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Title:
ENHANCED HETEROLOGOUS PRODUCTION OF LIPOXYGENASES
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2014/179207
Kind Code:
A2
Abstract:
The invention is directed to the enhanced expression and purification of lipoxygenase enzymes. These enzymes are of wide-spread industrial importance, often produced in heterologous microbial systems. Preferably, the lipoxygenase produced by the methods of the invention is a plant-derived enzyme and expressed at high-levels in a microbial system that includes a protease-deficient host and one or more chaperone expression plasmids. The invention is also directed to amino acid and nucleic acid fragments of the lipoxygenase enzyme including fragments in expression constructs encoding all or a portion of one or more lipoxygenase genes. The invention is also directed to methods of manufacturing bread and other food and also non-food products with lipoxygenase manufactured by the methods of the invention.

Inventors:
LIU, Gaofeng (15120 Dufief Drive, North Potomac, Maryland, 20878, US)
CHANG, Min-ju (543 Palmsprings Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland, 20878, US)
GNATT, Averell (3207 Nerak Road, Pikesville, Maryland, 20208, US)
YE, Tian (11924 Weybridge Lane, Germantown, Maryland, 20876, US)
Application Number:
US2014/035657
Publication Date:
November 06, 2014
Filing Date:
April 28, 2014
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
US NEWWIN, INC. (9430 Key West Ave, Suite 200Rockville, Maryland, 20850, US)
International Classes:
C12N9/02; A21D8/04
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
REMENICK, James et al. (Remenick PLLC, 1025 Thomas Jefferson St. NW,Suite 17, Washington District of Columbia, 20007, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Claims

1. A method of producing lipoxygenase enzyme comprising:

providing a nucleic acid expression construct within a host microorganism, wherein the construct encodes a plant-derived lipoxygenase enzyme;

providing one or more chaperone plasmids within the host microorganism; and inducing expression of a lipoxygenase polypetide encoded by the construct.

2. The method of claim 1, further comprising purifying the expressed lipoxygenase polypeptide and collecting isolated lipoxygenase polypeptide.

3. The method of claim 1, wherein the nucleic acid expression construct encodes all or a

functional portion of the sequence of SEQ ID NO 1, SEQ ID NO 2, or SEQ ID NO 3.

4. The method of claim 1, wherein the nucleic acid expression construct contains all or a

functional portion of the sequence of SEQ ID NO 4, SEQ ID NO 5, or SEQ ID NO 6.

5. The method of claim 1, wherein the host microorganism is a bacterial cell containing one or more protease deficiencies.

6. The method of claim 5, wherein the bacterial cell is a strain of K12 cells, E. coli cells ,

Bacillus cells, Lactoccocus or yeast cells.

7. The method of claim 5, wherein the bacterial cell is an organism generally recognized as safe for the production of food enzymes.

8. The method of claim 1, wherein the one or more chaperone plasmids are simultaneously co- expressed with the lipoxygenase polypeptide.

9. The method of claim 1, wherein inducing comprises maintaining the heterologous

microorganism at from 10-37°C for a period of time.

10. The method of claim 9, wherein inducing comprises maintaining the heterologous

microorganism at from 25-35°C for a period of time.

11. The method of claim 9, wherein inducing comprises maintaining the heterologous

microorganism at from 10-25°C for a period of time.

12. The method of claim 9, wherein inducing comprises maintaining the heterologous

microorganism at from 20-25°C for a period of time.

13. The method of claim 9, wherein the period of time is from 1 hour to 2 days.

14. The method of claim 1, wherein purification comprises contacting the expressed

lipoxygenase to immobilized-metal affinity chromatography media.

15. The method of claim 1, wherein the expressed lipoxygenase polypeptide does not contain a histidine tag.

16. The method of claim 1, wherein the collected lipoxygenase polypeptide comprises a plant lipoxygenase.

17. The method of claim 1, wherein the expressed lipoxygenase polypeptide does not contain a histidine tag.

18. The method of claim 1, wherein soluble lipoxygenase polypeptide relative to total soluble protein in the cell extract is 30% or greater.

19. A composition comprising lipoxygenase polypeptide made by the method of claim 1.

20. A method for the manufacture of a bread product, comprising adding the composition of claim 19 to a dough.

21. The method of claim 20, wherein the dough contains unsaturated fatty acids, carotinoids or both unsaturated fatty acids and carotinoids.

22. A bread product made by the method of claim 21.

23. A method of producing lipoxygenase enzyme comprising:

providing a nucleic acid expression construct within a host microorganism, wherein the construct encodes a plant-derived lipoxygenase enzyme and the host microorganism is generally recognized as safe for the production of food enzymes;

providing one or more chaperone plasmids within the host microorganism wherein the one or more chaperone plasmids are simultaneously co-expressed with the lipoxygenase polypeptide;

inducing expression of a lipoxygenase polypetide encoded by the construct;

purifying the expressed lipoxygenase polypeptide by contacting the expressed lipoxygenase to immobilized-metal affinity chromatography media, wherein soluble lipoxygenase polypeptide relative to total soluble protein in the cell extract is 30% or greater; and

collecting isolated lipoxygenase polypeptide.

24. An artificial and functional lipoxygenase enzyme produced by the method of claim 23.

Description:
ENHANCED HETEROLOGOUS PRODUCTION OF LIPOXYGENASES

Reference to Related Applications

This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/817,077 of the same title filed April 29, 2013, which is incorporated by reference in its entirety.

Sequence Listing

The instant application contains a Sequence Listing which has been submitted

electronically in ASCII format and is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. Said ASCII copy, created on April 28, 2014, is named 3060.002.US_SL.txt and is 29,528 bytes in size.

Background

1. Field of the Invention

The invention is directed to systems, compositions and methods for the expression and purification of lipoxygenases, to amino acid and nucleic acid sequences of all or portions of lipoxygenases, to molecular constructs for the expression of lipoxygenases, and, in particular, to methods for the large scale production and use of lipoxygenases in food products.

2. Description of the Background

Lipoxygenases (LOXs; EC1.13.11_). also known as lipoxydases, are non-heme iron- containing dioxygenases distributed in plants and animals. LOXs catalyze hydroperoxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the first step of fatty acid metabolite synthesis, to produce an unsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxide. A LOX definition according to enzyme classification is linoleate: oxygen oxidoreductase (for plant LOX) and arachidonate: oxygen oxidoreductase (for mammalian LOX). In plants, the most common LOX substrates linoleic acid and linolenic acids are converted into a variety of bioactive mediators involved in plant defense, senescence, seed germination, as well as plant growth and development (Grechkin A. Recent developments in biochemistry of the plant lipoxygenase pathway; Prog Lipid Res. 1998 Nov. 37(5):317-52). Lipoxygenases with different specificities, subcellular location, and tissue-specific expression patterns have been identified as ubiquitously found across kingdoms from bacteria to mammals.

LOXs are of commercial value in various industries including but not limited to food- related applications in food processing including bread making (bleaching and improved texture), aroma and flavor enhancement as well as for production of perfumes, paint driers (lipoxygenases: potential starting biocatalysts for the synthesis of signaling compounds. Joo YC, Oh DK. 2012) and pitch control in softwood pulp (Microbial and enzymatic control of pitch in the pulp and paper industry, Ana Gutierrez & Jose C. del Rio & Angel T. Martinez, Appl Microbiol Biotechnol (2009) 82: 1005-1018). Lipoxygenase is present in seeds (e.g. soybeans), grains and many other plant tissues. In the presence of oxygen, lipoxygenase oxidizes unsaturated fatty acids and produces lipid hydroperoxides, which improve dough structure through the oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids and subsequently react with specific chemical components of flour. As a consequence, dough stability and rising is increased, which either or together can increase the volume of the final product.

Regarding the processing of bread, lipoxygenase enzymes offer an advantage over current chemical additives. The flour ingredient industry had long been using chemical bleach, mostly benzoyl peroxide (BPO). Because of potential health concerns over BPO, some Euro countries and China banned the usage of BPO in flour. In the U.S., BPO is still widely used, but the demand keeps shirking although there is currently no safe alternative. Azodiformamide is another chemical alternative, but the dosage is limited to 40 ppm. At this trace dosage, the bleaching effect is quite restrained. In contrast, enzyme additives especially LOXs can replace chemicals to allow for the processing of flour, resulting in the bleaching of bread and its improved texture. In addition, lipid hydroperoxidases decolorize dough and oxidizes carotinoids, converting them into colorless compounds. This blanching of the dough results in lighter colored product, which is highly desired.

With regard to enzymes employed in the food industry, regulations frequently require enzymes to be recognized or proven as safe for use. In the case of lipoxygenases, considering that they are ubiquitously found in plants and consumed by humans and animals alike, plant lipoxygenases are considered safe for use, and therefore, of major value to the industry. Although soy extracts containing high levels of lipoxygenases have been used as an additive for bread manufacturing, soy produces an undesirable taste and smell and, accordingly, not often a useful option.

Because of plant LOX value, many attempts at high-level expression of recombinant plant derived LOX from soy, rice, potato and other sources by heterologous expression in microbial hosts including, but not limited to bacteria such as E. coli (BL21 strain), Bacilli, and in yeast has been attempted, though production was limited [3-8]. The best of these, although still a poor expression from E. coli, was observed at very cold temperatures [8]. Only one lipoxygenase was produced in Bacilli at high-levels (~160mg/L), but the lipoxygenase was from a bacterial enzyme, not a plant and consequently not approved for use in the human food industry [9, 10]. In addition, yields still could not achieve desired levels. Accordingly, a need exists for high level expression of plant lipoxygenases that is generally recognized as safe for use in foods, and easily produced in large quantities.

Summary of the Invention

The present invention overcomes the problems and disadvantages associated with current strategies and designs, and provides new methods and compositions involving the heterologous expression, purification and use of lipoxygenases.

One embodiment of the invention is directed to the heterologous expression of lipoxygenases in microbes.

Another embodiment of the invention is directed to methods for the purification of lipoxygenases, preferably from heterologous expression systems according to the invention.

Another embodiment of the invention is directed to lipoxygenase polypeptide and nucleic acids sequences and molecular constructs of lipoxygenase coding sequences, preferably for the high level expression of lipoxygenase as compared to expression in wild-type host cells.

Preferably wild-type host cells are cells that do not contain a protease deficiency and/or cells that do not contain one or more chaperones.

Another embodiment of the invention is directed to methods for the manufacture of bread products comprising adding lipoxygenases of the invention to a dough containing unsaturated fatty acids and/or carotinoids. Preferably the lipoxygenase reacts with components of the flour forming lipid hydroperoxides increasing the stability of the dough and enhancing the volume of the baked goods.

Another embodiment of the invention is directed to purified lipoxygenase enzyme made by the methods of the invention. When the purified enzyme is added to dough, another embodimemt of the invention comprises products made with the purified enzyme added to dough such as, preferably, bread products. The manufacture of bread products of the invention preferably comprises adding lipoxygenases to a dough containing unsaturated fatty acids and/or carotinoids. Preferably the lipoxygenase reacts with components of the flour forming lipid hydroperoxides increasing the stability of the dough and enhancing the volume of the baked goods. Other embodiments and advantages of the invention are set forth in part in the description, which follows, and in part, may be obvious from this description, or may be learned from the practice of the invention.

Description of the Figures

Figure 1 Western analysis of SLPl indicates varying profiles of degradation. M = marker. Different K12 cells with different genotypes are presented in sets of "U" (uninduced) and "I" (induced).

Figure 2 Co-expression of the GroEL-GroES chaperone enhances SLPl production. Four chaperones A-D were co-expressed in E. coli with SLPl. Left Panel: SLPl is directed detected as a weak band in SDS-PAGE as a result of Co-expression with Chaperone B. Right Lane: Enhanced expression of SLPl with co-expressed GroEL-GroES is confirmed by standard Western analysis.

Figure 3 Single step purification of SLPl from the 424 vector (native protein sequence, no polyhistidine tag). All lanes: SLPl lacking a his tag was eluted from Zinc-NTA (IMAC) columns and run in SDS PAGE followed by protein staining: Lanes 1 - crude lysate; Lane 2 - column flow-through; Lane 3 - column wash; Lanes 4-7 - Zinc-NTA (IMAC) elution with SLPl loaded in the presence of 0, 2, 5 and lOmM imidazole, each eluted with 80mM imidazole.

Figure 4 E. coli cell lines used to verify experiments.

Figure 5 SLPl expression in E. coli; SDS PAGE protein gel of whole cell K12 E. coli lysate expressing SLPl.

Description of the Invention

Lipoxygenase enzymes (also referred to herein as LOX) are widely used in commercial processing of food products, the manufacture of perfumes and painting products, and in the processing of wood pulp. Although all lipoxygenase catalyze the same basic function, only plant lipoxygenases have been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for use in foods and food products. Despite their broad uses, lipoxygenase enzymes are only expressed at low levels and, consequently, commercial quantities are both expensive and difficult to produce.

Despite previous failures in achieving high level LOX expression, it has been surprisingly discovered that considerable enhancement of plant lipoxygenase expression can be achieved. At least part of this high-level of expression is attributed to the selection of sequences being expressed, expression of the sequences in a protease deficient host, and/or the co-expression with one or more chaperone plasmid sequences. Preferable, the increased expression achieved is at a higher level than expression in host cells that do not contain a protease deficiency and/or cells that do not contain one or more chaperone plasmids. Preferably the expression of the one or more proteases is eliminated, reduced to an undetectable level using conventional detection or reduced by at least 90%, all as compared to wild-type expression levels.

One embodiment of the invention comprises a system containing a bacterial cell host, preferably with a deficiency or one or more proteases, containing a coding sequence for lipoxygenase enzyme and preferably a chaperone system comprising one or more chaperone molecules. The system is preferably inducible and also preferably maintained from about 10°C to about 37°C for a period of time for maximal expression of enzyme product. The period of time is preferably from minutes to hours to days, and more preferably from about 1 to about 24 hours, more preferably from 2 to 12 hours and more preferably from about 2 to about 4 hours. The cells are preferably maintained at temperatures from about 15°C to about 25°C during this period.

The lipoxygenase enzyme may be derived from animal or bacterial cells, and is preferably derived from plant cells. Expression constructs may contain all or a portion of the lipoxygenase gene or coding region. Preferably constructs contain a portion of the coding region sufficient to create functional lipoxygenase activity. Preferably the constructs of the invention encode the sequences of SEQ ID NOs 1-3, or contain the nucleic acid sequences of SEQ ID NOs 4-6. Also preferably the sequence is a functional sequences that generates functional

lipoxygenase activity.

Preferably the host cell is a microorganism that rapidly and economically proliferates in vitro such as, for example, one or more of the bacterial cell strains of K12 cells, E. coli cells, Bacillus cells, Lactococci or yeast cells. Also preferably, the host cells contain one or more protease deficiencies as compared to wild-type cells. For E. coli host cells, the deficiency is preferably of one or more of the proteases Lon, OMPT, and/or Lon/ClpP.

Preferably the host cells further contain one or more chaperone plasmid expression vectors. Chaperones function in assisting protein folding, benefiting the co-expressed molecules.

Expression of lipoxygenase in the systems of the invention typically involves inducing expression of the lipoxygenase sequence and also preferably the chaperone sequences before, during or after expression of the lipoxygenase, and preferably simultaneously or nearly simultaneously to allow for maximal expression of the enzyme.

Lipoxygenase produced according to methods of the invention can be further isolated and purified. Preferably, purification of lipoxygenase produced according to the methods of the invention involves contact the with immobilized-metal affinity chromatography media. The enzyme remains bound and can be washed with wash buffer and subsequently eluted with elution buffer.

Preferably the increased lipoxygenase expression of the invention is 5 fold greater as compared to expression in wild-type cells (e.g., cells that are not protease deficient and/or cells without one or more expression chaperones), more preferably 10 fold greater, more preferably 50 fold greater, more preferably 100 fold greater, more preferably 200 fold greater, more preferably 300 fold greater, more preferably 400 fold greater, and more preferably 500 fold greater or more.

Lipoxygenase made according to the invention is preferably useful in the manufacture of food products such as bread products (for either, or both bleaching and improving texture), the manufacture of paints thinners, perfumes, aroma and flavor enhancers, as signaling compounds, and for pitch control in softwood pulp in paper industry.

The following examples illustrate embodiments of the invention, but should not be viewed as limiting the scope of the invention.

Examples

Example 1: LOXs employed for protein production.

SLPl (seed linoleate 13S-lipoxygenase-l [Glycine max] NCBI Reference Sequence: NP_001236153.1, length 839 amino acids) and SLP3 seed linoleate 9S-lipoxygenase-3 [Glycine max] NCBI Reference Sequence: NP_001235383.1) were employed as LOXs for production in microbes. In addition, a shortened version of SLPl (herein minilox) from amino acid Serine 278 containing an additional methionine before the Serine 278 were cloned and expressed in microbes.

Example 2: Synthesis of DNA encoding protein sequences for SLPl, SLP3 and Minilox optimized for expression.

Optimal gene codon usage in plants and bacteria differ. New DNA encoding sequences for SLPl, SLP3 and minilox were determined and synthetically generated according to instructions (Genscript USA Inc.). The sequence for minilox was identical as that of SLPl with the exception of having an ATG encoding for an initiator methionine prior to nucleotide bases encoding for SLP1 Serine 278. Optimized sequences with desired cloning sites were created. Example 3: Cloning of Soybean Lipoxygenase 1 (SLP1) and 3 (SLP3) and MiniLox.

Initially, SLP1 and SLP3 were cloned into the pET 47b vector (Novogen) using Smal- Xhol restriction sites, so that each contained the pET47b initiating methionine and a 6X histidine tag (SEQ ID NO 7). The SLP1 and minilox encoding DNA were then transferred to the DNA2.0 expression vector 424 purple, a low copy number plasmid without the histidine tags using Ndel- Xhol sites, so that expressed proteins would not contain the histidine tags. Similarly, the SLP1 encoding sequence was cloned into the 424-purple vector (herein 424 vector) with the exception of using Ndel-EcoRI cloning sites. The SLP1 encoding sequences were then transferred to the DNA2.0 purple-444 vector (herein 444 vector), a high copy number plasmid using restriction sites Ndel-Xhol. The vectors contained promoters for expression of the insert DNA with the pET47 containing a T7-promotor, and the DNA2.0 vectors contained a T5-promotor.

Example 4: Expression of SLP1, minilox and SLP3.

Vectors were transfected into cell lines. Initially, expression of SLP1 was performed with the 6 histidine (SEQ ID NO 7) tagged SLP1 vector in E. coli BL21 cells, an E. coli B cell line suitable for the expression of the pET47b vectors. Thereafter, all expression was performed in E. coli K12 strains. Expression was tested in LB media, with 50-10( g/ml ampicillin, and induction of expression for all vectors was with 0.5- ImM IPTG.

Example 5: Activity assay.

The activity assay utilized linoleic acid as a substrate and colorimetric detection of product. Detected values for the assay varied depending on the substrate preparation, age of substrate, and substrate batch, which may be subject to variation due to oxidation from the environment. As such, approximate expression levels of SLP1 in BL21 are presented as 1 unit/cell OD550 SLPl-LB culture and relative and approximate values for expression in other strains is relative to the BL21 expression. Cell OD550 is defined as a cell density at OD550. Example 6: Improvement of SLP1 production.

SLP1 expressed with or without a histidine tag using the pET47b vector and BL21 cells was very poor when induced at room temperature. The standard level of activity, 1 unit/OD cells was established for induction at 15°C with and overnight expression. Dramatically improved activity was observed using the purple-424 vector (herein 424 vector), in the K12 HMS 174 cell line (4 units/Cell OD550). Unlike BL21 cells, activity was also observed when induced at 20°C- 25°C with overnight expression. Slpl activity could be further enhanced by growing cells at 15°C for up to several days. In all E. coli strains tested, growth at 37C of was found to generate little or no SLP1 activity, and protein degradation products were observed upon western analysis (Figure 2).

An additional increase in activity was discovered using protease deficient E. coli K12 strains with the 424 vector. Lon, OMPT, or Lon/ClpP mutants all showed a further minimum two-fold increase in activity with (-10 units/cell OD550). The specific E. coli cell lines with specific protease deficiencies also showed some similar characteristics of protein degradation (Figure 3) yet some cell lines had less degradation than others, signifying that proteases play a role in the limited production of lipoxygenases.

An additional enhancement of activity was observed when using the 444 high plasmid copy vector in the K12 Paml55 (lon protease deficient) E. coli cell line and with chaperones. Chaperone plasmid sets consisting of five different plasmids from Takara Bio Inc. each designed to express a single or multiple molecular chaperone sets can enable optimal protein expression and folding and reduce protein misfolding. Each Takara plasmid carries an origin of replication (ORF) derived from pACYC and a chloramphenicol-resistance gene (Cm r ) gene, which allows the use of E. coli expression systems containing ColEl-type plasmids that confer ampicillin resistance. The chaperone genes are situated downstream of the araB or Pzt-1 (tet) promoters and, as a result, expression of target proteins and chaperones can be individually induced if the target gene is placed under the control of different promoters (e.g., lac). These plasmids also contain the necessary regulator (araC or tef) for each promoter. Takara Bio Inc. plasmids containing chaperones or sets thereof either tetracycline or arabinose inducible were coexpressed with SLPl. These include: groES-groEL, dnaK-dnaJ-grpE, groES-groEL-tig, or tig in plasmids (TakaraBo Inc.). Expression of SLPl in the presence of groES-groEL alone or with tig (groES- groEL-tig) enhanced the amount of active enzyme produced roughly to 40-60 units/cell OD. Activity was optimal at 15°C but also observed at or below 25°C. At 37°C, expression was more limited.

Expression of SLPl in the Paml53 cell with concomitant GroESL chaperone expression, in LB, produces 68 micrograms of SLPl per milliliter at a bacterial OD550 of 3, when grown in test tubes at 37°C and induced at 20°C overnight. However, SLPl expression in an E. coli strain that is not a protease deficient strain and without chaperone expression can either not be detected at all with standard SDS PAGE analysis, or western analysis, or expresses less than ^g per milliliter LB under similar conditions at an OD550 of 3 (see Figure 4). In general, expression of SLPl in E. coli strains grown and induced under optimal conditions was undetectable or less than 1 microgram per milliliter when appropriate chaperones were absent and strains were not protease deficient. However when expressing SLPl in E. coli K12 protease deficient strains with co-expression of an appropriate chaperone, 68 micrograms of SLPl per milliliter at a bacterial OD550 of 3 was attained.

Example 7: Purification of SPL1.

Purification of SLPl with the 6Xhis tag (SEQ ID NO 7) was highly effective using standard Ni-NTA IMAC purification. In the 424 or 444 vectors lacking the 6Xhis tag(SEQ ID NO 7), where SLPl was encoded by the native SLPl sequence alone, IMAC was equally efficient though under modified conditions. Nickel and zinc were each tested with similar results and calcium or other divalent metals should do as well. Buffers for IMAC were either 50mM phosphate or Tris-HCl at pH 7-9, with 400mM NaCl and 10% glycerol. Cells were disrupted using B-PER (Peirce) or by a homogenizer, in the presence of PMSF as a protease inhibitor. Employing Zinc-NTA, it was discovered that loading the sample in buffer with lOmM imidazole and elution in buffer with 80mM imidazole was effective in purification of SLPl. Other column media that effectively binds SLPl include MonoQ and DEAE, but not negatively charged resins. Example 8: Novel information provides Improved SLPl expression.

Preliminary studies indicate that relatively poor production of SLPl is the result of rapid proteolysis accompanied by improper folding of the enzyme. The limited soluble SLPl and lack of insoluble protein suggests that most of the protein produced was rapidly degraded. Degradation products of SLPl are visible in different E. coli strains with different protease deficient genetic backgrounds (see Figure 1). An increase in both active enzyme and total protein was observed when inducing at suboptimal growth temperatures, where proteases are less functional. A relative increase in production and activity of SLPl when protein folding is enhanced by an over-expressed chaperone.

Example 9: High Level Expression of Lipoxygenase In the E. Coli, K12,

Unless otherwise stated, all bacterial media employed in this example was Luria Broth

(herein LB, consisting of 10 grams Tryptone, 5 grams Yeast Extract, and 10 grams NaCl, dissolved in 1 liter water, and sterilized for a minimum of 20 minutes in an autoclave). Soybean Lipoxygenase 1 (herein SLP1) was expressed from a plasmid transfected into E. Coli K12 cells. Figure 5 represents an SDS-PAGE protein gel of whole cell soluble proteins extracted from the K12 cells employing the commercial B-PER Protein Extraction Reagent (Pierce, Cat#78243), following company protocols. The highest level of soluble SLP1 protein relative to total soluble protein in the cell extract was 30% or greater and approximated at 34% as estimated by the ImageJ (National Institute of Health public software) analysis software. These levels are consistent with high level production of the enzyme. M = marker, 1 Uninduced, 2 SLP1 induced with 0.5mM IPTG 3&4 Induced with 0.5mM IPTG and expressing a molecular chaperone.

Cited References

1. Permiakova, M.D. and V.A. Trufanov, Effect of soybean lipoxygenae on baking properties of wheat flour, Prikl Biokhim Mikrobiol, 2011. 47(3): p. 348-54.

2. Permiakova, M.D., et al., [Role of lipoxygenase in the determination of wheat grain quality]. Prikl Biokhim Mikrobiol, 2010. 46(1): p. 96-102.

3. Kanamoto, H., M. Takemura, and K. Ohyama, Cloning and expression of three lipoxygenase genes from liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha L., in Escherichia coli. Phytochemistry, 2012. 77: p. 70-8.

4. Osipova, E.V., et al., Recombinant maize 9-lipoxygenase: expression, purification, and properties. Biochemistry Biokhimii a, 2010. 75(7): p. 861-5.

5. Hwang, I.S. and B.K. Hwang, The pepper 9-lipoxygenase gene CaLOXl functions in defense and cell death responses to microbial pathogens. Plant Physiol, 2010. 152(2): p. 948-67.

6. Padilla, M.N., et al., Functional characterization of two 13-lipoxygenase genes from olive fruit in relation to the biosynthesis of volatile compounds of virgin olive oil. J Agric Food Chem,

2009. 57(19): p. 9097-107.

7. Knust, B. and D. von Wettstein, Expression and secretion of pea- seed lipoxygenase isoenzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol, 1992. 37(3): p. 342-51.

8. Steczko, J., et al., Effect of ethanol and low-temperature culture on expression of soybean lipoxygenase L-l in Escherichia coli. Protein Expr Purif, 1991. 2(2-3): p. 221-7.

Sequence Information

SLP1 polypeptide sequence (SEQ ID NO 1)

MFS AGHKIKGTV VLMPKNELE VNPDGS AVDNLN AFLGRS VS LQLIS ATKAD AHGKGKV GKDTFLEGINTS LPTLG AGES AFNIHFEWDGS MGIPG AFYIKN YMQ VEFFLKS LTLEAIS N QGTIRF VCNS W V YNTKLYKS VRIFFANHT Y VPS ETPAPLVS YREEELKS LRGNGTGERKE YDRIYDYDVYNDLGNPDKSEKLARPVLGGSSTFPYPRRGRTGRGPTVTDPNTEKQGEVF Y VPRDENLGHLKS KD ALEIGTKS LS QIVQPAFES AFDLKS TPIEFHS FQD VHDLYEGGIKL PRD VIS TIIPLP VIKELYRTDGQHILKFPQPH V VQ VS QS AWMTDEEFAREMIAG VNPC VIR GLEEFPPKSNLDPAIYGDQSSKITADSLDLDGYTMDEALGSRRLFMLDYHDIFMPYVRQI NQLNS AKT YATRTILFLREDGTLKP VAIELS LPHS AGDLS A AVS Q V VLPAKEG VES TIWLL AKAY VIVNDS C YHQLMS HWLNTH A AMEPF VIATHRHLS VLHPIYKLLTPH YRNNMNIN ALARQS LIN ANGIIETTFLPS KYS VEMS S AV YKNWVFTDQ ALPADLIKRG VAIKDPS TPHG VRLLIEDYPYAADGLEIWAAIKTWVQEYVPLYYARDDDVKNDSELQHWWKEAVEKGH GDLKDKPWWPKLQTLEDLVEVCLIIIWIASALHAAVNFGQYPYGGLIMNRPTASRRLLPE KGTPE YEEMINNHEKAYLRTITS KLPTLIS LS VIEILS TH AS DE V YLGQRDNPHWTS DS KA LQ AFQKFGNKLKEIEEKLVRRNNDPS LQGNRLGP VQLP YTLLYPS S EEGLTFRGIPNS IS I

SLP3 polypeptide sequence (SEQ ID NO 2)

MLGGLLHRGHKIKGT V VLMRKN VLD VNS VTS VGGIIGQGLDLVGS TLDTLTAFLGRS VS LQLIS ATKAD ANGKGKLGKATFLEGIITS LPTLG AGQS AFKINFEWDDGS GIPG AFYIKNF MQTEFFLVSLTLEDIPNHGSIHFVCNSWIYNAKLFKSDRIFFANQTYLPSETPAPLVKYR EE ELHNLRGDGTGERKEWERIYDYDVYNDLGDPDKGENHARPVLGGNDTFPYPRRGRTG RKPTRKDPNS ES RS ND V YLPRDE AFGHLKS S DFLT YGLKS VS QN VLPLLQS AFDLNFTPR EFDS FDE VHGLYS GGIKLPTDIIS KIS PLP VLKEIFRTDGEQ ALKFPPPKVIQVS KS AWMTD EEFAREMLAGVNPNLIRCLKDFPPRS KLDS QVYGDHTS QITKEHLEPNLEGLTVDEAIQN KRLFLLDHHDPIMPYLRRINATSTKAYATRTILFLKNDGTLRPLAIELSLPHPQGDQSGA FS QVFLPADEGVESSIWLLAKAYVVVNDSCYHQLVSHWLNTHAVVEPFIIATNRHLSVVHPI YKLLHPH YRDTMNINGLARLS LVNDGG VIEQTFLWGRYS VEMS AV V YKD W VFTDQ ALP ADLIKRGMAIEDPSCPHGIRLVIEDYPYTVDGLEIWDAIKTWVHEYVFLYYKSDDTLRED PELQACWKELVEVGHGDKKNEPWWPKMQTREELVEACAIIIWTASALHAAVNFGQYPY GGLILNRPTLS RRFMPEKGS AE YEELRKNPQKAYLKTITPKFQTLIDLS VIEILS RH AS DE V YLGERDNPNWTS DTRALE AFKRFGNKLAQIENKLS ERNNDEKLRNRCGP VQMP YTLLL PSSKEGLTFRGIPNSISI

Miniloxl polypeptide sequence (SEQ ID NO 3)

MS TPIEFHS FQD VHDLYEGGIKLPRD VIS TIIPLP VIKELYRTDGQHILKFPQPH VVQVS QS A WMTDEEFAREMIAG VNPCVIRGLEEFPPKSNLDPAIYGDQS S KITADS LDLDGYTMDEAL GS RRLFMLD YHDIFMP Y VRQINQLNS AKTYATRTILFLREDGTLKP VAIELS LPHS AGDLS A AVS QV VLPAKEG VES Tr LLAKAY VIVNDS C YHQLMS HWLNTH A AMEPF VIATHRHL S VLHPIYKLLTPH YRNNMNIN ALARQS LIN ANGIIETTFLPS KYS VEMS S AV YKNWVFTD QALPADLIKRGVAIKDPSTPHGVRLLIEDYPYAADGLEIWAAIKTWVQEYVPLYYARDDD VKNDSELQHWWKEAVEKGHGDLKDKPWWPKLQTLEDLVEVCLIIIWIASALHAAVNFG Q YP YGGLIMNRPTAS RRLLPEKGTPE YEEMINNHEKAYLRTITS KLPTLIS LS VIEILS TH AS DEVYLGQRDNPHWTSDSKALQAFQKFGNKLKEIEEKLVRRNNDPSLQGNRLGPVQLPY TLLYPS S EEGLTFRGIPNS IS I

SLP1 DNA optimized encoding sequence (with restriction sites 5' Smal and 3' Xhol with stop codon for cloning into pET47b with 6X histidine tag (SEQ ID NO 7)) (SEQ ID NO 4)

CCCGGGATGTTTAGTGCTGGTCACAAAATCAAAGGTACCGTGGTCCTGATGCCGAAA AATGAACTGGAAGTCAACCCGGATGGTAGCGCCGTTGATAACCTGAATGCGTTCCTG GGTCGTAGCGTGTCTCTGCAGCTGATTTCCGCCACCAAAGCAGACGCTCACGGCAAG GGTAAAGTTGGCAAAGATACGTTTCTGGAAGGTATTAATACCTCCCTGCCGACCCTGG GTGCCGGTGAATCAGCTTTCAACATCCATTTCGAATGGGATGGTTCAATGGGCATTCC GGGCGCCTTCTACATCAAAAACTACATGCAGGTGGAATTTTTCCTGAAAAGTCTGACC CTGGAAGCAATCTCCAATCAGGGTACGATTCGTTTTGTCTGCAACTCGTGGGTGTATA ATACCAAACTGTACAAAAGCGTTCGCATCTTTTTCGCGAACCACACCTATGTTCCGAG CGAAACCCCGGCACCGCTGGTTTCTTACCGTGAAGAAGAACTGAAAAGTCTGCGCG GCAATGGTACCGGCGAACGTAAAGAATATGATCGCATTTATGACTACGATGTTTACAA CGACCTGGGCAATCCGGATAAA AGCGAAA AACTGGCCCGTCCGGTCCTGGGCGGTA GCTCTACCTTCCCGTATCCGCGTCGCGGTCGTACCGGTCGTGGTCCGACCGTGACCGA TCCGAACACCGAAAAACAGGGCGAAGTCTTTTATGTGCCGCGCGACGAAAATCTGGG CCATCTGAAATCTAAAGATGCCCTGGAAATCGGTACCAAAAGTCTGTCCCAGATTGTG CAACCGGCGTTTGAAAGCGCCTTCGATCTGAAATCTACGCCGATTGAATTTCACTCCT TCCAGGACGTTCATG ATCTGTATGAAGGCGGTATC AAACTGCCGCGTGACGTCATTTC AACCATTATCCCGCTGCCGGTGATCAAAGAACTGTACCGCACGGATGGTCAGCACATT CTGAAATTTCCGCAACCGCATGTGGTTCAGGTTTCACAATCGGCGTGGATGACCGATG AAGAATTCGCGCGTGAAATGATCGCCGGCGTTAACCCGTGCGTCATTCGCGGTCTGG AAGAATTTCCGCCGAAAAGCAATCTGGACCCGGCAATCTATGGCGATCAGAGTTCCA AAATTACCGCTGACTCTCTGGACCTGGATGGCTACACGATGGATGAAGCCCTGGGTAG TCGTCGCCTGTTTATGCTGGACTATCACGATATCTTCATGCCGTACGTGCGTCAGATTA ACCAACTGAATTCTGCAAAAACCTATGCTACCCGTACGATCCTGTTTCTGCGCGAAGA CGGCACGCTGAAACCGGTTGCAATTGAACTGAGCCTGCCGCATTCTGCTGGTGATCT GAGTGCCGCGGTGTCCCAGGTTGTGCTGCCGGCAAAAGAAGGCGTTGAAAGTACCA TCTGGCTGCTGGCGAAAGCCTATGTTATTGTCAACGATTCATGTTACCATCAACTGATG TCGCACTGGCTGAATACCCATGCAGCTATGGAACCGTTTGTTATCGCAACGCATCGCC ACCTGTCTGTCCTGCACCCGATTTATAAACTGCTGACCCCGCATTACCGTAACAATATG AACATCAATGCACTGGCTCGCCAGAGTCTGATTAACGCGAATGGTATTATCGAAACCA CGTTCCTGCCGTCAAAATATTCGGTGGAAATGTCATCGGCCGTTTACAAAAACTGGGT CTTTACCGACCAGGCACTGCCGGCTGATCTGATCAAACGTGGCGTCGCGATTAAAGAT CCGAGCACCCCGCATGGTGTGCGTCTGCTGATTGAAGACTATCCGTACGCGGCCGATG GCCTGGAAATCTGGGCAGCTATTAAAACCTGGGTGCAGGAATATGTTCCGCTGTATTA CGCACGCGATGACGATGTGAAAAATGACTCCGAACTGCAACACTGGTGGAAAGAAG CTGTTGAAAAAGGTCATGGCGACCTGAAAGATAAACCGTGGTGGCCGAAACTGCAG ACCCTGGAAGATCTGGTGGAAGTTTGTCTGATTATCATTTGGATTGCCAGCGCACTGC ATGCCGCGGTGAACTTTGGTCAATATCCGTACGGCGGTCTGATTATGAATCGTCCGAC CGCAAGCCGTCGCCTGCTGCCGGAAAAAGGCACGCCGGAATACGAAGAAATGATCA ACAACCATGAAAAAGCGTACCTGCGCACCATCACGAGCAAACTGCCGACCCTGATTA GCCTGTCTGTTATCGAAATTCTGTCAACGCACGCGTCGGATGAAGTCTATCTGGGTCA GCGTGACAACCCGCATTGGACCAGTGATTCCAAAGCGCTGCAGGCCTTCCAAAAATT CGGCAACAAACTGAAAGAAATCGAAGAAAAACTGGTCCGTCGCAACAATGATCCGA GCCTGCAGGGTAACCGTCTGGGTCCGGTGCAACTGCCGTATACCCTGCTGTATCCGTC CAGTGAAGAAGGTCTGACGTTTCGTGGTATTCCGAACTCCATTTCCATCTGACTCGAG

SLP3 DNA optimized encoding sequence (with restriction sites 5' Ndel and 3' EcoRI and 3' stop codon for cloning into the pJex purple 424 vector from DNA2.0 Inc. (SEQ ID NO 5) CATATGCTGGGCGGCCTGCTGCACCGTGGTCATAAAATCAAGGGCACCGTGGTCCTG ATGCGTAAGAACGTCCTGGATGTGAATAGCGTGACCTCGGTCGGCGGTATTATCGGCC AGGGTCTGGACCTGGTGGGTAGCACGCTGGATACCCTGACGGCCTTTCTGGGCCGCT CAGTGTCGCTGCAACTGATCAGCGCAACCAAAGCAGATGCTAACGGCAAAGGCAAG CTGGGCAAGGCGACGTTCCTGGAAGGCATTATCACCTCCCTGCCGACGCTGGGTGCA GGCCAGTCAGCCTTTAAAATTAATTTCGAATGGGATGACGGCTCTGGTATTCCGGGCG CCTTCTACATCAAGAACTTCATGCAGACCGAATTTTTCCTGGTCAGCCTGACGCTGGA AGATATCCCGAATCATGGCTCGATTCACTTTGTGTGCAACAGCTGGATCTACAATGCG AAACTGTTCAAGTCCGATCGCATTTTCTTTGCCAATCAGACCTATCTGCCGTCAGAAA CGCCGGC ACCGCTGGTTAAATACCGTGAAGAAGAACTGCAC AACCTGCGTGGTGAC GGTACCGGTGAACGTAAAGAATGGGAACGCATCTACGATTACGACGTTTACAACGAT CTGGGTGATCCGGACAAAGGCGAAAACCATGCGCGTCCGGTCCTGGGCGGTAATGAC ACCTTTCCGTACCCGCGTCGCGGTCGTACCGGTCGTAAACCGACGCGTAAGGATCCG AACAGCGAATCTCGCAGTAATGATGTGTATCTGCCGCGTGACGAAGCCTTTGGTCACC TGAAAAGCTCTGATTTCCTGACGTACGGCCTGAAGTCCGTTTCAC AGAACGTCCTGC CGCTGCTGCAAAGCGCATTTGATCTGAATTTCACCCCGCGCGAATTTGATTCGTTCGA CGAAGTTCATGGTCTGTATAGCGGCGGTATTAAGCTGCCGACCGACATTATCTCTAAAA TCAGTCCGCTGCCGGTGCTGAAGGAAATTTTTCGCACGGATGGCGAACAGGCTCTGA AGTTCCCGCCGCCGAAAGTCATCCAAGTGTCGAAAAGCGCGTGGATGACCGATGAA GAATTTGCACGTGAAATGCTGGCTGGTGTTAACCCGAATCTGATTCGCTGTCTGAAGG ATTTCCCGCCGCGTTCCAAACTGGATTCACAGGTGTATGGTGACCACACCAGTCAAAT CACGAAAGAACATCTGGAACCGAACCTGGAAGGCCTGACCGTTGATGAAGCTATTCA GAATAAACGTCTGTTTCTGCTGGATCATCACGACCCGATCATGCCGTATCTGCGTCGCA TTAATGCGACCTCGACGAAAGCGTACGCCACCCGCACGATCCTGTTCCTGAAGAACG ATGGTACCCTGCGTCCGCTGGCCATTGAACTGAGCCTGCCGCATCCGCAGGGTGACC AATCGGGTGCGTTTAGCCAGGTTTTCCTGCCGGCCGATGAAGGCGTCGAAAGTTCCA TCTGGCTGCTGGCAAAAGCTTATGTGGTTGTCAACGATTCTTGCTACCATCAGCTGGT GTCTCACTGGCTGAATACCCATGCAGTGGTTGAACCGTTTATTATCGCTACGAACCGC CACCTGTCTGTCGTGCATCCGATCTATAAACTGCTGCATCCGCACTACCGCGACACCA TGAACATTAATGGTCTGGCGCGTCTGAGTCTGGTCAACGATGGCGGTGTGATTGAAC AGACGTTTCTGTGGGGCCGTTATTCTGTTGAAATGAGTGCCGTTGTCTACAAAGATTG GGTCTTCACCGACCAAGCACTGCCGGCAGACCTGATCAAGCGTGGTATGGCAATTGA AGATCCGTCCTGTCCGCACGGCATCCGTCTGGTGATTGAAGATTATCCGTACACCGTT GACGGTCTGGAAATCTGGGATGCAATTAAAACGTGGGTGCATGAATACGTTTTTCTGT ACTACAAGTCTGATGACACCCTGCGCGAAGACCCGGAACTGCAGGCGTGCTGGAAA GAACTGGTGGAAGTTGGTCACGGCGATAAAAAGAACGAACCGTGGTGGCCGAAAAT GCAAACCCGTGAAGAACTGGTTGAAGCGTGTGCCATTATCATTTGGACGGCAAGCGC TCTGCATGCGGCCGTGAACTTTGGCCAGTATCCGTACGGCGGTCTGATTCTGAATCGC CCGACCCTGTCTCGTCGCTTCATGCCGGAAAAAGGCAGTGCTGAATATGAAGAACTG CGTAAAAATCCGCAGAAGGCGTACCTGAAAACCATCACGCCGAAATTTCAAACCCTG ATTGACCTGAGCGTGATCGAAATTCTGTCCCGCCATGCGTCAGATGAAGTTTATCTGG GTGAACGTGACAACCCGAATTGGACCTCCGATACGCGTGCACTGGAAGCTTTTAAGC GCTTCGGCAACAAACTGGCCCAGATCGAAAACAAGCTGTCAGAACGTAACAACGAT GAAAAGCTGCGTAATCGCTGCGGCCCGGTGCAAATGCCGTATACCCTGCTGCTGCCGT CCTCAAAAGAAGGTCTGACGTTCCGTGGTATCCCGAATAGCATTAGCATCTAAGAATT C Minilox optimized encoding sequence (with 5' Ndel and 3' Xhol restriction sites and 3' stop codon for cloning into pJexpress purple 424 vector from DNA2.0 Inc.) (SEQ ID NO 6)

CATATGTCTACGCCGATTGAATTTCACTCCTTCCAGGACGTTCATGATCTGTATGAAGG CGGTATCAAACTGCCGCGTGACGTCATTTCAACCATTATCCCGCTGCCGGTGATCAAA GAACTGTACCGCACGGATGGTCAGCACATTCTGAAATTTCCGCAACCGCATGTGGTTC AGGTTTCACAATCGGCGTGGATGACCGATGAAGAATTCGCGCGTGAAATGATCGCCG GCGTTAACCCGTGCGTCATTCGCGGTCTGGAAGAATTTCCGCCGAAAAGCAATCTGG ACCCGGCAATCTATGGCGATCAGAGTTCCAAAATTACCGCTGACTCTCTGGACCTGGA TGGCTACACGATGGATGAAGCCCTGGGTAGTCGTCGCCTGTTTATGCTGGACTATCAC GATATCTTC ATGCCGTACGTGCGTC AGATTA ACC AACTGAATTCTGCAAAAACCTATG CTACCCGTACGATCCTGTTTCTGCGCGAAGACGGCACGCTGAAACCGGTTGCAATTG AACTGAGCCTGCCGCATTCTGCTGGTGATCTGAGTGCCGCGGTGTCCCAGGTTGTGCT GCCGGCAAAAGAAGGCGTTGAAAGTACCATCTGGCTGCTGGCGAAAGCCTATGTTAT TGTCAACGATTCATGTTACCATCAACTGATGTCGCACTGGCTGAATACCCATGCAGCTA TGGAACCGTTTGTTATCGCAACGCATCGCCACCTGTCTGTCCTGC ACCCGATTTATAA ACTGCTGACCCCGCATTACCGTAACAATATGAACATCAATGCACTGGCTCGCCAGAGT CTGATTAACGCGAATGGTATTATCGAAACCACGTTCCTGCCGTCAAAATATTCGGTGG AAATGTCATCGGCCGTTTACAAAAACTGGGTCTTTACCGACCAGGCACTGCCGGCTG ATCTGATCAAACGTGGCGTCGCGATTAAAGATCCGAGCACCCCGCATGGTGTGCGTCT GCTGATTGAAGACTATCCGTACGCGGCCGATGGCCTGGAAATCTGGGCAGCTATTAAA ACCTGGGTGCAGGAATATGTTCCGCTGTATTACGCACGCGATGACGATGTGAAAAATG ACTCCGAACTGCAACACTGGTGGAAAGAAGCTGTTGAAAAAGGTCATGGCGACCTG AAAGATAAACCGTGGTGGCCGAAACTGCAGACCCTGGAAGATCTGGTGGAAGTTTGT CTGATTATCATTTGGATTGCCAGCGCACTGCATGCCGCGGTGAACTTTGGTCAATATCC GTACGGCGGTCTGATTATGAATCGTCCGACCGCAAGCCGTCGCCTGCTGCCGGAAAA AGGCACGCCGGAATACGAAGAAATGATCAACAACCATGAAAAAGCGTACCTGCGCA CCATCACGAGCAAACTGCCGACCCTGATTAGCCTGTCTGTTATCGAAATTCTGTCAAC GCACGCGTCGGATGAAGTCTATCTGGGTCAGCGTGACAACCCGCATTGGACCAGTGA TTCCAAAGCGCTGCAGGCCTTCCAAAAATTCGGCAACAAACTGAAAGAAATCGAAG AAAAACTGGTCCGTCGCAACAATGATCCGAGCCTGCAGGGTAACCGTCTGGGTCCGG TGCAACTGCCGTATACCCTGCTGTATCCGTCCAGTGAAGAAGGTCTGACGTTTCGTGG TATTCCGAACTCCATTTCCATCTGACTCGAG

Other embodiments and uses of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art from consideration of the specification and practice of the invention disclosed herein. All references cited herein, including all publications, U.S. and foreign patents and patent applications, are specifically and entirely incorporated by reference. The term comprising, where ever used, is intended to include the terms consisting and consisting essentially of. Furthermore, the terms comprising, including, and containing are not intended to be limiting. It is intended that the specification and examples be considered exemplary only with the true scope and spirit of the invention indicated by the following claims.