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Title:
FASTENING TAPE WITH CORD
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/078421
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A fastening tape (10) including a plurality of fasteners (34) positioned between two support walls. A gap (30A, 30B, 32A, 32B) is included within or adjacent each of the two support sidewalls (28A), and a knitted cord (50) having a base (54) and multi- stranded yarn (52) extending from the base (54) is positioned within each gap (30A, 30B, 32A, 32B). The cord (50) as arranged within the gap (30A, 30B, 32A, 32B) is configured to help prevent or reduce foam intrusion into the fastening tape (10). In some cases, the cord (50) is dimensioned relative to the gap (30A, 30B, 32A, 32B) to enhance the foam-blocking characteristics of the cord (50) arranged within the gap (30A, 30B, 32A, 32B).

Inventors:
MIYAZAKI, Yuichi (41481 Eleven Mile RoadNovi, MI, 48375, US)
SUGITA, Hisatomo (41481 Eleven Mile RoadNovi, MI, 48375, US)
YOSHINO, Tetsuya (41481 Eleven Mile RoadNovi, MI, 48375, US)
Application Number:
IB2016/056492
Publication Date:
May 03, 2018
Filing Date:
October 27, 2016
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
YKK CORPORATION (1 Kanda Izumi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 〒101-8642, JP)
International Classes:
A44B18/00; B29C44/12; D04B21/20
Domestic Patent References:
WO2010016122A12010-02-11
WO2011147142A12011-12-01
Foreign References:
EP2342989A12011-07-13
Other References:
None
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

That which is claimed is:

1. A fastening tape comprising:

a first edge and a second edge opposite the first edge, the fastening tape defining a lateral direction from the first edge to the second edge and a longitudinal direction transverse to the lateral direction;

a plurality of fasteners extending in an upward direction from a top surface of the fastening tape;

a first sidewall extending in the upward direction from the top surface of the body between the first edge and the second edge;

a first gap extending in the longitudinal direction within or adjacent the first sidewall, wherein the first gap is positioned between the first edge and the plurality of fasteners;

a second sidewall extending in the upward direction from the top surface of the body between the first sidewall and the second edge;

a second gap extending in the longitudinal direction within or adjacent the second sidewall, wherein the second gap is positioned between the second edge and the plurality of fasteners; and

a knitted cord comprising a base and at least one multi-stranded yarn extending from the base, wherein the knitted cord is positioned within one of the first and second gaps.

2. The fastening tape of claim 1, further comprising a second knitted cord comprising a base and at least one multi-stranded yarn extending from the base, wherein the second cord is positioned within another of the first and second gaps.

3. The fastening tape of claim 1, wherein a diameter of the base corresponds to a width of the one of the first and second gaps.

4. The fastening tape of claim 1, wherein a diameter of the base is slightly larger than a width of the one of the first and second gaps.

5. The fastening tape of claim 1, wherein a height of the at least one multi-stranded yarn of the knitted cord plus a diameter of the base of the knitted cord corresponds to a height of the first and second sidewalls when the knitted cord is positioned within the one of the first and second gaps.

6. The fastening tape of claim 1, wherein a height of the at least one multi-stranded yarn of the knitted cord plus a diameter of the base of the knitted cord is equal to or greater than a height of the first and second sidewalls when the knitted cord is positioned within the one of the first and second gaps.

7. The fastening tape of claim 1, wherein the knitted cord is positioned within the one of the first and second gaps so the base is proximate the top surface of the fastening tape and the at least one multi-stranded yarn extends in the upward direction beyond a top of the first and second sidewalls by a predetermined distance.

8. The fastening tape of claim 7, wherein the predetermined distance corresponds to a diameter of the base.

9. The fastening tape of claim 1, wherein the at least one multi-stranded yarn comprises at least two multi-stranded yarns.

10. The fastening tape of claim 1, wherein the knitted cord positioned within the one of the first and second gaps is configured to block the intrusion of foam beyond the first and second sidewalls of the fastening tape.

11. The fastening tape of claim 1, wherein the base of the knitted cord comprises chain knitting yarn.

12. The fastening tape of claim 1, wherein the at least one multi-stranded yarn extends from the base similar to bristles extending from a brush.

13. The fastening tape of claim 1, wherein the at least one multi-stranded yarn is cut so that ends of filaments of the at least one multi-stranded yarn are exposed.

14. The fastening tape of claim 1, wherein:

the first gap is positioned between the plurality of fasteners and the first sidewall; and

the second gap is positioned between the plurality of fasteners and the second sidewall.

15. A method comprising:

providing a fastening tape, the fastening tape comprising a plurality of fasteners positioned between a first sidewall and a second sidewall of the fastening tape; and

positioning a knitted cord into a gap of the fastening tape, wherein the knitted cord comprises at least one multi-stranded yarn extending similar to bristles from a base of the knitted cord.

16. The method of claim 15, wherein the knitted cord is press fit into the gap.

17. The method of claim 15, further comprising securing the knitted cord within the gap by at least one of continuous injection molding, ultrasonic welding, heat adhesion, or adhering the knitted cord with a surface of the gap using an adhesive.

18. The method of claim 15, wherein positioning the knitted cord into the gap comprises arranging the knitted cord so the at least one multi-stranded yarn extends in an upward direction beyond a top of the first and second sidewalls by a predetermined distance.

19. The method of claim 18, wherein the predetermined distance corresponds to a diameter of the base.

20. A method of manufacturing a knitted cord for use with a fastening tape, the method comprising: knitting a knit structure comprising at least two chain knitting yarns, at least one first multi-stranded weft yarn and at least one second multi-stranded weft yarn, wherein the at least one first multi-stranded weft yarn and the at least one second multi-stranded weft yarn are knitted with each of the at least two chain knitting yarns; and

separating the at least two chain knitting yarns to form at least two knitted cords, wherein each of the at least two knitted cords comprises a base corresponding to one of the at least two chain knitting yarns and strands of yarn corresponding to cut portions of each of the at least one first multi-stranded weft yarn and at least one second multi-stranded weft yarn.

21. The method of claim 20, wherein separating the at least two chain knitting yarns comprises cutting the knit structure between the at least two chain knitting yarns.

22. The method of claim 21, wherein at least one of the at least one first multi-stranded weft yarn and the at least one second multi-stranded weft yarn is made of yarns of different compositions, wherein the yarns of different compositions are twisted or doubled together to form the at least one of the at least one first multi-stranded weft yarn and the at least one second multi-stranded weft yarn.

Description:
FASTENING TAPE WITH CORD

BACKGROUND

Technical Field

[0001] The application relates to fastening tape and methods of forming fastening tape.

Background Technology

[0002] Fastening tape used in automotive and other applications may be installed on a seat cushion or other component by first placing the fastening tape on a trench within a mold. After the fastening tape has been situated, urethane foam is introduced, which forms the seat cushion or other component around the fastening tape. If foam intrudes into the fastening tape, the fasteners, such as hooks, of the fastening tape are more prone to failure.

SUMMARY

[0003] The term embodiment and like terms are intended to refer broadly to all of the subject matter of this disclosure. Statements containing these terms should be understood not to limit the subject matter described herein. This summary is a high-level overview of various aspects of the disclosure and introduces some of the concepts that are further described in the Detailed Description section below. This summary is not intended to identify key or essential features, nor is it intended to be used in isolation.

[0004] Disclosed is a fastening tape that includes a plurality of fasteners positioned between two support walls. Each of the two support walls includes a gap, and a knitted cord having a base and multi-stranded yarn extending from the base is positioned within each gap. The cord as arranged within the gap is configured to help prevent or reduce foam intrusion into the fastening tape. In some cases, the cord is dimensioned relative to the gap to enhance the foam-blocking characteristics of the cord arranged within the gap.

[0005] Various implementations described in the present disclosure can include additional systems, methods, features, and advantages, which are not necessarily expressly disclosed herein, but will be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art upon examination of the following detailed description and accompanying drawings. All such systems, methods, features, and advantages are included within the present disclosure and protected by the accompanying claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0006] Illustrative embodiments of the present disclosure are described in detail below with reference to the following drawing figures:

[0007] Figure 1 is a top perspective view of a segment of fastening tape according to an example.

[0008] Figure 2 is an end view of a segment of fastening tape according to an example.

[0009] Figure 3 is a top view of a segment of a fastening tape according to an example, shown assembled with an exemplary cord.

[0010] Figure 4 is a perspective top view of a segment of the fastening tape of Figure

3, shown assembled with the cord of Figure 3.

[0011] Figure 5 is a side view of a segment of the fastening tape of Figure 3, shown assembled with the cord of Figure 3.

[0012] Figure 6 is an end view of a segment of the fastening tape of Figure 2, shown assembled with a schematic of an exemplary cord.

[0013] Figure 7 is an exemplary knitting pattern for forming a knit structure including two cords according to an example.

[0014] Figure 8 illustrates an exemplary separation of the knit structure formed from the knitting pattern of Figure 7.

[0015] Figure 9 is a digital image of the two cords formed from the knitting pattern of Figure 7 after the separation of Figure 8.

[0016] Figure 10 illustrates an exemplary separation of a knit structure formed from another knitting pattern.

[0017] Figure 11 is a digital image of the cord formed after the separation of Figure

10.

[0018] Figure 12 is an exemplary knitting pattern for forming a knit structure including a plurality of cords according to another example.

[0019] Figure 13 is a digital image of a cord of the knit structure of Figure 12 after separation of the knit structure. [0020] Figure 14 is an exemplary knitting pattern for forming a knit structure including a plurality of cords according to another example.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0021] The subject matter of aspects and examples of the present invention is described here with specificity to meet statutory requirements, but this description is not necessarily intended to be limiting. The described subject matter may be embodied in other ways, may include different elements or steps, and may be used in conjunction with other existing or future technologies. This description should not be interpreted as implying any particular order or arrangement among or between various steps or elements except when the order of individual steps or arrangement of elements is explicitly described.

[0022] As used throughout, the singular forms "a," "an" and "the" include plural referents unless the context clearly dictates otherwise. Thus, for example, reference to "a fastener" can include two or more such fasteners unless the context indicates otherwise.

[0023] Ranges can be expressed as from "about" one particular value and/or to

"about" another particular value. When such a range is expressed, another aspect includes from the one particular value and/or to the other particular value. Similarly, when values are expressed as approximations, by use of the antecedent "about," the particular value forms another aspect. Moreover, the endpoints of each of the ranges are significant both in relation to the other endpoint, and independently of the other endpoint.

[0024] The word "or" as used herein means any one member of a particular list and also includes any combination of members of that list. Further, conditional language, such as, among others, "can," "could," "might," or "may," unless specifically stated otherwise, or otherwise understood within the context as used, is generally intended to convey that certain aspects include, while other aspects do not include, certain features, elements and/or steps. Thus, such conditional language is not generally intended to imply that features, elements and/or steps are in any way required for one or more particular aspects. Directional references such as "up," "down," "top," "bottom," "left," "right," "front," "back," and "corners," among others, are intended to refer to the orientation as illustrated and described in the figure (or figures) to which the components and directions are referencing. [0025] Disclosed are fastening tapes and associated methods, systems, devices, and various apparatuses. In one aspect, a fastening tape has a body, sidewalls, a plurality of fasteners such as hooks, at least one knitted cord positioned within a gap of the sidewalls. One of ordinary skill in the art will understand that the disclosed fastening tapes are described in but a few exemplary aspects among many.

[0026] Referring to Figures 1-6, a fastening tape 10 includes a body 12 having a first edge 14 and a second edge 16 distal from the first edge 14. The body 12 further includes a top surface 18 and a bottom surface 20 (Figure 2), each extending between the first edge 14 and the second edge 16. The body 12 defines a lateral direction 22 extending from the first edge 14 to the second edge 16, and a longitudinal direction 24 extending transversely to the lateral direction 22 (see Figure 3). In some cases, as shown in Figure 1, the fastening tape 10 has tabs 26 extending outwardly from the first edge 14 and the second edge 16, respectively.

[0027] As shown in Figures 1-2 and 6, the fastening tape 10 includes sidewalls 28A,B.

The sidewalls 28A,B extend in an upward direction from the top surface 18, and extend along the top surface 18 of the body 12 in the longitudinal direction 24. As illustrated in Figures 1-2 and 6, in one non-limiting example, the sidewall 28A is positioned proximate to the first edge 14 and the sidewall 28B is positioned proximate to the second edge 16. The sidewalls 28A,B are arranged to act as a barrier to reduce the amount of foam intrusion into the space between the sidewalls 28A,B during a molding process. In some aspects, each sidewall 28A,B is made up of any suitable number of sidewall components. Although six sidewall components are illustrated, any number of sidewall components can be present in each sidewall 28A,B, respectively, including one or more sidewall components. In the illustrated examples, each sidewall component is made up of a plurality of walls extending in the longitudinal direction 24, although in some cases each sidewall component is instead a continuous or semi-continuous wall extending in the longitudinal direction 24. The sidewall components are illustrated as overlapped along the longitudinal direction 24 so there are no gaps in the sidewalls 28A,B along the longitudinal direction 24. In other cases, the sidewall components are not overlapped and instead are aligned with one another along the longitudinal direction 24 such that gaps extending in the lateral direction 22 are present in each sidewall 28A,B. [0028] The fastening tape 10 also includes one or more gaps. Referring to Figures 2 and 6, the fastening tape 10 includes gaps 30A,B and gaps 32A,B positioned between sidewalls 28A,B. In the example of Figure 1, the fastening tape 10 includes gaps 30A,B, but not gaps 32A,B.

[0029] Fastening tape 10 also includes magnetic material 36 such as, but not limited to, iron or a ferrous alloy for self-alignment of the fastening tape 10 when placed on a trench within a mold. In one non-limiting example, the magnetic material 36 is iron monofilament, but any other suitable magnetic material can be present. As illustrated in Figure 1, the magnetic material 36 extends in the longitudinal direction 24 and is generally parallel to the sidewalls 28A,B. In the example shown in Figure 1, the magnetic material 36 is positioned on supports 35A,B, respectively. In the example of Figures 2 and 6, the magnetic material 36 is iron monofilament positioned within one or both gaps 32A,B between the components of sidewalls 28A,B. Each of the magnetic materials 36 can be continuous in the longitudinal direction 24, although they need not be. In some examples, the magnetic material 36 is positioned offset from, but proximate to, the top surface 18 of the body 12. In other examples, the fastening tape 10 is a co-extruded product that includes an extruded plastic or other portion containing iron powder (or other suitable material) as the magnetic material instead of an iron monofilament.

[0030] As illustrated, the fastening tape 10 also includes a plurality of fasteners 34 extending in the upward direction from the top surface 18 of the body 12. As shown in Figures 1-4 and 6, the fasteners 34 are positioned between the sidewalls 28A,B. Any suitable number of fasteners 34, including at least one fastener, may extend from the fastening tape 10. Fasteners 34 can have any suitable shape and configuration, including generally Y-shaped, J-shaped, etc. As illustrated in Figures 1 and 3, the fasteners 34 are arranged in rows that extend in the lateral direction 22 between the sidewalls 28A,B. In other examples, the fasteners 34 need not be arranged in rows. The fastening tape 10 also includes lateral walls for preventing intrusion of urethane foam in the form of a liquid in the longitudinal direction 24 between the sidewalls 28A,B. In the example of Figures 1 and 2, the fasteners 34 arranged in the lateral direction 22 may serve as the lateral walls. In other examples, aside from the fasteners 34, walls extending upward from the top surface 18 of the body 12 may constitute the lateral walls. In one non-limiting example, as shown in Figures 1 and 2, slits (gaps) may be formed in the lateral walls. The size of each gap may be set to the extent that the lateral walls help to substantially reduce the intrusion of the urethane form in the form of a liquid into the area of the fasteners 34. The fastening tape 10 is made of synthetic resin and is formed by extrusion molding. At least the body 12, the sidewalls 28A,B, the fastener 34 and the lateral walls of the fastening tape 10 are integrally formed by extrusion molding.

[0031] As illustrated in the Figures, the gaps 30A,30B and/or the gaps 32A, 32B are formed between components of the sidewalls 28A,B. In some cases, however, gap 30A or gap 32A is formed between the fasteners 34 and the sidewall 28A, while gap 30B or gap 32B is formed between the fasteners and the sidewall 28B.

[0032] As illustrated in Figures 3-6, one or more cords 50 are positioned within one or both gaps 30A,B between the sidewalls 28A,B. If the fastening tape 10 is a co-extruded product, the cords 50 may be located in gaps 32A,B and gaps 30A,B may not be present. In some cases, the cords 50 are knitted cords. As illustrated in Figure 6, each cord 50 has a base 54 and multi-stranded yarns 52 that extend from the base 54 similar to bristles on a brush. The cords 50 can be wedged into the gaps 30A,B for a pressure/friction fit or may be secured with the top surface 18 using one or more of an adhesive, continuous injection molding, ultrasonic welding, heat adhesion, or any other suitable joining technique. The cords 50 are configured to help prevent or reduce the intrusion of foam beyond the sidewalls 28A,B and into the fasteners 34 of the fastening tape 10. In some examples, some of the yarn strands 52 of the cords 50 extend beyond top surfaces of the sidewalls 28A, B, whereas the base 54 does not extend beyond the top surfaces of the sidewalls 28A, B. As each of the yarn strands 52 is a yarn having a pointed tip, no loop element exists in the yarn strands 52. Accordingly, the yarn strands 52 are not hooked into the fasteners 34 of another fastening tape 10. Thus, it is possible to efficiently pack up and ship out a number of fastening tapes 10. In some examples, the yarn strands 52 that extend beyond the top surfaces of the sidewalls 28A,B are preferably formed into an irregular shape, as shown in Figure 4. With this configuration, it is possible to help prevent or reduce the intrusion of foam beyond the sidewalls 28A,B. In some examples, the height of the yarn strands 52 that extends beyond the top surfaces of the sidewalls 28A, B is slightly greater than the height of the lateral walls and the height of the fasteners 34. In other words, the yarn strands 52 are formed to be the highest among all components of the fastening tapes 10. Preferably, the height of the sidewalls 28A,B is equal to or slightly less than the height of the lateral walls and the height of the fasteners 34. As the yarn strands 52 have flexibility, when the fastening tapes 10 are placed on a surface of the trench, the yarn strands 52 deform to substantially close the gaps between the lateral walls and the surface of the trench. That is, the yarn strands are configured to help prevent or reduce the intrusion of foam beyond the sidewalls 28A,B and the lateral walls and into the fasteners 34 of the fastening tape 10.

[0033] Figures 7, 12, and 14 provide non-limiting examples of knitting patterns 38 used to form knit structures 40 that become one or more cords 50. As one of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate, the black circles in the knitting patterns represent entry points of a knitting needle. As described in more detail below, the knit structures 40 formed according to the knitting patterns 38 provide one or more cords 50.

[0034] Figure 7 depicts an exemplary knitting pattern 38 that forms the knit structure 40 of Figure 9. Knitting pattern 38 includes two chain knitting yarns 42 and one first multi-stranded weft yarn 44 and one second multi-stranded weft yarn 46. As described below, chain knitting yarns 42 and/or each of the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46 can be a single yarn or more than one yarn twisted or doubled together. Although the knitting pattern 38 of Figure 7 illustrates two chain knitting yarns 42, the pattern can be modified to include any suitable number of chain knitting yarns 42 depending on the desired configuration of and/or number of cords. For example, Figures 12 and 15 illustrate five chain knitting yarns 42 and Figure 16 illustrates fourteen chain knitting yarns 42. Similarly, any suitable number of multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46 can be used depending on the desired configuration of the yarn strands 52 of the cords.

[0035] As illustrated in the exemplary knitting pattern 38 of Figure 7, each chain knitting yarn 42 follows a 1-0/0-1 knitting pattern. First multi-stranded weft yarn 44 follows a 4-0/0-4 knitting pattern while second multi-stranded weft yarn 46 follows a 0-4/4-0 knitting pattern.

[0036] Each of the chain knitting yarns 42 and the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46 can be formed of any suitable material, such as polyester, nylon or acrylic, and each yarn can have any suitable weight/thickness and any number of filaments. As mentioned above, in some cases, any or all of the chain knitting yarn 42 and the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46 include two or more yarns twisted or doubled together. The twisted/doubled yarns may be the same as one another or different. [0037] Some non-limiting examples for the one or more chain knitting yarns 42 include the following, where T indicates decitex and d indicates denier of each yarn making up the chain knitting yarn 42 and f indicates the number of filaments of each yarn making up the knitting yarn: [(330T/96f xl) x2]; [(167T/36f x2) x2]; and [(150d/144f x2) x2]. For illustration purposes, the convention [(330T/96f xl) x2] indicates that each yarn weighs 330 grams/10,000 meters, that each yarn has 96 filaments, and that one yarn is used to form the chain knitting yarn 42. The last "x2" in the convention indicates that the knitting pattern 38 has two such chain knitting yarns 42. In some cases, two or more yarns are twisted or doubled together to form the chain knitting yarn 42. In some cases, yarns having different characteristics are twisted or doubled together to form the chain knitting yarns 42.

[0038] Some non-limiting examples for each of the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46 include the following, where T indicates decitex and d indicates denier of yarn making up each of the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46 and f indicates the number of filaments of each yarn: [(150d/144f xl) xl]; and [(150d/144f x2) xl]. In some cases, two or more yarns are twisted or doubled together to form one or both of the weft yarns 44, 46. Although the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46 are the same in the described and illustrated example, this need not be the case.

[0039] In some cases, two or more yarns having different characteristics can be twisted or doubled together to form one or both of the first multi-stranded weft yarn 44 and the second multi-stranded weft yarn 46. As one non-limiting example, one or both of the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46 can include the following different yarns: [(150d/144f x2) xl] and [(167T/36f x 1) xl]. In the above examples, one of each of the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46 is included in knitting pattern 38.

[0040] Knitting pattern 38 can include any suitable combination of the above, as well as different yarns and arrangements.

[0041] As shown in Figures 8-9, the knit structure 40 formed from the knitting pattern 38 can be separated between the chain knitting yarns 42 to obtain two separate cords 50. For example, by cutting weft yarns, the knit structure 40 can be slit or otherwise separated between the two chain knitting yarns 42. In some cases, as shown in Figure 8, the cut is made approximately midway between the two chain knitting yarns 42. Figure 9 is a digital image of two exemplary cords 50 as they are formed by separating knit structure 40 as illustrated in Figure 8. [0042] Figure 10 shows a knit structure 40 with more than two chain knitting yarns

42 as it is separated according to another example. In this example, instead of cutting the knit structure approximately midway between the two chain knitting yarns 42, the cut is proximate one of the chain knitting yarns 42. Figure 11 illustrates one cord 50 in isolation after it has been separated as illustrated in Figure 10.

[0043] As illustrated in Figure 11, cords 50 are knitted cords that include a base 54

(corresponding to one of the chain knitting yarns 42) and multi-stranded yarns 52 (corresponding to cut portions of the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46) that extend from the base 54. In some cases, as shown in Figures 6, 10-11 and 14, the multi- stranded yarns 52 extend from the base 54 like bristles on a brush. The base 54 of the cord 50 can have any suitable diameter d and the yarn strands 52 can have any suitable height hi when the cord 50 is positioned within the gaps 30A,B. In some cases, when the cord 50 is positioned within the gaps 30A,B the base 54 has a diameter d that generally corresponds to a width w of the gaps 30A,B (see Figure 2). In one example, the diameter d of the base 54 is slightly larger than the width w of the gaps 30A,B, which causes the cord 50 to be compressed within the gap 30A,B and thus better secured within the gap 30A,B.

[0044] In some examples, when the cord 50 is positioned within the gaps 30A,B, the height hi of the yarn strands 52 of the cord 50 (Figure 11) may correspond to a height h 2 of the sidewalls 28A,B (Figure 2). In some cases, the height hi of the yarn strands 52 of the cord 50 (Figure 11) is approximately the same as the height h 2 of the sidewalls 28A,B (Figure 2) when the cord 50 is positioned within the gaps 30A,B. In some cases, the height hi of the yarn strands 52 + the diameter d of the cord 50 is equal to or greater than the height h 2 of the sidewalls 28A,B when the cord 50 is positioned within the gaps 30A,B. In some cases, the yarn strands 52 extend beyond the top of the sidewalls 28A,B by a predetermined amount, as shown in Figure 6. If the height hi of the yarn strands 52 is the same as the height h 2 of the sidewalls 28A,B when the cord 50 is positioned within the gaps 30A,B, then the yarn strands extend beyond the top of the sidewalls 28A,B by a distance d corresponding to the diameter of the base 54. In some examples, the diameter d of the cord 50 is less than the height h 2 of the sidewalls 28A,B. And the expression hi - d < h 2 is satisfied so that the yarn strands 52 can extend beyond the top surfaces of the sidewalls 28A,B. In some example, only the yarn strands 52 of the cord 50 extend beyond the top surfaces of the sidewalls 28A,B by a predetermined amount, as shown in Figure 6. That is, the base 54 of the cord 50 is completely accommodated in the sidewalls 28A,B and the loop elements of the cord 50 does not extend beyond the top surfaces of the sidewalls 28A,B.

[0045] Figure 12 illustrates another non-limiting example of a knitting pattern 38. In this example, the knit structure includes two selvage portions 56, five chain knitting yarns 42, four first multi-stranded weft yarns 44, and four second multi-stranded weft yarns 46. Each chain knitting yarn 42 follows a 1-0/0-1 knitting pattern. Each of the first multi- stranded weft yarns 44 follows a 3-0/0-3 knitting pattern while each of the second multi- stranded weft yarns 46 follows a 0-3/3-0 knitting pattern.

[0046] As with the knitting pattern of Figure 7, each of the chain knitting yarns 42 and the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46 can be formed of any suitable material, such as polyester, nylon or acrylic, and each yarn can have any suitable weight/thickness and any number of filaments. In some cases, any or all of the chain knitting yarns 42 and the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46 include two or more yarns (which can be the same or different) twisted or doubled together.

[0047] In some cases, the selvage portions 56 of the knit structure 40 is saved and used to form a cord 50. In others, the selvage portions 56 are discarded.

[0048] Figure 13 is a digital image of a cord 50 formed from the knitting pattern 38 of Figure 12 after separation of the knit structure between chain knitting yarns 42. Yarn strands 52 correspond to the cut portions of the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46 and base 54 corresponds to one of the chain knitting yarns 42. If the knit structure formed from knitting pattern 38 were cut differently, a cord 50 as shown in Figures 10-11 could also be obtained. As shown in Figure 13, some cords 50 include two or more sets (such as sets 55, 57 in Figure 13) of multi-stranded yarns 52 that extend from different sides/portions of the base 54, like bristles extending from different sides of a brush. In this case, the cord 50 is positioned within the gaps 30A,B of the sidewalls 28A,B such that the base 54 is proximate the top surface 18 of the fastening tape 10 and the multi-stranded yarns 52 extend in an upward direction from the top surface 18 as far as possible. In some cases, the cord 50 of Figure 13 is bent so the two or more sets of multi-stranded yarns 52 rotate toward one another as the cord 50 is positioned within a gap 30A,B.

[0049] Figure 14 illustrates yet another non-limiting example of a knitting pattern

38. In this example, the knit structure includes two selvage portions 56, fourteen chain knitting yarns 42, thirteen first multi-stranded weft yarns 44, and thirteen second multi- stranded weft yarns 46. Any or all of chain knitting yarns 42, first multi-stranded weft yarns 44 and second multi-stranded weft yarns 46 can be made of any suitable yarns and/or combination of yarns, for example as described above with respect to the knitting pattern of Figures 7 or 12.

[0050] Various modifications to the knitting pattern 38 and the yarns used therein may be made to alter the characteristics of the cord 50 produced from the knitting pattern. Other types of cords besides knitted cords may be used. For example, a cord may have a base or a core with brush-like extensions. As another example, the cord may consist of a plurality of longitudinally-extending multi-stranded yarns that are twisted or doubled together. In some cases, the yarns extend approximately 360° around a base or core. In some cases, the cords are made of a single type of material (e.g., fibers such as polyester).

[0051] As another variation, the density and hardness of the yarn strands 52 of the cord 50 can be adjusted by changing the composition of the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46. For example, the number of yarns making up each of the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46, as well as the weights of the filaments and/or the number of filaments making up each yarn of the multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46 can vary. Along these lines, the composition of yarns making up the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46 can be adjusted to vary the elasticity of one or more portions of the cord 50. In this way, the stability of the cord 50 once placed in the gaps 30A,B can be controlled. In some cases, the stability of the cord may also be increased with the application of heat.

[0052] In some examples, the cord 50 may be adjusted by varying the number and/or thickness of the yarns making up the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46 (and in turn, the strands of yarn 52). For example, reducing the friction generated between the strands of yarns 52 and a surface of the trench on which the fastening tape 10 is placed during a molding process can help facilitate alignment, while increasing the friction generated between the strands of yarn 52 and the top surface 18 and/or sidewalls 28A,B may help secure the cord 50 within the gaps 30A,B. In addition, using thinner yarns with more filaments may be desirable, and may provide less twisting. If too many yarns are used, the yarns may absorb foam during the molding process, which may cause an undesirable air bubble or void. [0053] The cords 50 described and illustrated herein are flexible and thus advantageously bend if the fastening tape 10 with which they are assembled bends, for example if fastening tape 10 is used with a curved mold.

[0054] In some cases, one or more of the yarns used for the chain knitting yarns 42 and/or the first and second multi-stranded weft yarns 44, 46 can be heat adhesive yarns, such as commercially available yarn known as Toray's ELDER yarns, which is made from nylon with a low melting point. Such yarns with low melting points may be particularly desirable if heat is applied to the yarns to help with the attachment of the cord 50 within the gaps 30A,B.

[0055] The above-described aspects are merely possible examples of implementations, merely set forth for a clear understanding of the principles of the present disclosure. Many variations and modifications can be made to the above-described examples without departing substantially from the spirit and principles of the present disclosure. All such modifications and variations are intended to be included herein within the scope of the present disclosure, and all possible claims to individual aspects or combinations of elements or steps are intended to be supported by the present disclosure. Moreover, although specific terms are employed herein, as well as in the claims which follow, they are used only in a generic and descriptive sense, and not for the purposes of limiting the described invention, nor the claims which follow.