Login| Sign Up| Help| Contact|

Patent Searching and Data


Title:
EMERGENCY STATION AND METHOD OF USE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/152359
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An integrated, portable, battery-powered, variable-pressure electric liquid pump and power emergency station comprising a chassis; one or more wheels supporting the chassis; an electrically powered, variable-pressure liquid pump carried by the chassis; one or more rechargeable batteries powering the variable-pressure liquid pump to transfer liquid at variable pressures from a liquid source to a liquid destination; and one or more AC outlets carried by the chassis and powered by the one or more rechargeable batteries to provide emergency back-up power during power outage.

More Like This:
Inventors:
FLASTER, Michael Leonard (6341 Hartley Drive, La Jolla, California, 92037, US)
Application Number:
US2019/015552
Publication Date:
August 08, 2019
Filing Date:
January 29, 2019
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
FFP2018, INC. (6341 Hartley Drive, La Jolla, California, 92037, US)
International Classes:
F04B17/03; F04B49/10; F04B53/00
Foreign References:
US20150231430A12015-08-20
US20080150473A12008-06-26
US20100122824A12010-05-20
US6279838B12001-08-28
US20050077391A12005-04-14
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BEUERLE, Stephen C. et al. (Cory Hargreaves & Savitch LLP,525 B Street, Suite 220, San Diego California, 92101, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

I CLAIM:

1. An integrated, portable, battery-powered, variable-pressure electric liquid pump and power emergency station, comprising: a chassis; one or more wheels supporting the chassis; an electrically powered, variable-pressure liquid pump carried by the chassis; one or more rechargeable batteries powering the variable-pressure liquid pump to transfer liquid at variable pressures from a liquid source to a liquid destination; one or more AC outlets carried by the chassis and powered by the one or more rechargeable batteries to provide emergency back-up power during power outage.

2. The emergency station of claim 1 , wherein the emergency station includes one or more wireless communication components that receive wireless signals and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by the at least one hardware processor, enable remote control of the emergency station by a mobile computing device application via the at least one hardware processor and one or more of WIFI and radio signals received by the one or more wireless communication components.

3. The emergency station of claims 1 and 2, wherein the emergency station includes at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by the at least one hardware processor, receive incoming signals representative of emergency alert

communication signals from one or more of FEMA, NOAA, fire services, police services, military services, and local emergency services; determine if the received incoming signals meet predetermined criteria indicative of an emergency; cause the one or more rechargeable batteries to be fully charged upon determination that the received incoming signals meet the predetermined criteria.

4. The emergency station of claims 1 -3, further including a visual alarm, and the one or more software modules that, when executed by the at least one hardware processor, cause actuation of the visual alarm upon determination that the received incoming signals meet the predetermined criteria.

5. The emergency station of claims 1 -4, further including an audible alarm, and the one or more software modules that, when executed by the at least one hardware processor, cause actuation of the audible arm upon determination that the received incoming signals meet the predetermined criteria.

6. The emergency station of claims 1 -5, wherein the emergency station includes at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by the at least one hardware processor, receive incoming signals representative of emergency alert

communication signals from one or more of FEMA, NOAA, fire services, police services, military services, and local emergency services; determine if the received incoming signals meet predetermined criteria indicative of an emergency; cause actuation of one or more of onboard electrical equipment and ancillary electrical equipment upon determination that the received incoming signals meet the predetermined criteria.

7. The emergency station of claims 1 -6, further including a user control and display panel and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by the at least one hardware processor, causes the user control and display panel to display water pressure of the variable-pressure liquid pump, remaining battery time of the one or more rechargeable batteries, and charging status of the one or more rechargeable batteries when the variable-pressure liquid pump is actuated via the user control and display panel.

8. The emergency station of claims 1 -7, further including a user control and display panel and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by the at least one hardware processor, causes the user control and display panel to display at least one of duration and volume of a remaining supply of liquid resources when the variable-pressure liquid pump is actuated via the user control and display panel.

9. The emergency station of claims 1 -8, further including a user control and display panel and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by the at least one hardware processor, initiate activation of the electrically powered, variable-pressure liquid pump at variable pressures to address a fire when the variable-pressure liquid pump is actuated via the user control and display panel.

10. The emergency station of claims 1 -9, further including a user control and display panel and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by the at least one hardware processor, initiate activation of the electrically powered, variable-pressure liquid pump at variable pressures to address a flood when the variable-pressure liquid pump is actuated via the user control and display panel.

11. The emergency station of claims 1 -10, further including a user control and display panel and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by the at least one hardware processor, initiate activation of the electrically powered, variable-pressure liquid pump at variable pressures to address loss of area water pressure when the variable-pressure liquid pump is actuated via the user control and display panel.

12. The emergency station of claims 1 -11 , further including a user control and display panel and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by the at least one hardware processor, supply power to the one or more AC outlets via the one or more rechargeable batteries to provide emergency back-up power during power outage when a corresponding input is actuated via the user control and display panel.

13. The emergency station of claims 1 -12, further including an electric motor to power the one or more wheels and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by the at least one hardware processor, supply power to the electric motor via the one or more rechargeable batteries to propel the one or more wheels when a corresponding input is actuated in the emergency station.

14. The emergency station of claims 1 -13, further including a user control and display panel, one or more ultra-capacitors, and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by the at least one hardware processor, engage the one or more ultra-capacitors to supply power to the variable- pressure liquid pump to prime the variable-pressure liquid pump when a corresponding input is actuated via the user control and display panel.

Description:
EMERGENCY STATION AND METHOD OF USE

Field of the Invention

[0001] The invention relates to portable electric, variable-pressure liquid pumps, in general, and to portable electric liquid fire pumps and liquid transfer pumps, battery backup electric power supplies, remote alert monitoring and triggering and area water pressure boosting, in particular.

Background

[0002] Changing climatic, weather and building patterns in the United States and around the world have placed many homes and commercial properties in closer proximity to flood and wildfire events

(https://www.wsj.com/articles/why-californians-were-drawn -toward-the-fire- zones-1544202053?mod=searchresults&page=1 &pos=1 ). In California alone more than 1 million housing units are at high or very high risk for fire (Jonathan Cooper, AP SDUT C2 1/5/2018). The increased frequency with which wildfires occur, longer annual fire seasons, a resultant thinning of community fire-fighting resources and official advice to both create“defensible spaces” and“shelter in place” intensifies the need for self-reliance in the event of such emergencies.

[0003] Recent news footage from Northern and Southern California wildfires feature desperate homeowners using garden hoses to protect their properties. Such low-pressure solutions offer limited potential for defense. Moreover, such close-in tactics place amateur responders in intimate range of danger. Rapid fire spread and possible terrain access limitations (smoke, flooding, landslides, power outages, tree or rock falls) might delay or prevent professional or volunteer emergency personnel access to particular home sites or businesses.

[0004] While a number of personal portable diesel and gas fueled fire pumps are available for fire suppression and prevention, the nature of their fuel source makes them difficult to use and maintain in a fire situation. Gas and diesel-fueled fire pumps are inherently limited by the size of their fuel tanks, the need to store and access flammable liquids near fire events and the

complications associated with water pump priming. Furthermore, starting and regulating an internal combustion engine is a relatively complex process during time-critical events. Patents and products for electrically powered systems are for decidedly industrial or large-scale commercial applications and are of limited portability.

[0005] Further, some homeowners, offices and industries find themselves facing multiple emergency situations simultaneously, in succession or episodically; needing to counter flooding, fire, loss of electrical power and/or loss of area water pressure.

Summary of the Invention

[0006] Recognized is a need for a product that contains or embodies a fully integrated, portable, user-programmable and remotely triggered platform capable of addressing the variety of emergency situations outlined above.

[0007] An aspect of the invention is an emergency station that is user- programmable and remotely triggerable platform capable of addressing and monitoring a variety of emergency situations including flood, fire, loss of area water pressure and power outages. The invention will consist of an integrated, battery-powered, portable, variable-pressure electric liquid pump and power system for personal, residential, military, commercial and emergency service application. The entire system will be on a wheeled cart making it portable so that that it can be moved by an able-bodied person. The cart will feature an electric motor to power the platform’s rear wheels to improve its portability.

[0008] The emergency station has the capability to monitor various wireless frequencies to detect electronic emergency and alert signals which may then trigger alarms (visual and audio), activate various onboard and ancillary electrical equipment and/or begin the Station’s top-off battery charging. The Station can be user configured to enable particular suites of preset and/or user programmable functions. Furthermore, the Emergency station is designed to be remotely controlled through WIFI, radio or phone applications. [0009] The emergency station provides commercial, civic, industrial, military and emergency service personnel as well as consumers with support in firefighting, fire prevention as well as liquid pumping & transfer (flood

mitigation), water system pressure boosting capabilities, and a battery system that may be used as an ongoing or backup home/office power supply.

[0010] The emergency station is portable, and its primary power source will be rechargeable batteries with additional power options. The emergency station will feature an electric motor to power its platform’s rear wheels and assist in its portability. It will additionally include an electrically powered, variable-pressure liquid pump.

[0011] Unattended, the emergency station receives emergency alerts from FEMA, NOAA and other local and regional fire, police, military and/or local emergency services (for example SDEmergency) to trigger battery charging and/or other user-defined emergency functions (i.e. audible and/or visible alarms, local power supply enhancement, liquid pumping and transfer, local water system pressure augmentation, etc.). The emergency station may be further configured to enable particular suites of preset and/or user- programmable functions. Furthermore, the Emergency station may be remotely triggered and/or controlled by authorized users through WIFI, radio or phone signals.

[0012] The emergency station Central Processing Unit (CPU) provides system power management. The emergency station’s control panel, Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) and displays will provide information including water pressure, remaining battery time and charging status. With user input, the CPU will be able to calculate and display, in minutes or gallons, the emergency station’s remaining supply of liquid resources. The CPU will have the ability to interface, both wirelessly and through onboard USB data ports, with outside emergency service feeds though onboard optional connected devices (i.e.

mobile phones, tablets, etc.) to display real-time emergency information including wind speed, weather forecasts and video updates. [0013] Another aspect of the invention involves an integrated, portable, battery-powered, variable-pressure electric liquid pump and power emergency station comprising a chassis; one or more wheels supporting the chassis; an electrically powered, variable-pressure liquid pump carried by the chassis; one or more rechargeable batteries powering the variable-pressure liquid pump to transfer liquid at variable pressures from a liquid source to a liquid destination; and one or more AC outlets carried by the chassis and powered by the one or more rechargeable batteries to provide emergency back-up power during power outage.

[0014] One or more implementations of the immediately above aspect of the invention involves one or more of the following: the emergency station includes one or more wireless communication components that receive wireless signals and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by at least one hardware processor, enable remote control of the emergency station by a mobile computing device application via at least one hardware processor and one or more of WIFI and radio signals received by the one or more wireless communication components; the emergency station includes at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by at least one hardware processor, receive incoming signals representative of emergency alert communication signals from one or more of FEMA, NOAA, fire services, police services, military services, and/or local emergency services; determine if the received incoming signals meet predetermined criteria indicative of an emergency; cause the one or more rechargeable batteries to be fully charged upon determination that the received incoming signals meet the predetermined criteria; a visual alarm, and the one or more software modules that, when executed by at least one hardware processor, cause actuation of the visual alarm upon determination that the received incoming signals meet the predetermined criteria; an audible alarm, and the one or more software modules that, when executed by at least one hardware processor, cause actuation of the audible arm upon determination that the received incoming signals meet the predetermined criteria; at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by at least one hardware processor, receive incoming signals representative of emergency alert communication signals from one or more of FEMA, NOAA, fire services, police services, military services, and/or local emergency services; determine if the received incoming signals meet predetermined criteria indicative of an emergency; cause actuation of one or more of onboard electrical equipment and ancillary electrical equipment upon determination that the received incoming signals meet the predetermined criteria; a user control and display panel and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by at least one hardware processor, causes the user control and display panel to display water pressure of the variable-pressure liquid pump, remaining battery time of the one or more rechargeable batteries, and charging status of the one or more rechargeable batteries when the variable-pressure liquid pump is actuated via the user control and display panel; a user control and display panel and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by at least one hardware processor, causes the user control and display panel to display at least one of duration and volume of the remaining supply of liquid resources when the variable-pressure liquid pump is actuated via the user control and display panel; a user control and display panel and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by at least one hardware processor, initiate activation of the electrically powered, variable-pressure liquid pump at variable pressures to address a fire when the variable-pressure liquid pump is actuated via the user control and display panel; a user control and display panel and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by at least one hardware processor, initiate activation of the electrically powered, variable-pressure liquid pump at variable pressures to address a flood when the variable-pressure liquid pump is actuated via the user control and display panel; a user control and display panel and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by the at least one hardware processor, initiate activation of the electrically powered, variable-pressure liquid pump at variable pressures to address loss of area water pressure when the variable-pressure liquid pump is actuated via the user control and display panel; a user control and display panel and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by at least one hardware processor, supply power to the one or more AC outlets via the one or more rechargeable batteries to provide emergency back-up power during power outage when a corresponding input is actuated via the user control and display panel; an electric motor to power the one or more wheels and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by the at least one hardware processor, supply power to the electric motor via the one or more rechargeable batteries to propel the one or more wheels when a corresponding input is actuated in the emergency station; and/or a user control and display panel, one or more ultra-capacitors, and at least one hardware processor; and one or more software modules that, when executed by the at least one hardware processor, engage the one or more ultra-capacitors to supply power to the variable-pressure liquid pump to prime the variable- pressure liquid pump when a corresponding input is actuated via the user control and display panel.

Brief Description of the Drawings

[0015] FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of an embodiment of the integrated, portable emergency station;

[0016] FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating an embodiment of an electrical system of the emergency station;

[0017] FIG. 3A is schematic illustrating exemplary electrical power command relationships in the electrical system and computer system of the emergency station;

[0018] FIG. 3B is schematic illustrating exemplary data command relationships in the electrical system and computer system of the emergency station;

[0019] FIG. 4 is a diagram of an embodiment of a user control, interface and monitoring system of the emergency station;

[0020] FIG. 5 is a diagram of an embodiment of a variable pressure electric liquid pump system of the emergency station; [0021] FIG. 6 illustrates an example infrastructure, in which one or more of the processes described herein, may be implemented, according to an embodiment;

[0022] FIG. 7 illustrates an example processing system, by which one or more of the processed described herein, may be executed, according to an embodiment;

[0023] FIG. 8 is a flow chart of an exemplary process for using the emergency station for fire suppression and control;

[0024] FIG. 9 is a flow chart of an exemplary process for using the emergency station for flood control;

[0025] FIG. 10 is a flow chart of an exemplary process for using the emergency station for boosting water pressure of a residence or other facility, in the event of pressure loss;

[0026] FIG. 11 is a flow chart of an exemplary process for using the emergency station for providing self-contained power for emergency situations, via battery energy storage; and

[0027] FIG. 12 is a flow chart of an exemplary process for using the emergency station for continually monitoring wireless and/or radio emergency broadcasting and performing automatic functions if alerted.

Detailed Description

[0028] With reference to FIGS. 1 -7, an embodiment of an integrated, battery-powered, portable, variable-pressure electric liquid pump and power emergency station (“emergency station”) 100 capable of addressing and monitoring a variety of emergency situations including flood mitigation, fire prevention or suppression (e.g., transfer or pumping of liquids, gels or foams), loss of area water pressure (e.g., water pressure boosting), and power outages (e.g., AC power augmentation) for personal, residential, military, commercial and emergency service applications will be described. The emergency station 100 includes embodiments of 1 ) an emergency station chassis and housing, 2) an emergency station electrical system, 3) an emergency station computer system, 4) an emergency station user control/display and monitoring system, and 5) an emergency station liquid pump system, each of which will be described in turn below.

1. EMERGENCY STATION CHASSIS AND HOUSINGS

[0029] FIG. 1 illustrates an embodiment of an emergency station chassis and housing 110 of the emergency station 100. In the embodiment shown, the chassis and housing 110 is a wheeled cart, making it portable so that that it can be moved by an able-bodied person. The emergency station 100 includes an electric motor 112 to power rear wheels 114 to improve the emergency station’s portability. The emergency station 100 may alternately be placed in a stationary position for storage or use in monitoring or power augmentation modes.

[0030] The cart 110 includes an L-shaped frame 190 with a horizontal frame member 200, a vertical frame member 210, and a horizontal handle frame member 220 with handle grip(s) 230 extending laterally rearward from the vertical frame member 210. A variable speed throttle 232 is located on one of the grip(s) 230 to control the electric motor 112 powering the rear two wheels 114. The throttle 232 has on/off, neutral, reverse and variable speed options. A rotating front wheel 250 on a swivel 252 provides the emergency station 100 with additional support and directional stability.

[0031] A user control and display panel 290 is supported by the horizontal handle frame member 220. Monitoring and computer system(s) 292 is located below user control and display panel 290 and attached to the vertical frame member 210. Suction hose hanger 293 and fire hose hanger 295 are located on an opposite side of vertical frame member 210. The electric pump/compressor/pressurizer 120 is supported by the horizontal frame member 200 via supports 204, 206. 2. EMERGENCY STATION ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

[0032] With reference additionally to FIG. 2, an embodiment of an electrical system 294 of the emergency station 100 including various electrical systems and features will be described.

[0033] The system’s power sources include an outboard 120V supply connected via a standard power cord via AC line in connector 260 and/or one or more onboard interchangeable, removable, hot-swappable rechargeable batteries 130. The batteries 130 and rechargeable onboard ultra-capacitor 140 are supported by the vertical frame member 210. Power management circuitry is integrated into the system 294 to use the rechargeable batteries 130 to power the electric fire pump/compressor/pressurizer 120, electric wheel motor(s) 112, and monitoring and computer system(s) 292. The rechargeable ultra- capacitors) 140 provide an initial current surge to start and/or prime the electric fire pump/compressor/pressurizer 120.

[0034] Both the rechargeable batteries 130 and the ultra-capacitor(s) 140 are sealed and their connectors enclosed when mechanically locked into the station’s chassis and housing 110 to prevent accidental discharge if damaged, submerged or in contact with water or any conductive liquid or solid. The emergency station 100 includes circuitry to prevent discharge of its power sources should the emergency station 100 be damaged or submerged in water or any conductive liquid. Both the rechargeable batteries 130 and the ultra- capacitors) 140 are emergency/military-grade and resistant to high heat and fire. Features of the power sources include one or more of the following:

• battery powered with single or multiple stackable and rechargeable

batteries for portable use;

• single charged battery which starts and runs system for one hour;

• outboard AC 120 Volt power connection operation and/or battery

recharge;

• ultra-capacitor(s) for initial electric motor power surge;

• all power sources being hot-swappable [0035] An exemplary AC power augmentation method of use will be described. The emergency station 100 is battery or AC-powered both during regular operation and in standby mode for emergency alert monitoring and triggering. In standby mode, batteries and ultra-capacitors 140 are charged to optimal storage rates and then triggered to fully charge either manually or automatically by user assigned and specified remote signals. Such activations may also be programmed to trigger a detachable 1 ,000 lumen flashlight/strobe 298 and/or 120db audible alarm 300.

[0036] The electric fire pum p/com pressor/pressurizer 120 may be alternatively powered by connecting the power cord 296 to an outboard 120-volt AC source. With advance warning, the emergency station 100 is charged manually. The emergency station 100 may rely on available AC (110V) or optional solar arrays 302 for power while simultaneously charging the unit’s batteries 130.

[0037] The one or more AC line in connectors 260 are provided for charging the one or more rechargeable batteries 130. Batteries 130 may also be charged externally via 120-volt AC power source while in a charging station 304.

[0038] Three or more 15-amp 120V AC connectors/outlets 306 are located onboard for powering ancillary devices (e.g., lighting, sump pumps, household appliances) via an inverter 308. Power to each onboard outlet 306 may be user-preset to be manually or remotely triggered depending on a switch position.

[0039] An electric motor controller 360 controls the variable speed electric pum p/com pressor/pressurizer 120.

3. EMERGENCY STATION COMPUTER SYSTEM

[0040] FIG. 3A diagrams the electrical power command relationships in the electrical and computer systems of the emergency station 100.

[0041] FIG. 3B diagrams data command relationships in the electrical and computer systems of the emergency station 100. [0042] A CPU 320 manages and integrates the emergency station’s power, communication and monitoring systems while simultaneously managing control and display systems. Optional cell phone, tablet, and/or computer devices are connected to the emergency station 100 via wireless, Bluetooth, WIFI (through USB Dongle or USB wired ports 370 to augment user controls, monitor emergency signals and/or websites, and/or to control and monitor user- supplied remote drones.

[0043] Features of the CPU 320 include one or more of the following:

• monitor internal and external inputs to detect Radio Frequency (RF) signals via onboard telescoping 376 or connected external antennae 378, cell phone receiver circuitry or via USB from user supplied wirelessly connected devices;

• monitor presence of AC power input;

• monitor battery power, and enable battery charging (on/off to charge circuit);

• monitor system activity and dynamically calculate remaining battery

power, and time remaining at various system states and power loads;

• adjust pump motor power and frequency (and thus output PSI and GPM) by means of selectable user adjustable input via a rotating switch 314 (FIG. 4);

• automatically adjust pump controller motor input power and frequency (and thus output PSI and GPM) by means of real-time calculations from remaining battery power to determine desired remaining time of use;

• dynamically calculate battery life, remaining liquid volume, and pump flow rates;

• send and receive data via USB ports or other common data interfaces;

• convert modulated information from onboard and external antenna to drive audible information via a speaker;

• manage LED indicators and display content (LCD or segmented). 4. EMERGENCY STATION USERS CONTROL/DISPLAY AND

MONITORING SYSTEMS

[0044] With reference additionally to FIG. 4, a user control, interface and monitoring system 350 of the emergency station 100 will be described.

[0045] Provided that the emergency station 100 is connected to an outside 120V AC power source or onboard charged batteries 130, rotating switch 314 assigns various tasks to assorted emergency station systems.

[0046] A first switch position 352 is OFF. This disconnects all emergency station systems from internal and external electrical power.

[0047] A second switch position 354 is ON. This powers the emergency station electrical systems to supply to onboard AC connectors/outlets 306, drive wheel electric motor 112, and user control and display panel 290.

[0048] A third switch position 356 is STANDBY. This configures the emergency station 100 to monitor outside radio, WIFI, and phone signals whose presence may trigger user preset functions including, but not limited to, topping off of battery charging, activation of pump 120 at user predetermined rates as well as controlling and monitoring onboard AC connectors/outlets 306.

[0049] A fourth position 358, PRIME, will turn on power to all emergency station systems, engage the ultra-capacitor(s) 140 and provide for priming of the pump system 120 by sending preassigned frequency and amperage rates to electric pump motor controller 360.

[0050] When the switch is in this position, no electrical power will flow to the AC connectors/outlets 306.

[0051] In a fifth position 362, VARIABLE PRESSURE, will turn on power to all emergency station systems and allow the user to manually control the liquid pressure from low to high by sending various currents and frequency rates to the electric pump motor controller 360. When the switch is in this position, no electrical power will flow to the AC connectors/outlets 306. A feedback circuit from pump valves 364 will not allow pressure to exceed 80 PSI when either low-pressure hose coupling adapters 366 are detected. An accompanying display 368 will indicate liquid pressure (in pounds per square inch) and flow (in gallons per minute).

[0052] The emergency station 100 may also be activated manually or remotely by phone, radio or WIFI signal to perform assorted user-defined tasks. In addition, the emergency station 100 may be user programmed and

configured to connect with optional tablet, phone and/or computers wirelessly or through USB ports 370 to link with optional applications which can supply geolocation and telemetry status, amongst others. Cradles 372 to physically support optional phones or tablets will be located above the user control and display panel 290.

[0053] In the event of a fire or flood situation, the emergency station 100 may be deployed to transfer liquid at variable rates and pressures. In addition, the emergency station 100 may provide AC power supply, emergency monitoring and user defined feature activation for flood mitigation.

[0054] A rotating switch 374 will be assigned to monitor assorted emergency and broadcast bands which can be fine-tuned to specific

frequencies to monitor real-time notifications and updates. The system’s receiver will simultaneously monitor via telescoping antenna 376, internal antennas, and/or an external coax connector 378 and antenna to detect various emergency signals (FEMA, NOAA, Military, local emergency frequencies, etc.) and trigger assorted user-defined tasks (to fully charge onboard batteries, activate visual or sonic alarms, power onboard AC outlets, etc.). A display 379 displays information related to the monitored emergency and broadcast band(s). During an emergency, an onboard speaker 380 may provide audio alerts and monitoring from various emergency agencies (FEMA, NOAA, etc.) as well as local television and radio stations. An audible alarm reset (e.g., LED and push switch) 381 resets the audible alarm 300. A speaker volume and on/off control 382 will regulate its output or amplify audio from optionally connected phone or tablet devices. A tune control 383 is used to tune frequency of the monitored emergency and broadcast band(s). [0055] A plurality of LED lights 384 (e.g., six LED lights) indicate which of the alert signals triggered the emergency station. A seventh button 386 in this array will allow the user to reset these indicators.

[0056] A plurality of the USB outlets 370 (e.g., three USB outlets) are mounted on the user control and display panel 290 to provide power and data transfer between the station and other assorted user-supplied equipment such as mobile phones, computers and tablets. Such optional equipment offers users setup support, additional displays and control options and an interface for system software and firmware updates.

[0057] One or more indicator(s) 390 display the charge status of the one or more rechargeable batteries including the percentage of charge and the remaining running time (in minutes) for each battery 130 based on real-time current draw. One or more indicator(s) 391 display the status of the AC outlets 306. Additionally, an LED indicator/ recharge switch 392 indicates the charge status of the ultra-capacitor(s) 140.

5. EMERGENCY STATION LIQUID PUMP SYSTEM FEATURES

[0058] With reference additionally to FIG. 5, the emergency station’s hydraulic and electro-mechanical systems 400 will be described.

[0059] The electric pum p/com pressor/pressurizer 120 includes a variable speed electric motor 402, an impeller 404, and a diffuser 406.

[0060] The system 400 connects at an intake coupler 408 (e.g., 2 inch intake coupler) to a supplied suction hose 150 (e.g., twenty foot 2-3 inch diameter cam lock suction hose) with a filter valve/strainer 160. The system 400 is compatible with standard firehose/ linkages 170 and stream or spray nozzle 180 for connection at discharge coupler 410 (e.g., 2” discharge coupler). The system 400 may also connect to supplied standard fire hose 170 with standard 2” coupling 414 to be used for liquid intake and discharge in the event of flooding.

[0061] The system 400 may also be connected to supplied reinforced 5/8” diameter hoses 416, 418 via coupling adapters 366 which, at low pressure (30 - 80 psi), can be placed in-line with a user modified area plumbing or sprinkler systems to boost or provide closed system area water pressure or pressure augmentation. The 5/8” hose 416, 418 is connected to the pump’s intake and/or discharge coupler(s) 408, 410 via detachable coupling adapter (5/8” - 2”) 366. When either coupling adapter 366 is detected by the CPU 320, a feedback circuit will prevent the liquid pump120 from operating at pressures higher than 80 psi. In this mode, the station 100 may additionally function as a power washer.

[0062] The emergency station’s hydraulic and electro-mechanical systems 400 include one or more of the following features:

• Electric Powered Centrifugal Motor; self-priming with backflow check valve

• Ability to Create Variable Pressure (nominally 30 - 200 pounds per

square inch)

• Ability to Create Variable Flow (between 50 - 500 gallons per minute)

• 1 , 1.5 or 2-inch discharge fitting to standard fire hose or other

• 2 - 3” suction inlet fitting to cam lock“quick connect” suction hose

• Pump Overhead Lift of up to 100 feet pump to destination at high

pressure

• Ability to charge a Fire Hose Rated length of up to 200 feet at high

pressure

• Pump Suction Head can draft water source up to 25 feet to pump at high pressure

• Ability to transfer water & liquids such as gels or foams at fire-fighting hose speeds and pressures.

• Liquid pressure detection feature to automatically shut off pump system when liquid supply is exhausted.

[0063] The station 100 may be moved from place to place to optimize liquid sourcing and/or transfer for firefighting, water pressure support, flood mitigation or power supply needs. The station 100 may be used to pre-treat structures or vegetation with liquid and/or foams and retardants to delay fire spread. The station 100 may also be used to actively fight fire spread.

[0064] Potential liquid sources for the station 100 include one or more of the following:

• Home Pool

• Well

• Cistern

• Reservoir or Lake

• Water Storage Tank

• Hydrant or other Public Water Source

• Fire Suppression Gels & Foams

[0065] With reference to FIG. 6, an example infrastructure, in which one or more of the processes described herein, may be implemented, according to an embodiment, will be described, and, with reference to FIG. 7, an example processing system, by which one or more of the processed described herein, may be executed, according to an embodiment, will be described.

[0066] For example, but not by way of limitation, the example

infrastructure and/or example processing system may be used with respect to the monitoring and detecting various emergency signals (FEMA, NOAA,

Military, local emergency frequencies, etc.) and trigger assorted user-defined tasks (to fully charge onboard batteries, activate visual or sonic alarms, power onboard AC outlets, etc.). Further, the example processing system may be used in conjunction with control and/or operation of the various systems shown and/or described herein. Further, but not by way of limitation, the processing system may be used to manage the unit’s power supplies; identifying, switching and engaging between AC sources and batteries; recharging drained batteries when connected to an AC power source and/or switching between individual batteries when their respective charges are depleted. The the processing system and its components are rated to military and/or high stress (water-proof, high heat and shock resistant standards). System Overview

Infrastructure

[0067] FIG. 6 illustrates an example system 500 that may be used, for example, but not by way of limitation, for monitoring and detecting various emergency signals and triggering assorted user-defined tasks, according to an embodiment. The infrastructure may comprise a platform 510 (e.g., one or more servers) which hosts and/or executes one or more of the various functions, processes, methods, and/or software modules described herein.

Platform 510 may comprise dedicated servers, or may instead comprise cloud instances, which utilize shared resources of one or more servers. These servers or cloud instances may be collocated and/or geographically distributed. Platform 510 may also comprise or be communicatively connected to a server application 512 and/or one or more databases 514. In addition, platform 510 may be communicatively connected to one or more user systems 530 via one or more networks 520. Platform 510 may also be communicatively connected to one or more external systems 540 (e.g., other platforms, websites, etc.) via one or more networks 520.

[0068] Network(s) 520 may comprise the Internet, and platform 510 may communicate with user system(s) 530 through the Internet using standard transmission protocols, such as HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP), HTTP Secure (HTTPS), File Transfer Protocol (FTP), FTP Secure (FTPS), Secure Shell FTP (SFTP), and the like, as well as proprietary protocols. While platform 110 is illustrated as being connected to various systems through a single set of network(s) 520, it should be understood that platform 510 may be connected to the various systems via different sets of one or more networks. For example, platform 510 may be connected to a subset of user systems 530 and/or external systems 540 via the Internet, but may be connected to one or more other user systems 530 and/or external systems 540 via an intranet. Furthermore, while only a few user systems 130 and external systems 540, one server application 512, and one set of database(s) 514 are illustrated, it should be understood that the infrastructure may comprise any number of user systems, external systems, server applications, and databases. [0069] User system(s) 530 may comprise any type or types of computing devices capable of wired and/or wireless communication, including without limitation, desktop computers, laptop computers, tablet computers, smart phones or other mobile phones, servers, game consoles, televisions, set-top boxes, electronic kiosks, point-of-sale terminals, Automated Teller Machines, and/or the like.

[0070] Platform 510 may comprise web servers which host one or more websites and/or web services. In embodiments in which a website is provided, the website may comprise a graphical user interface, including, for example, one or more screens (e.g., webpages) generated in HyperText Markup

Language (HTML) or other language. Platform 510 transmits or serves one or more screens of the graphical user interface in response to requests from user system(s) 530. In some embodiments, these screens may be served in the form of a wizard, in which case two or more screens may be served in a sequential manner, and one or more of the sequential screens may depend on an interaction of the user or user system 530 with one or more preceding screens. The requests to platform 510 and the responses from platform 510, including the screens of the graphical user interface, may both be

communicated through network(s) 520, which may include the Internet, using standard communication protocols (e.g., HTTP, HTTPS, etc.). These screens (e.g., webpages) may comprise a combination of content and elements, such as text, images, videos, animations, references (e.g., hyperlinks), frames, inputs (e.g., textboxes, text areas, checkboxes, radio buttons, drop-down menus, buttons, forms, etc.), scripts (e.g., JavaScript), and the like, including elements comprising or derived from data stored in one or more databases (e.g., database(s) 514) that are locally and/or remotely accessible to platform 510. Platform 510 may also respond to other requests from user system(s) 530.

[0071] Platform 510 may further comprise, be communicatively coupled with, or otherwise have access to one or more database(s) 514. For example, platform 510 may comprise one or more database servers which manage one or more databases 514. A user system 530 or server application 512 executing on platform 510 may submit data (e.g., user data, form data, etc.) to be stored in database(s) 514, and/or request access to data stored in database(s) 514. Any suitable database may be utilized, including without limitation MySQL™, Oracle™, IBM™, Microsoft SQL™, Access™, and the like, including cloud- based databases and proprietary databases. Data may be sent to platform 510, for instance, using the well-known POST request supported by HTTP, via FTP, and/or the like. This data, as well as other requests, may be handled, for example, by server-side web technology, such as a servlet or other software module (e.g., comprised in server application 512), executed by platform 510.

[0072] In embodiments in which a web service is provided, platform 510 may receive requests from external system(s) 540, and provide responses in extensible Markup Language (XML), JavaScript Object Notation (JSON), and/or any other suitable or desired format. In such embodiments, platform 510 may provide an application programming interface (API) which defines the manner in which user system(s) 530 and/or external system(s) 540 may interact with the web service. Thus, user system(s) 530 and/or external system(s) 540 (which may themselves be servers), can define their own user interfaces, and rely on the web service to implement or otherwise provide the backend processes, methods, functionality, storage, and/or the like, described herein. For example, in such an embodiment, a client application 532 executing on one or more user system(s) 530 may interact with a server application 512 executing on platform 510 to execute one or more or a portion of one or more of the various functions, processes, methods, and/or software modules described herein. Client application 532 may be“thin,” in which case processing is primarily carried out server-side by server application 512 on platform 510. A basic example of a thin client application is a browser application, which simply requests, receives, and renders webpages at user system(s) 530, while the server application on platform 510 is responsible for generating the webpages and managing database functions. Alternatively, the client application may be“thick,” in which case processing is primarily carried out client-side by user system(s) 530. It should be understood that client application 532 may perform an amount of processing, relative to server application 512 on platform 510, at any point along this spectrum between“thin” and“thick,” depending on the design goals of the particular implementation. In any case, the application described herein, which may wholly reside on either platform 510 (e.g., in which case server application 512 performs all processing) or user system(s) 530 (e.g., in which case client application 532 performs all processing) or be distributed between platform 510 and user system(s) 530 (e.g., in which case server application 512 and client application 532 both perform processing), can comprise one or more executable software modules that implement one or more of the functions, processes, or methods of the application described herein.

Example Processing Device

[0073] FIG. 7 is a block diagram illustrating an example wired or wireless system 600 that may be used in connection with various embodiments described herein. For example, system 600 may be used as or in conjunction with one or more of the functions, processes, or methods (e.g., to store and/or execute the application or one or more software modules of the application) described herein, and may represent components of platform 510, user system (s) 530, external system (s) 540, and/or other processing devices described herein. System 600 can be a server or any conventional personal computer, or any other processor-enabled device that is capable of wired or wireless data communication. Other computer systems and/or architectures may be also used, as will be clear to those skilled in the art.

[0074] System 600 preferably includes one or more processors, such as processor 610. Additional processors may be provided, such as an auxiliary processor to manage input/output, an auxiliary processor to perform floating- point mathematical operations, a special-purpose microprocessor having an architecture suitable for fast execution of signal-processing algorithms (e.g., digital-signal processor), a slave processor subordinate to the main processing system (e.g., back-end processor), an additional microprocessor or controller for dual or multiple processor systems, and/or a coprocessor. Such auxiliary processors may be discrete processors or may be integrated with processor 610. Examples of processors which may be used with system 600 include, without limitation, the Pentium® processor, Core i7® processor, and Xeon® processor, all of which are available from Intel Corporation of Santa Clara, California. [0075] Processor 610 is preferably connected to a communication bus 605. Communication bus 605 may include a data channel for facilitating information transfer between storage and other peripheral components of system 600. Furthermore, communication bus 605 may provide a set of signals used for communication with processor 610, including a data bus, address bus, and/or control bus (not shown). Communication bus 605 may comprise any standard or non-standard bus architecture such as, for example, bus

architectures compliant with industry standard architecture (ISA), extended industry standard architecture (EISA), Micro Channel Architecture (MCA), peripheral component interconnect (PCI) local bus, standards promulgated by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) including IEEE 488 general-purpose interface bus (GPIB), IEEE 696/S-100, and/or the like.

[0076] System 600 preferably includes a main memory 615 and may also include a secondary memory 620. Main memory 615 provides storage of instructions and data for programs executing on processor 610, such as one or more of the functions and/or modules discussed herein. It should be

understood that programs stored in the memory and executed by processor 610 may be written and/or compiled according to any suitable language, including without limitation C/C++, Java, JavaScript, Perl, Visual Basic, .NET, and the like. Main memory 615 is typically semiconductor-based memory such as dynamic random access memory (DRAM) and/or static random access memory (SRAM). Other semiconductor-based memory types include, for example, synchronous dynamic random access memory (SDRAM), Rambus dynamic random access memory (RDRAM), ferroelectric random access memory (FRAM), and the like, including read only memory (ROM).

[0077] Secondary memory 620 may optionally include an internal medium 625 and/or a removable medium 630. Removable medium 630 is read from and/or written to in any well-known manner. Removable storage medium 230 may be, for example, a magnetic tape drive, a compact disc (CD) drive, a digital versatile disc (DVD) drive, other optical drive, a flash memory drive, and/or the like. [0078] Secondary memory 620 is a non-transitory computer-readable medium having computer-executable code (e.g., disclosed software modules) and/or other data stored thereon. The computer software or data stored on secondary memory 620 is read into main memory 615 for execution by processor 610.

[0079] In alternative embodiments, secondary memory 620 may include other similar means for allowing computer programs or other data or

instructions to be loaded into system 600. Such means may include, for example, a communication interface 640, which allows software and data to be transferred from external storage medium 645 to system 600. Examples of external storage medium 645 may include an external hard disk drive, an external optical drive, an external magneto-optical drive, and/or the like. Other examples of secondary memory 620 may include semiconductor-based memory, such as programmable read-only memory (PROM), erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM), electrically erasable read-only memory (EEPROM), and flash memory (block-oriented memory similar to EEPROM).

[0080] As mentioned above, system 600 may include a communication interface 640. Communication interface 640 allows software and data to be transferred between system 600 and external devices (e.g. printers), networks, or other information sources. For example, computer software or executable code may be transferred to system 600 from a network server (e.g., platform 510) via communication interface 640. Examples of communication interface 640 include a built-in network adapter, network interface card (NIC), Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA) network card, card bus network adapter, wireless network adapter, Universal Serial Bus (USB) network adapter, modem, a wireless data card, a communications port, an infrared interface, an IEEE 1394 fire-wire, and any other device capable of interfacing system 600 with a network (e.g., network(s) 520) or another computing device. Communication interface 640 preferably implements industry-promulgated protocol standards, such as Ethernet IEEE 802 standards, Fiber Channel, digital subscriber line (DSL), asynchronous digital subscriber line (ADSL), frame relay, asynchronous transfer mode (ATM), integrated digital services network (ISDN), personal communications services (PCS),

transmission control protocol/Internet protocol (TCP/IP), serial line Internet protocol/point to point protocol (SLIP/PPP), and so on, but may also implement customized or non-standard interface protocols as well.

[0081] Software and data transferred via communication interface 640 are generally in the form of electrical communication signals 655. These signals 655 may be provided to communication interface 640 via a

communication channel 650. In an embodiment, communication channel 650 may be a wired or wireless network (e.g., network(s) 520), or any variety of other communication links. Communication channel 650 carries signals 655 and can be implemented using a variety of wired or wireless communication means including wire or cable, fiber optics, conventional phone line, cellular phone link, wireless data communication link, radio frequency (“RF”) link, or infrared link, just to name a few.

[0082] Computer-executable code (e.g., computer programs, such as the disclosed application, or software modules) is stored in main memory 615 and/or secondary memory 620. Computer programs can also be received via communication interface 640 and stored in main memory 615 and/or secondary memory 620. Such computer programs, when executed, enable system 600 to perform the various functions of the disclosed embodiments as described elsewhere herein.

[0083] In this description, the term“computer-readable medium” is used to refer to any non-transitory computer-readable storage media used to provide computer-executable code and/or other data to or within system 600. Examples of such media include main memory 615, secondary memory 620 (including internal memory 625, removable medium 630, and external storage medium 645), and any peripheral device communicatively coupled with communication interface 640 (including a network information server or other network device). These non-transitory computer-readable media are means for providing executable code, programming instructions, software, and/or other data to system 600. [0084] In an embodiment that is implemented using software, the software may be stored on a computer-readable medium and loaded into system 600 by way of removable medium 630, I/O interface 635, or

communication interface 640. In such an embodiment, the software is loaded into system 600 in the form of electrical communication signals 655. The software, when executed by processor 610, preferably causes processor 610 to perform one or more of the processes and functions described elsewhere herein.

[0085] In an embodiment, I/O interface 635 provides an interface between one or more components of system 600 and one or more input and/or output devices. Example input devices include, without limitation, sensors, keyboards, touch screens or other touch-sensitive devices, biometric sensing devices, computer mice, trackballs, pen-based pointing devices, and/or the like. Examples of output devices include, without limitation, other processing devices, cathode ray tubes (CRTs), plasma displays, light-emitting diode (LED) displays, liquid crystal displays (LCDs), printers, vacuum fluorescent displays (VFDs), surface-conduction electron-emitter displays (SEDs), field emission displays (FEDs), and/or the like. In some cases, an input and output device may be combined, such as in the case of a touch panel display (e.g., in a smartphone, tablet, or other mobile device).

[0086] System 600 may also include one or more optional wireless communication components that facilitate wireless communication over a voice network and/or a data network (e.g., in the case of user system 530). The wireless communication components comprise an antenna system 670, a radio system 665, and a baseband system 660. In system 600, radio frequency (RF) signals are transmitted and received over the air by antenna system 670 under the management of radio system 665.

[0087] In an embodiment, antenna system 670 may comprise one or more antennae and one or more multiplexors (not shown) that perform a switching function to provide antenna system 670 with transmit and receive signal paths. In the receive path, received RF signals can be coupled from a multiplexor to a low noise amplifier (not shown) that amplifies the received RF signal and sends the amplified signal to radio system 665.

[0088] In an alternative embodiment, radio system 665 may comprise one or more radios that are configured to communicate over various

frequencies. In an embodiment, radio system 665 may combine a demodulator (not shown) and modulator (not shown) in one integrated circuit (1C). The demodulator and modulator can also be separate components. In the incoming path, the demodulator strips away the RF carrier signal leaving a baseband receive audio signal, which is sent from radio system 665 to baseband system 660.

[0089] If the received signal contains audio information, then baseband system 660 decodes the signal and converts it to an analog signal. Then the signal is amplified and sent to a speaker. Baseband system 660 also receives analog audio signals from a microphone. These analog audio signals are converted to digital signals and encoded by baseband system 660. Baseband system 660 also encodes the digital signals for transmission and generates a baseband transmit audio signal that is routed to the modulator portion of radio system 665. The modulator mixes the baseband transmit audio signal with an RF carrier signal, generating an RF transmit signal that is routed to antenna system 670 and may pass through a power amplifier (not shown). The power amplifier amplifies the RF transmit signal and routes it to antenna system 670, where the signal is switched to the antenna port for transmission.

[0090] Baseband system 660 is also communicatively coupled with processor 610, which may be a central processing unit (CPU). Processor 210 has access to data storage areas 615 and 620. Processor 610 is preferably configured to execute instructions (i.e. , computer programs, such as the disclosed application, or software modules) that can be stored in main memory 615 or secondary memory 620. Computer programs can also be received from baseband processor 660 and stored in main memory 610 or in secondary memory 620, or executed upon receipt. Such computer programs, when executed, enable system 600 to perform the various functions of the disclosed embodiments. Process Overview

[0091] Embodiment(s) of processes for using the emergency station 100 will now be described in detail. It should be understood that the described processes may be embodied in one or more software modules that are executed by one or more hardware processors (e.g., processor 610), e.g., as the application discussed herein (e.g., server application 512, client application 532, and/or a distributed application comprising both server application 512 and client application 532), which may be executed wholly by processor(s) of platform 510, wholly by processor(s) of user system(s) 530, or may be distributed across platform 510 and user system(s) 530, such that some portions or modules of the application are executed by platform 510 and other portions or modules of the application are executed by user system(s) 530. The described processes may be implemented as instructions represented in source code, object code, and/or machine code. These instructions may be executed directly by the hardware processor(s), or alternatively, may be executed by a virtual machine operating between the object code and the hardware

processors. In addition, the disclosed application may be built upon or interfaced with one or more existing systems.

[0092] Alternatively, the described processes may be implemented as a hardware component (e.g., general-purpose processor, integrated circuit (IC), application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), digital signal processor (DSP), field-programmable gate array (FPGA) or other programmable logic device, discrete gate or transistor logic, etc.), combination of hardware components, or combination of hardware and software components. To clearly illustrate the interchangeability of hardware and software, various illustrative components, blocks, modules, circuits, and steps are described herein generally in terms of their functionality. Whether such functionality is implemented as hardware or software depends upon the particular application and design constraints imposed on the overall system. Skilled persons can implement the described functionality in varying ways for each particular application, but such

implementation decisions should not be interpreted as causing a departure from the scope of the invention. In addition, the grouping of functions within a component, block, module, circuit, or step is for ease of description. Specific functions or steps can be moved from one component, block, module, circuit, or step to another without departing from the invention.

Fire Suppression & Control

[0093] With reference to FIG. 8, an exemplary application process 700 for using the emergency station 100 is for fire suppression and control. The variable speed capability of the liquid transfer pump provides fire suppression capabilities through high flow/pressure water and/or fire retardant via a high flow fire hose. Water is fed to pump through a suction hose via a static water source (pool, lake, reservoir, tank, etc.). The emergency station 100 is mobile, allowing for movement of the emergency station 100 close enough to the water source to allow insertion of the suction hose.

[0094] At step 710, the emergency station 100 is powered on via the U I/ user control and display panel 290.

[0095] At step 720, the“Fire Suppression” option or fifth position 362, VARIABLE PRESSURE, is selected from the Ul/user control and display panel 290. In the fifth position 362, power to all emergency station systems is turned on and the user manually controls the liquid pressure from low to high via the rotating switch 314, sending various currents and frequency rates to the electric pump motor controller 360.

[0096] At step 730, if required, the emergency station 100 is

disconnected from power source (e.g., AC power source).

[0097] At step 740, the emergency station 100 is manually wheeled, which may include actuating the electric motor 112 for the wheels 114, to a desired fire suppression location.

[0098] At step 750, the suction hose 150, 170, 416 is removed from storage cradle and connected to suction port or intake coupler 408.

[0099] At step 760, the suction hose 150, 170, 416 is placed in water reservoir. [0100] At step 770, the fire hose 170 (with nozzle 180) is removed from storage cradle and connected to discharge coupler 410. The nozzle 180 is verified to be in the off position. A fire retardant adapter is added, if applicable.

[0101] At step 780, pumping is initiated from Ul/user control and display panel 290 from selected desired pressure (e.g., Highest Pressure), with the Ul/user control and display panel 290 continually showing state of charge and time remaining on existing charge based on current usage.

[0102] At step 790, the nozzle 180 is opened to desired level and spraying occurs. Ul/user control and display panel 290 to continually show state of charge and time remaining on existing charge based on current usage.

[0103] At step 800, when complete, pump 120 is turned off by rotating switch 314 to the“Off” position 352. The emergency station 100 may be wheeled back to storage location and turned off.

Flood Control

[0104] With reference to FIG. 9, an exemplary application process 810 for using the emergency station 100 is for flood control. The emergency station 100 utilizes the fire suppression accessories to mitigate flooding (i.e. , suction hose 150, 170, 416 and fire house 140 to remove liquid from flooded area).

The suction hose 150, 170, 416 normally used as an inlet hose for fire suppression is used similar to a vacuum hose.

[0105] At step 820, the emergency station 100 is powered on via the U I/ user control and display panel 290.

[0106] At step 830, a“Flood Control” option or fifth position 362,

VARIABLE PRESSURE, is selected from the Ul/user control and display panel 290. In the fifth position 362, power to all emergency station systems is turned on and the user manually controls the liquid pressure from low to high via the rotating switch 314, sending various currents and frequency rates to the electric pump motor controller 360. [0107] At step 840, if required, the emergency station 100 is

disconnected from power source (e.g., AC power source).

[0108] At step 850, the emergency station 100 is manually wheeled, which may include actuating the electric motor 112 for the wheels 114, to a desired flood control location.

[0109] At step 860, the suction hose 150, 170, 416 is removed from storage cradle and connected to suction port or intake coupler 408.

[0110] At step 870, the suction hose 150, 170, 416 is placed in flooded area.

[0111] At step 880, the fire hose 170 (with nozzle 180) is removed from storage cradle and connected to discharge coupler 410. The nozzle 180 is verified to be in the off position.

[0112] At step 890, pumping is initiated from Ul/user control and display panel 290 from selected desired pressure (e.g., Highest Pressure), with the Ul/user control and display panel 290 continually showing state of charge and time remaining on existing charge based on current usage. The nozzle 180 is opened to desired level and removal of water from the flooded area occurs. Ul/user control and display panel 290 to continually show state of charge and time remaining on existing charge based on current usage.

[0113] At step 900, when complete, pump 120 is turned off by rotating switch 314 to the“Off” position 352. The emergency station 100 may be wheeled back to storage location and turned off.

Water Pressure Support and Augmentation

[0114] With reference to FIG. 10, an exemplary application process 910 for using the emergency station 100 is for using the variable speed capability of the liquid transfer pump 120 to boost water pressure of a residence or other facility, in the event of pressure loss. The emergency station 100 also has the ability to automatically sense loss of home water pressure and activate the home pressure boosting feature. For homes with existing booster pumps, the emergency station 100 provide electricity back-up during a power failure (see “Auxiliary Power” feature below). Residential water code stipulates potable water supply pressure to be between 30psi (minimum) and 80psi (maximum). Pressure regulators are typically preset to 50psi from the factory. In the event pressure is reduced/lost (i.e. municipal booster station power loss, fire event, etc.), the emergency station 100 may serve as a“booster pump” to increase water pressure back to desired level.

[0115] At step 920, the emergency station 100 is powered on via the U I/ user control and display panel 290.

[0116] At step 930, a“Water Pressure Augmentation” option, automatic option, or fifth position 362, VARIABLE PRESSURE, is selected from the U I/user control and display panel 290. In the fifth position 362, power to all emergency station systems is turned on and the user manually controls the liquid pressure from low to high via the rotating switch 314, sending various currents and frequency rates to the electric pump motor controller 360.

[0117] At step 940, if required, the emergency station 100 is

disconnected from power source (e.g., AC power source).

[0118] At step 950, the emergency station 100 is manually wheeled, which may include actuating the electric motor 112 for the wheels 114, to a desired pressure augmentation location.

[0119] At step 960, the relevant hoses 150, 170, 416, 418 are removed from storage cradle and connected to suction port or intake coupler 408 and to discharge coupler 410.

[0120] At step 970, the bypass valves are twisted to direct water flow to the emergency station 100.

[0121] At step 980, pumping is initiated from Ul/user control and display panel 290 from selected desired pressure (e.g., Highest Pressure), with the Ul/user control and display panel 290 continually showing state of charge and time remaining on existing charge based on current usage. Ul/user control and display panel 290 to continually show state of charge and time remaining on existing charge based on current usage.

[0122] At step 990, when complete, pump 120 is turned off by rotating switch 314 to the“Off” position 352. The emergency station 100 may be wheeled back to storage location and turned off.

Auxiliary Power

[0123] With reference to FIG. 11 , an exemplary application process 1000 for using the emergency station 100 is for providing self-contained power for emergency situations, via battery energy storage. The emergency station provides auxiliary power via 120 and/or 240 volt electrical outlets 306 fed by battery storage.

[0124] At step 1010, the emergency station 100 is powered on via the U I/ user control and display panel 290.

[0125] At step 1020, an“Auxiliary Power” or“ON” second switch position 354 is selected from the U I/user control and display panel 290. In the second switch position 354, power is supplied to onboard AC connectors/outlets 306, drive wheel electric motor 112, and user control and display panel 290.

[0126] At step 1030, if required, the emergency station 100 is

disconnected from power source (e.g., AC power source).

[0127] At step 1040, the emergency station 100 is manually wheeled, which may include actuating the electric motor 112 for the wheels 114, to a desired location where emergency power supply is required.

[0128] At step 1050, desired accessories are plugged into the electrical outlets 306.

[0129] At step 1060, the accessories are powered up as needed with the U I/ user control and display panel 290 showing the state of charge and time remaining on existing charge based on current usage at display 390. [0130] At step 1070, when complete, the emergency station 100 is turned off by rotating switch 314 to the“Off” position 352. The emergency station 100 may be wheeled back to storage location and turned off.

Remote Activation and Detection

[0131] With reference to FIG. 12, an exemplary application process 1100 for using the emergency station 100 is for continually monitoring wireless and/or radio emergency broadcasting and performing automatic functions if alerted. Automatic functions performed include, but are not limited to, sounding of the audible alarm 300, actuating visual warning alarm/strobe/flash light 298, initiate full battery charging in anticipation of heavy usage, energize the auxiliary electrical outlets 306, and/or execute any user specific pre-programmed macros.

[0132] At step 1110, the emergency station 100 is powered on via the U I/ user control and display panel 290.

[0133] At step 1120, a“Standby” or“Stby” third switch position 356 is selected from the U I/user control and display panel 290.

[0134] In the third switch position 356, at step 1130, the emergency station 100 monitors outside radio, WIFI, and/or phone signals.

[0135] At step 1140, the CPU 320 determines whether the monitored signal(s) meet predetermined criteria. If no, then control passes back to step 1130. If yes, then control passes on to step 1150.

[0136] At step 1150, the CPU 320 triggers one or more of the following user preset functions: sounding of the audible alarm 300, actuating visual warning alarm/strobe/flash light 298, initiating full charging of the one or more rechargeable batteries 130 in anticipation of heavy usage, energizing the auxiliary electrical outlets 306, and/or executing any user specific pre- programmed macros.

[0137] While various embodiments of the present invention have been described above, it should be understood that they have been presented by way of example only, and not of limitation. Likewise, the various diagrams may depict an example architectural or other configuration for the disclosure, which is done to aid in understanding the features and functionality that can be included in the disclosure. The invention is not restricted to the illustrated example architectures or configurations, but the desired features can be implemented using a variety of alternative architectures and configurations. Indeed, it will be apparent to one of skill in the art how alternative functional, logical or physical partitioning and configurations can be implemented to implement the desired features of the present disclosure.

[0138] Although the disclosure is described above in terms of various exemplary embodiments and implementations, it should be understood that the various features, aspects and functionality described in one or more of the individual embodiments are not limited in their applicability to the particular embodiment with which they are described, but instead can be applied, alone or in various combinations, to one or more of the other embodiments of the disclosure, whether or not such embodiments are described and whether or not such features are presented as being a part of a described embodiment. Thus, the breadth and scope of the present disclosure should not be limited by any of the above-described exemplary embodiments.

[0139] Terms and phrases used in this document, and variations thereof, unless otherwise expressly stated, should be construed as open ended as opposed to limiting. As examples of the foregoing: the term“including” should be read as meaning“including, without limitation” or the like; the term“example” is used to provide exemplary instances of the item in discussion, not an exhaustive or limiting list thereof; the terms“a” or“an” should be read as meaning“at least one,”“one or more” or the like; and adjectives such as “conventional,”“traditional,”“normal,”“standar d,”“known” and terms of similar meaning should not be construed as limiting the item described to a given time period or to an item available as of a given time, but instead should be read to encompass conventional, traditional, normal, or standard technologies that may be available or known now or at any time in the future. Likewise, where this document refers to technologies that would be apparent or known to one of ordinary skill in the art, such technologies encompass those apparent or known to the skilled artisan now or at any time in the future.

[0140] The presence of broadening words and phrases such as“one or more,”“at least,”“but not limited to” or other like phrases in some instances shall not be read to mean that the narrower case is intended or required in instances where such broadening phrases may be absent.