyst component I comprises a boron bridged metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl group and an indenyl group; and

catalyst component II comprises a single atom bridged metallocene compound with a fluorenyl group.

12. The process of claim 1 1, wherein:

the catalyst composition comprises an organoaluminum co-catalyst; and the activator comprises a fluorided solid oxide and/or a sulfated solid oxide.

13. The process of claim 1 1, wherein the activator comprises an aluminoxane compound, an organoboron or organoborate compound, an ionizing ionic compound, or any combination thereof.

14. The process of claim 1 1, wherein:

the polymerization reactor system comprises a slurry reactor, a gas-phase reactor, a solution reactor, or a combination thereof; and

the olefin monomer comprises ethylene, and the olefin comonomer comprises 1-butene, 1-hexene, 1-octene, or a mixture thereof.

15. The process of claim 1 1, wherein the olefin polymer is an ethylene/a-olefin copolymer characterized by a substantially constant short chain branch distribution.

16. A catalyst composition comprising catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator, and an optional co-catalyst, wherein:

catalyst component I comprises a boron bridged metallocene compound having formula (A):

(A); and catalyst component II comprises a single atom bridged metallocene compound having formul

(B); wherein:

M and M3 independently are Ti, Zr, or Hf;

each X independently is a monoanionic ligand;

Cp is a cyclopentadienyl group, optionally substituted;

Ind is an indenyl group, optionally substituted;

Cpc is a cyclopentadienyl group or an indenyl group, optionally substituted;

Rx and RY independently are H, a halide, a Ci to C36 hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to C36 halogenated hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to C36 hydrocarboxy group, or a Ci to C36 hydrocarbylsilyl group;

E3 is C, Si, or Ge;

each R independently is H, a Ci to C36 hydrocarbyl group, or a Ci to C36 hydrocarbylsilyl group; and

each R3 independently is H or a Ci to Cis hydrocarbyl group.

17. The composition of claim 16, wherein the activator comprises an aluminoxane compound, an organoboron or organoborate compound, an ionizing ionic compound, or any combination thereof.

18. The composition of claim 16, wherein the catalyst composition comprises a co- catalyst, and wherein the activator comprises an activator-support, the activator-support comprising a solid oxide treated with an electron-withdrawing anion.

19. The composition of claim 16, wherein a weight ratio of catalyst component I to catalyst component II is in a range of from about 1 : 10 to about 10: 1.

20. The composition of claim 16, wherein:

M and M3 independently are Zr or Hf;

each X independently is a halide or a Ci to Cis hydrocarbyl group;

at least one of Cp and Ind has an alkenyl substituent; Cpc is a cyclopentadienyl group, optionally substituted; Rx and RY independently are a Ci to Cs hydrocarbyl group; E3 is C or Si;

each R independently is a Ci to C12 hydrocarbyl group; and each R3 independently is a Ci to C12 hydrocarbyl group.

Description:
DUAL CATALYST SYSTEMS FOR PRODUCING POLYMERS WITH A BROAD MOLECULAR WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION AND A UNIFORM SHORT CHAIN BRANCH DISTRIBUTION REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 61/905,894, filed on November 19, 2013, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Polyolefins such as high density polyethylene (HDPE) homopolymer and linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) copolymer can be produced using various combinations of catalyst systems and polymerization processes. In some end-use applications, it can be beneficial to use a dual metallocene catalyst system to produce copolymers having broad and/or bimodal molecular weight distributions. Moreover, it can be beneficial for such copolymers to also have a flat or uniform comonomer distribution. Accordingly, it is to these ends that the present invention is directed.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described below in the detailed description. This summary is not intended to identify required or essential features of the claimed subject matter. Nor is this summary intended to be used to limit the scope of the claimed subject matter.

The present invention generally relates to new catalyst compositions, methods for preparing catalyst compositions, methods for using the catalyst compositions to polymerize olefins, the polymer resins produced using such catalyst compositions, and articles produced using these polymer resins. In particular, aspects of the present invention are directed to catalyst compositions employing two metallocene catalyst components. The first catalyst component can comprise a boron bridged metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl group and an indenyl group. The second catalyst component can comprise a single atom bridged metallocene compound with a fluorenyl group. Such catalyst compositions can be used to produce, for example, ethylene-based copolymers for variety of end-use applications.

The present invention also contemplates and encompasses olefin polymerization processes. Such processes can comprise contacting a catalyst composition with an olefin monomer and optionally an olefin comonomer under polymerization conditions to produce an olefin polymer. Generally, the catalyst composition employed can comprise any of the catalyst component I (boron bridged) cyclopentadienyl-indenyl metallocene compounds, any of the catalyst component II (single atom bridged) metallocene compounds with a fluorenyl group, and any of the activators and optional co-catalysts disclosed herein. For example, organoaluminum compounds can be utilized in the catalyst compositions and/or polymerization processes.

Polymers produced from the polymerization of olefins, resulting in homopolymers, copolymers, terpolymers, etc., can be used to produce various articles of manufacture. A representative and non-limiting example of an olefin polymer (e.g., an ethylene copolymer) consistent with aspects of this invention can be characterized as having the following properties: a melt index of less than or equal to about 50 g/10 min, a ratio of Mw/Mn in a range from about 4 to about 20, a density in a range from about 0.90 g/cm 3 to about 0.945 g/cm 3 , and a substantially constant short chain branch distribution (SCBD). Another representative and non-limiting ethylene-based polymer described herein can have a melt index of less than or equal to about 10 g/10 min, a ratio of Mw/Mn in a range from about 4.1 to about 8, a density in a range from about 0.915 g/cm 3 to about 0.945 g/cm 3 , and a substantially constant short chain branch distribution (SCBD). These polymers, in further aspects, can be characterized by low levels of long chain branches (LCB) and/or by a bimodal molecular weight distribution.

Both the foregoing summary and the following detailed description provide examples and are explanatory only. Accordingly, the foregoing summary and the following detailed description should not be considered to be restrictive. Further, features or variations may be provided in addition to those set forth herein. For example, certain aspects and embodiments may be directed to various feature combinations and sub-combinations described in the detailed description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 presents a plot of the molecular weight distribution and short chain branch distribution of the polymer of Example 1.

FIG. 2 presents a plot of the molecular weight distribution and short chain branch distribution of the polymer of Example 2. FIG. 3 presents a plot of the molecular weight distribution and short chain branch distribution of the polymer of Example 3.

FIG. 4 presents a plot of the molecular weight distribution and short chain branch distribution of the polymer of Example 4.

FIG. 5 presents a plot of the molecular weight distribution and short chain branch distribution of the polymer of Example 5.

FIG. 6 illustrates the definitions of D85 and D 15 on a molecular weight distribution curve.

DEFINITIONS

To define more clearly the terms used herein, the following definitions are provided. Unless otherwise indicated, the following definitions are applicable to this disclosure. If a term is used in this disclosure but is not specifically defined herein, the definition from the IUPAC Compendium of Chemical Terminology, 2nd Ed (1997), can be applied, as long as that definition does not conflict with any other disclosure or definition applied herein, or render indefinite or non-enabled any claim to which that definition is applied. To the extent that any definition or usage provided by any document incorporated herein by reference conflicts with the definition or usage provided herein, the definition or usage provided herein controls.

While compositions and methods are described herein in terms of "comprising" various components or steps, the compositions and methods can also "consist essentially of or "consist of the various components or steps, unless stated otherwise. For example, a catalyst composition consistent with aspects of the present invention can comprise; alternatively, can consist essentially of; or alternatively, can consist of; (i) catalyst component I, (ii) catalyst component II, (iii) an activator, and (iv) optionally, a co-catalyst.

The terms "a," "an," "the," etc., are intended to include plural alternatives, e.g., at least one, unless otherwise specified. For instance, the disclosure of "an activator- support" or "a metallocene compound" is meant to encompass one, or mixtures or combinations of more than one, activator-support or metallocene compound, respectively, unless otherwise specified.

Generally, groups of elements are indicated using the numbering scheme indicated in the version of the periodic table of elements published in Chemical and Engineering News, 63(5), 27, 1985. In some instances, a group of elements can be indicated using a common name assigned to the group; for example, alkali metals for Group 1 elements, alkaline earth metals for Group 2 elements, transition metals for Group 3-12 elements, and halogens or halides for Group 17 elements.

For any particular compound disclosed herein, the general structure or name presented is also intended to encompass all structural isomers, conformational isomers, and stereoisomers that can arise from a particular set of substituents, unless indicated otherwise. Thus, a general reference to a compound includes all structural isomers unless explicitly indicated otherwise; e.g., a general reference to pentane includes n- pentane, 2-methyl-butane, and 2,2-dimethylpropane, while a general reference to a butyl group includes an n-butyl group, a sec -butyl group, an iso-butyl group, and a tert- butyl group. Additionally, the reference to a general structure or name encompasses all enantiomers, diastereomers, and other optical isomers whether in enantiomeric or racemic forms, as well as mixtures of stereoisomers, as the context permits or requires. For any particular formula or name that is presented, any general formula or name presented also encompasses all conformational isomers, regioisomers, and stereoisomers that can arise from a particular set of substituents.

The term "substituted" when used to describe a group, for example, when referring to a substituted analog of a particular group, is intended to describe any non- hydrogen moiety that formally replaces a hydrogen in that group, and is intended to be non-limiting. A group or groups can also be referred to herein as "unsubstituted" or by equivalent terms such as "non-substituted," which refers to the original group in which a non-hydrogen moiety does not replace a hydrogen within that group. Unless otherwise specified, "substituted" is intended to be non-limiting and include inorganic substituents or organic substituents as understood by one of ordinary skill in the art.

The term "hydrocarbon" whenever used in this specification and claims refers to a compound containing only carbon and hydrogen. Other identifiers can be utilized to indicate the presence of particular groups in the hydrocarbon (e.g., halogenated hydrocarbon indicates the presence of one or more halogen atoms replacing an equivalent number of hydrogen atoms in the hydrocarbon). The term "hydrocarbyl group" is used herein in accordance with the definition specified by IUPAC: a univalent group formed by removing a hydrogen atom from a hydrocarbon (that is, a group containing only carbon and hydrogen). Non-limiting examples of hydrocarbyl groups include alkyl, alkenyl, aryl, and aralkyl groups, amongst other groups.

The term "polymer" is used herein generically to include olefin homopolymers, copolymers, terpolymers, and so forth. A copolymer is derived from an olefin monomer and one olefin comonomer, while a terpolymer is derived from an olefin monomer and two olefin comonomers. Accordingly, "polymer" encompasses copolymers, terpolymers, etc., derived from any olefin monomer and comonomer(s) disclosed herein. Similarly, an ethylene polymer would include ethylene homopolymers, ethylene copolymers, ethylene terpolymers, and the like. As an example, an olefin copolymer, such as an ethylene copolymer, can be derived from ethylene and a comonomer, such as 1-butene, 1-hexene, or 1-octene. If the monomer and comonomer were ethylene and 1 -hexene, respectively, the resulting polymer can be categorized an as ethylene/ 1-hexene copolymer.

In like manner, the scope of the term "polymerization" includes homopolymerization, copolymerization, terpolymerization, etc. Therefore, a copolymerization process can involve contacting one olefin monomer (e.g., ethylene) and one olefin comonomer (e.g., 1-hexene) to produce a copolymer.

The term "co-catalyst" is used generally herein to refer to compounds such as aluminoxane compounds, organoboron or organoborate compounds, ionizing ionic compounds, organoaluminum compounds, organozinc compounds, organomagnesium compounds, organolithium compounds, and the like, that can constitute one component of a catalyst composition, when used, for example, in addition to an activator-support. The term "co-catalyst" is used regardless of the actual function of the compound or any chemical mechanism by which the compound may operate.

The terms "chemically-treated solid oxide," "treated solid oxide compound," and the like, are used herein to indicate a solid, inorganic oxide of relatively high porosity, which can exhibit Lewis acidic or Bronsted acidic behavior, and which has been treated with an electron-withdrawing component, typically an anion, and which is calcined. The electron-withdrawing component is typically an electron-withdrawing anion source compound. Thus, the chemically-treated solid oxide can comprise a calcined contact product of at least one solid oxide with at least one electron- withdrawing anion source compound. Typically, the chemically-treated solid oxide comprises at least one acidic solid oxide compound. The "activator-support" of the present invention can be a chemically-treated solid oxide. The terms "support" and "activator-support" are not used to imply these components are inert, and such components should not be construed as an inert component of the catalyst composition. The term "activator," as used herein, refers generally to a substance that is capable of converting a metallocene component into a catalyst that can polymerize olefins, or converting a contact product of a metallocene component and a component that provides an activatable ligand (e.g., an alkyl, a hydride) to the metallocene, when the metallocene compound does not already comprise such a ligand, into a catalyst that can polymerize olefins. This term is used regardless of the actual activating mechanism. Illustrative activators include activator-supports, aluminoxanes, organoboron or organoborate compounds, ionizing ionic compounds, and the like. Aluminoxanes, organoboron or organoborate compounds, and ionizing ionic compounds generally are referred to as activators if used in a catalyst composition in which an activator-support is not present. If the catalyst composition contains an activator-support, then the aluminoxane, organoboron or organoborate, and ionizing ionic materials are typically referred to as co-catalysts.

The term "metallocene" as used herein describes compounds comprising at least one η 3 to r) 5 -cycloalkadienyl-type moiety, wherein η 3 to r) 5 -cycloalkadienyl moieties include cyclopentadienyl ligands, indenyl ligands, fluorenyl ligands, and the like, including partially saturated or substituted derivatives or analogs of any of these. Possible substituents on these ligands may include H, therefore this invention comprises ligands such as tetrahydroindenyl, tetrahydrofluorenyl, octahydrofluorenyl, partially saturated indenyl, partially saturated fluorenyl, substituted partially saturated indenyl, substituted partially saturated fluorenyl, and the like. In some contexts, the metallocene is referred to simply as the "catalyst," in much the same way the term "co- catalyst" is used herein to refer to, for example, an organoaluminum compound.

The terms "catalyst composition," "catalyst mixture," "catalyst system," and the like, do not depend upon the actual product or composition resulting from the contact or reaction of the initial components of the disclosed or claimed catalyst composition/mixture/system, the nature of the active catalytic site, or the fate of the co- catalyst, the metallocene compound(s), or the activator (e.g., activator-support), after combining these components. Therefore, the terms "catalyst composition," "catalyst mixture," "catalyst system," and the like, encompass the initial starting components of the composition, as well as whatever product(s) may result from contacting these initial starting components, and this is inclusive of both heterogeneous and homogenous catalyst systems or compositions. The terms "catalyst composition," "catalyst mixture," "catalyst system," and the like, can be used interchangeably throughout this disclosure.

The term "contact product" is used herein to describe compositions wherein the components are contacted together in any order, in any manner, and for any length of time. For example, the components can be contacted by blending or mixing. Further, contacting of any component can occur in the presence or absence of any other component of the compositions described herein. Combining additional materials or components can be done by any suitable method. Further, the term "contact product" includes mixtures, blends, solutions, slurries, reaction products, and the like, or combinations thereof. Although "contact product" can include reaction products, it is not required for the respective components to react with one another. Similarly, the term "contacting" is used herein to refer to materials which can be blended, mixed, slurried, dissolved, reacted, treated, or otherwise contacted in some other manner.

Although any methods, devices, and materials similar or equivalent to those described herein can be used in the practice or testing of the invention, the typical methods, devices and materials are herein described.

All publications and patents mentioned herein are incorporated herein by reference for the purpose of describing and disclosing, for example, the constructs and methodologies that are described in the publications, which might be used in connection with the presently described invention. The publications discussed throughout the text are provided solely for their disclosure prior to the filing date of the present application. Nothing herein is to be construed as an admission that the inventors are not entitled to antedate such disclosure by virtue of prior invention.

Applicants disclose several types of ranges in the present invention. When Applicants disclose or claim a range of any type, Applicants' intent is to disclose or claim individually each possible number that such a range could reasonably encompass, including end points of the range as well as any sub-ranges and combinations of sub- ranges encompassed therein. For example, when the Applicants disclose or claim a chemical moiety having a certain number of carbon atoms, Applicants' intent is to disclose or claim individually every possible number that such a range could encompass, consistent with the disclosure herein. For example, the disclosure that a moiety is a Ci to C 18 hydrocarbyl group, or in alternative language, a hydrocarbyl group having from 1 to 18 carbon atoms, as used herein, refers to a moiety that can have 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 1 1, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, or 18 carbon atoms, as well as any range between these two numbers (for example, a Ci to Cs hydrocarbyl group), and also including any combination of ranges between these two numbers (for example, a C 2 to C 4 and a C 12 to C½ hydrocarbyl group).

Similarly, another representative example follows for the ratio of Mw/Mn of an olefin polymer produced in an aspect of this invention. By a disclosure that the Mw/Mn can be in a range from about 4 to about 15, Applicants intend to recite that the Mw/Mn can be any ratio in the range and, for example, can be equal to about 4, about 5, about 6, about 7, about 8, about 9, about 10, about 1 1, about 12, about 13, about 14, or about 15. Additionally, the Mw/Mn can be within any range from about 4 to about 15 (for example, from about 4.1 to about 10.5), and this also includes any combination of ranges between about 4 and about 15 (for example, the Mw/Mn can be in a range from about 4.2 to about 8, or from about 8.5 to about 12). Likewise, all other ranges disclosed herein should be interpreted in a manner similar to these examples.

Applicants reserve the right to proviso out or exclude any individual members of any such group, including any sub-ranges or combinations of sub-ranges within the group, that can be claimed according to a range or in any similar manner, if for any reason Applicants choose to claim less than the full measure of the disclosure, for example, to account for a reference that Applicants may be unaware of at the time of the filing of the application. Further, Applicants reserve the right to proviso out or exclude any individual substituents, analogs, compounds, ligands, structures, or groups thereof, or any members of a claimed group, if for any reason Applicants choose to claim less than the full measure of the disclosure, for example, to account for a reference that Applicants may be unaware of at the time of the filing of the application. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed generally to new catalyst compositions, methods for preparing catalyst compositions, methods for using the catalyst compositions to polymerize olefins, the polymer resins produced using such catalyst compositions, and articles produced using these polymer resins. In particular, the present invention relates to catalyst compositions containing two metallocene components, to polymerization processes utilizing such catalyst compositions, and to the resulting olefin polymers produced from the polymerization processes.

CATALYST COMPONENT I

Catalyst component I can comprise a boron bridged metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl group and an indenyl group. In one aspect, for instance, catalyst component I can comprise a boron bridged, zirconium or hafnium based metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl group and an indenyl group. In another aspect, catalyst component I can comprise a boron bridged, zirconium or hafnium based metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl group and an indenyl group, and does not have an alkyl or an alkenyl substituent. In another aspect, catalyst component I can comprise a boron bridged, zirconium or hafnium based metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl group and an indenyl group, and the cyclopentadienyl group has an alkyl and/or an alkenyl substituent. In another aspect, catalyst component I can comprise a boron bridged, zirconium or hafnium based metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl group and an indenyl group, and the indenyl group has an alkyl and/or an alkenyl substituent. In yet another aspect, catalyst component I can comprise a boron bridged, zirconium or hafnium based metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl group and an indenyl group, and an alkyl and/or alkenyl substituent is present on at least one of the cyclopentadienyl group and the indenyl group. In still another aspect, catalyst component I can comprise a boron bridged, zirconium or hafnium based metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl and an indenyl group, and wherein the cyclopentadienyl group contains no additional substituents (e.g., other than the boron bridging group).

Catalyst component I can comprise, in particular aspects of this invention, a metallocene compound having formula (A):

Within formula (A), M, Cp, Ind, each R, and each X are independent elements of the boron bridged metallocene compound. Accordingly, the boron bridged metallocene compound having formula (A) can be described using any combination of M, Cp, Ind, R, and X disclosed herein.

Unless otherwise specified, formula (A) above, any other structural formulas disclosed herein, and any metallocene complex, compound, or species disclosed herein are not designed to show stereochemistry or isomeric positioning of the different moieties (e.g., these formulas are not intended to display cis or trans isomers, or R or S diastereoisomers), although such compounds are contemplated and encompassed by these formulas and/or structures.

In accordance with aspects of this invention, the metal in formula (A), M, can be Ti, Zr, or Hf. In one aspect, for instance, M can be Zr or Hf, while in another aspect, M can be Ti; alternatively, M can be Zr; or alternatively, M can be Hf.

Each X in formula (A) independently can be a monoanionic ligand. In some aspects, suitable monoanionic ligands can include, but are not limited to, H (hydride), BH 4 , a halide, a Ci to C 36 hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to C 36 hydrocarboxy group, a Ci to C 36 hydrocarbylaminyl group, a Ci to C 36 hydrocarbylsilyl group, a Ci to C 36 hydrocarbylaminylsilyl group, — OBR^, or— OSO2R 1 , wherein R 1 is a Ci to C36 hydrocarbyl group. It is contemplated that each X can be either the same or a different monoanionic ligand.

In one aspect, each X independently can be H, BH 4 , a halide (e.g., F, CI, Br, etc.), a Ci to Cis hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to Cis hydrocarboxy group, a Ci to Cis hydrocarbylaminyl group, a Ci to Cis hydrocarbylsilyl group, or a Ci to Cis hydrocarbylaminylsilyl group. Alternatively, each X independently can be H, BH 4 , a halide, OBR^, or OSO2R 1 , wherein R 1 is a Ci to Cis hydrocarbyl group. In another aspect, each X independently can be H, BH 4 , a halide, a Ci to C12 hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to C12 hydrocarboxy group, a Ci to C12 hydrocarbylaminyl group, a Ci to C12 hydrocarbylsilyl group, a Ci to C 12 hydrocarbylaminylsilyl group, OBR^, or OSO2R 1 , wherein R 1 is a Ci to C 12 hydrocarbyl group. In another aspect, each X independently can be H, BH 4 , a halide, a Ci to C 10 hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to C 10 hydrocarboxy group, a Ci to C10 hydrocarbylaminyl group, a Ci to C10 hydrocarbylsilyl group, a Ci to Cio hydrocarbylaminylsilyl group, OBR^, or OSO2R 1 , wherein R 1 is a Ci to C 10 hydrocarbyl group. In yet another aspect, each X independently can be H, BH 4 , a halide, a Ci to Cs hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to Cs hydrocarboxy group, a Ci to Cs hydrocarbylaminyl group, a Ci to Cs hydrocarbylsilyl group, a Ci to Cs hydrocarbylaminylsilyl group, OBR^, or OSO2R 1 , wherein R 1 is a Ci to Cs hydrocarbyl group. In still another aspect, each X independently can be a halide or a Ci to Cis hydrocarbyl group. For example, each X can be CI.

The hydrocarbyl group which can be an X (one or both) in formula (A) can be a Ci to C 36 hydrocarbyl group, including, but not limited to, a Ci to C 36 alkyl group, a C2 to C 36 alkenyl group, a C 4 to C 36 cycloalkyl group, a Ce to C 36 aryl group, or a C7 to C 36 aralkyl group. For instance, each X independently can be a Ci to C 18 alkyl group, a C2 to Cis alkenyl group, a C 4 to C 18 cycloalkyl group, a Ce to C 18 aryl group, or a C7 to C 18 aralkyl group; alternatively, each X independently can be a Ci to C 12 alkyl group, a C2 to C12 alkenyl group, a C 4 to C 12 cycloalkyl group, a Ce to C 12 aryl group, or a C7 to C 12 aralkyl group; alternatively, each X independently can be a Ci to Cio alkyl group, a C2 to Cio alkenyl group, a C 4 to Cio cycloalkyl group, a Ce to Cio aryl group, or a C7 to Cio aralkyl group; or alternatively, each X independently can be a Ci to C5 alkyl group, a C2 to C5 alkenyl group, a C5 to Cs cycloalkyl group, a Ce to Cs aryl group, or a C7 to Cs aralkyl group.

Accordingly, in some aspects, the alkyl group which can be an X in formula (A) can be a methyl group, an ethyl group, a propyl group, a butyl group, a pentyl group, a hexyl group, a heptyl group, an octyl group, a nonyl group, a decyl group, a undecyl group, a dodecyl group, a tridecyl group, a tetradecyl group, a pentadecyl group, a hexadecyl group, a heptadecyl group, or an octadecyl group; or alternatively, a methyl group, an ethyl group, a propyl group, a butyl group, a pentyl group, a hexyl group, a heptyl group, an octyl group, a nonyl group, or a decyl group. In some aspects, the alkyl group which can be an X in formula (A) can be a methyl group, an ethyl group, a n-propyl group, an iso-propyl group, a n-butyl group, an iso-butyl group, a sec-butyl group, a tert-butyl group, a n-pentyl group, an iso-pentyl group, a sec-pentyl group, or a neopentyl group; alternatively, a methyl group, an ethyl group, an iso-propyl group, a tert-butyl group, or a neopentyl group; alternatively, a methyl group; alternatively, an ethyl group; alternatively, a n-propyl group; alternatively, an iso-propyl group; alternatively, a tert-butyl group; or alternatively, a neopentyl group.

Suitable alkenyl groups which can be an X in formula (A) can include, but are not limited to, an ethenyl group, a propenyl group, a butenyl group, a pentenyl group, a hexenyl group, a heptenyl group, an octenyl group, a nonenyl group, a decenyl group, a undecenyl group, a dodecenyl group, a tridecenyl group, a tetradecenyl group, a pentadecenyl group, a hexadecenyl group, a heptadecenyl group, or an octadecenyl group. Such alkenyl groups can be linear or branched, and the double bond can be located anywhere in the chain. In one aspect, each X in formula (A) independently can be an ethenyl group, a propenyl group, a butenyl group, a pentenyl group, a hexenyl group, a heptenyl group, an octenyl group, a nonenyl group, or a decenyl group, while in another aspect, each X in formula (A) independently can be an ethenyl group, a propenyl group, a butenyl group, a pentenyl group, or a hexenyl group. For example, an X can be an ethenyl group; alternatively, a propenyl group; alternatively, a butenyl group; alternatively, a pentenyl group; or alternatively, a hexenyl group. In yet another aspect, an X can be a terminal alkenyl group, such as a C3 to Ci 8 terminal alkenyl group, a C3 to C 12 terminal alkenyl group, or a C3 to Cs terminal alkenyl group. Illustrative terminal alkenyl groups can include, but are not limited to, a prop-2-en-l-yl group, a bute-3-en-l-yl group, a pent-4-en-l-yl group, a hex-5-en-l-yl group, a hept-6- en-l-yl group, an octe-7-en- 1 -yl group, a non-8-en-l-yl group, a dece-9-en-l-yl group, and so forth.

Each X in formula (A) independently can be a cycloalkyl group, including, but not limited to, a cyclobutyl group, a substituted cyclobutyl group, a cyclopentyl group, a substituted cyclopentyl group, a cyclohexyl group, a substituted cyclohexyl group, a cycloheptyl group, a substituted cycloheptyl group, a cyclooctyl group, or a substituted cyclooctyl group. For example, an X in formula (A) can be a cyclopentyl group, a substituted cyclopentyl group, a cyclohexyl group, or a substituted cyclohexyl group. Moreover, each X in formula (A) independently can be a cyclobutyl group or a substituted cyclobutyl group; alternatively, a cyclopentyl group or a substituted cyclopentyl group; alternatively, a cyclohexyl group or a substituted cyclohexyl group; alternatively, a cycloheptyl group or a substituted cycloheptyl group; alternatively, a cyclooctyl group or a substituted cyclooctyl group; alternatively, a cyclopentyl group; alternatively, a substituted cyclopentyl group; alternatively, a cyclohexyl group; or alternatively, a substituted cyclohexyl group. Substituents which can be utilized for the substituted cycloalkyl group are independently disclosed herein and can be utilized without limitation to further describe the substituted cycloalkyl group which can be an X in formula (A).

In some aspects, the aryl group which can be an X in formula (A) can be a phenyl group, a substituted phenyl group, a naphthyl group, or a substituted naphthyl group. In an aspect, the aryl group can be a phenyl group or a substituted phenyl group; alternatively, a naphthyl group or a substituted naphthyl group; alternatively, a phenyl group or a naphthyl group; alternatively, a substituted phenyl group or a substituted naphthyl group; alternatively, a phenyl group; or alternatively, a naphthyl group. Substituents which can be utilized for the substituted phenyl groups or substituted naphthyl groups are independently disclosed herein and can be utilized without limitation to further describe the substituted phenyl groups or substituted naphthyl groups which can be an X in formula (A).

In an aspect, the substituted phenyl group which can be an X in formula (A) can be a 2-substituted phenyl group, a 3 -substituted phenyl group, a 4-substituted phenyl group, a 2,4-disubstituted phenyl group, a 2,6-disubstituted phenyl group, a 3,5-disubstituted phenyl group, or a 2,4,6-trisubstituted phenyl group. In other aspects, the substituted phenyl group can be a 2-substituted phenyl group, a 4-substituted phenyl group, a 2,4-disubstituted phenyl group, or a 2,6-disubstituted phenyl group; alternatively, a 3-substituted phenyl group or a 3,5-disubstituted phenyl group; alternatively, a 2-substituted phenyl group or a 4-substituted phenyl group; alternatively, a 2,4-disubstituted phenyl group or a 2,6-disubstituted phenyl group; alternatively, a 2-substituted phenyl group; alternatively, a 3-substituted phenyl group; alternatively, a 4-substituted phenyl group; alternatively, a 2,4-disubstituted phenyl group; alternatively, a 2,6-disubstituted phenyl group; alternatively, a 3,5-disubstituted phenyl group; or alternatively, a 2,4,6-trisubstituted phenyl group. Substituents which can be utilized for these specific substituted phenyl groups are independently disclosed herein and can be utilized without limitation to further describe these substituted phenyl groups which can be an X group(s) in formula (A).

In some aspects, the aralkyl group which can be an X group in formula (A) can be a benzyl group or a substituted benzyl group. In an aspect, the aralkyl group can be a benzyl group or, alternatively, a substituted benzyl group. Substituents which can be utilized for the substituted aralkyl group are independently disclosed herein and can be utilized without limitation to further describe the substituted aralkyl group which can be an X group(s) in formula (A).

In an aspect, each non-hydrogen substituent(s) for the substituted cycloalkyl group, substituted aryl group, or substituted aralkyl group which can be an X in formula (A) independently can be a Ci to C 18 hydrocarbyl group; alternatively, a Ci to Cs hydrocarbyl group; or alternatively, a Ci to C5 hydrocarbyl group. Specific hydrocarbyl groups are independently disclosed herein and can be utilized without limitation to further describe the substituents of the substituted cycloalkyl groups, substituted aryl groups, or substituted aralkyl groups which can be an X in formula (A). For instance, the hydrocarbyl substituent can be an alkyl group, such as a methyl group, an ethyl group, a n-propyl group, an isopropyl group, a n-butyl group, a sec-butyl group, an isobutyl group, a tert-butyl group, a n-pentyl group, a 2-pentyl group, a 3- pentyl group, a 2-methyl-l -butyl group, a tert-pentyl group, a 3 -methyl- 1 -butyl group, a 3-methyl-2-butyl group, or a neo-pentyl group, and the like. Furthermore, the hydrocarbyl substituent can be a benzyl group, a phenyl group, a tolyl group, or a xylyl group, and the like.

A hydrocarboxy group is used generically herein to include, for instance, alkoxy, aryloxy, aralkoxy, -(alkyl, aryl, or aralkyl)-0-(alkyl, aryl, or aralkyl) groups, and -0(CO)-(hydrogen or hydrocarbyl) groups, and these groups can comprise up to about 36 carbon atoms (e.g., Ci to C36, Ci to C 18 , Ci to C 10 , or Ci to Cs hydrocarboxy groups). Illustrative and non-limiting examples of hydrocarboxy groups which can be an X in formula (A) can include, but are not limited to, a methoxy group, an ethoxy group, an n-propoxy group, an isopropoxy group, an n-butoxy group, a sec-butoxy group, an isobutoxy group, a tert-butoxy group, an n-pentoxy group, a 2-pentoxy group, a 3-pentoxy group, a 2-methyl-l -butoxy group, a tert-pentoxy group, a 3 -methyl- 1- butoxy group, a 3 -methy 1-2 -butoxy group, a neo-pentoxy group, a phenoxy group, a toloxy group, a xyloxy group, a 2,4,6-trimethylphenoxy group, a benzoxy group, an acetylacetonate group (acac), a formate group, an acetate group, a stearate group, an oleate group, a benzoate group, and the like. In an aspect, the hydrocarboxy group which can be an X in formula (A) can be a methoxy group; alternatively, an ethoxy group; alternatively, an n-propoxy group; alternatively, an isopropoxy group; alternatively, an n-butoxy group; alternatively, a sec-butoxy group; alternatively, an isobutoxy group; alternatively, a tert-butoxy group; alternatively, an n-pentoxy group; alternatively, a 2-pentoxy group; alternatively, a 3-pentoxy group; alternatively, a 2- methyl-l-butoxy group; alternatively, a tert-pentoxy group; alternatively, a 3 -methyl- 1- butoxy group, alternatively, a 3-methyl-2-butoxy group; alternatively, a neo-pentoxy group; alternatively, a phenoxy group; alternatively, a toloxy group; alternatively, a xyloxy group; alternatively, a 2,4,6-trimethylphenoxy group; alternatively, a benzoxy group; alternatively, an acetylacetonate group; alternatively, a formate group; alternatively, an acetate group; alternatively, a stearate group; alternatively, an oleate group; or alternatively, a benzoate group.

The term hydrocarbylaminyl group is used generically herein to refer collectively to, for instance, alkylaminyl, arylaminyl, aralkylaminyl, dialkylaminyl, diarylaminyl, diaralkylaminyl, and -(alkyl, aryl, or aralkyl)-N-(alkyl, aryl, or aralkyl) groups, and unless otherwise specified, the hydrocarbylaminyl groups which can be an X in formula (A) can comprise up to about 36 carbon atoms (e.g., Ci to C36, Ci to Cis, Ci to Cio, or Ci to Cs hydrocarbylaminyl groups). Accordingly, hydrocarbylaminyl is intended to cover both (mono)hydrocarbylaminyl and dihydrocarbylaminyl groups. In some aspects, the hydrocarbylaminyl group which can be an X in formula (A) can be, for instance, a methylaminyl group (-NHCH 3 ), an ethylaminyl group (-NHCH2CH 3 ), an n-propylaminyl group (-NHCH 2 CH 2 CH 3 ), an iso-propylaminyl group (- NHCH(CH 3 ) 2 ), an n-butylaminyl group (-NHCH2CH2CH2CH3), a t-butylaminyl group (-NHC(CH 3 ) 3 ), an n-pentylaminyl group (-NHCH2CH2CH2CH2CH3), a neo- pentylaminyl group (-NHCH 2 C(CH 3 ) 3 ), a phenylaminyl group (- HC 6 H 5 ), a tolylaminyl group (-NHC 6 H 4 CH 3 ), or a xylylaminyl group (- HC 6 H 3 (CH 3 ) 2 ); alternatively, a methylaminyl group; alternatively, an ethylaminyl group; alternatively, a propylaminyl group; or alternatively, a phenylaminyl group. In other aspects, the hydrocarbylaminyl group which can be an X in formula (A) can be, for instance, a dimethylaminyl group (-N(CH 3 ) 2 ), a diethylaminyl group (-N(CH 2 CH 3 ) 2 ), a di-n- propylaminyl group (-N(CH 2 CH 2 CH 3 ) 2 ), a di-iso-propylaminyl group (- N(CH(CH 3 ) 2 ) 2 ), a di-n-butylaminyl group (-N(CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 CH 3 ) 2 ), a di-t-butylaminyl group (-N(C(CH 3 ) 3 ) 2 ), a di-n-pentylaminyl group (-N(CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 CH 3 ) 2 ), a di- neo-pentylaminyl group (-N(CH 2 C(CH 3 ) 3 ) 2 ), a di-phenylaminyl group (- (C 6 H 5 ) 2 ), a di-tolylaminyl group (-N(C 6 H 4 CH 3 ) 2 ), or a di-xylylaminyl group (-N(C 6 H 3 (CH 3 ) 2 ) 2 ); alternatively, a dimethylaminyl group; alternatively, a di-ethylaminyl group; alternatively, a di-n-propylaminyl group; or alternatively, a di-phenylaminyl group.

In accordance with some aspects disclosed herein, each X independently can be a Ci to C 3 6 hydrocarbylsilyl group; alternatively, a Ci to C 24 hydrocarbylsilyl group; alternatively, a Ci to Cis hydrocarbylsilyl group; or alternatively, a Ci to Cs hydrocarbylsilyl group. In an aspect, each hydrocarbyl (one or more) of the hydrocarbylsilyl group can be any hydrocarbyl group disclosed herein (e.g., a Ci to C5 alkyl group, a C 2 to C5 alkenyl group, a C5 to Cs cycloalkyl group, a Ce to Cs aryl group, a C7 to Cs aralkyl group, etc.). As used herein, hydrocarbylsilyl is intended to cover (mono)hydrocarbylsilyl (-SiH 2 R), dihydrocarbylsilyl (-SiHR 2 ), and trihydrocarbylsilyl (-SiR 3 ) groups, with R being a hydrocarbyl group. In one aspect, the hydrocarbylsilyl group can be a C 3 to C ¾ or a C 3 to Cis trihydrocarbylsilyl group, such as, for example, a trialkylsilyl group or a triphenylsilyl group. Illustrative and non-limiting examples of hydrocarbylsilyl groups which can be an X group(s) in formula (A) can include, but are not limited to, trimethylsilyl, triethylsilyl, tripropylsilyl (e.g., triisopropylsilyl), tributylsilyl, tripentylsilyl, triphenylsilyl, allyldimethylsilyl, and the like.

A hydrocarbylaminylsilyl group is used herein to refer to groups containing at least one hydrocarbon moiety, at least one N atom, and at least one Si atom. Illustrative and non-limiting examples of hydrocarbylaminylsilyl groups which can be an X can include, but are not limited to -N(SiMe 3 ) 2 , -N(SiEt 3 ) 2 , and the like. Unless otherwise specified, the hydrocarbylaminylsilyl groups which can be X can comprise up to about 36 carbon atoms (e.g., Ci to C 3 6, Ci to Cis, Ci to Ci 2 , or Ci to Cs hydrocarbylaminylsilyl groups). In an aspect, each hydrocarbyl (one or more) of the hydrocarbylaminylsilyl group can be any hydrocarbyl group disclosed herein (e.g., a Ci to C5 alkyl group, a C 2 to C5 alkenyl group, a C5 to Cs cycloalkyl group, a Ce to Cs aryl group, a C7 to Cs aralkyl group, etc.). Moreover, hydrocarbylaminylsilyl is intended to cover -NH(SiH 2 R), -NH(SiHR 2 ), -NH(SiR 3 ), -N(SiH 2 R) 2 , -N(SiHR 2 ) 2 , and -N(SiR 3 ) 2 groups, among others, with R being a hydrocarbyl group.

In an aspect, each X independently can be -OBR x 2 or -OS0 2 R 1 , wherein R 1 is a Ci to C36 hydrocarbyl group, or alternatively, a Ci to Cis hydrocarbyl group. The hydrocarbyl group in OBR x 2 and/or OS0 2 R 1 independently can be any hydrocarbyl group disclosed herein, such as, for instance, a Ci to Cis alkyl group, a C 2 to Cis alkenyl group, a C 4 to Cis cycloalkyl group, a Ce to Cis aryl group, or a C7 to Cis aralkyl group; alternatively, a Ci to Ci 2 alkyl group, a C 2 to Ci 2 alkenyl group, a C 4 to Ci 2 cycloalkyl group, a Ce to Ci 2 aryl group, or a C7 to Ci 2 aralkyl group; or alternatively, a Ci to Cs alkyl group, a C 2 to Cs alkenyl group, a C5 to Cs cycloalkyl group, a Ce to Cs aryl group, or a C7 to Cs aralkyl group.

In one aspect, each X independently can be H, BH 4 , a halide, or a Ci to C36 hydrocarbyl group, hydrocarboxy group, hydrocarbylaminyl group, hydrocarbylsilyl group, or hydrocarbylaminylsilyl group, while in another aspect, each X independently can be H, BH 4 , or a Ci to Cis hydrocarboxy group, hydrocarbylaminyl group, hydrocarbylsilyl group, or hydrocarbylaminylsilyl group. In yet another aspect, each X independently can be a halide; alternatively, a Ci to Cis hydrocarbyl group; alternatively, a Ci to Cis hydrocarboxy group; alternatively, a Ci to Cis hydrocarbylaminyl group; alternatively, a Ci to Cis hydrocarbylsilyl group; or alternatively, a Ci to Cis hydrocarbylaminylsilyl group. In still another aspect, each X can be H; alternatively, F; alternatively, CI; alternatively, Br; alternatively, I; alternatively, BH 4 ; alternatively, a Ci to Cis hydrocarbyl group; alternatively, a Ci to Cis hydrocarboxy group; alternatively, a Ci to Cis hydrocarbylaminyl group; alternatively, a Ci to Cis hydrocarbylsilyl group; or alternatively, a Ci to Cis hydrocarbylaminylsilyl group.

Each X independently can be, in some aspects, H, a halide, methyl, phenyl, benzyl, an alkoxy, an aryloxy, acetylacetonate, formate, acetate, stearate, oleate, benzoate, an alkylaminyl, a dialkylaminyl, a trihydrocarbylsilyl, or a hydrocarbylaminylsilyl; alternatively, H, a halide, methyl, phenyl, or benzyl; alternatively, an alkoxy, an aryloxy, or acetylacetonate; alternatively, an alkylaminyl or a dialkylaminyl; alternatively, a trihydrocarbylsilyl or hydrocarbylaminylsilyl; alternatively, H or a halide; alternatively, methyl, phenyl, benzyl, an alkoxy, an aryloxy, acetylacetonate, an alkylaminyl, or a dialkylaminyl; alternatively, H; alternatively, a halide; alternatively, methyl; alternatively, phenyl; alternatively, benzyl; alternatively, an alkoxy; alternatively, an aryloxy; alternatively, acetylacetonate; alternatively, an alkylaminyl; alternatively, a dialkylaminyl; alternatively, a trihydrocarbylsilyl; or alternatively, a hydrocarbylaminylsilyl. In these and other aspects, the alkoxy, aryloxy, alkylaminyl, dialkylaminyl, trihydrocarbylsilyl, and hydrocarbylaminylsilyl can be a Ci to C 36 , a Ci to Cis, a Ci to Cu, or a Ci to Cs alkoxy, aryloxy, alkylaminyl, dialkylaminyl, trihydrocarbylsilyl, and hydrocarbylaminylsilyl.

Moreover, each X independently can be, in certain aspects, a halide or a Ci to

Cis hydrocarbyl group; alternatively, a halide or a Ci to Cs hydrocarbyl group; alternatively, F, CI, Br, I, methyl, benzyl, or phenyl; alternatively, CI, methyl, benzyl, or phenyl; alternatively, a Ci to Cis alkoxy, aryloxy, alkylaminyl, dialkylaminyl, trihydrocarbylsilyl, or hydrocarbylaminylsilyl group; alternatively, a Ci to Cs alkoxy, aryloxy, alkylaminyl, dialkylaminyl, trihydrocarbylsilyl, or hydrocarbylaminylsilyl group; or alternatively, methyl, ethyl, propyl, butyl, pentyl, hexyl, heptyl, octyl, nonyl, decyl, ethenyl, propenyl, butenyl, pentenyl, hexenyl, heptenyl, octenyl, nonenyl, decenyl, phenyl, tolyl, benzyl, naphthyl, trimethylsilyl, triisopropylsilyl, triphenylsilyl, or allyldimethylsilyl.

In formula (A), Cp and Ind can be a cyclopentadienyl and an indenyl group, respectively. In one aspect, Cp and/or Ind can be substituted with one or more substituents (not including the bridging group). If present, each substituent on Cp and Ind independently can be H, a halide, a Ci to C 36 hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to C 36 halogenated hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to C 36 hydrocarboxy group, or a Ci to C 36 hydrocarbylsilyl group. Importantly, each substituent on Cp and/or Ind can be either the same or a different substituent group. Moreover, each substituent can be at any position on the respective cyclopentadienyl or indenyl ring structure that conforms with the rules of chemical valence. In an aspect, the number of substituents on Cp and/or on Ind and/or the positions of each substituent on Cp and/or on Ind are independent of each other. For instance, two or more substituents on Cp can be different, or alternatively, each substituent on Cp can be the same. Additionally or alternatively, two or more substituents on Ind can be different, or alternatively, all substituents on Ind can be the same. In another aspect, one or more of the substituents on Cp can be different from the one or more of the substituents on Ind, or alternatively, all substituents on both Cp and/or on Ind can be the same. In these and other aspects, each substituent can be at any position on the respective cyclopentadienyl or indenyl ring structure. If substituted, Cp and/or Ind independently can have one substituent, two substituents, three substituents, four substituents, and so forth.

In formula (A), each substituent on Cp and/or on Ind independently can be H, a halide, a Ci to C 36 hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to C 36 halogenated hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to C 36 hydrocarboxy group, or a Ci to C 36 hydrocarbylsilyl group. In some aspects, each substituent independently can be H; alternatively, a halide; alternatively, a Ci to Ci 8 hydrocarbyl group; alternatively, a Ci to Cis halogenated hydrocarbyl group; alternatively, a Ci to Cis hydrocarboxy group; alternatively, a Ci to Cis hydrocarbylsilyl group; alternatively, a Ci to C12 hydrocarbyl group or a Ci to C12 hydrocarbylsilyl group; or alternatively, a Ci to Cs alkyl group or a C 3 to Cs alkenyl group. The halide, Ci to C 36 hydrocarbyl group, Ci to C 36 hydrocarboxy group, and Ci to C 36 hydrocarbylsilyl group which can be a substituent on Cp and/or on Ind in formula (A) can be any halide, Ci to C 36 hydrocarbyl group, Ci to C 36 hydrocarboxy group, and Ci to C 36 hydrocarbylsilyl group described herein (e.g., as pertaining to X in formula (A)). A substituent on Cp and/or on Ind in formula (A) can be, in certain aspects, a Ci to C 36 halogenated hydrocarbyl group, where the halogenated hydrocarbyl group indicates the presence of one or more halogen atoms replacing an equivalent number of hydrogen atoms in the hydrocarbyl group. The halogenated hydrocarbyl group often can be a halogenated alkyl group, a halogenated alkenyl group, a halogenated cycloalkyl group, a halogenated aryl group, or a halogenated aralkyl group. Representative and non-limiting halogenated hydrocarbyl groups include pentafluorophenyl, trifluoromethyl (CF 3 ), and the like.

As a non-limiting example, if present, each substituent on Cp and/or Ind independently can be H, CI, CF 3 , a methyl group, an ethyl group, a propyl group, a butyl group (e.g., t-Bu), a pentyl group, a hexyl group, a heptyl group, an octyl group, a nonyl group, a decyl group, an ethenyl group, a propenyl group, a butenyl group, a pentenyl group, a hexenyl group, a heptenyl group, an octenyl group, a nonenyl group, a decenyl group, a phenyl group, a tolyl group (or other substituted aryl group), a benzyl group, a naphthyl group, a trimethylsilyl group, a triisopropylsilyl group, a triphenylsilyl group, or an allyldimethylsilyl group; alternatively, H; alternatively, CI; alternatively, CF 3 ; alternatively, a methyl group; alternatively, an ethyl group; alternatively, a propyl group; alternatively, a butyl group; alternatively, a pentyl group; alternatively, a hexyl group; alternatively, a heptyl group; alternatively, an octyl group, a nonyl group; alternatively, a decyl group; alternatively, an ethenyl group; alternatively, a propenyl group; alternatively, a butenyl group; alternatively, a pentenyl group; alternatively, a hexenyl group; alternatively, a heptenyl group; alternatively, an octenyl group; alternatively, a nonenyl group; alternatively, a decenyl group; alternatively, a phenyl group; alternatively, a tolyl group; alternatively, a benzyl group; alternatively, a naphthyl group; alternatively, a trimethylsilyl group; alternatively, a triisopropylsilyl group; alternatively, a triphenylsilyl group; or alternatively, an allyldimethylsilyl group.

In one aspect, Cp is a cyclopentadienyl group with an alkyl and/or alkenyl substituent, and Ind is an indenyl group and does not contain an alkyl or an alkenyl substituent. In another aspect, Cp is a cyclopentadienyl group and does not contain an alkyl or an alkenyl substituent, and Ind is an indenyl group with an alkyl or an alkenyl substituent. In these and other aspects, the alkenyl substituent can be a C2 to C 18 alkenyl group, i.e., any C2 to Ci 8 alkenyl group disclosed herein. For instance, the alkenyl substituent can be an ethenyl group, a propenyl group, a butenyl group, a pentenyl group, a hexenyl group, a heptenyl group, an octenyl group, a nonenyl group, or a decenyl group. Moreover, the alkenyl substituent can be a C2 to C 12 linear or branched alkenyl group; alternatively, a C2 to Cs linear or branched alkenyl group; alternatively, a C3 to C 12 linear alkenyl group; alternatively, a C2 to Cs linear alkenyl group; alternatively, a C 3 to Cs terminal alkenyl group; or alternatively, a C 3 to Ce terminal alkenyl group. In these and other aspects, the alkyl substituent can be a Ci to Cis alkyl group, i.e., any Ci to C 18 alkyl group disclosed herein. For instance, the alkyl substituent can be a methyl group, an ethyl group, a propyl group, a butyl group, a pentyl group, a hexyl group, a heptyl group, an octyl group, a nonyl group, a decyl group, a undecyl group, a dodecyl group, a tridecyl group, a tetradecyl group, a pentadecyl group, a hexadecyl group, a heptadecyl group, or an octadecyl group; or alternatively, a methyl group, an ethyl group, a propyl group, a butyl group, a pentyl group, a hexyl group, a heptyl group, or an octyl group. Moreover, the alkyl substituent can be a Ci to C 12 linear or branched alkyl group; alternatively, a Ci to Cs linear or branched alkyl group; alternatively, a Ci to C 12 linear alkyl group; alternatively, a Ci to Cs linear alkyl group; alternatively, a C3 to Cs branched alkyl group; or alternatively, a C 3 to Ce branched alkyl group.

In formula (A), each R independently can be H, a Ci to C 36 hydrocarbyl group, or a Ci to C 36 hydrocarbylsilyl group. The Ci to C 36 hydrocarbyl group and Ci to C 36 hydrocarbylsilyl group which can be a R in formula (A) can be any Ci to C 36 hydrocarbyl group or Ci to C 36 hydrocarbylsilyl group described herein (e.g., as pertaining to X in formula (A)). It is contemplated that each R can be either the same or a different substituent group. For example, each R independently can be H, a Ci to Ci 8 hydrocarbyl group, or a Ci to Cis hydrocarbylsilyl group. In some aspects, each R independently can be a Ci to Ce linear or branched alkyl group (e.g., an isopropyl group). In other aspects, each R independently can be a methyl group, an ethyl group, a propyl group, a butyl group, a pentyl group, a hexyl group, a heptyl group, an octyl group, a nonyl group, a decyl group, a phenyl group, a tolyl group, a benzyl group, a naphthyl group, a trimethylsilyl group, a triisopropylsilyl group, a triphenylsilyl group, an allyldimethylsilyl group, or a 1-methylcyclohexyl group, and the like.

Illustrative and non-limiting examples of suitable boron-bridged, cyclopentadienyl-indenyl metallocene compounds can include the following compounds:

and the like.

Methods of making boron-bridged metallocene complexes of the present invention also are encompassed herein. These metallocene complexes can be synthesized by various suitable procedures, such as those described in WO 00/20462, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety, and the procedures provided herein. A representative synthesis scheme is provided below, wherein the boron-bridged metallocene compound is synthesized in a multistep process:

1 ) BuLi

2) N 2 /Pr

Also encompassed herein are ligand compounds which can be used to form metallocene compounds having formula (A). Illustrative and non-limiting examples of cyclopentadienyl-indenyl boron-bridged ligand compounds (with the alkenyl substituent on the cyclopentadienyl group) can include the following compounds:

the like.

Illustrative and non-limiting examples of cyclopentadienyl-indenyl boron- bridged ligand compounds (with the alkenyl substituent on the indenyl group) can include the following compounds:

; and the like.

Using analogous synthesis schemes to those provided herein, ligand and metallocene complexes with substituents on the nitrogen other than isopropyl can be derived, and complexes with cyclopentadienyl and indenyl groups with various alkyl and/or alkenyl substituents (and optionally, other substituents) can be derived. Moreover, using analogous synthesis schemes to those provided herein, metallocene complexes with monoanionic ligands other than CI (e.g., hydrocarbyl, hydrocarbylaminyl, hydrocarbylsilyl, etc.) can be derived, and complexes with various transition metals can be derived.

CATALYST COMPONENT II

Catalyst component II can comprise a single atom bridged metallocene compound with a fluorenyl group. In one aspect, for instance, catalyst component II can comprise a single atom bridged metallocene compound with a fluorenyl group and either a cyclopentadienyl group or an indenyl group. In another aspect, catalyst component II can comprise a single atom bridged metallocene compound with a fluorenyl group and a cyclopentadienyl group. In yet another aspect, catalyst component II can comprise a single atom bridged metallocene compound with a fluorenyl group and an indenyl group. In these and other aspects, the bridging atom can be Ge, C, Si, B, or P; alternatively, the bridging atom can be B or P; or alternatively, the bridging atom can be Ge, Si, or C. In further aspects, the catalyst component II metallocene compound can contain an aryl substituent (e.g., a phenyl group) on the bridging atom. Additionally or alternatively, the catalyst component II metallocene compound can contain an alkenyl substituent, for example, on the bridging atom, and/or on the fluorenyl group, and/or on the cyclopentadienyl or indenyl group. Moreover, in particular aspects of this invention, the catalyst component II metallocene compound can comprise a zirconium or hafnium based metallocene compound. In still another aspect, catalyst component II can comprise a boron bridged (or phosphorus bridged) metallocene compound with a fluorenyl group and either a cyclopentadienyl group or an indenyl group.

Catalyst component II can comprise, in particular aspects of this invention, a bridged metallocene compound having formula (B):

Within formula (B), M 3 , Cp c , R x , R Y , E 3 , each R 3 , and each X are independent elements of the bridged metallocene compound. Accordingly, the bridged metallocene compound having formula (B) can be described using any combination of M 3 , Cp c , R x , R Y , E 3 , R 3 , and X disclosed herein.

The selections for M 3 and each X in formula (B) are the same as those described herein above for formula (A), e.g., M 3 can be Ti, Zr, or Hf. In formula (B), Cp c can be a cyclopentadienyl or indenyl group. In one aspect, Cp c can be a cyclopentadienyl group, while in another aspect, Cp c can be an indenyl group. In some aspects, Cp c can contain no additional substituents, e.g., other than bridging atom E 3 , discussed further herein below. In other aspects, Cp c can be further substituted with one substituent, two substituents, three substituents, four substituents, and so forth. If present, each substituent on Cp c independently can be H, a halide, a Ci to C 36 hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to C 36 halogenated hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to C 36 hydrocarboxy group, or a Ci to C 36 hydrocarbylsilyl group. Importantly, each substituent on Cp c can be either the same or a different substituent group. Moreover, each substituent can be at any position on the respective cyclopentadienyl or indenyl ring structure that conforms with the rules of chemical valence. In general, any substituent on Cp c , independently, can be H or any halide, Ci to C 36 hydrocarbyl group, Ci to C 36 halogenated hydrocarbyl group, Ci to C 36 hydrocarboxy group, or Ci to C 36 hydrocarbylsilyl group described herein (e.g., as pertaining to substituents on Cp and Ind in formula (A)). In one aspect, for example, each substituent on Cp c independently can be a Ci to C hydrocarbyl group or a Ci to C12 hydrocarbylsilyl group. In another aspect, each substituent on Cp c independently can be a Ci to Cs alkyl group or a C3 to Cs alkenyl group. In yet another aspect, each substituent on Cp c independently can be H, CI, CF 3 , a methyl group, an ethyl group, a propyl group, a butyl group, a pentyl group, a hexyl group, a heptyl group, an octyl group, a nonyl group, a decyl group, an ethenyl group, a propenyl group, a butenyl group, a pentenyl group, a hexenyl group, a heptenyl group, an octenyl group, a nonenyl group, a decenyl group, a phenyl group, a tolyl group, a benzyl group, a naphthyl group, a trimethylsilyl group, a triisopropylsilyl group, a triphenylsilyl group, or an allyldimethylsilyl group.

Similarly, R x and R Y in formula (B) independently can be H or any halide, Ci to C 36 hydrocarbyl group, Ci to C 36 halogenated hydrocarbyl group, Ci to C 36 hydrocarboxy group, or Ci to C 36 hydrocarbylsilyl group disclosed herein (e.g., as pertaining to substituents on Cp and Ind in formula (A)). In one aspect, for example, R x and R Y independently can be H or a Ci to C12 hydrocarbyl group. In another aspect, R x and R Y independently can be a Ci to C1 0 hydrocarbyl group. In yet another aspect, R x and R Y independently can be H, CI, CF 3 , a methyl group, an ethyl group, a propyl group, a butyl group (e.g., t-Bu), a pentyl group, a hexyl group, a heptyl group, an octyl group, a nonyl group, a decyl group, an ethenyl group, a propenyl group, a butenyl group, a pentenyl group, a hexenyl group, a heptenyl group, an octenyl group, a nonenyl group, a decenyl group, a phenyl group, a tolyl group, a benzyl group, a naphthyl group, a trimethylsilyl group, a triisopropylsilyl group, a triphenylsilyl group, or an allyldimethylsilyl group, and the like. In still another aspect, R x and R Y independently can be a methyl group, an ethyl group, a propyl group, a butyl group, a pentyl group, a hexyl group, a heptyl group, an octyl group, a nonyl group, a decyl group, an ethenyl group, a propenyl group, a butenyl group, a pentenyl group, a hexenyl group, a heptenyl group, an octenyl group, a nonenyl group, a decenyl group, a phenyl group, a tolyl group, or a benzyl group.

The bridging atom, E 3 , can be C, Si, or Ge, and each R 3 independently can be H or any Ci to Cis hydrocarbyl group disclosed herein. In some aspects of this invention, each R 3 independently can be a Ci to C12 hydrocarbyl group; alternatively, each R 3 independently can be a Ci to Cs hydrocarbyl group; alternatively, each R 3 independently can be a phenyl group, a Ci to Cs alkyl group, or a C3 to Cs alkenyl group; alternatively, each R 3 independently can be a methyl group, an ethyl group, a propyl group, a butyl group, a pentyl group, a hexyl group, a heptyl group, an octyl group, a nonyl group, a decyl group, an ethenyl group, a propenyl group, a butenyl group, a pentenyl group, a hexenyl group, a heptenyl group, an octenyl group, a nonenyl group, a decenyl group, a phenyl group, a cyclohexylphenyl group, a naphthyl group, a tolyl group, or a benzyl group; or alternatively, each R 3 independently can be a methyl group, an ethyl group, a propyl group, a butyl group, a pentyl group, a hexyl group, a propenyl group, a butenyl group, a pentenyl group, a hexenyl group, a phenyl group, or a benzyl group. In these and other aspects, each R 3 can be either the same or different.

Illustrative and non-limiting examples of bridged metallocene compounds having formula (B) and/or suitable for use as catalyst component II can include the following compounds (Me = methyl, Ph = phenyl; t-Bu = tert-butyl):

and the like, as well as combinations thereof.

Catalyst component II is not limited solely to the bridged metallocene compounds such as described above. Other suitable bridged metallocene compounds are disclosed in U.S. Patent Nos. 7,026,494, 7,041,617, 7,226,886, 7,312,283, 7,517,939, and 7,619,047, which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety. ACTIVATOR-SUPPORTS

The present invention encompasses various catalyst compositions containing an activator-support. In one aspect, the activator-support can comprise a solid oxide treated with an electron-withdrawing anion. Alternatively, in another aspect, the activator-support can comprise a solid oxide treated with an electron-withdrawing anion, the solid oxide containing a Lewis-acidic metal ion. Non-limiting examples of suitable activator-supports are disclosed in, for instance, U.S. Patent Nos. 7,294,599, 7,601,665, 7,884, 163, 8,309,485, 8,623,973, and 8,703,886, which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.

The solid oxide can encompass oxide materials such as alumina, "mixed oxides" thereof such as silica-alumina, coatings of one oxide on another, and combinations and mixtures thereof. The mixed oxides such as silica-alumina can be single or multiple chemical phases with more than one metal combined with oxygen to form the solid oxide. Examples of mixed oxides that can be used to form an activator- support, either singly or in combination, can include, but are not limited to, silica- alumina, silica-titania, silica-zirconia, alumina-titania, alumina-zirconia, zinc- aluminate, alumina-boria, silica-boria, aluminophosphate-silica, titania-zirconia, and the like. The solid oxide used herein also can encompass oxide materials such as silica- coated alumina, as described in U.S. Patent No. 7,884, 163.

Accordingly, in one aspect, the solid oxide can comprise silica, alumina, silica- alumina, silica-coated alumina, aluminum phosphate, aluminophosphate, heteropolytungstate, titania, silica-titania, zirconia, silica-zirconia, magnesia, boria, zinc oxide, any mixed oxide thereof, or any combination thereof. In another aspect, the solid oxide can comprise alumina, silica-alumina, silica-coated alumina, aluminum phosphate, aluminophosphate, heteropolytungstate, titania, silica-titania, zirconia, silica-zirconia, magnesia, boria, or zinc oxide, as well as any mixed oxide thereof, or any mixture thereof. In another aspect, the solid oxide can comprise silica, alumina, titania, zirconia, magnesia, boria, zinc oxide, any mixed oxide thereof, or any combination thereof. In yet another aspect, the solid oxide can comprise silica- alumina, silica-coated alumina, silica-titania, silica-zirconia, alumina-boria, or any combination thereof. In still another aspect, the solid oxide can comprise alumina, silica-alumina, silica-coated alumina, or any mixture thereof; alternatively, alumina; alternatively, silica-alumina; or alternatively, silica-coated alumina.

The silica-alumina or silica-coated alumina solid oxide materials which can be used can have an silica content from about 5 to about 95% by weight. In one aspect, the silica content of these solid oxides can be from about 10 to about 80%, or from about 20% to about 70%, silica by weight. In another aspect, such materials can have silica contents ranging from about 15% to about 60%, or from about 25% to about 50%, silica by weight. The solid oxides contemplated herein can have any suitable surface area, pore volume, and particle size, as would be recognized by those of skill in the art.

The electron-withdrawing component used to treat the solid oxide can be any component that increases the Lewis or Bronsted acidity of the solid oxide upon treatment (as compared to the solid oxide that is not treated with at least one electron- withdrawing anion). According to one aspect, the electron- withdrawing component can be an electron-withdrawing anion derived from a salt, an acid, or other compound, such as a volatile organic compound, that serves as a source or precursor for that anion. Examples of electron-withdrawing anions can include, but are not limited to, sulfate, bisulfate, fluoride, chloride, bromide, iodide, fluorosulfate, fluoroborate, phosphate, fluorophosphate, trifluoroacetate, triflate, fluorozirconate, fluorotitanate, phospho- tungstate, tungstate, molybdate, and the like, including mixtures and combinations thereof. In addition, other ionic or non-ionic compounds that serve as sources for these electron-withdrawing anions also can be employed. It is contemplated that the electron-withdrawing anion can be, or can comprise, fluoride, chloride, bromide, phosphate, triflate, bisulfate, or sulfate, and the like, or any combination thereof, in some aspects provided herein. In other aspects, the electron-withdrawing anion can comprise sulfate, bisulfate, fluoride, chloride, bromide, iodide, fluorosulfate, fluoroborate, phosphate, fluorophosphate, trifluoroacetate, triflate, fluorozirconate, fluorotitanate, and the like, or combinations thereof. Yet, in other aspects, the electron- withdrawing anion can comprise fluoride and/or sulfate.

The activator-support generally can contain from about 1 to about 25 wt. % of the electron-withdrawing anion, based on the weight of the activator-support. In particular aspects provided herein, the activator-support can contain from about 1 to about 20 wt. %, from about 2 to about 20 wt. %, from about 3 to about 20 wt. %, from about 2 to about 15 wt. %, from about 3 to about 15 wt. %, from about 3 to about 12 wt. %, or from about 4 to about 10 wt. %, of the electron- withdrawing anion, based on the total weight of the activator-support.

In an aspect, the activator-support can comprise fluorided alumina, chlorided alumina, bromided alumina, sulfated alumina, fluorided silica-alumina, chlorided silica- alumina, bromided silica-alumina, sulfated silica-alumina, fluorided silica-zirconia, chlorided silica-zirconia, bromided silica-zirconia, sulfated silica-zirconia, fluorided silica-titania, fluorided silica-coated alumina, sulfated silica-coated alumina, phosphated silica-coated alumina, and the like, as well as any mixture or combination thereof. In another aspect, the activator-support employed in the catalyst systems described herein can be, or can comprise, a fluorided solid oxide and/or a sulfated solid oxide, non-limiting examples of which can include fluorided alumina, sulfated alumina, fluorided silica-alumina, sulfated silica-alumina, fluorided silica-zirconia, fluorided silica-coated alumina, sulfated silica-coated alumina, and the like, as well as combinations thereof. In yet another aspect, the activator-support can comprise fluorided alumina; alternatively, chlorided alumina; alternatively, sulfated alumina; alternatively, fluorided silica-alumina; alternatively, sulfated silica-alumina; alternatively, fluorided silica-zirconia; alternatively, chlorided silica-zirconia; alternatively, sulfated silica-coated alumina; or alternatively, fluorided silica-coated alumina.

Various processes can be used to form activator-supports useful in the present invention. Methods of contacting the solid oxide with the electron-withdrawing component, suitable electron withdrawing components and addition amounts, impregnation with metals or metal ions (e.g., zinc, nickel, vanadium, titanium, silver, copper, gallium, tin, tungsten, molybdenum, zirconium, and the like, or combinations thereof), and various calcining procedures and conditions are disclosed in, for example, U.S. Patent Nos. 6, 107,230, 6, 165,929, 6,294,494, 6,300,271, 6,316,553, 6,355,594, 6,376,415, 6,388,017, 6,391,816, 6,395,666, 6,524,987, 6,548,441, 6,548,442, 6,576,583, 6,613,712, 6,632,894, 6,667,274, 6,750,302, 7,294,599, 7,601,665, 7,884, 163, and 8,309,485, which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety. Other suitable processes and procedures for preparing activator-supports (e.g., fluorided solid oxides, sulfated solid oxides, etc.) are well known to those of skill in the art.

CO-CATALYSTS

In certain aspects directed to catalyst compositions containing a co-catalyst, the co-catalyst can comprise a metal hydrocarbyl compound, examples of which include non-halide metal hydrocarbyl compounds, metal hydrocarbyl halide compounds, non- halide metal alkyl compounds, metal alkyl halide compounds, and so forth. The hydrocarbyl group (or alkyl group) can be any hydrocarbyl (or alkyl) group disclosed herein. Moreover, in some aspects, the metal of the metal hydrocarbyl can be a group 1, 2, 11, 12, 13, or 14 metal; alternatively, a group 13 or 14 metal; or alternatively, a group 13 metal. Hence, in some aspects, the metal of the metal hydrocarbyl (non- halide metal hydrocarbyl or metal hydrocarbyl halide) can be lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, cadmium, boron, aluminum, or tin; alternatively, lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, zinc, boron, aluminum, or tin; alternatively, lithium, sodium, or potassium; alternatively, magnesium or calcium; alternatively, lithium; alternatively, sodium; alternatively, potassium; alternatively, magnesium; alternatively, calcium; alternatively, zinc; alternatively, boron; alternatively, aluminum; or alternatively, tin. In some aspects, the metal hydrocarbyl or metal alkyl, with or without a halide, can comprise a lithium hydrocarbyl or alkyl, a magnesium hydrocarbyl or alkyl, a boron hydrocarbyl or alkyl, a zinc hydrocarbyl or alkyl, or an aluminum hydrocarbyl or alkyl.

In particular aspects directed to catalyst compositions containing a co-catalyst (e.g., the activator can comprise a solid oxide treated with an electron-withdrawing anion), the co-catalyst can comprise an aluminoxane compound, an organoboron or organoborate compound, an ionizing ionic compound, an organoaluminum compound, an organozinc compound, an organomagnesium compound, or an organolithium compound, and this includes any combinations of these materials. In one aspect, the co-catalyst can comprise an organoaluminum compound. In another aspect, the co- catalyst can comprise an aluminoxane compound, an organoboron or organoborate compound, an ionizing ionic compound, an organozinc compound, an organomagnesium compound, an organolithium compound, or any combination thereof. In yet another aspect, the co-catalyst can comprise an aluminoxane compound; alternatively, an organoboron or organoborate compound; alternatively, an ionizing ionic compound; alternatively, an organozinc compound; alternatively, an organomagnesium compound; or alternatively, an organolithium compound.

Specific non-limiting examples of suitable organoaluminum compounds can include trimethylaluminum (TMA), triethylaluminum (TEA), tri-n-propylaluminum (TNPA), tri-n-butylaluminum (TNBA), triisobutylaluminum (TIBA), tri-n- hexylaluminum, tri-n-octylaluminum, diisobutylaluminum hydride, diethylaluminum ethoxide, diethylaluminum chloride, and the like, or combinations thereof. Representative and non-limiting examples of aluminoxanes include methylaluminoxane, modified methylaluminoxane, ethylaluminoxane, n- propylaluminoxane, iso-propylaluminoxane, n-butylaluminoxane, t-butylaluminoxane, sec-butylaluminoxane, iso-butylaluminoxane, 1 -pentylaluminoxane, 2- pentylaluminoxane, 3 -pentylaluminoxane, isopentylaluminoxane, neopentylaluminoxane, and the like, or any combination thereof. Representative and non-limiting examples of organoboron/organoborate compounds include N,N- dimethylanilinium tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate, triphenylcarbenium tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate, lithium tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate, N,N- dimethylanilinium tetrakis [3 ,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate, triphenylcarbenium tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate, tris(pentafluorophenyl)boron, tris[3,5- bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]boron, and the like, or mixtures thereof.

Examples of ionizing ionic compounds can include, but are not limited to, the following compounds: tri(n-butyl)ammonium tetrakis (p-tolyl)borate, tri(n-butyl) ammonium tetrakis(m-tolyl)borate, tri(n-butyl)ammonium tetrakis(2,4- dimethylphenyl)borate, tri(n-butyl)ammonium tetrakis(3,5-dimethylphenyl)borate, tri(n-butyl)ammonium tetrakis [3 ,5 -bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate, tri(n- butyl)ammonium tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate, Ν,Ν-dimethylanilinium tetrakis(p- tolyl)borate, Ν,Ν-dimethylanilinium tetrakis(m-tolyl)borate, N,N-dimethylanilinium tetrakis(2,4-dimethylphenyl)borate, Ν,Ν-dimethylanilinium tetrakis(3,5-dimethyl- phenyl)borate, Ν,Ν-dimethylanilinium tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate, Ν,Ν-dimethylanilinium tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate, triphenylcarbenium tetrakis(p-tolyl)borate, triphenylcarbenium tetrakis(m-tolyl)borate, triphenylcarbenium tetrakis(2,4-dimethylphenyl)borate, triphenylcarbenium tetrakis(3 ,5 - dimethylphenyl)borate, triphenylcarbenium tetrakis [3 ,5 -bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] borate, triphenylcarbenium tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate, tropylium tetrakis(p- tolyl)borate, tropylium tetrakis (m-tolyl)borate, tropylium tetrakis(2,4- dimethylphenyl)borate, tropylium tetrakis(3,5-dimethylphenyl)borate, tropylium tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate, tropylium tetrakis (pentafluorophenyl) borate, lithium tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate, lithium tetraphenylborate, lithium tetrakis(p-tolyl)borate, lithium tetrakis(m-tolyl)borate, lithium tetrakis(2,4- dimethylphenyl)borate, lithium tetrakis(3,5-dimethylphenyl)borate, lithium tetrafluoroborate, sodium tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate, sodium tetraphenylborate, sodium tetrakis(p-tolyl)borate, sodium tetrakis(m-tolyl)borate, sodium tetrakis(2,4- dimethylphenyl)borate, sodium tetrakis(3,5-dimethylphenyl)borate, sodium tetrafluoroborate, potassium tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate, potassium tetraphenylborate, potassium tetrakis(p-tolyl)borate, potassium tetrakis(m-tolyl)borate, potassium tetrakis(2,4-dimethylphenyl)borate, potassium tetrakis(3,5- dimethylphenyl)borate, potassium tetrafluoroborate, lithium tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)aluminate, lithium tetraphenylaluminate, lithium tetrakis(p- tolyl)aluminate, lithium tetrakis(m-tolyl)aluminate, lithium tetrakis(2,4- dimethylphenyl)aluminate, lithium tetrakis(3,5-dimethylphenyl)aluminate, lithium tetrafluoroaluminate, sodium tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)aluminate, sodium tetraphenylaluminate, sodium tetrakis(p-tolyl)aluminate, sodium tetrakis(m- tolyl)aluminate, sodium tetrakis(2,4-dimethylphenyl)aluminate, sodium tetrakis(3,5- dimethylphenyl)aluminate, sodium tetrafluoroaluminate, potassium tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)aluminate, potassium tetraphenylaluminate, potassium tetrakis(p-tolyl)aluminate, potassium tetrakis(m-tolyl)aluminate, potassium tetrakis(2,4- dimethylphenyl)aluminate, potassium tetrakis (3,5-dimethylphenyl)aluminate, potassium tetrafluoroaluminate, and the like, or combinations thereof.

Exemplary organozinc compounds which can be used as co-catalysts can include, but are not limited to, dimethylzinc, diethylzinc, dipropylzinc, dibutylzinc, dineopentylzinc, di(trimethylsilyl)zinc, di(triethylsilyl)zinc, di(triisoproplysilyl)zinc, di(triphenylsilyl)zinc, di(allyldimethylsilyl)zinc, di(trimethylsilylmethyl)zinc, and the like, or combinations thereof. Similarly, exemplary organomagnesium compounds can include, but are not limited to, dimethylmagnesium, diethylmagnesium, dipropylmagnesium, dibutylmagnesium, dineopentylmagnesium, di(trimethylsilylmethyl)magnesium, methylmagnesium chloride, ethylmagnesium chloride, propylmagnesium chloride, butylmagnesium chloride, neopentylmagnesium chloride, trimethylsilylmethylmagnesium chloride, methylmagnesium bromide, ethylmagnesium bromide, propylmagnesium bromide, butylmagnesium bromide, neopentylmagnesium bromide, trimethylsilylmethylmagnesium bromide, methylmagnesium iodide, ethylmagnesium iodide, propylmagnesium iodide, butylmagnesium iodide, neopentylmagnesium iodide, trimethylsilylmethylmagnesium iodide, methylmagnesium ethoxide, ethylmagnesium ethoxide, propylmagnesium ethoxide, butylmagnesium ethoxide, neopentylmagnesium ethoxide, trimethylsilylmethylmagnesium ethoxide, methylmagnesium propoxide, ethylmagnesium propoxide, propylmagnesium propoxide, butylmagnesium propoxide, neopentylmagnesium propoxide, trimethylsilylmethylmagnesium propoxide, methylmagnesium phenoxide, ethylmagnesium phenoxide, propylmagnesium phenoxide, butylmagnesium phenoxide, neopentylmagnesium phenoxide, trimethylsilylmethylmagnesium phenoxide, and the like, or any combinations thereof.

Likewise, exemplary organolithium compounds can include, but are not limited to, methyllithium, ethyllithium, propyllithium, butyllithium (e.g., t-butyllithium), neopentyllithium, trimethylsilylmethyllithium, phenyllithium, tolyllithium, xylyllithium, benzyllithium, (dimethylphenyl)methyllithium, allyllithium, and the like, or combinations thereof.

Co-catalysts that can be used in the catalyst compositions of this invention are not limited to the co-catalysts described above. Other suitable co-catalysts are well known to those of skill in the art including, for example, those disclosed in U.S. Patent Nos. 3,242,099, 4,794,096, 4,808,561, 5,576,259, 5,807,938, 5,919,983, 7,294,599 7,601,665, 7,884,163, 8, 114,946, and 8,309,485, which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.

OLEFIN MONOMERS

Unsaturated reactants that can be employed with catalyst compositions and polymerization processes of this invention typically can include olefin compounds having from 2 to 30 carbon atoms per molecule and having at least one olefinic double bond. This invention encompasses homopolymerization processes using a single olefin such as ethylene or propylene, as well as copolymerization, terpolymerization, etc., reactions using an olefin monomer with at least one different olefinic compound. For example, the resultant ethylene copolymers, terpolymers, etc., generally can contain a major amount of ethylene (>50 mole percent) and a minor amount of comonomer (<50 mole percent), though this is not a requirement. Comonomers that can be copolymerized with ethylene often can have from 3 to 20 carbon atoms, or from 3 to 10 carbon atoms, in their molecular chain.

Acyclic, cyclic, poly cyclic, terminal (a), internal, linear, branched, substituted, unsubstituted, functionalized, and non-functionalized olefins can be employed in this invention. For example, typical unsaturated compounds that can be polymerized with the catalyst compositions of this invention can include, but are not limited to, ethylene, propylene, 1-butene, 2-butene, 3 -methyl- 1-butene, isobutylene, 1-pentene, 2-pentene, 3 -methyl- 1-pentene, 4-methyl- 1-pentene, 1-hexene, 2-hexene, 3-hexene, 3-ethyl-l- hexene, 1-heptene, 2-heptene, 3-heptene, the four normal octenes (e.g., 1-octene), the four normal nonenes, the five normal decenes, and the like, or mixtures of two or more of these compounds. Cyclic and bicyclic olefins, including but not limited to, cyclopentene, cyclohexene, norbornylene, norbornadiene, and the like, also can be polymerized as described herein. Styrene can also be employed as a monomer in the present invention. In an aspect, the olefin monomer can comprise a C2-C20 olefin; alternatively, a C2-C20 alpha-olefin; alternatively, a C2-C10 olefin; alternatively, a C 2 - C10 alpha-olefin; alternatively, the olefin monomer can comprise ethylene; or alternatively, the olefin monomer can comprise propylene.

When a copolymer (or alternatively, a terpolymer) is desired, the olefin monomer and the olefin comonomer independently can comprise, for example, a C 2 - C20 alpha-olefin. In some aspects, the olefin monomer can comprise ethylene or propylene, which is copolymerized with at least one comonomer (e.g., a C2-C20 alpha- olefin, a C3-C20 alpha-olefin, etc.). According to one aspect of this invention, the olefin monomer used in the polymerization process can comprise ethylene. In this aspect, examples of suitable olefin comonomers can include, but are not limited to, propylene, 1-butene, 2-butene, 3 -methyl- 1-butene, isobutylene, 1-pentene, 2-pentene, 3-methyl-l- pentene, 4-methyl-l-pentene, 1-hexene, 2-hexene, 3-ethyl-l-hexene, 1-heptene, 2- heptene, 3-heptene, 1-octene, 1-decene, styrene, and the like, or combinations thereof. According to another aspect of the present invention, the olefin monomer can comprise ethylene, and the comonomer can comprise a C3-C10 alpha-olefin; alternatively, the comonomer can comprise 1-butene, 1 -pentene, 1-hexene, 1-octene, 1-decene, styrene, or any combination thereof; alternatively, the comonomer can comprise 1-butene, 1- hexene, 1-octene, or any combination thereof; alternatively, the comonomer can comprise 1-butene; alternatively, the comonomer can comprise 1-hexene; or alternatively, the comonomer can comprise 1-octene.

Generally, the amount of comonomer introduced into a polymerization reactor system to produce a copolymer can be from about 0.01 to about 50 weight percent of the comonomer based on the total weight of the monomer and comonomer. According to another aspect of the present invention, the amount of comonomer introduced into a polymerization reactor system can be from about 0.01 to about 40 weight percent comonomer based on the total weight of the monomer and comonomer. In still another aspect, the amount of comonomer introduced into a polymerization reactor system can be from about 0.1 to about 35 weight percent comonomer based on the total weight of the monomer and comonomer. Yet, in another aspect, the amount of comonomer introduced into a polymerization reactor system can be from about 0.5 to about 20 weight percent comonomer based on the total weight of the monomer and comonomer.

While not intending to be bound by this theory, where branched, substituted, or functionalized olefins are used as reactants, it is believed that a steric hindrance can impede and/or slow the polymerization process. Thus, branched and/or cyclic portion(s) of the olefin removed somewhat from the carbon-carbon double bond would not be expected to hinder the reaction in the way that the same olefin substituents situated more proximate to the carbon-carbon double bond might.

According to one aspect of the present invention, at least one monomer/reactant can be ethylene (or propylene), so the polymerization reaction can be a homopolymerization involving only ethylene (or propylene), or a copolymerization with a different acyclic, cyclic, terminal, internal, linear, branched, substituted, or unsubstituted olefin. In addition, the catalyst compositions of this invention can be used in the polymerization of diolefin compounds including, but not limited to, 1,3- butadiene, isoprene, 1,4-pentadiene, and 1,5-hexadiene.

CATALYST COMPOSITIONS

In some aspects, the present invention can employ catalyst compositions containing catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator (one or more than one), and optionally, a co-catalyst. These catalyst compositions can be utilized to produce polyolefins - homopolymers, copolymers, and the like - for a variety of end- use applications. Catalyst components I and II are discussed herein above. In aspects of the present invention, it is contemplated that the catalyst composition can contain more than one catalyst component I metallocene compound, and/or more than one catalyst component II metallocene compound. Further, additional catalytic compounds - other than those specified as catalyst component I or II - can be employed in the catalyst compositions and/or the polymerization processes, provided that the additional catalytic compound(s) does not detract from the advantages disclosed herein. Additionally, more than one activator also may be utilized.

The metallocene compounds of catalyst component I are discussed hereinabove. For instance, in some aspects, catalyst component I can comprise (or consist essentially of, or consist of) a boron bridged metallocene compound having formula (A). The single atom bridged metallocene compounds of catalyst component II also are discussed hereinabove. For instance, in some aspects, catalyst component II can comprise (or consist essentially of, or consist of) a metallocene compound having formula (B).

Generally, catalyst compositions of the present invention can comprise catalyst component I, catalyst component II, and an activator. In aspects of the invention, the activator can comprise an activator-support (e.g., an activator-support comprising a solid oxide treated with an electron-withdrawing anion). Activator-supports useful in the present invention are disclosed herein. Optionally, such catalyst compositions can further comprise one or more than one co-catalyst compound or compounds (suitable co-catalysts, such as organoaluminum compounds, also are discussed herein). Thus, a catalyst composition of this invention can comprise catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator-support, and an organoaluminum compound. For instance, the activator-support can comprise (or consist essentially of, or consist of) fluorided alumina, chlorided alumina, bromided alumina, sulfated alumina, fluorided silica- alumina, chlorided silica-alumina, bromided silica-alumina, sulfated silica-alumina, fluorided silica-zirconia, chlorided silica-zirconia, bromided silica-zirconia, sulfated silica-zirconia, fluorided silica-titania, fluorided silica-coated alumina, sulfated silica- coated alumina, phosphated silica-coated alumina, and the like, or combinations thereof; alternatively, the activator-support can comprise (or consist essentially of, or consist of) a fluorided solid oxide and/or a sulfated solid oxide. Additionally, the organoaluminum compound can comprise (or consist essentially of, or consist of) trimethylaluminum, triethylaluminum, tri-n-propylaluminum, tri-n-butylaluminum, triisobutylaluminum, tri-n-hexylaluminum, tri-n-octylaluminum, diisobutylaluminum hydride, diethylaluminum ethoxide, diethylaluminum chloride, and the like, or combinations thereof. Accordingly, a catalyst composition consistent with aspects of the invention can comprise (or consist essentially of, or consist of) a boron bridged, zirconium or hafnium based cyclopentadienyl-indenyl metallocene compound; a single atom bridged, zirconium or hafnium based metallocene compound with a fluorenyl group and a cyclopentadienyl group; sulfated alumina (or fluorided silica-alumina, or fluorided silica-coated alumina); and triethylaluminum (or triisobutylaluminum).

In another aspect of the present invention, a catalyst composition is provided which comprises catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator-support, and an organoaluminum compound, wherein this catalyst composition is substantially free of aluminoxanes, organoboron or organoborate compounds, ionizing ionic compounds, and/or other similar materials; alternatively, substantially free of aluminoxanes; alternatively, substantially free or organoboron or organoborate compounds; or alternatively, substantially free of ionizing ionic compounds. In these aspects, the catalyst composition has catalyst activity, discussed below, in the absence of these additional materials. For example, a catalyst composition of the present invention can consist essentially of catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator-support, and an organoaluminum compound, wherein no other materials are present in the catalyst composition which would increase/decrease the activity of the catalyst composition by more than about 10% from the catalyst activity of the catalyst composition in the absence of said materials. However, in other aspects of this invention, these activators/co-catalysts can be employed. For example, a catalyst composition comprising catalyst component I, catalyst component II, and an activator-support can further comprise an optional co- catalyst. Suitable co-catalysts in this aspect can include, but are not limited to, aluminoxane compounds, organoboron or organoborate compounds, ionizing ionic compounds, organoaluminum compounds, organozinc compounds, organomagnesium compounds, organolithium compounds, and the like, or any combination thereof; or alternatively, organoaluminum compounds, organozinc compounds, organomagnesium compounds, organolithium compounds, or any combination thereof. More than one co- catalyst can be present in the catalyst composition.

In a different aspect, a catalyst composition is provided which does not require an activator-support. Such a catalyst composition can comprise catalyst component I, catalyst component II, and an activator, wherein the activator comprises an aluminoxane compound, an organoboron or organoborate compound, an ionizing ionic compound, or combinations thereof.

In a particular aspect contemplated herein, the catalyst composition is a catalyst composition comprising an activator (one or more than one), only one catalyst component I metallocene compound, and only one catalyst component II metallocene compound. In these and other aspects, the catalyst composition can comprise an activator (e.g., an activator-support comprising a solid oxide treated with an electron- withdrawing anion); only one boron bridged, cyclopentadienyl-indenyl metallocene compound; and only one single atom bridged, zirconium or hafnium based metallocene compound with a fluorenyl group.

This invention further encompasses methods of making these catalyst compositions, such as, for example, contacting the respective catalyst components in any order or sequence. Accordingly, the catalyst composition can be produced by a process comprising contacting, in any order, catalyst component I, catalyst component II, the activator, and the co-catalyst (if utilized).

According to an aspect of this invention, the weight ratio of catalyst component I to catalyst component II in the catalyst composition can be in a range from about 10: 1 to about 1 : 10, from about 8: 1 to about 1 :8, from about 5: 1 to about 1 :5, from about 4: 1 to about 1 :4, from about 3: 1 to about 1 :3; from about 2: 1 to about 1 :2, from about 1.5: 1 to about 1 : 1.5, from about 1.25 : 1 to about 1 : 1.25, or from about 1.1 : 1 to about 1 : 1.1.

Generally, the weight ratio of organoaluminum compound to activator-support can be in a range from about 10: 1 to about 1 : 1000. If more than one organoaluminum compound and/or more than one activator-support are employed, this ratio is based on the total weight of each respective component. In another aspect, the weight ratio of the organoaluminum compound to the activator-support can be in a range from about 3: 1 to about 1 : 100, or from about 1 : 1 to about 1 :50.

In some aspects of this invention, the weight ratio of metallocene compounds (total of catalyst component I and II) to activator-support can be in a range from about 1 : 1 to about 1 : 1,000,000. If more than one activator-support is employed, this ratio is based on the total weight of the activator-support. In another aspect, this weight ratio can be in a range from about 1 :5 to about 1 : 100,000, or from about 1 : 10 to about 1 : 10,000. Yet, in another aspect, the weight ratio of the metallocene compounds to the activator-support can be in a range from about 1 :20 to about 1 : 1000.

Catalyst compositions of the present invention generally have a catalyst activity greater than about 100,000 grams of ethylene polymer (homopolymer, copolymer, etc., as the context requires) per gram of the metallocene compounds (component I and component II) per hour (abbreviated g/g/h). In another aspect, the catalyst activity can be greater than about 200,000, greater than about 250,000, or greater than about 300,000 g/g/h. In still another aspect, catalyst compositions of this invention can be characterized by having a catalyst activity greater than about 350,000, greater than about 400,000, or greater than about 500,000 g/g/h, and often can range up to 1,000,000-2,000,000 g/g/h. These activities are measured under slurry polymerization conditions, with a triisobutylaluminum co-catalyst, using isobutane as the diluent, at a polymerization temperature of 80 °C and a reactor pressure of about 340 psig. Additionally, in some aspects, the activator can comprise an activator-support, such as sulfated alumina, fluorided silica-alumina, or fluorided silica-coated alumina, although not limited thereto.

POLYMERIZATION PROCESSES

Catalyst compositions of the present invention can be used to polymerize olefins to form homopolymers, copolymers, terpolymers, and the like. One such process for polymerizing olefins in the presence of a catalyst composition of the present invention can comprise contacting the catalyst composition with an olefin monomer and optionally an olefin comonomer (one or more) in a polymerization reactor system under polymerization conditions to produce an olefin polymer, wherein the catalyst composition can comprise catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator, and an optional co-catalyst. Catalyst components I and II are discussed herein. For instance, catalyst component I can comprise a boron bridged metallocene compound having formula (A), and catalyst component II can comprise a single atom bridged metallocene compound having formula (B).

In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the polymerization process can employ a catalyst composition comprising catalyst component I, catalyst component II, and an activator, wherein the activator comprises an activator-support. Activator- supports useful in the polymerization processes of the present invention are disclosed herein. The catalyst composition, optionally, can further comprise one or more than one organoaluminum compound or compounds (or other suitable co-catalyst). Thus, a process for polymerizing olefins in the presence of a catalyst composition can employ a catalyst composition comprising catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator-support, and an organoaluminum compound. In some aspects, the activator- support can comprise (or consist essentially of, or consist of) fluorided alumina, chlorided alumina, bromided alumina, sulfated alumina, fluorided silica-alumina, chlorided silica-alumina, bromided silica-alumina, sulfated silica-alumina, fluorided silica-zirconia, chlorided silica-zirconia, bromided silica-zirconia, sulfated silica- zirconia, fluorided silica-titania, fluorided silica-coated alumina, sulfated silica-coated alumina, phosphated silica-coated alumina, and the like, or combinations thereof; or alternatively a fluorided solid oxide and/or a sulfated solid oxide. In some aspects, the organoaluminum compound can comprise (or consist essentially of, or consist of) trimethylaluminum, triethylaluminum, tri-n-propylaluminum, tri-n-butylaluminum, triisobutylaluminum, tri-n-hexylaluminum, tri-n-octylaluminum, diisobutylaluminum hydride, diethylaluminum ethoxide, diethylaluminum chloride, and the like, or combinations thereof.

In accordance with another aspect of the invention, the polymerization process can employ a catalyst composition comprising catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator-support, and an optional co-catalyst, wherein the co-catalyst can comprise an aluminoxane compound, an organoboron or organoborate compound, an ionizing ionic compound, an organoaluminum compound, an organozinc compound, an organomagnesium compound, or an organolithium compound, or any combination thereof. Hence, aspects of this invention are directed to a process for polymerizing olefins in the presence of a catalyst composition, the processes comprising contacting a catalyst composition with an olefin monomer and optionally an olefin comonomer (one or more) under polymerization conditions to produce an olefin polymer, and the catalyst composition can comprise catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator-support, and an aluminoxane compound; alternatively, catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator-support, and an organoboron or organoborate compound; alternatively, catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator- support, and an ionizing ionic compound; alternatively, catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator-support, and an organoaluminum compound; alternatively, catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator-support, and an organozinc compound; alternatively, catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator- support, and an organomagnesium compound; or alternatively, catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator-support, and an organolithium compound. Furthermore, more than one co-catalyst can be employed, e.g., an organoaluminum compound and an aluminoxane compound, an organoaluminum compound and an ionizing ionic compound, etc.

In accordance with another aspect of the invention, the polymerization process can employ a catalyst composition comprising only one catalyst component I metallocene compound, only one catalyst component II metallocene compound, an activator-support, and an organoaluminum compound.

In accordance with yet another aspect of the invention, the polymerization process can employ a catalyst composition comprising catalyst component I, catalyst component II, and an activator, wherein the activator comprises an aluminoxane compound, an organoboron or organoborate compound, an ionizing ionic compound, or combinations thereof.

The catalyst compositions of the present invention are intended for any olefin polymerization method using various types of polymerization reactor systems and reactors. The polymerization reactor system can include any polymerization reactor capable of polymerizing olefin monomers and comonomers (one or more than one comonomer) to produce homopolymers, copolymers, terpolymers, and the like. The various types of reactors include those that can be referred to as a batch reactor, slurry reactor, gas-phase reactor, solution reactor, high pressure reactor, tubular reactor, autoclave reactor, and the like, or combinations thereof. Suitable polymerization conditions are used for the various reactor types. Gas phase reactors can comprise fluidized bed reactors or staged horizontal reactors. Slurry reactors can comprise vertical or horizontal loops. High pressure reactors can comprise autoclave or tubular reactors. Reactor types can include batch or continuous processes. Continuous processes can use intermittent or continuous product discharge. Processes can also include partial or full direct recycle of unreacted monomer, unreacted comonomer, and/or diluent.

Polymerization reactor systems of the present invention can comprise one type of reactor in a system or multiple reactors of the same or different type (e.g., a single reactor, dual reactor, more than two reactors). Production of polymers in multiple reactors can include several stages in at least two separate polymerization reactors interconnected by a transfer device making it possible to transfer the polymers resulting from the first polymerization reactor into the second reactor. The desired polymerization conditions in one of the reactors can be different from the operating conditions of the other reactor(s). Alternatively, polymerization in multiple reactors can include the manual transfer of polymer from one reactor to subsequent reactors for continued polymerization. Multiple reactor systems can include any combination including, but not limited to, multiple loop reactors, multiple gas phase reactors, a combination of loop and gas phase reactors, multiple high pressure reactors, or a combination of high pressure with loop and/or gas phase reactors. The multiple reactors can be operated in series, in parallel, or both. Accordingly, the present invention encompasses polymerization reactor systems comprising a single reactor, comprising two reactors, and comprising more than two reactors. The polymerization reactor system can comprise a slurry reactor, a gas-phase reactor, a solution reactor, in certain aspects of this invention, as well as multi-reactor combinations thereof. According to one aspect of the invention, the polymerization reactor system can comprise at least one loop slurry reactor comprising vertical or horizontal loops. Monomer, diluent, catalyst, and comonomer can be continuously fed to a loop reactor where polymerization occurs. Generally, continuous processes can comprise the continuous introduction of monomer/comonomer, a catalyst, and a diluent into a polymerization reactor and the continuous removal from this reactor of a suspension comprising polymer particles and the diluent. Reactor effluent can be flashed to remove the solid polymer from the liquids that comprise the diluent, monomer and/or comonomer. Various technologies can be used for this separation step including, but not limited to, flashing that can include any combination of heat addition and pressure reduction, separation by cyclonic action in either a cyclone or hydrocyclone, or separation by centrifugation.

A typical slurry polymerization process (also known as the particle form process) is disclosed, for example, in U.S. Patent Nos. 3,248, 179, 4,501,885, 5,565, 175, 5,575,979, 6,239,235, 6,262, 191, and 6,833,415, each of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

Suitable diluents used in slurry polymerization include, but are not limited to, the monomer being polymerized and hydrocarbons that are liquids under polymerization conditions. Examples of suitable diluents include, but are not limited to, hydrocarbons such as propane, cyclohexane, isobutane, n-butane, n-pentane, isopentane, neopentane, and n-hexane. Some loop polymerization reactions can occur under bulk conditions where no diluent is used. An example is polymerization of propylene monomer as disclosed in U.S. Patent Nos. 5,455,314, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

According to yet another aspect of this invention, the polymerization reactor system can comprise at least one gas phase reactor. Such systems can employ a continuous recycle stream containing one or more monomers continuously cycled through a fluidized bed in the presence of the catalyst under polymerization conditions. A recycle stream can be withdrawn from the fluidized bed and recycled back into the reactor. Simultaneously, polymer product can be withdrawn from the reactor and new or fresh monomer can be added to replace the polymerized monomer. Such gas phase reactors can comprise a process for multi-step gas-phase polymerization of olefins, in which olefins are polymerized in the gaseous phase in at least two independent gas- phase polymerization zones while feeding a catalyst-containing polymer formed in a first polymerization zone to a second polymerization zone. One type of gas phase reactor is disclosed in U.S. Patent Nos. 5,352,749, 4,588,790, and 5,436,304, each of which is incorporated by reference in its entirety herein.

According to still another aspect of the invention, a high pressure polymerization reactor can comprise a tubular reactor or an autoclave reactor. Tubular reactors can have several zones where fresh monomer, initiators, or catalysts are added. Monomer can be entrained in an inert gaseous stream and introduced at one zone of the reactor. Initiators, catalysts, and/or catalyst components can be entrained in a gaseous stream and introduced at another zone of the reactor. The gas streams can be intermixed for polymerization. Heat and pressure can be employed appropriately to obtain optimal polymerization reaction conditions.

According to yet another aspect of the invention, the polymerization reactor system can comprise a solution polymerization reactor wherein the monomer (and comonomer, if used) are contacted with the catalyst composition by suitable stirring or other means. A carrier comprising an inert organic diluent or excess monomer can be employed. If desired, the monomer/comonomer can be brought in the vapor phase into contact with the catalytic reaction product, in the presence or absence of liquid material. The polymerization zone is maintained at temperatures and pressures that will result in the formation of a solution of the polymer in a reaction medium. Agitation can be employed to obtain better temperature control and to maintain uniform polymerization mixtures throughout the polymerization zone. Adequate means are utilized for dissipating the exothermic heat of polymerization.

Polymerization reactor systems suitable for the present invention can further comprise any combination of at least one raw material feed system, at least one feed system for catalyst or catalyst components, and/or at least one polymer recovery system. Suitable reactor systems for the present invention can further comprise systems for feedstock purification, catalyst storage and preparation, extrusion, reactor cooling, polymer recovery, fractionation, recycle, storage, loadout, laboratory analysis, and process control. Polymerization conditions that are controlled for efficiency and to provide desired polymer properties can include temperature, pressure, and the concentrations of various reactants. Polymerization temperature can affect catalyst productivity, polymer molecular weight, and molecular weight distribution. A suitable polymerization temperature can be any temperature below the de-polymerization temperature according to the Gibbs Free energy equation. Typically, this includes from about 60 °C to about 280 °C, for example, or from about 60 °C to about 120 °C, depending upon the type of polymerization reactor(s). In some reactor systems, the polymerization temperature generally can fall within a range from about 70 °C to about 100 °C, or from about 75 °C to about 95 °C. Various polymerization conditions can be held substantially constant, for example, for the production of a particular grade of olefin polymer.

Suitable pressures will also vary according to the reactor and polymerization type. The pressure for liquid phase polymerizations in a loop reactor is typically less than 1000 psig (6.9 MPa). Pressure for gas phase polymerization is usually at about 200 to 500 psig (1.4 MPa to 3.4 MPa). High pressure polymerization in tubular or autoclave reactors is generally run at about 20,000 to 75,000 psig (138 to 517 MPa). Polymerization reactors can also be operated in a supercritical region occurring at generally higher temperatures and pressures. Operation above the critical point of a pressure/temperature diagram (supercritical phase) may offer advantages.

Aspects of this invention are directed to olefin polymerization processes comprising contacting a catalyst composition with an olefin monomer and an optional olefin comonomer under polymerization conditions to produce an olefin polymer. The olefin polymer (e.g., an ethylene copolymer) produced by the process can have any of the polymer properties disclosed herein, for example, a melt index of less than or equal to about 50 g/10 min, and/or ratio of Mw/Mn in a range from about 4 to about 20, and/or density in a range from about 0.90 g/cm 3 to about 0.945 g/cm 3 , and/or a substantially constant short chain branch distribution (SCBD), and/or low levels of long chain branches (LCB), and/or a bimodal molecular weight distribution.

Aspects of this invention also are directed to olefin polymerization processes conducted in the absence of added hydrogen. An olefin polymerization process of this invention can comprise contacting a catalyst composition with an olefin monomer and optionally an olefin comonomer in a polymerization reactor system under polymerization conditions to produce an olefin polymer, wherein the catalyst composition can comprise catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator, and an optional co-catalyst, and wherein the polymerization process is conducted in the absence of added hydrogen (no hydrogen is added to the polymerization reactor system). As one of ordinary skill in the art would recognize, hydrogen can be generated in-situ by metallocene catalyst compositions in various olefin polymerization processes, and the amount generated can vary depending upon the specific catalyst composition and metallocene compound(s) employed, the type of polymerization process used, the polymerization reaction conditions utilized, and so forth.

In other aspects, it may be desirable to conduct the polymerization process in the presence of a certain amount of added hydrogen. Accordingly, an olefin polymerization process of this invention can comprise contacting a catalyst composition with an olefin monomer and optionally an olefin comonomer in a polymerization reactor system under polymerization conditions to produce an olefin polymer, wherein the catalyst composition comprises catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator, and an optional co-catalyst, and wherein the polymerization process is conducted in the presence of added hydrogen (hydrogen is added to the polymerization reactor system). For example, the ratio of hydrogen to the olefin monomer in the polymerization process can be controlled, often by the feed ratio of hydrogen to the olefin monomer entering the reactor. The added hydrogen to olefin monomer ratio in the process can be controlled at a weight ratio which falls within a range from about 25 ppm to about 1500 ppm, from about 50 to about 1000 ppm, or from about 100 ppm to about 750 ppm.

In some aspects of this invention, the feed or reactant ratio of hydrogen to olefin monomer can be maintained substantially constant during the polymerization run for a particular polymer grade. That is, the hydrogen:olefin monomer ratio can be selected at a particular ratio within a range from about 5 ppm up to about 1000 ppm or so, and maintained at the ratio to within about +/- 25% during the polymerization run. For instance, if the target ratio is 100 ppm, then maintaining the hydrogen: olefin monomer ratio substantially constant would entail maintaining the feed ratio between about 75 ppm and about 125 ppm. Further, the addition of comonomer (or comonomers) can be, and generally is, substantially constant throughout the polymerization run for a particular polymer grade.

However, in other aspects, it is contemplated that monomer, comonomer (or comonomers), and/or hydrogen can be periodically pulsed to the reactor, for instance, in a manner similar to that employed in U.S. Patent No. 5,739,220 and U.S. Patent Publication No. 2004/0059070, the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.

The concentration of the reactants entering the polymerization reactor system can be controlled to produce resins with certain physical and mechanical properties. The proposed end-use product that will be formed by the polymer resin and the method of forming that product ultimately can determine the desired polymer properties and attributes. Mechanical properties include tensile, flexural, impact, creep, stress relaxation, and hardness tests. Physical properties include density, molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, melting temperature, glass transition temperature, temperature melt of crystallization, density, stereoregularity, crack growth, long chain branching, and rheological measurements.

This invention is also directed to, and encompasses, the polymers (e.g., ethylene/a-olefin copolymers) produced by any of the polymerization processes disclosed herein. Articles of manufacture can be formed from, and/or can comprise, the polymers produced in accordance with this invention.

POLYMERS AND ARTICLES

Certain aspects of this invention are directed to olefin polymers, such as ethylene copolymers, that have a substantially constant short chain branch distribution (SCBD). This feature often can be referred to as a flat SCBD, or alternatively, as a uniform or homogeneous comonomer distribution. Ethylene copolymers having a uniform comonomer distribution can, for example, have less polymer swell and less solubility in solvents/diluents than copolymers with heterogeneous and non-uniform comonomer distributions, and this can be advantageous in slurry polymerization processes, particularly for lower density copolymers. Olefin polymers described herein, in certain aspects, can have a unique combination of a flat SCBD and a relatively broad and/or bimodal molecular weight distribution, and such polymers can be produced using a dual metallocene catalyst system as disclosed herein. Generally, olefin polymers encompassed herein can include any polymer produced from any olefin monomer and comonomer(s) described herein. For example, the olefin polymer can comprise an ethylene homopolymer, a propylene homopolymer, an ethylene copolymer (e.g., ethylene/a-olefin, ethylene/ 1-butene, ethylene/ 1-hexene, ethylene/ 1-octene, etc.), a propylene copolymer, an ethylene terpolymer, a propylene terpolymer, and the like, including combinations thereof. In one aspect, the olefin polymer can be an ethylene/ 1-butene copolymer, an ethylene/ 1-hexene copolymer, or an ethylene/ 1-octene copolymer, while in another aspect, the olefin polymer can be an ethylene/ 1-hexene copolymer.

If the resultant polymer produced in accordance with the present invention is, for example, an ethylene polymer, its properties can be characterized by various analytical techniques known and used in the polyolefin industry. Articles of manufacture can be formed from, and/or can comprise, the ethylene polymers of this invention, whose typical properties are provided below.

An illustrative and non-limiting example of an olefin polymer (e.g., an ethylene copolymer) of the present invention can have a melt index of less than or equal to about 50 g/10 min, a ratio of Mw/Mn in a range from about 4 to about 20, a density in a range from about 0.90 g/cm 3 to about 0.945 g/cm 3 , and a substantially constant short chain branch distribution (SCBD). Another illustrative and non-limiting example of an olefin polymer (e.g., an ethylene copolymer) of the present invention can have a melt index of less than or equal to about 10 g/10 min, a ratio of Mw/Mn in a range from about 4.1 to about 8, a density in a range from about 0.915 g/cm 3 to about 0.945 g/cm 3 , and a substantially constant short chain branch distribution (SCBD). These illustrative and non-limiting examples of olefin polymers consistent with the present invention also can have any of the polymer properties listed below and in any combination.

Polymers of ethylene (homopolymers, copolymers, etc.) produced in accordance with some aspects of this invention generally can have a melt index (MI) from 0 to about 50 g/10 min. Melt indices in the range from 0 to about 10, from about 0.01 to about 50, from about 0.1 to about 25, or from about 0.3 to about 20 g/10 min, are contemplated in other aspects of this invention. For example, a polymer of the present invention can have a MI in a range from about 0.5 to about 10, or from about 0.3 to about 8 g/10 min. Consistent with certain aspects of this invention, ethylene polymers described herein can have a high load melt index (HLMI) in a range from about 5 to about 1500, from about 10 to about 800, from about 10 to about 500, or from about 12 to about 450 g/10 min. In further aspects, ethylene polymers described herein can have a HLMI in a range from about 15 to about 500, from about 10 to about 300, or from about 15 to about 100 g/10 min.

In an aspect, the polymers described herein can have a ratio of HLMI/MI in a range from about 10 to about 250, such as, for instance, from about 10 to about 100, from about 15 to about 100, from about 15 to about 75, from about 20 to about 80, or from about 25 to about 65, and the like.

The densities of ethylene-based polymers (e.g., ethylene copolymers) produced using the catalyst systems and processes disclosed herein often are less than or equal to about 0.945 g/cm 3 , for example, less than or equal to about 0.940 g/cm 3 , and often can range down to about 0.895 g/cm 3 . Yet, in particular aspects, the density can be in a range from about 0.90 to about 0.945, such as, for example, from about 0.90 to about 0.94, from about 0.91 to about 0.945, from about 0.91 to about 0.94, from about 0.915 to about 0.94, or from about 0.915 to about 0.935 g/cm 3 .

Generally, polymers produced in aspects of the present invention are essentially linear or have very low levels of long chain branching, with typically less than about 0.01 long chain branches (LCB) per 1000 total carbon atoms, and similar in LCB content to polymers shown, for example, in U.S. Patent Nos. 7,517,939, 8,1 14,946, and 8,383,754, which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety. In other aspects, the number of LCB per 1000 total carbon atoms can be less than about 0.008, less than about 0.007, less than about 0.005, or less than about 0.003 LCB per 1000 total carbon atoms.

In an aspect, ethylene polymers described herein can have a ratio of Mw/Mn, or the polydispersity index, in a range from about 4 to about 20, from about 4 to about 15, from about 4 to about 12, from about 4 to about 10, or from about 4 to about 8. In another aspect, ethylene polymers described herein can have a Mw/Mn in a range from about 4.1 to about 12, from about 4.1 to about 8, from about 4.2 to about 10, or from about 4.2 to about 8. In an aspect, ethylene polymers described herein can have a ratio of Mz/Mw in a range from about 2 to about 6, from about 2 to about 5, from about 2 to about 4, or from about 2 to about 3.5. In another aspect, ethylene polymers described herein can have a Mz/Mw in a range from about 2.2 to about 4.5, from about 2.2 to about 4, from about 2.2 to about 3.8, or from about 2.3 to about 3.7.

In an aspect, ethylene polymers described herein can have a weight-average molecular weight (Mw) in a range from about 40,000 to about 350,000, from about 50,000 to about 300,000, from about 50,000 to about 250,000, from about 50,000 to about 225,000, or from about 50,000 to about 200,000 g/mol. In another aspect, ethylene polymers described herein can have a Mw in a range from about 60,000 to about 250,000, from about 60,000 to about 200,000, from about 60,000 to about 175,000, from about 40,000 to about 200,000, from about 70,000 to about 200,000, or from about 40,000 to about 150,000 g/mol.

In an aspect, ethylene polymers described herein can have a number-average molecular weight (Mn) in a range from about 8,000 to about 40,000, from about 10,000 to about 40,000, or from about 8,000 to about 30,000 g/mol. In another aspect, ethylene polymers described herein can have a Mn in a range from about 10,000 to about 35,000, from about 10,000 to about 30,000, from about 10,000 to about 28,000, or from about 12,000 to about 28,000 g/mol.

Ethylene polymers consistent with certain aspects of the invention often can have a bimodal molecular weight distribution (as determined using gel permeation chromatography (GPC) or other suitable analytical technique). Typically, a bimodal molecular weight distribution can be characterized as having an identifiable high molecular weight component (or distribution) and an identifiable low molecular weight component (or distribution).

Ethylene copolymers, for example, produced using the polymerization processes and catalyst systems described herein can, in some aspects, have a substantially constant SCBD. As noted above, this characteristic also may be referred to as a flat or uniform SCBD or comonomer distribution. In one aspect, the substantially constant SCBD can be described by the slope of a plot of the number of short chain branches per 1000 total carbon atoms versus the logarithm of molecular weight of the olefin polymer (and determined via linear regression over the range from D15 to D85), and the slope can be in a range from about -0.6 to about 0.6. In further aspects, the slope can be from about -0.5 to about 0.5; alternatively, from about -0.4 to about 0.4; alternatively, from about -0.3 to about 0.3; or alternatively, from about -0.2 to about 0.2. In another aspect, the substantially constant SCBD can be described by the percentage of data points deviating from the average short chain branch content of the polymer by greater than 0.5 short chain branches per 1000 total carbon atoms (determined over the range from D 15 to D85), and the percentage can be less than or equal to 20%. In further aspects, this percentage can be less than or equal to 15%; alternatively, less than or equal to 10%; or alternatively, less than or equal to 5%. In yet another aspect, the substantially constant SCBD can be described by the percentage of data points deviating from the average short chain branch content of the polymer by greater than 1 short chain branch per 1000 total carbon atoms (determined over the range from D15 to D85), and the percentage can be less than or equal to 15%. In further aspects, this percentage can be less than or equal to 10%; alternatively, less than or equal to 3%; or alternatively, less than or equal to 1%.

D85 is the molecular weight at which 85% of the polymer by weight has higher molecular weight, and D15 is the molecular weight at which 15% of the polymer by weight has higher molecular weight. D85 and D15 are depicted graphically in FIG. 6 for a molecular weight distribution curve as a function of increasing logarithm of the molecular weight. Hence, the substantially constant, or flat, SCBD is determined over the D85 to D15 molecular weight range.

In an aspect, the olefin polymer described herein can be a reactor product (e.g., a single reactor product), for example, not a post-reactor blend of two polymers, for instance, having different molecular weight characteristics. As one of skill in the art would readily recognize, physical blends of two different polymer resins can be made, but this necessitates additional processing and complexity not required for a reactor product.

Olefin polymers, whether homopolymers, copolymers, and so forth, can be formed into various articles of manufacture. Articles which can comprise polymers of this invention include, but are not limited to, an agricultural film, an automobile part, a bottle, a container for chemicals, a drum, a fiber or fabric, a food packaging film or container, a food service article, a fuel tank, a geomembrane, a household container, a liner, a molded product, a medical device or material, an outdoor storage product, outdoor play equipment, a pipe, a sheet or tape, a toy, or a traffic barrier, and the like. Various processes can be employed to form these articles. Non-limiting examples of these processes include injection molding, blow molding, rotational molding, film extrusion, sheet extrusion, profile extrusion, thermoforming, and the like. Additionally, additives and modifiers are often added to these polymers in order to provide beneficial polymer processing or end-use product attributes. Such processes and materials are described in Modern Plastics Encyclopedia, Mid-November 1995 Issue, Vol. 72, No. 12; and Film Extrusion Manual - Process, Materials, Properties, TAPPI Press, 1992; the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety. In some aspects of this invention, an article of manufacture can comprise any of ethylene copolymers described herein, and the article of manufacture can be a film product or a molded product.

Applicants also contemplate a method for forming or preparing an article of manufacture comprising a polymer produced by any of the polymerization processes disclosed herein. For instance, a method can comprise (i) contacting a catalyst composition with an olefin monomer and an optional olefin comonomer under polymerization conditions in a polymerization reactor system to produce an olefin polymer, wherein the catalyst composition can comprise catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator (e.g., an activator-support comprising a solid oxide treated with an electron-withdrawing anion), and an optional co-catalyst (e.g., an organoaluminum compound); and (ii) forming an article of manufacture comprising the olefin polymer. The forming step can comprise blending, melt processing, extruding, molding, or thermoforming, and the like, including combinations thereof.

EXAMPLES

The invention is further illustrated by the following examples, which are not to be construed in any way as imposing limitations to the scope of this invention. Various other aspects, embodiments, modifications, and equivalents thereof which, after reading the description herein, may suggest themselves to one of ordinary skill in the art without departing from the spirit of the present invention or the scope of the appended claims. Melt index (MI, g/10 min) was determined in accordance with ASTM D 1238 at 190 °C with a 2,160 gram weight, and high load melt index (HLMI, g/10 min) was determined in accordance with ASTM D1238 at 190 °C with a 21,600 gram weight. Polymer density was determined in grams per cubic centimeter (g/cm 3 ) on a compression molded sample, cooled at about 15 °C per hour, and conditioned for about 40 hours at room temperature in accordance with ASTM D1505 and ASTM D4703.

Molecular weights and molecular weight distributions were obtained using a PL-GPC 220 (Polymer Labs, an Agilent Company) system equipped with a IR4 detector (Polymer Char, Spain) and three Styragel HMW-6E GPC columns (Waters, MA) running at 145 °C. The flow rate of the mobile phase 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB) containing 0.5 g/L 2,6-di-t-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT) was set at 1 mL/min, and polymer solution concentrations were in the range of 1.0-1.5 mg/mL, depending on the molecular weight. Sample preparation was conducted at 150 °C for nominally 4 hr with occasional and gentle agitation, before the solutions were transferred to sample vials for injection. An injection volume of about 400 μϊ ^ was used. The integral calibration method was used to deduce molecular weights and molecular weight distributions using a Chevron Phillips Chemical Company's HDPE polyethylene resin, MARLEX ® BHB5003, as the broad standard. The integral table of the broad standard was pre-determined in a separate experiment with SEC-MALS. Mn is the number- average molecular weight, Mw is the weight-average molecular weight, and Mz is the z-average molecular weight.

The long chain branches (LCB) per 1000 total carbon atoms can be calculated using the method of Janzen and Colby (J. Mol. Struct., 485/486, 569-584 (1999)), from values of zero shear viscosity, η 0 (determined from the Carreau-Yasuda model), and measured values of Mw obtained using a Dawn EOS multiangle light scattering detector (Wyatt). See also U.S. Patent No. 8,114,946; J. Phys. Chem. 1980, 84, 649; and Y. Yu, D. C. Rohlfing, G. R Hawley, and P. J. DesLauriers, Polymer Preprint, 44, 50, (2003). These references are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.

Short chain branch (SCB) content and short chain branching distribution (SCBD) across the molecular weight distribution were determined via an IR5-detected GPC system (IR5-GPC), wherein the GPC system was a PL220 GPC/SEC system (Polymer Labs, an Agilent company) equipped with three Styragel HMW-6E columns (Waters, MA) for polymer separation. A thermoelectric -cooled IR5 MCT detector (IR5) (Polymer Char, Spain) was connected to the GPC columns via a hot-transfer line. Chromatographic data were obtained from two output ports of the IR5 detector. First, the analog signal goes from the analog output port to a digitizer before connecting to Computer "A" for molecular weight determinations via the Cirrus software (Polymer Labs, now an Agilent Company) and the integral calibration method using a broad MWD HDPE Marlex™ BHB5003 resin (Chevron Phillips Chemical) as the broad molecular weight standard. The digital signals, on the other hand, go via a USB cable directly to Computer "B" where they are collected by a LabView data collection software provided by Polymer Char. Chromatographic conditions were set as follows: column oven temperature of 145 °C; flowrate of 1 mL/min; injection volume of 0.4 mL; and polymer concentration of about 2 mg/mL, depending on sample molecular weight. The temperatures for both the hot-transfer line and IR5 detector sample cell were set at 150 °C, while the temperature of the electronics of the IR5 detector was set at 60 °C. Short chain branching content was determined via an in-house method using the intensity ratio of CH 3 (J m) to CH 2 (Jem) coupled with a calibration curve. The calibration curve was a plot of SCB content (XSCB) as a function of the intensity ratio of ICH3 ICH2- To obtain a calibration curve, a group of polyethylene resins (no less than 5) of SCB level ranging from zero to ca. 32 SCB/1,000 total carbons (SCB Standards) were used. All these SCB Standards have known SCB levels and flat SCBD profiles pre-determined separately by NMR and the solvent-gradient fractionation coupled with NMR (SGF-NMR) methods. Using SCB calibration curves thus established, profiles of short chain branching distribution across the molecular weight distribution were obtained for resins fractionated by the IR5-GPC system under exactly the same chromatographic conditions as for these SCB standards. A relationship between the intensity ratio and the elution volume was converted into SCB distribution as a function of MWD using a predetermined SCB calibration curve (i.e., intensity ratio of Icro/Icm vs. SCB content) and MW calibration curve (i.e., molecular weight vs. elution time) to convert the intensity ratio of ICH3 ICH2 and the elution time into SCB content and the molecular weight, respectively.

Fluorided silica-coated alumina activator-supports for Examples 2-5 were prepared as follows. Bohemite was obtained from W.R. Grace & Company under the designation "Alumina A" and having a surface area of about 300 m 2 /g, a pore volume of about 1.3 mL/g, and an average particle size of about 100 microns. The alumina was first calcined in dry air at about 600 °C for approximately 6 hours, cooled to ambient temperature, and then contacted with tetraethylorthosilicate in isopropanol to equal 25 wt. % S1O2. After drying, the silica-coated alumina was calcined at 600 °C for 3 hours. Fluorided silica-coated alumina (7 wt. % F) was prepared by impregnating the calcined silica-coated alumina with an ammonium bifluoride solution in methanol, drying, and then calcining for 3 hours at 600 °C in dry air. Afterward, the fluorided silica-coated alumina was collected and stored under dry nitrogen, and was used without exposure to the atmosphere.

Sulfated alumina activator-supports for Example 1 were prepared as follows. As above, bohemite was obtained from W.R. Grace & Company under the designation "Alumina A." This material was impregnated to incipient wetness with an aqueous solution of ammonium sulfate to equal about 15% sulfate. This mixture was then placed in a flat pan and allowed to dry under vacuum at approximately 110 °C for about 16 hours. To calcine the resultant powdered mixture, the material was fluidized in a stream of dry air at about 550 °C for about 6 hours. Afterward, the sulfated alumina was collected and stored under dry nitrogen, and was used without exposure to the atmosphere.

The structures for MET 1, MET 2, MET 3, and MET 4, used in Examples 1-5, are shown below:

MET 1 MET 2 MET 3

MET 4

Metallocenes MET 1, MET 3, and MET 4 were produced using suitable procedures. MET 2 was synthesized by first reacting lithiated indene with 5-bromo-l- pentene. Pure 3-(l-pentenyl) indene was obtained via vacuum distillation as a pale yellow oil. One mole of 3-(l-pentenyl) indene was added to diethyl ether and cooled to -74 °C, and one mole of n-butyllithium was added. The reaction mixture was stirred at 21 °C for 3 hr, then cooled again to -74 °C, followed by the addition of a diethyl ether solution of dichloro(diisopropylamino) boron, and then stirred for 12 hr while warming to 21 °C. The resulting yellow slurry was centrifuged, and the bright yellow solution was poured off and solvent removed under reduced pressure. Monochloro(diisopropylamino)-3-(l-pentenyl)indenylboron was obtained as a yellow oil. One mole of monochloro(diisopropylamino)-3-(l-pentenyl)indenylboron was added to tetrahydrofuran and cooled to 0 °C, followed by the addition of one mole of sodium cyclopentadiaenide, producing a yellow slurry, which was stirred at 21 °C for 12 hr. The reaction solution was centrifuged and then decanted off. Concentration under reduced atmosphere yielded the ligand shown below as a yellow oil:

A portion of the ligand product was mixed with diethyl ether and cooled to -34

°C, and then mixed with a diethyl ether solution of lithium diisopropylamine, resulting in a yellow/orange slurry (ligand lithium salt), followed by warming to 20 °C while stirring. A suspension of ZrCl 4 in diethyl ether was cooled to -34 °C, followed by addition of the ligand lithium salt slurry; the solution turned to a red slurry. After stirring for 12 hr at 20 °C, the solution was centrifuged, removed, and concentrated to a red foam solid. The solid was extracted with pentane, filtered, and concentrated to yield a red solid product of MET 2 {¾ NMR (300 MHz C 6 D 6 ): 57.51 (d, 1H); 7.25 (t, 1H); 7.00 (d, 1H); 6.90 (t, 1H); 6.69 (d, 1H); 6.54 (d, 1H); 5.73 (m, 2H); 5.29 (m, 1H); 5.24 (t, 1H); 5.02 (m, 2H); 3.05 (m, 2H), 1.82 - 0.72 (m, 18H) ppm} .

Using synthesis procedures analogous to that described above, the following ligand compounds also were produced:

EXAMPLES 1-5

Examples 1-5 were produced using the following polymerization procedure (Table I summarizes certain information relating to the polymerization experiments of Examples 1-5). The polymerization runs were conducted in a one-gallon stainless steel reactor, and isobutane (1.8 L) was used in all runs. Metallocene solutions were prepared at about 1 mg/mL in toluene. Approximately 150-200 mg of fluorided silica- coated alumina (in Examples 2-5) or sulfated alumina (in Example 1) (activator- support, A-S), 0.6-0.8 mmol of triisobutylaluminum (TIBA), and the metallocene solutions (mixture of the two catalysts) were added in that order through a charge port while slowly venting isobutane vapor. The charge port was closed and isobutane was added. The contents of the reactor were stirred and heated to the desired run temperature of 80 or 90 °C, and ethylene and 1 -hexene were then introduced into the reactor. No hydrogen was added. Ethylene was fed on demand to maintain the target pressure of 340 or 390 psig pressure for the 20 or 30 minute length of the polymerization run. The reactor was maintained at the desired temperature throughout the run by an automated heating-cooling system. FIGS. 1-5 illustrate the molecular weight distributions (amount of polymer versus the logarithm of molecular weight) and the short chain branch distributions (SCBD's) of the polymers of Examples 1-5, and Table II summarizes certain density, melt flow, and molecular weight characteristics of the polymers of Examples 1-5. As shown in Table II, the polymers of Examples 2, 3, and 5, which were produced using a catalyst system containing a boron bridged metallocene and a carbon bridged metallocene, each had a melt index less than 10, a HLMI/MI ratio in the 30-55 range, and a Mw/Mn ratio in the 4-7 range.

FIG. 2, FIG. 3, and FIG. 5 illustrate the broad and/or bimodal characteristics of the polymers of Examples 2, 3, and 5, respectively, as well as, unexpectedly, the substantially constant SCBD. In contrast to the SCBD of the polymers of Examples 1 and 4, which showed a generally decreasing number of SCB's as molecular weight increases, the SCBD's of the polymers of Examples 2, 3, and 5 were substantially constant (or substantially flat). Using linear regression over the range from D15 to D85, the slopes of the lines representing the number of short chain branches per 1000 total carbon atoms versus the logarithm of molecular weight of the polymers of Examples 2, 3, and 5 were in the range of -0.25 to 0.25. Table III summarizes certain SCBD characteristics of the polymers of Examples 1-5. As shown in Table III, and unexpectedly, the polymers of Examples 2, 3, and 5 had less than 3% of the SCBD data points deviating from the average short chain branch content by greater than 0.5 short chain branches per 1000 total carbon atoms, and less than 1% (i.e., zero) of the SCBD data points deviating from the average short chain branch content by greater than 1 short chain branch per 1000 total carbon atoms (this data was determined over the range from D15 to D85). These measurements for the flat SCBD of Examples 2, 3, and 5 were significantly different than the comparable measurements for the decreasing SCBD of Examples 1 and 4. Table I. Examples 1-5 - Polymerization Conditions

Table II. Examples 1-5 - Polymer Characteristics

Table III. Examples 1-5 - SCBD Characteristics

The invention is described above with reference to numerous aspects and embodiments, and specific examples. Many variations will suggest themselves to those skilled in the art in light of the above detailed description. All such obvious variations are within the full intended scope of the appended claims. Other embodiments of the invention can include, but are not limited to, the following (embodiments are described as "comprising" but, alternatively, can "consist essentially of or "consist of):

Embodiment 1. An olefin polymer having a melt index of less than or equal to about 50 g/10 min, a ratio of Mw/Mn in a range from about 4 to about 20, a density in a range from about 0.90 g/cm 3 to about 0.945 g/cm 3 , and a substantially constant short chain branch distribution (SCBD).

Embodiment 2. The polymer defined in embodiment 1, wherein the olefin polymer has a melt index (MI) in any range disclosed herein, e.g., less than or equal to about 10, from about 0.01 to about 50, from about 0.3 to about 20, from about 0.5 to about 10 g/10 min, etc.

Embodiment 3. The polymer defined in embodiment 1 or 2, wherein the olefin polymer has a high load melt index (HLMI) in any range disclosed herein, e.g., from about 10 to about 1500, from about 10 to about 800, from about 10 to about 500, from about 15 to about 500, from about 15 to about 100 g/10 min, etc.

Embodiment 4. The polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-3, wherein the olefin polymer has a ratio of HLMI/MI in any range disclosed herein, e.g., from about 10 to about 250, from about 10 to about 100, from about 20 to about 80, from about 25 to about 65, etc.

Embodiment 5. The polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-4, wherein the olefin polymer has a density in any range disclosed herein, e.g., from about 0.90 to about 0.94, from about 0.91 to about 0.945, from about 0.915 to about 0.94 g/cm 3 , etc.

Embodiment 6. The polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-5, wherein the olefin polymer has a ratio of Mw/Mn in any range disclosed herein, e.g., from about 4 to about 15, from about 4.1 to about 12, from about 4 to about 10, from about 4.1 to about 8, from about 4.2 to about 10, etc.

Embodiment 7. The polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-6, wherein the olefin polymer has a ratio of Mz/Mw in any range disclosed herein, e.g., from about 2 to about 5, from about 2 to about 4, from about 2.2 to about 4, from about 2.2 to about 3.8, from about 2.3 to about 3.7, etc.

Embodiment 8. The polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-7, wherein the olefin polymer has a Mw in any range disclosed herein, e.g., from about 50,000 to about 300,000, from about 50,000 to about 250,000, from about 70,000 to about 200,000, from about 60,000 to about 175,000 g/mol, etc.

Embodiment 9. The polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-8, wherein the olefin polymer has a Mn in any range disclosed herein, e.g., from about 8,000 to about 30,000, from about 10,000 to about 28,000, from about 10,000 to about 30,000, from about 12,000 to about 28,000 g/mol, etc.

Embodiment 10. The polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-9, wherein the olefin polymer has a bimodal molecular weight distribution.

Embodiment 11. The polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-10, wherein the olefin polymer has less than about 0.01 long chain branches (LCB) per 1000 total carbon atoms, e.g., less than about 0.008 LCB, less than about 0.005 LCB, etc.

Embodiment 12. The polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-11, wherein the olefin polymer has a melt index of less than or equal to about 10 g/10 min, a ratio of Mw/Mn in a range from about 4.1 to about 8, a density in a range from about 0.915 g/cm 3 to about 0.945 g/cm 3 , and a substantially constant short chain branch distribution (SCBD).

Embodiment 13. The polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-12, wherein the olefin polymer has a slope of a plot of the number of short chain branches per 1000 total carbon atoms versus the logarithm of molecular weight of the olefin polymer (determined via linear regression over the range from D15 to D85) in any range disclosed herein, e.g., from about -0.6 to about 0.6, from about -0.5 to about 0.5, from about -0.4 to about 0.4, from about -0.3 to about 0.3, etc.

Embodiment 14. The polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-13, wherein the olefin polymer has a percentage of data points deviating from the average short chain branch content by greater than 0.5 short chain branches per 1000 total carbon atoms (determined over the range from D15 to D85) in any range disclosed herein, e.g., less than or equal to about 20%, less than or equal to about 15%, less than or equal to about 10%, less than or equal to about 5%, etc.

Embodiment 15. The polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-14, wherein the olefin polymer has a percentage of data points deviating from the average short chain branch content by greater than 1 short chain branch per 1000 total carbon atoms (determined over the range from D15 to D85) in any range disclosed herein, e.g., less than or equal to about 15%, less than or equal to about 5%, less than or equal to about 3%, less than or equal to about 1%, etc.

Embodiment 16. The polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-15, wherein the olefin polymer is any ethylene copolymer disclosed herein, e.g., any ethylene a-olefin copolymer disclosed herein.

Embodiment 17. The polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-16, wherein the olefin polymer is an ethylene/ 1-butene copolymer, an ethylene/ 1-hexene copolymer, or an ethylene/ 1-octene copolymer.

Embodiment 18. The polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-17, wherein the olefin polymer is an ethylene/ 1-hexene copolymer.

Embodiment 19. An article comprising the olefin polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-18.

Embodiment 20. An article comprising the olefin polymer defined in any one of embodiments 1-18, wherein the article is an agricultural film, an automobile part, a bottle, a drum, a fiber or fabric, a food packaging film or container, a food service article, a fuel tank, a geomembrane, a household container, a liner, a molded product, a medical device or material, a pipe, a sheet or tape, or a toy.

Embodiment 21. A catalyst composition comprising catalyst component I, catalyst component II, an activator, and an optional co-catalyst, wherein:

catalyst component I comprises a boron bridged metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl group and an indenyl group; and

catalyst component II comprises a single atom bridged metallocene compound with a fluorenyl group.

Embodiment 22. The composition defined in embodiment 21, wherein the activator comprises any activator disclosed herein. Embodiment 23. The composition defined in embodiment 21 or 22, wherein the activator comprises an aluminoxane compound, an organoboron or organoborate compound, an ionizing ionic compound, or any combination thereof.

Embodiment 24. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-23, wherein the activator comprises an aluminoxane compound.

Embodiment 25. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-23, wherein the activator comprises an organoboron or organoborate compound.

Embodiment 26. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-23, wherein the activator comprises an ionizing ionic compound.

Embodiment 27. The composition defined in embodiment 21 or 22, wherein the activator comprises an activator-support, the activator-support comprising any solid oxide treated with an electron-withdrawing anion disclosed herein.

Embodiment 28. The composition defined in embodiment 27, wherein the solid oxide comprises any solid oxide disclosed herein, e.g., silica, alumina, silica-alumina, silica-coated alumina, aluminum phosphate, aluminophosphate, heteropolytungstate, titania, zirconia, magnesia, boria, zinc oxide, a mixed oxide thereof, or any mixture thereof; and the electron-withdrawing anion comprises any electron-withdrawing anion disclosed herein, e.g., sulfate, bisulfate, fluoride, chloride, bromide, iodide, fluorosulfate, fluoroborate, phosphate, fluorophosphate, trifluoroacetate, triflate, fluorozirconate, fluorotitanate, phospho-tungstate, or any combination thereof.

Embodiment 29. The composition defined in embodiment 27, wherein the activator-support comprises fluorided alumina, chlorided alumina, bromided alumina, sulfated alumina, fluorided silica-alumina, chlorided silica-alumina, bromided silica- alumina, sulfated silica-alumina, fluorided silica-zirconia, chlorided silica-zirconia, bromided silica-zirconia, sulfated silica-zirconia, fluorided silica-titania, fluorided silica-coated alumina, sulfated silica-coated alumina, phosphated silica-coated alumina, or any combination thereof.

Embodiment 30. The composition defined in embodiment 27, wherein the activator-support comprises fluorided alumina, sulfated alumina, fluorided silica- alumina, sulfated silica-alumina, fluorided silica-coated alumina, sulfated silica-coated alumina, or any combination thereof. Embodiment 31. The composition defined in embodiment 27, wherein the activator-support comprises a fluorided solid oxide, a sulfated solid oxide, or any combination thereof.

Embodiment 32. The composition defined in embodiment 27, wherein the activator-support further comprises any metal or metal ion disclosed herein, e.g., zinc, nickel, vanadium, titanium, silver, copper, gallium, tin, tungsten, molybdenum, zirconium, or any combination thereof.

Embodiment 33. The composition defined in embodiment 21 or 22, wherein the activator comprises an activator-support, the activator-support comprising a clay mineral, a pillared clay, an exfoliated clay, an exfoliated clay gelled into another oxide matrix, a layered silicate mineral, a non-layered silicate mineral, a layered aluminosilicate mineral, a non-layered aluminosilicate mineral, or any combination thereof.

Embodiment 34. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-33, wherein the catalyst composition comprises a co-catalyst, e.g., any co-catalyst disclosed herein.

Embodiment 35. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-34, wherein the co-catalyst comprises an organoaluminum compound, an organozinc compound, an organomagnesium compound, an organolithium compound, or any combination thereof.

Embodiment 36. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-35, wherein the co-catalyst comprises an organoaluminum compound.

Embodiment 37. The composition defined in embodiment 36, wherein the organoaluminum compound comprises any organoaluminum compound disclosed herein, e.g., trimethylaluminum, triethylaluminum, triisobutylaluminum, etc., or combinations thereof.

Embodiment 38. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 27-37, wherein the catalyst composition is substantially free of aluminoxane compounds, organoboron or organoborate compounds, ionizing ionic compounds, or combinations thereof.

Embodiment 39. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 27-37, wherein the co-catalyst comprises an aluminoxane compound, an organoboron or organoborate compound, an ionizing ionic compound, an organoaluminum compound, an organozinc compound, an organomagnesium compound, an organolithium compound, or any combination thereof.

Embodiment 40. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-39, wherein the catalyst composition comprises only one boron bridged metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl group and an indenyl group, and only one single atom bridged metallocene compound with a fluorenyl group.

Embodiment 41. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-40, wherein catalyst component I comprises a boron bridged, zirconium or hafnium based metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl group and an indenyl group.

Embodiment 42. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-40, wherein catalyst component I comprises a boron bridged, zirconium or hafnium based metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl group and an indenyl group, and does not have an alkyl and/or an alkenyl substituent.

Embodiment 43. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-40, wherein catalyst component I comprises a boron bridged, zirconium or hafnium based metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl group and an indenyl group, and the cyclopentadienyl group has an alkyl and/or an alkenyl substituent.

Embodiment 44. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-40, wherein catalyst component I comprises a boron bridged, zirconium or hafnium based metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl group and an indenyl group, and the indenyl group has an alkyl and/or an alkenyl substituent.

Embodiment 45. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-40, wherein catalyst component I comprises a boron bridged, zirconium or hafnium based metallocene compound with a cyclopentadienyl and an indenyl group, and wherein the cyclopentadienyl group contains no additional substituents (e.g., other than the boron bridging group).

Embodiment 46. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-40, wherein catalyst component I comprises any boron bridged metallocene compound disclosed herein, e.g., having formula (A):

(A); wherein:

M is Ti, Zr, or Hf;

each X independently is any monoanionic ligand disclosed herein;

Cp is a cyclopentadienyl group, optionally substituted with any substituent (one or more) disclosed herein;

Ind is an indenyl group, optionally substituted with any substituent (one or more) disclosed herein; and

each R independently is H or any Ci to C 36 hydrocarbyl group or Ci to C 36 hydrocarbylsilyl group disclosed herein.

Embodiment 47. The composition defined in embodiment 46, wherein Cp is a cyclopentadienyl group with an alkyl or alkenyl substituent, and Ind is an indenyl group and does not contain an alkyl or alkenyl substituent.

Embodiment 48. The composition defined in embodiment 46, wherein Cp is a cyclopentadienyl group and does not contain an alkyl or alkenyl substituent, and Ind is an indenyl group with an alkyl or alkenyl substituent.

Embodiment 49. The composition defined in embodiment 47 or 48, wherein the alkenyl substituent is any alkenyl group disclosed herein, e.g., a C2 to C 18 alkenyl group, a C 3 to C 12 linear alkenyl group, a C 3 to Cs terminal alkenyl group, etc.

Embodiment 50. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 46-49, wherein Cp contains a substituent (one or more), e.g., H, a halide, a Ci to C 36 hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to C 36 halogenated hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to C 36 hydrocarboxy group, or a Ci to C36 hydrocarbylsilyl group.

Embodiment 51. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 46-50, wherein Ind contains a substituent (one or more), e.g., H, a halide, a Ci to C 36 hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to C 36 halogenated hydrocarbyl group, a Ci to C 36 hydrocarboxy group, or a Ci to C 36 hydrocarbylsilyl group. Embodiment 52. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-51, wherein catalyst component II comprises a single atom bridged metallocene compound with a fluorenyl group and either a cyclopentadienyl group or an indenyl group.

Embodiment 53. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-52, wherein catalyst component II comprises a single atom bridged metallocene compound with a fluorenyl group and a cyclopentadienyl group.

Embodiment 54. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-52, wherein catalyst component II comprises a single atom bridged metallocene compound with a fluorenyl group and an indenyl group.

Embodiment 55. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-54, wherein catalyst component II contains an aryl group (e.g., a phenyl group) on the bridging atom.

Embodiment 56. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-55, wherein catalyst component II contains an alkenyl substituent.

Embodiment 57. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-56, wherein the bridging atom is Ge, C, Si, B, or P.

Embodiment 58. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-57, wherein catalyst component II comprises a zirconium or hafnium based metallocene compound.

Embodiment 59. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-51, wherein catalyst component II comprises any single atom bridged metallocene compound with a fluorenyl group disclosed herein, e.g., having formula (B):

Cp is a cyclopentadienyl group or an indenyl group, optionally substituted with any substituent (one or more) disclosed herein; R x and R Y independently are H or any halide, Ci to C36 hydrocarbyl group, Ci to C36 halogenated hydrocarbyl group, Ci to C36 hydrocarboxy group, or Ci to C36 hydrocarbylsilyl group disclosed herein;

E 3 is C, Si, or Ge; and

each R 3 independently is H or any Ci to Cis hydrocarbyl group disclosed herein.

Embodiment 60. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-59, wherein a weight ratio of catalyst component I to catalyst component II in the catalyst composition is in any range of weight ratios disclosed herein, e.g., from about 1 : 10 to about 10: 1, from about 3 : 1 to about 1 :3, from about 1.5: 1 to about 1 : 1.5, etc.

Embodiment 61. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-60, wherein the catalyst composition is produced by a process comprising contacting, in any order, catalyst component I, catalyst component II, the activator, and the co- catalyst (if utilized).

Embodiment 62. The composition defined in any one of embodiments 21-61, wherein a catalyst activity of the catalyst composition is in any range disclosed herein, e.g., greater than about 100,000 grams, greater than about 300,000 grams, greater than about 500,000 grams, etc., of ethylene polymer per gram of metallocene compounds (catalyst components I and II) per hour, under slurry polymerization conditions, with a triisobutylaluminum co-catalyst, using isobutane as a diluent, and with a polymerization temperature of 80 °C and a reactor pressure of 340 psig.

Embodiment 63. An olefin polymerization process, the process comprising contacting the catalyst composition defined in any one of embodiments 21 -62 with an olefin monomer and an optional olefin comonomer in a polymerization reactor system under polymerization conditions to produce an olefin polymer.

Embodiment 64. The process defined in embodiment 63, wherein the olefin monomer comprises any olefin monomer disclosed herein, e.g., any C2-C2 0 olefin.

Embodiment 65. The process defined in embodiment 63 or 64, wherein the olefin monomer and the optional olefin comonomer independently comprise a C2-C2 0 alpha-olefin.

Embodiment 66. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-65, wherein the olefin monomer comprises ethylene. Embodiment 67. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-66, wherein the catalyst composition is contacted with ethylene and an olefin comonomer comprising a C3-C10 alpha-olefin.

Embodiment 68. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-67, wherein the catalyst composition is contacted with ethylene and an olefin comonomer comprising 1-butene, 1-hexene, 1-octene, or a mixture thereof.

Embodiment 69. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-65, wherein the olefin monomer comprises propylene.

Embodiment 70. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-69, wherein the polymerization reactor system comprises a batch reactor, a slurry reactor, a gas-phase reactor, a solution reactor, a high pressure reactor, a tubular reactor, an autoclave reactor, or a combination thereof.

Embodiment 71. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-70, wherein the polymerization reactor system comprises a slurry reactor, a gas-phase reactor, a solution reactor, or a combination thereof.

Embodiment 72. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-71, wherein the polymerization reactor system comprises a loop slurry reactor.

Embodiment 73. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-72, wherein the polymerization reactor system comprises a single reactor.

Embodiment 74. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-72, wherein the polymerization reactor system comprises 2 reactors.

Embodiment 75. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-72, wherein the polymerization reactor system comprises more than 2 reactors.

Embodiment 76. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-75, wherein the olefin polymer comprises any olefin polymer disclosed herein.

Embodiment 77. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-76, wherein the olefin polymer is an ethylene homopolymer, an ethylene/ 1-butene copolymer, an ethylene/ 1-hexene copolymer, or an ethylene/ 1-octene copolymer.

Embodiment 78. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-77, wherein the olefin polymer is an ethylene/ 1-hexene copolymer. Embodiment 79. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-76, wherein the olefin polymer is a polypropylene homopolymer or a propylene-based copolymer.

Embodiment 80. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-79, wherein the polymerization conditions comprise a polymerization reaction temperature in a range from about 60 °C to about 120 °C and a reaction pressure in a range from about 200 to about 1000 psig (about 1.4 to about 6.9 MPa).

Embodiment 81. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-80, wherein the polymerization conditions are substantially constant, e.g., for a particular polymer grade.

Embodiment 82. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-81, wherein no hydrogen is added to the polymerization reactor system.

Embodiment 83. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-81, wherein hydrogen is added to the polymerization reactor system.

Embodiment 84. The process defined in any one of embodiments 63-83, wherein the olefin polymer (e.g., an ethylene/ 1-hexene copolymer) has a decrease in density in any range disclosed herein, based on an increase in comonomenmonomer molar ratio (e.g., 1-hexene: ethylene molar ratio) from 0.034 to 0.068, e.g., a decrease in density of at least about 0.002 g/cm 3 (up to about 0.009-0.010 g/cm 3 ), at least about 0.003 g/cm 3 , at least about 0.004 g/cm 3 , at least about 0.005 g/cm 3 , etc.

Embodiment 85. An olefin polymer produced by the olefin polymerization process defined in any one of embodiments 63-84.

Embodiment 86. An olefin polymer (e.g., an ethylene copolymer) defined in any one of embodiments 1-18 produced by the olefin polymerization process defined in any one of embodiments 63-84.

Embodiment 87. An article comprising the olefin polymer defined in any one of embodiments 85-86.

Embodiment 88. A method or forming or preparing an article of manufacture comprising an olefin polymer, the method comprising (i) performing the olefin polymerization process defined in any one of embodiments 63-84 to produce an olefin polymer (e.g., the olefin polymer of any one of embodiments 1-18), and (ii) forming the article of manufacture comprising the olefin polymer, e.g., via any technique disclosed herein.

Embodiment 89. The article defined in any one of embodiments 87-88, wherein the article is an agricultural film, an automobile part, a bottle, a drum, a fiber or fabric, a food packaging film or container, a food service article, a fuel tank, a geomembrane, a household container, a liner, a molded product, a medical device or material, a pipe, a sheet or tape, or a toy.