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Title:
DUAL CHAMBER DRINKING VESSEL
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/079408
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A dual chamber drinking vessel includes a cup chamber positioned adjacent to an angled chamber. The cup chamber includes a cup upper portion and a cup lower portion. The angled chamber includes an angled chamber upper portion and an angled chamber lower portion. The cup upper portion is joined to the angled chamber upper portion by a bridge. The dual chamber drinking vessel is configured to allow different liquids to be received within the cup chamber and angled chamber without mixing the liquids until the vessel is tilted to elevate the angled chamber relative to the cup chamber. The angled chamber includes an outer wall portion and an inner wall portion. The inner wall portion extends at an angle from the bridge and meets the outer wall portion at an angle configured to enhance the mixing of the second liquid with the first liquid.

Inventors:
SCHULTZ JORDON (US)
Application Number:
US2018/056231
Publication Date:
April 25, 2019
Filing Date:
October 17, 2018
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
SCHULTZ JORDON J (US)
International Classes:
B65D1/04; A47G19/22; A47G19/23; A61J7/00; B65D1/36; B65D25/04; B65D81/32; G01F19/00
Foreign References:
US20150223624A12015-08-13
US20140348974A12014-11-27
US0828854A1906-08-14
US1520402A1924-12-23
US3261494A1966-07-19
DE20111393U12002-11-21
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HUSSIN, Christopher, J. (1 S. Pinckney St. Ste. 41, Madison WI, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

What is claimed is:

1. A dual chamber drinking vessel, comprising:

a cup chamber including a cup upper portion and a cup lower portion; and

an angled chamber including an angled chamber upper portion and an angled chamber lower portion having an inclined bottom surface, wherein the cup upper portion is joined to the angled chamber upper portion.

2. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 1, wherein the cup upper portion is joined to the angled chamber upper portion by a common rim and a bridge.

3. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 2, wherein the bridge is at a position lower than the common top lip.

4. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 1, wherein the cup chamber is configured to receive a first liquid, and the angled chamber is configured to receive a second liquid, wherein tilting of the vessel such that the angled chamber is elevated relative to the cup chamber causes the second liquid to enter the cup chamber and to mix with the first liquid.

5. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 1, wherein the cup chamber has a liquid- volume-capacity and the coupled chamber has a liquid volume capacity, and a ratio of the liquid- volume-capacity of the cup chamber to liquid-volume-capacity of the angled chamber is about 2: 1.

6. A dual chamber drinking vessel, comprising: a vertical axis;

a cup chamber including a cup upper portion and a cup lower portion; and

an angled chamber including an angled chamber upper portion and an angled chamber lower portion, wherein the cup chamber is positioned adjacent to the angled chamber, and the cup upper portion is joined to the angled chamber upper portion by a bridge;

wherein the cup chamber is configured to receive a first liquid, and the angled chamber is configured to receive a second liquid, and wherein tilting of the vessel such that the angled chamber is elevated relative to the cup chamber causes the second liquid to enter the cup chamber and to mix with the first liquid.

7. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 6, wherein the angled chamber further comprises an outer wall portion and an inner wall portion, and wherein the inner wall portion extends at an angle to the vertical axis of 36 degrees to 41 degrees.

8. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 6, wherein the liquid-volume-capacity ratio of the cup chamber to the angled chamber is about 2: 1.

9. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 6, wherein the cup chamber has a liquid- volume-capacity of about 1.0 to 4.0 ounces and the angled chamber has a liquid-volume-capacity of about 0.50 to 2.0 ounces.

10. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 6, wherein the cup chamber and the angled chamber are configured to allow a plurality of dual chamber drinking vessels to be stacked together.

11. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 6, wherein the cup upper portion is joined to the angled chamber upper portion by a common rim.

12. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 1 1, wherein the angled chamber further comprises an outer wall portion and an inner wall portion, and the outer wall portion extends inward from the common rim and meets the inner wall portion at an angle of about 20 degrees to about 40 degrees.

13. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 1 1, wherein the bridge is positioned at a distance of about 0.10 to 0.50 inches below the common rim.

14. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 11 , further comprising a cup chamber opening for accessing an interior cup space, and an angled chamber opening for accessing an interior angled space, wherein the common rim joins the cup chamber opening to the angled chamber opening, creating a shared vessel opening.

15. A dual chamber drinking vessel, comprising:

a cup chamber including a cup upper portion and a cup lower portion; and

an angled chamber including an angled chamber upper portion and an angled chamber lower portion,

wherein the cup chamber is positioned adj acent to the angled chamber, and the cup upper portion is joined to the angled chamber upper portion by a bridge;

wherein the cup chamber is configured to receive a first liquid, and the angled chamber is configured to receive a second liquid, wherein tilting of the vessel such that the angled chamber is elevated relative to the cup chamber causes the second liquid to enter the cup chamber and to mix with the first liquid; and wherein the angled chamber further comprises an outer wall portion and an inner wall portion, and the inner wall portion extends at an angle from the bridge and meets the outer wall portion at an angle configured to enhance the mixing of the second liquid with the first liquid.

16. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 15, wherein the inner wall portion meets the outer wall portion at an angle ranging from about 20 degrees to about 40 degrees.

17. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 15, wherein the cup chamber and the angled chamber are configured to allow a plurality of dual chamber drinking vessels to be stacked together.

18. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 15, wherein the liquid-volume-capacity ratio of the cup chamber to the angled chamber is about 2: 1.

19. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 15 further comprising an overall rim joining the cup upper portion to the angled chamber upper portion, wherein the overall rim is ellipse shaped.

20. The dual chamber drinking vessel of Claim 19, wherein the bridge is positioned at a distance of about 0.10 to about 0.50 inches below the common rim.

Description:
DUAL CHAMBER DRINKING VESSEL

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/574,402 entitled "Dual Chamber Drinking Vessel," filed October 19, 2017, the entire contents of which is incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD

[0002] The present disclosure relates to a drinking vessel. More particularly, the disclosure relates to a dual chamber drinking vessel used for consuming two (e.g., two different types of) beverages at one time.

BACKGROUND

[0003] Individuals often desire to consume one beverage, such as an alcohol beverage, with another beverage, such as another alcohol or a non-alcohol beverage. A known method of serving such a drink is to place two distinct liquids in separate vessels, which are not mixed until the drinker is ready to consume the beverage. As another example, and referring to FIG. 1, bars and restaurants often prepare such a drink by pouring an alcohol-containing liquid into a shot glass that is physically located inside another or outer glass. A non-alcoholic liquid is then poured into the volume of the outer glass around the shot glass. Drinkers tilt the outer glass to consume the beverage and cause a portion of the two liquids to mix as they enter the drinker's mouth. This mode of delivery is commonly referred to as a "bomb shot."

[0004] Vessels designed to aid in the serving of such beverages allow multiple alcohol and/or non-alcohol liquids to be consumed simultaneously in order to alter or enhance the beverage's overall taste. However, design problems make serving and consuming bomb shots undesirable in known containers and vessels. First, it can be difficult or tedious to pour a liquid into the shot glass and another liquid into the space between the shot glass and the outer glass, which can be time-consuming for bartenders or others preparing the drink. Second, the size of the opening of the outer glass can cause liquid to spill out the sides of a drinker's mouth, making a mess and causing a loss of alcohol or beverage. Third, known containers are not designed to yield or facilitate uniform or optimal mixing results. SUMMARY

[0005] Accordingly, there is a need for a drinking vessel that is configured to allow multiple liquids to be consumed simultaneously but which is also configured to be more easily and more quickly filled with such liquids. There is also a need for a drinking vessel with a smaller or narrower cross section so that the liquids are more easily and neatly consumed. In addition, there is a need for a drinking vessel configured or adapted to yield or facilitate more uniform or optimal mixing of multiple liquids.

[0006] Accordingly, disclosed herein is a dual chamber drinking vessel comprising: a cup chamber including a cup upper portion and a cup lower portion; and an angled chamber including an angled chamber upper portion and an angled chamber lower portion having an inclined bottom surface, wherein the cup upper portion is joined to the angled chamber upper portion.

[0007] Also disclosed herein is a dual chamber drinking vessel, comprising: a cup chamber including a cup upper portion and a cup lower portion; and an angled chamber including an angled chamber upper portion and an angled chamber lower portion, wherein the cup chamber is positioned adjacent to the angled chamber, and the cup upper portion is joined to the angled chamber upper portion by a bridge; wherein the cup chamber is configured to receive a first liquid, and the angled chamber is configured to receive a second liquid, and wherein tilting of the vessel such that the angled chamber is elevated relative to the cup chamber causes the second liquid to enter the cup chamber and to mix with the first liquid.

[0008] Also disclosed herein is a dual chamber drinking vessel, comprising: a cup chamber including a cup upper portion and a cup lower portion; and an angled chamber including an angled chamber upper portion and an angled chamber lower portion, wherein the cup chamber is positioned adjacent to the angled chamber, and the cup upper portion is joined to the angled chamber upper portion by a bridge; wherein the cup chamber is configured to receive a first liquid, and the angled chamber is configured to receive a second liquid, wherein tilting of the vessel such that the angled chamber is elevated relative to the cup chamber causes the second liquid to enter the cup chamber and to mix with the first liquid; and wherein the angled chamber further comprises an outer wall portion and an inner wall portion, and the inner wall portion extends at an angle from the bridge and meets the outer wall portion at an angle configured to enhance the mixing of the second liquid with the first liquid. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0009] While the specification concludes with the claims particularly pointing out and distinctly claiming the invention, the present technology will be better understood from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. Various examples of embodiments of the systems, devices, and methods according to this invention will be described in detail, with reference to the following figures, wherein:

[0010] FIG. 1 is an example of a known drinking vessel having a shot glass provided therein;

[0011] FIG. 2 is an isometric view of a dual chamber drinking vessel, according to various examples of embodiments;

[0012] FIG. 3 is a side cross-sectional view of the dual chamber drinking vessel of FIG. i;

[0013] FIG. 4 is a top view of the dual chamber drinking vessel of FIG.1 ;

[0014] FIG. 5 is a side cross-sectional view of two dual chamber drinking vessels stacked together, according to various embodiments;

[0015] FIG. 6 is an isometric view of a dual chamber drinking vessel, according to various embodiments.

[0016] FIG. 7 is a side view of the dual chamber drinking vessel of FIG. 6, according to various embodiments;

[0017] FIG. 8 is a top view of the dual chamber drinking vessel of FIG. 6, according to various embodiments;

[0018] FIGS. 9 illustrates an isometric view of a dual chamber drinking vessel, according to various examples of embodiments;

[0019] FIG. 10 illustrates a top view of the dual chamber drinking vessel of FIG. 9; and, according to various examples of embodiments; and

[0020] FIG. 12 illustrates a side view of the dual chamber drinking vessel of FIG. 9.

[0021] It should be understood that the drawings are not necessarily to scale. In certain instances, details that are not necessary to the understanding of the invention or render other details difficult to perceive may have been omitted. It should be understood, of course, that the invention is not necessarily limited to the particular embodiments illustrated herein. DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0019] Various embodiments will now be described. The following description provides specific details for a thorough understanding and enabling description of these embodiments. One skilled in the art will understand, however, that the invention may be practiced without many of these details. Additionally, some well-known structures or functions may not be shown or described in detail so as to avoid unnecessarily obscuring the relevant description of the various embodiments.

[0020] The terminology used in the description presented below is intended to be interpreted in its broadest reasonable manner, even though it is being used in conjunction with a detailed description of certain specific embodiments of the invention. Certain terms may even be emphasized below; however, any terminology intended to be interpreted in any restricted manner will be overtly and specifically defined as such in this detailed description section.

[0021] The present disclosure is directed to a dual chamber drinking vessel for consuming two (e.g., two different) substances, beverages or types of beverages at the same time. In various embodiments, the vessel includes two shot-glass or shot-glass-like chambers located or provided side-by-side or adjacent each other, connected by a bridge, and joined or fused at a top or common rim such that one or more liquids may be poured into each of the chambers while preventing the liquids poured into each chamber from substantially mixing until the vessel is tilted (e.g., during drinking). One of the two chambers may have an inclined bottom, side, or inner surface, and may have or retain less volume than the other chamber. The disclosed dual chamber drinking vessel may be stackable to reduce or better optimize the space occupied during storage or transportation of multiple drinking vessels. In some embodiments, the vessel may include three or more chambers. For ease of description, however, only a dual chamber vessel is described below.

[0022] As used herein, "joined" means "permanently joined" or "releasably joined." The term "permanently joined" is understood to refer to configurations in which a first element is secured to a second element such that the elements generally cannot be separated from each other without at least partially destroying one or both of the elements. The term "releasably joined" is understood to refer to configurations in which a first element is secured to a second element, such that the first element and the second element can be separated with no or minimal damage to the first and second elements.

[0023] For the purpose of this disclosure, the term "coupled" means the joining of two members directly or indirectly to one another. Such joining may be stationary in nature or moveable in nature. Such joining may be achieved with the two members or the two members and any additional intermediate members being integrally formed as a single unitary body with one another or with the two members or the two members and any additional intermediate members being attached to one another. Such joining may be permanent in nature or may be removable or releasable in nature.

[0024] Where the context permits, singular or plural terms may also include the plural or singular term, respectively. Moreover, unless the word "or" is expressly limited to mean only a single item exclusive from the other items in a list of two or more items, then the use of "or" in such a list is to be interpreted as including (a) any single item in the list, (b) all of the items in the list, or (c) any combination of items in the list.

[0025] FIG. 2 illustrates a dual chamber drinking vessel 1 , according to various embodiments. Dual chamber drinking vessel 1 may include a first or cup chamber 10 positioned or provided adjacent to a second or angled chamber 30. Cup chamber 10 may include a surrounding cup wall 15 joined to a bottom 25. In various embodiments, surrounding cup wall 15 is circular in cross-section and slopes downward and inward between a cup chamber rim 7 and bottom 25. In various embodiments, surrounding cup wall 15 and bottom 25 define or at least partially enclose an interior cup space 12 for holding or retaining a first liquid. In various embodiments, cup chamber rim 7 helps define a cup chamber opening 20 for accessing interior cup space 12. Angled chamber 30 may include a surrounding angled chamber wall 35 and an angled chamber bottom 45 that partially enclose an interior angled chamber space 32 for holding or retaining a second liquid. In various embodiments, angled chamber 30 includes an angled chamber rim 33 helping define an angled chamber opening 40 for accessing interior angled chamber space 32.

[0026] Cup chamber 10 and angled chamber 30 may be joined by a bridge 50 between an inner cup wall portion 18 and an inner angled chamber wall portion 37. In various embodiments, bridge 50 extends between inner cup wall portion 18 and inner angled chamber wall portion 37. In various embodiments, common rims 55 extend between and/or join cup chamber rim 7 and angled chamber rim 33 to form vessel rim 60. In various embodiments, surrounding angled chamber wall 35 is semi-circular in cross-section and slopes downward and inward between bridge 50 and angled chamber bottom 45. An adjacent or side-by-side chamber orientation, as shown in FIG. 1, may be desirable because it can make the pouring of liquids into the vessel easier and allows for combination or mixing of liquids when the vessel is tilted in various embodiments. In one embodiment, cup chamber 10 and angled chamber 30 are permanently coupled or joined. In various embodiments, the cup chamber and the angled chamber are releasably joined. In one embodiment, cup chamber 10 and angled chamber 30 are integral and otherwise formed as one piece. In various embodiments, the cup chamber and the angled chamber may be formed as two or more pieces.

[0027] Referring to FIG. 3, cup chamber opening 20 and angled chamber opening 40 may be interconnected by bridge 50 and by common rims 55 to help form or define a larger shared vessel opening 5. In various embodiments, bridge 50 is provided or spans between cup chamber 10 and angled chamber 30 at a position on surrounding cup wall 15 (and/or inner cup wall portion 18) and surrounding angled chamber wall 35 (and/or inner angled chamber wall portion 37) that is high enough or sufficiently near common rim 55 to help keep or retain liquid in cup chamber 10 separate from liquid in angled chamber 30, but allows liquids in cup chamber 10 and angled chamber 30 to combine and/or mix as or when dual chamber drinking vessel 1 is tilted (e.g., during drinking). In some embodiments, bridge 50 is located or provided at a distance D below one or more common rims 55. For example, bridge 50 may be located at distance D of about 0.10 to about 0.50 inches from or below one or more common rims 55. More specifically, bridge 50 may be located at distance D about 0.20 to about 0.40 inches from or below one or more common rims 55. Even more specifically, bridge 50 may be located at distance D of about 0.25 inches from or below one or more common rims 55. In various embodiments, the bridge may include or have a minimal, smooth or arcuate transition 52 from inner angled chamber wall portion 37 to inner wall portion 18 to help direct or encourage fluid in angled chamber 30 to flow into fluid in cup chamber 10 or otherwise help optimize flow and/or mixing, as the drinking vessel is tipped.

[0028] Surrounding cup wall 15 of cup chamber 10 may extend from cup chamber rim 7 and/or cup chamber upper portion 16 interconnected with common rims 55 to cup chamber lower portion 17 joined to bottom 25. In various embodiments, bottom 25 is rigid and flat. Cup chamber 10 may have a height HI of about 1.0 to 4.0 inches, or about 1.5 to 3.5 inches, or about 2.0 to 3.0 inches, or about 2.5 inches. In one embodiment, cup upper portion 16 may have an outer diameter OD 1 of about 1.0 to 3.0 inches, or about 1.5 to 2.5 inches, or about 1.75 to 2.25 inches, or about 2.0 inches. In one embodiment, cup lower portion 17 may have an outer diameter OD2 of about 0.5 to 2.5 inches, or about 1.0 to 2.0 inches, or about 1.5 to about 1.75 inches, or about 1.6 inches. These dimensions of cup chamber 10 may be desirable because they may reduce spilling out of the sides of the drinker's mouth and provide space for the drinker's upper lip and nose as the drinker raises the dual chamber drinking vessel to consume the liquid or liquids contained therein.

[0029] Surrounding angled chamber wall 35 of angled chamber 30 may extend from angled chamber upper portion 41 (and/or angled chamber rim 33) interconnected with common rims 55 to angled chamber lower portion 42 joined to angled bottom 45, forming a conical, funneled, tapered, and/or pyramidal shape. Surrounding angled chamber wall 35 may further include outer wall portion 39 and inner angled chamber wall portion 37. Angled chamber 30 may have a height H2 of about 1.0 to 4.0 inches, or about 1.5 to 3.5 inches, or about 2.0 to 3.0 inches, or about 2.5 inches. Angled chamber upper portion 41 may have an outer diameter OD3 of about 1.0 to 3.0 inches, or about 1.5 to 2.5 inches, or about 1.75 to 2.25 inches, or about 2.0 inches. Angled chamber lower portion 42 may have a diameter of about 0.5 to 2.5 inches, or about 1.0 to 2.0 inches, or about 1.5 to 1.75 inches, or about 1.6 inches. Such a shape of angled chamber 30 may be desirable because it can allow angled chamber 30 to have less volume than cup chamber 10.

[0030] In various embodiments, inner angled chamber wall portion 37 may extend at an angle from bridge 50 and may meet outer wall portion 39 at angled bottom 45 at an angle a of about 20 to 45 degrees, or about 25 to 40 degrees, or about 30 to 35 degrees, or about 32 degrees. In another embodiment, the inner angled chamber wall portion may extend downward from the bridge to the angled bottom and may be substantially parallel to the inner cup wall portion. In one embodiment, outer wall portion 39 may extend from angled chamber rim 33 at a tapering angle or an angle pointing inward and may meet inner wall portion 37 at angle a of about 20 to 45 degrees, or about 25 to 40 degrees, or about 30 to 35 degrees, or about 32 degrees. Angle a may be desirable because it may allow the liquid in angled chamber 30 to better flow over or past bridge 50 and may better optimize or enhance the combination or mixing of the liquid in second or angled chamber 30 with the liquid in first or cup chamber 10. In addition, angle a of inner wall portion 37 may be desirable because it can allow dual chamber drinking vessel 1 to be stackable with other (e.g., similarly shaped) dual chamber drinking vessels. Inner wall portion 37 need not be planar as shown. For example, the inner wall portion may have a radius or be arcuate (e.g., concavely, inwardly, convexly, or outwardly arcuate along at least some of a length extending between the angled bottom to the bridge, or concavely, inwardly, convexly or outwardly arcuate from side to side).

[0031] In one embodiment, cup chamber 10 is adapted or configured to hold about twice the volume of liquid as angled chamber 30. In various embodiments, the liquid-volume-capacity ratio of cup chamber 10 to angled chamber 30 is from about 1 : 1 to 5: 1, or from about 1.5: 1 to 4: 1, or from about 1.75: 1 to about 3: 1, or about 2: 1. In various embodiments, cup chamber 10 is adapted or configured to hold about 1.0 to 4.0 ounces of liquid, or about 1.5 to 3.0 ounces of liquid, or about 1.75 to 2.50 ounces of liquid, or about 2.0 ounces of liquid. In various embodiments, angled chamber 30 is adapted or configured to hold about 0.5 to 2.0 ounces of liquid, or about 0.75 to 1.5 ounces of liquid, or about 1.0 ounce of liquid. These volumes or relative volume of cup chamber 10 and angled chamber 30 may be desirable because they may allow a bartender or other person to pour the desired, proper, or a pre-determined amount of liquid into each chamber without requiring further measurement of each liquid, thereby making serving drinks easier and more efficient.

[0032] FIG. 4 illustrates a top view of dual chamber drinking vessel 1 including cup chamber 10 provided or positioned adjacent to, and coupled or connected to, angled chamber 30 by bridge 50 and common rims 55. In various embodiments, a distance between common rims 55 on either side of bridge 50 may be shorter than the diameter of cup chamber 10 and/or the diameter of angled chamber 30. It should be appreciated, however, that the distance between common rims 55 on either side of bridge 50 may also be equal or greater than the diameter of cup chamber 10 and/or angled chamber 30. In various embodiments, common rims 55 extend straight between cup chamber rim 7 and angled chamber rim 33. In various embodiments, one or more of the common rims may extend substantially straight from a tangent of the cup chamber rim and/or the angled chamber rim. In various embodiments, bridge 50 may include an inner bridge portion 51 and an inner bridge width IW and an outer bridge portion 53 and an outer bridge width OW. In various embodiments, outer bridge width OW may be greater than inner bridge width IW. In various embodiments, inner bridge width IW may be in a range of about 0.10 to 1.8 inches, or about 0.20 to 1.5 inches, or about 0.30 to 1.0 inches, or be about 0.33 inches. In various embodiments, outer bridge width OW may be in a range of about 0.50 to 2.0 inches, or about 0.75 to 1.75 inches, or about 1.0 to 1.5 inches, or be about 1.3 inches. In various embodiments, bridge 50 may have a length BL of about 0.75 to 3.0 inches, or about 1.0 to 2.5 inches, or about 1.2 to 2.0 inches, or about 1.35 inches.

[0033] In various examples of embodiments, cup chamber rim 7, angled chamber rim 33, and common rims 55 may together form a vessel rim 60. Vessel rim may be figure eight-shaped (e.g., as illustrated in FIG. 4). The vessel rim may also take other shapes. For example, the vessel rim may be an ellipse shape. In various embodiments, the overall rim may have a major axis of about 2.0 to 7.0 inches, or about 3.0 to 6.0 inches, or about 3.5 to 5.0 inches, or about 4.1 inches. In one embodiment, the vessel rim may have a minor axis of about 1.0 to 4.0 inches, or about 1.5 to 3.0 inches, or about 1.75 to 2.5 inches, or about 2.0 inches. The ellipse shape of the vessel rim may be desirable for aesthetics and/or because it can allow a bartender or other person to line up a series of dual chamber drinking vessels when preparing multiple beverages.

[0034] FIG. 5 illustrates a side cross-sectional view of two dual chamber drinking vessels stacked together. Cup chamber 10 and angled chamber 30 may be configured with tapering wall surfaces narrower at the bottom than at the top to better allow multiple dual chamber drinking vessels to be stacked (e.g., in a nested array) for storage and/or shipping. Surrounding cup chamber wall 15 may have a draft angle β of about 1.0 to 10.0 degrees, or about 2.0 to 8.0 degrees, or about 3.0 to 7.0 degrees, or about 5 degrees. Surrounding angled chamber wall 35 may have a draft angle Θ of about 1.0 to 10.0 degrees, or about 2.0 to 8.0 degrees, or about 3.0 to 7.0 degrees, or about 5 degrees.

[0035] Referring now to FIGS. 6-8, a dual chamber drinking vessel 100, according to various embodiments, is illustrated. As shown, dual chamber drinking vessel 100 may include a first or cup chamber 110 positioned or provided adjacent to a second or angled chamber 130. Cup chamber 110 may include a surrounding cup wall 115 joined to a bottom 125. In various embodiments, surrounding cup wall 115 is circular in cross-section and slopes downward and inward between a cup upper portion 116 and bottom 125. As shown in FIGS. 6-8, the slope downward and inward may vary between the upper portion and the bottom and may not be a consistent slope. For example, as shown in FIG. 7, the slope may be more arcuate than straight. Cup chamber 110 and angled chamber 130 may be joined by a bridge 150 between an inner cup wall portion 118 and an inner angled chamber wall portion 137. In various embodiments, bridge 150 extends between inner cup wall portion 118 and inner angled chamber wall portion 137. As shown, common rims 155 may form a cup chamber rim 107 and/or angled chamber rim 133, the distance between common rims 155 on either side of bridge 150 may vary or taper along bridge 150 from the cup chamber 110 to the angled chamber 130. It should be appreciated, however, that the distance between common rims 155 on either side of bridge 150, and/or the bridge, may also taper in the other direction (i.e., from the angled chamber to the cup chamber).

[0036] Referring now to FIGS. 9-11, a dual chamber drinking vessel 200 is illustrated according to various examples of embodiments. In various embodiments, the vessel includes most of the same features of other usual embodiments disclosed herein. In various embodiments, however, vessel 200 includes and angled chamber 230 having an inner angled chamber wall 237 extending from an arch, bridge, span or linking portion 250, inner angled chamber wall 237 generally extending at an angle γ to a vertical axis 300 of vessel 200. In various embodiments, and as more particularly illustrated in FIG. 12, angle γ is in a range of about 30 degrees to about 45 degrees. In various embodiments, angle γ is in a range of about 35 degrees to about 42 degrees. In various embodiments, angle γ is in a range of about 36 degrees to about 41 degrees. In various embodiments, angle γ is in a range of about 37 degrees to about 40 degrees. In various embodiments, angle γ is in a range of about 38 degrees to about 39 degrees. Angle γ may be desirable because it may allow liquid in angled chamber 230 to better flow over or past arch, bridge or span 250 and into a first or cup chamber 210, and may better optimize or enhance the combination or mixing of liquid in angled chamber 230 with liquid in first or cup chamber 210 during use. In addition, angle γ may be desirable because it can allow dual chamber drinking vessel 200 to be stackable with other (e.g., similarly shaped) dual chamber drinking vessels. It should be appreciated that inner angled chamber wall 237 need not be planar as shown. For example, the inner angled chamber wall may have a radius or be arcuate (e.g., concavely, inwardly, convexly, or outwardly arcuate along at least some of a length extending between the angled bottom to the bridge, or concavely, inwardly, convexly or outwardly arcuate from side to side). As shown, in various examples of embodiments, arch, bridge, span or linking member 250 also has or defines a radius 252 to help optimize flow from the angled chamber to the cup chamber.

[0037] In one embodiment, a non-alcohol or alcohol liquid may be placed or provided in, or received by, the cup chamber and an alcohol liquid may be placed or provided in, or received by, the angled chamber. Liquid poured into the cup chamber and angled chamber may be substantially separately contained until the dual chamber drinking vessel is tilted during drinking. A drinker may place his or her mouth on the common rim of the cup chamber, and, in various embodiments, as or when the drinker tilts the cup chamber to drink, the angled chamber is elevated over the cup chamber. The alcohol liquid held or contained by the angled chamber may flow from the interior angled space past or over the bridge to the interior cup chamber space where it may mix with the non-alcohol liquid before or as it enters the drinker's mouth.

[0038] In one embodiment, the dual chamber drinking vessel may be fabricated from a transparent material, such as a clear glass or polymeric resin material. The transparency of the dual chamber drinking vessel can allow the drinker to see the liquids contained within each chamber prior to consumption. In another embodiment, the dual chamber may be colored, opaque, etc.

[0039] In various embodiments, the dual chamber drinking vessel may be disposable and may be made of an inexpensive plastic material. In one embodiment, the dual chamber drinking vessel may be fabricated from stainless-steel. In various embodiments, the dual chamber drinking vessel may be formed of a single molded piece of material. In various other embodiments, the dual chamber drinking vessel may be a combination of pieces that are joined or coupled together. It should be appreciated that the figures only schematically illustrate the dual chamber drinking vessel, and the cup chamber and angled chamber may be formed from a variety of different shapes, sizes, configurations, and materials. [0040] The dimensions and values disclosed herein are not to be understood as being strictly limited to the exact numerical values recited. Instead, unless otherwise specified, each such dimension is intended to mean both the recited value and a functionally equivalent range surrounding that value. For example, a dimension disclosed as "40 mm" is intended to mean "about 40 mm."

[0041] Any of the above-described embodiments may be used alone or in combination with one another. Further, the drinking vessel may include additional features not described herein. While several embodiments have been shown and described, various changes and substitutions may of course be made, without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. The invention, therefore, should not be limited, except by the following claims and their equivalents.

[0042] As utilized herein, the terms "approximately," "about," "substantially", and similar terms are intended to have a broad meaning in harmony with the common and accepted usage by those of ordinary skill in the art to which the subject matter of this disclosure pertains. It should be understood by those of skill in the art who review this disclosure that these terms are intended to allow a description of certain features described and claimed without restricting the scope of these features to the precise numerical ranges provided. Accordingly, these terms should be interpreted as indicating that insubstantial or inconsequential modifications or alterations of the subject matter described and claimed are considered to be within the scope of the invention as recited in the appended claims.

[0043] It should be noted that references to relative positions (e.g., "top" and "bottom") in this description are merely used to identify various elements as are oriented in the Figures. It should be recognized that the orientation of particular components may vary greatly depending on the application in which they are used.

[0044] It is also important to note that the construction and arrangement of the system, methods, and devices as shown in the various examples of embodiments is illustrative only. Although only a few embodiments have been described in detail in this disclosure, those skilled in the art who review this disclosure will readily appreciate that many modifications are possible (e.g., variations in sizes, dimensions, structures, shapes and proportions of the various elements, values of parameters, mounting arrangements, use of materials, colors, orientations, etc.) without materially departing from the novel teachings and advantages of the subject matter recited. For example, elements shown as integrally formed may be constructed of multiple parts or elements show as multiple parts may be integrally formed, the operation of the interfaces may be reversed or otherwise varied, the length or width of the structures and/or members or connector or other elements of the system may be varied, the nature or number of adjustment positions provided between the elements may be varied (e.g. by variations in the number of engagement slots or size of the engagement slots or type of engagement). The order or sequence of any process or method steps may be varied or re-sequenced according to altemative embodiments. Other substitutions, modifications, changes and omissions may be made in the design, operating conditions and arrangement of the various examples of embodiments without departing from the spirit or scope of the present inventions.

[0045] While this invention has been described in conjunction with the examples of embodiments outlined above, various alternatives, modifications, variations, improvements and/or substantial equivalents, whether known or that are or may be presently foreseen, may become apparent to those having at least ordinary skill in the art. Accordingly, the examples of embodiments of the invention, as set forth above, are intended to be illustrative, not limiting. Various changes may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention.

Therefore, the invention is intended to embrace all known or earlier developed alternatives, modifications, variations, improvements and/or substantial equivalents.