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Title:
FENCE POST
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/187827
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The invention provides a post/picket (20) with a top cap (2) which can be used for striking the post/picket (20) into the ground, and which can be used to remove the post/picket (20) by hitting the underside of the top cap (2). The top cap (2) protects users by covering the previously exposed sharp top end of the post/picket (20). The top cap further protects the top end of the post/picket (20) which can deform from driving impacts. The top cap (2) preferably includes a raised or further thickened section (3) at a portion thereof corresponding to the strongest point of the post/picket cross-section. The fence post/picket can be used as a forming peg for concrete formwork (steel formwork) and barrier peg.

Inventors:
GOLLEDGE, Malcolm Alexander (PO Box 2697, Bowral, NSW 2576, AU)
GOLLEDGE, Lyndon James (PO Box 2697, Bowral, NSW 2576, AU)
Application Number:
AU2018/000049
Publication Date:
October 18, 2018
Filing Date:
April 10, 2018
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
BFRE PTY LTD (PO Box 2697, Bowral, NSW 2576, AU)
International Classes:
E04H17/20; E04G17/14; E04H17/08
Foreign References:
AU2010214644A12011-03-17
US20060070313A12006-04-06
AU661649B31995-07-27
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PROTECTMYIDEA.COM.AU (PO Box 5005, Empire Bay, NSW 2257, AU)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Claims

The claims defining the invention are as follows:

1. A fence post comprising:

an elongated body having at least two substantially co-extensive flanges,

the body having a top end, and a lower end with a driving point, and

an impact receiving plate mounted to the top end.

2. The fence post of claim 1 wherein the body comprises two flanges oriented at 90 degrees to each other.

3. The fence post of claim 1 wherein the body comprises three flanges and has a Y-shape or T-shape cross-section.

4. The fence post of claim 1 wherein the plate is adapted to receive impact blows to the upper and lower surfaces thereof.

5. The fence post of claim 1 wherein at least one flange has a series of apertures along its length.

6. The fence post of claim 1 wherein the body and the plate are constructed from steel and the plate is welded to tops of the flanges.

7. The fence post of claim 1 wherein the body and the plate are constructed from plastic and the plate is moulded together with the flanges.

8. The fence post of claim 5 wherein the apertures are spaced equally along the length of the flange.

9. The fence post of claim 1 wherein at least one of the flanges has a tapered end at the lower end thereof.

10. The fence post of claim 1 wherein at least one of the flanges has a flat end at the lower end thereof.

11. The fence post of claim 1 wherein each flange has a respective pointed lower end.

12. The fence post of claim 1 wherein the plate covers the entire top end of the fence post body.

13. The fence post of claim 1 wherein the plate extends past the outer edges of the top end of the fence post body.

14. The fence post of claim 1 wherein the plate includes a raised or further thickened section at a portion thereof corresponding to the strongest point of the fence post cross-section.

15. The fence post of claim 14 wherein the body has an L-shaped cross-section and the plate has a thickened section aligned with the junction in the cross-section.

16. The fence post of claim 14 wherein the plate has a dome shape with the raised or thickened section being at a central part thereof.

17. The fence post of claim 1 wherein each flange has a respective driving point at a lower end thereof.

18. A formwork assembly comprising:

a first fence post according to claim 1 driven vertically into the ground, and

a second fence post driven into the ground disposed at an angle to the first fence post, wherein the first and second fence posts respectively comprise first and second flanges oriented at 90 degrees to each other, the first and second flanges having apertures spaced along their lengths,

wherein the second flange of the second fence post is attached to the second flange of the first fence post with a fastener extending through aligned apertures therebetween to brace the first fence post.

19. The formwork assembly of claim 17, further comprising a fastener extending through an aperture of the first flange of the first fence post, the fastener fastened to a forming board placed against the first flange.

Description:
FENCE POST

Field of the Invention

[1] The present invention relates to an improved fence post/peg design incorporating built in safety features which can be used to support formboards for concrete slabs, and in general applications where lightweight barrier system supports are required.

Background of the Invention

[2] Concrete slab formwork is generally supported using hardwood timber pegs. The pegs are usually 50mm x 50 mm square section and come in a number of standard lengths, ranging from 450 mm to 1200 mm long. They are installed using a sledge hammer and removed by using a sledge hammer by knocking them sideways, backwards and forwards until they can be removed by hand. Within a short number of reuses, the peg can split causing potential for hammer deflections during installation and pegs breaking apart and pieces becoming airborne, both situations causing occupational and safety hazards.

[3] The form boards are generally fixed to the timber peg using nails fired from nail guns, and due to the high density of the hardwood the nails sometimes fail to penetrate or split the timber. An improvement in the timber pegs has been the introduction of a metal collar installed at the head. This addition has increased the life of the timber peg, however the pegs eventually fails in similar ways.

[4] In recent times the timber hardwood pegs have been replaced by bought off the shelf conventional star pickets. A star picket is a variant of a steel fence post. Steel fence posts, depending on design or country, are also called a T-post, a Y-post, or variants on star post, being different types of fence posts or pickets. They are typically made of steel. They can be used to support various types of wire or wire mesh. The end view of the post creates an obvious T, Y or other shape. The posts are driven into the ground with a manual driver or pneumatic post pounder. The star picket is a three-flanged peg made from steel, with holes equally spaced along the deeper flange partway along the length of the peg. The other two flanges do not have holes in them. The star picket is also used in fencing and barrier applications, and has very broad-based application in primary industry, the building industry and in general backyard uses around residential homes.

[5] When used in support of formwork tek-screws are generally deployed to fasten the formwork boards to the picket locating the screw in the existing holes in the picket, and when used in fencing applications, the wires are fastened to the side of the flange using the holes in the picket flange generally using tie wire. [6] When used in environments where safety is important, a specially made protective cap is available which fits the top of the picket. The protective cap is generally made from plastic, and can be round or in the shape of the star picket cross section, and sleeve fitted over the top of the peg relying on a friction fit between itself and the peg flange faces to hold them in place. Often, the safety caps are easily removed in windstorms or from being knocked during the surrounding construction process, so it is common to see unprotected star picket heads.

[7] The pegs are installed using a weighted sleeve called a dolly that fits over the peg and then a manually activated up and down motion impacts the pegs into the ground. Another method is to use a sledge or heavy hammer to drive the pegs into position. After a number of re-uses the head of the peg begins to deform and reaches a stage where the safety caps cannot be installed. At which time the uncovered deformed picket heads can injure workers. The process of installing and de installing the peg safety caps incurs a recurring labour expense, adding to the cost of the peg on every re use.

[8] The star picket was originally designed for fencing applications and the cross-sectional shape is in a star Y configuration, although not exactly spaced at 120 degrees. The star Y configuration offers strength in all directions, however its main strength axis is at right angles to the axis of the widest flange with the holes. This corresponds to an orientation of being parallel to the direction of the fence and fencing barrier material. When used with form boards the peg geometry does not allow a face of one of the peg flanges to rest flat against the face of the board, so that any connection made between the peg and the board is through an air gap, with adjacent picket flanges having line contact with the board either side. In this orientation it is also on the weaker axis. A further problem is encountered trying to connect bracing to the side of the picket to support the formwork boards fixed to it, against wet concrete loading on the boards that are fixed to it. The outward flanges of the peg are not aligned to the brace direction, so it is difficult to effectively fasten the brace to the peg. Because of this the brace is generally fixed to the top of the boards adjacent to the installed star picket.

[9] At the other end of the star picket each flange is angled off to a point. Not only does the pointed end create a safety hazard during the materials handling stage of the process, it also needs to be driven further into the ground to find sufficient resistance to sinking after installation due to both the point and the thin cross-sectional area of the star picket itself. Although in other applications where there is stiffer ground, a point may be desirable.

[10] When the star pickets need to be removed, a specially designed tool called a peg puller is used. The tool generally employs a clamping mechanism which is fitted to the outermost exposed flange of the star picket at ground level. When the clamping mechanism is engaged, the tool lever arm is pushed on which vertically lifts the post from the ground, the process is time consuming and sometimes difficult due to restricted access for the tool.

[11] The present invention seeks to overcome or substantially ameliorate at least some of the deficiencies of the prior art, or to at least provide an alternative.

[12] It is to be understood that, if any prior art information is referred to herein, such reference does not constitute an admission that the information forms part of the common general knowledge in the art, in Australia or any other country.

Summary of the Invention

[13] According to a first aspect, the present invention provides a fence post comprising: an elongated body having at least two substantially co-extensive flanges, the body having a top end, and a lower end with a driving point, and

an impact receiving plate mounted to the top end.

[14] In one embodiment, the body comprises two flanges oriented at 90 degrees to each other.

[15] In another embodiment, the body comprises three flanges and has a Y-shape or T- shape cross-section.

[16] In another embodiment, the plate is adapted to receive impact blows to the upper and lower surfaces thereof.

[17] In another embodiment, at least one flange has a series of apertures along its length.

[18] In another embodiment, the body and the plate are constructed from steel and the plate is welded to tops of the flanges.

[19] In another embodiment, the body and the plate are constructed from plastic and the plate is moulded together with the flanges.

[20] In another embodiment, the apertures are spaced equally along the length of the flange.

[21] In another embodiment, at least one of the flanges has a tapered end at the lower end thereof.

[22] In another embodiment, at least one of the flanges has a flat end at the lower end thereof.

[23] In another embodiment, each flange has a respective pointed lower end.

[24] In another embodiment, the plate covers the entire top end of the fence post body. [25] In another embodiment, the plate extends past the outer edges of the top end of the fence post body.

[26] In another embodiment, wherein the plate includes a raised or further thickened section at a portion thereof corresponding to the strongest point of the fence post cross-section.

[27] In another embodiment, the body has an L-shaped cross-section and the plate has a thickened section aligned with the junction in the cross-section.

[28] In another embodiment, the plate has a dome shape with the raised or thickened section being at a central part thereof.

[29] In another embodiment, each flange has a respective driving point at a lower end thereof.

[30] The present invention also provides a formwork assembly comprising:

a first fence post according to the above driven vertically into the ground, and a second fence post driven into the ground disposed at an angle to the first fence post, wherein the first and second fence posts respectively comprise first and second flanges oriented at 90 degrees to each other, the first and second flanges having apertures spaced along their lengths,

wherein the second flange of the second fence post is attached to the second flange of the first fence post with a fastener extending through aligned apertures therebetween to brace the first fence post.

[31] In another embodiment, the formwork assembly further comprises a fastener extending through an aperture of the first flange of the first fence post, the fastener fastened to a forming board placed against the first flange.

[32] Other aspects of the invention are also disclosed. Brief Description of the Drawings

[33] Notwithstanding any other forms which may fall within the scope of the present invention, preferred embodiments of the present invention will now be described, by way of examples only, with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

[34] Fig. 1 is an isometric drawing of a peg according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

[35] Fig. 2 is a plan view of the peg of Figure 1.

[36] Fig. 3 is a cross-section of an alternative embodiment of the peg of Figure 1 designed for greater strength. [37] Fig. 4 is a cross-section of another alternative embodiment of the peg of Figure 1 designed for greater safety.

[38] Fig. 5 shows a peg with an alternative shaped driving end designed for greater location stability.

[39] Fig. 6 shows a peg with an alternative shaped driving end designed for greater bearing stability.

[40] Fig. 7 is an assembly drawing of a peg and brace peg installation.

[41] Fig. 8 is a plan view of a peg according to another embodiment being a star picket having a steel plate welded to the top end thereof.

[42] Fig. 9 is an isometric view of the star picket with a metal plate welded to its top end.

[43] Fig. 10 shows a modified embodiment of the peg of Figure 1 having a modified cap, where (a) is an isometric view, (b) is a side view and (c) is a plan view.

[44] Fig. 1 1 shows a modified embodiment of the peg of Figure 9 having a modified cap, where (a) is an isometric view, (b) is a side view of the top portion, (c) is a plan view.

[45] Fig. 12 shows a modified embodiment of the peg of Figure 11 having a T-section cross- section peg, where (a) is an isometric view, (b) is a side view and (c) is a top plan view of the top section and (d) is a bottom plan view

Description of Embodiments

[46] It should be noted in the following description that like or the same reference numerals in different embodiments denote the same or similar features.

[47] Fig. 1 shows a peg 20 according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention. The peg 20 comprises an elongated metal body 22 with flanges 1 at 90 degrees to each other. The flanges 90 are generally elongated metal plates which are joined at a common side edge 44. In the preferred embodiment, the body 22 is a metal plate bent along its longitudinal middle line 44. The body 22 comprises holes or apertures 4 preferably equally spaced along each flange. Each flange 1 has an angled edge 3 at a lower end thereof, with the edges 3 tapered towards each other to form a driving point. The driving point is cut to have a preferred flat end 7 for safety.

[48] A peg cap 2 being a thickened plate with chamfered and rounded edges 6 is welded 5 to the top end of the body 22 of the peg 10. Figures 1 and 2 show the safety features 6 of the peg top end. The hatched area 12 is painted yellow and represents a peg visibility safety feature. The peg cap 2 is a generally right triangle shaped with the right-angle edges 32 thereof aligned with the respective flanges 1. The plate 2 extends past the free edges of the flanges 1 , with the plate 2 being welded to the flanges 1 at the inner junctions thereof. The peg cap 2 covers all of the edges of the top end of the peg 1.

[49] Fig. 3 is an alternative design for the peg body cross section comprising additional short flanges 24 extending from free edges of the flanges 1. The short flanges 24 extend inwardly at 90 degrees relative to their respective flange 1 and improves the overall strength of the peg 10.

[50] Fig. 4 is another alternative design for the peg body cross section comprising a peg body with folded over short flanges 24 that improves the safety aspects of the peg side edges.

[51] Fig. 5 shows a driving point design alternative with chamfers 3 on each side of each flange 1 at the lower ends thereof. Each flange 1 has tapered respective edges 3 which forms two driving points at the lower end of the peg 20. The points can be cut to have a short horizontal straight edge 7 for safety, or can have a standard sharp point.

[52] Fig. 6 shows a driving point design alternative with a peg with a taper 3 at the lower end of one flange 1 , with the other flange having a straight horizontal cut edge 7. The taper 3 meets the straight edge 7 at the lower point thereof.

[53] The pegs shown above are preferably made from steel but can also be made from plastics.

[54] This invention is a steel or plastic peg, which has inbuilt safety features and can be deployed in a range of applications, however is ideally suited to formwork construction.

[55] The peg is deployed as a substitute for other pegs. The thick steel plate welded to the top is designed to withstand impact loads from a hammer or dolly. The plate thickness is such that it cannot deform out of plane under normal impact loads and remains in a plane perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the peg due to the peg flange stiffness in the areas adjacent to the 90-degree bend.

[56] Fig. 7 is a brace assembly showing the application of pegs 1 to formwork. A first peg 1 is driven vertically into the ground in the desired location until it is firm. It is installed so that one of the peg flanges 1 is parallel in plane to the outside face of a form board 9. A screw 10 is fixed, or a nail 10 hammered through a hole 4 in the peg flange 1 into the board 9 which is set at the correct height. Another peg 8 is shown in its application as a brace, where the peg 1 is hammered into the ground at 45 degrees adjacent to the vertical peg 1 supporting the formboard 9. The two pegs 1 are arranged so that two flanges from each peg are co-planar, so that after correcting the orientation of the vertical peg, the adjacent flanges 1 are screwed together to complete the brace. [57] The invention does not need to have a safety cap installed every time it is reused, since the top of the peg with the plate 2 has the safety feature/ protection built into it.

[58] The peg cap (plate 2) is also employed as a means to remove the peg, by using a tool to impact its underside until it is loosened sufficiently to be removed by hand. This saves labour and materials and makes the peg unique and cost effective in the building industry

[59] The peg is deployed as a substitute for any other peg. The peg preferably has two sides, one perpendicular to the other, with each flange having equally-spaced holes or apertures along each flange the holes are used for facilitating fixing of timber or other materials in various forms to them.

[60] The peg can have up to 4 sides/3 flanges. When the peg has two side flanges, the flanges are preferably at 90 degrees. When the peg has two sides flanges, the sides flanges are preferably equal in width. The peg can be made from various materials, preferably steel or plastic.

[61] The peg has a rounded plate welded or moulded to its top end, shaped to protect workers against cuts and abrasions and does not need a plastic safety cap to be installed after each reuse.

[62] In another form of the present invention the peg may not have a plate welded to its top, rather a safety cap is fitted after installation.

[63] The peg has a rounded plate welded to the top suitable and is of a minimum thickness designed to withstand impact loads from a dolly or hammer. Along each flange or at least along one flange is equally-spaced holes/apertures, preferably along the length of the peg, used to facilitate board and barrier fastening.

[64] The lower end of the peg has at least one flange cut to a taper to form a driving point. The lower end can have two flanges each cut to a taper finishing to a point, however in its preferred form the tapers do not meet at a point, so that a flat portion, the distance between the taper ends, is left as a point.

[65] The peg in its current form can be deployed as a brace, and the intersecting flanges of the peg and the brace can be fixed to each other. The peg top plate can be employed in the removal of the peg by impacting the underside of the plate with a hammer.

[66] Figures 8 and 9 show an alternative form of the present invention, where a star picket 11 is provided with a steel plate 12 to its top by welding 13, to provide safety aspects and increase re-use, and make it easier to remove. This however does not provide improvement in its fitment to boards and has limitations when used in bracing. [67] The pegs can be provided with an identification number stamped into any one or more of the flanges for service management.

[68] Fig. 10 shows a modified peg 1 b having a modified peg cap 2. Mishit impacts can locally deform the free sides of the peg flanges under the plate. A raised/thickened portion 3 is formed onto the top plate 2 directly above the 90-degree bend of the peg flange so that the impact loads can be directed to the stronger portion of the peg 1. The strongest portion of the peg depends on the cross-sectional shape of the peg itself. In the case of an angle peg, the stronger portion of the peg is located between the shear centre and the centroid locating the raised area over the corner of the peg.

[69] Fig. 1 1 shows another modified peg 1c. The rounded steel plate peg cap 2 welded to the top of the star picket (Y cross-section) peg comprises a localised central raised area 3 to receive hammer blows. The raised area is aligned with the strongest portion of the peg 1.

[70] Fig. 12 shows another modified peg 1 d. The rounded steel plate peg cap 2 welded to the top of the T cross-section peg comprises a localised central raised area 3 to receive hammer blows. The raised area 3 can also offset from the center to be aligned more with the junction in the T cross-section.

[71] The invention thus provides a post/picket with a top cap which can be used for striking the post/picket into the ground, and which can be used to remove the post/picket by hitting the underside of the top cap. The top cap protects users by covering the previously exposed sharp top end of the post/picket. The top cap further protects the top end of the post/picket which can deform from driving impacts. The top cap preferably includes a raised or further thickened section at a portion thereof corresponding to the strongest point of the post/picket cross-section. The fence post/picket can be used as a forming peg for concrete formwork (steel formwork) and barrier peg.