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Title:
FOOD PRODUCT HAVING STABLE CRISPY TEXTURE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2017/027659
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A crispy textured ambient shelf-stable food product is formed from a dough that includes at least 50% by weight of a fruit and/or vegetable, starch and fat. The food product has a moisture content of less than 4% by weight and exhibits reduced moisture uptake such that the food product has a moisture content of less than 7% by weight after 2 weeks exposure to ambient conditions of 50% humidity at 23 °C.

Inventors:
SHAH, Utkarsh (314 Hallmark South, Hershey, Pennsylvania, 17033, US)
MONGIA, Gagan (917 Muirfield Drive, Hummelstown, Pennsylvania, 17036, US)
SIRIS, Supapong (973 Powder Horn Drive, Hummelstown, Pennsylvania, 17036, US)
Application Number:
US2016/046465
Publication Date:
February 16, 2017
Filing Date:
August 11, 2016
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
THE HERSHEY COMPANY (100 Crystal A Drive, Hershey, Pennsylvania, 17033, US)
International Classes:
A21D13/06; A21D2/18; A21D2/36; A21D10/00; A21D10/02
Domestic Patent References:
WO2010008688A12010-01-21
Foreign References:
US5523106A1996-06-04
EP1574138A12005-09-14
US20040067282A12004-04-08
US20110045146A12011-02-24
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
LEPPO, Shawn K. et al. (McNees Wallace & Nurick LLC, 100 Pine StreetP.O. Box 116, Harrisburg Pennsylvania, 17108-1166, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Claims

What is claimed is:

1. Λ crispy textured ambient shelf-stable food product formed from a dough, the dough comprising

at least 50% by weight of a fruit, vegetable or a combination thereof;

starch; and

fat,

wherein the food product has a moisture content of less than 4% by weight and exhibits reduced moisture uptake such that the food product has a moisture content of less than 7% by weight after 2 weeks exposure to ambient conditions of 50% humidity at 23 °C.

2. The food product of claim 1 being substantially free of gluten,

3. 'fhe food product of claim 1 or 2 being substantially free of hydrocolloids.

4. The food product of claim 1, wherein the dough is ai feast 70% by weight of a fruit, vegetable or combination thereof.

5. l¾e food product of claim 1 , wherein the dough comprises at least one powdered fruit or vegetable.

6. The food product of claim 5, wherein the powdered fruit or vegetable is about 35% to about 45% of the total fruit or vegetable conient of the dough.

7. The food product of claim 1, wherein the dough comprises about 35% by weight to about 45% by weight starch,

8. The food product of claim 7, wherein the dough comprises about 5% to about 25% by weight added starch, the balance of starch provided by the fruit or vegetable content.

9. The food product of claim 1 , wherein the dough comprises about 2% to about 8% by weight fat.

10. The food product of claim U the dough further comprising about 5% by weight to about 15% by weight protein powder.

1 1. The food product of claim 1, the dough further comprising up to 1% by weight of an emulsifier.

12. The food product of claim I, wherein the food product exhibits reduced moisture uptake such that the food product has a moisture content of less than 6.5% by weight after 4 weeks exposure to ambient conditioas of 50% humidity at 23 f'C.

13. A crispy textured ambient shelf-stable food product formed from a dough, the dough comprising

at least 70% by weight of a fruit or vegetable, with about 35% to 45% of the fruit or vegetable content present as a powdered fruit or vegetable;

starch, the dough comprising about 35% to about 45% by weight starch, wherein the dough comprises about 5% to about 25% by weight added starch, the balance of starch provided by the fruit or vegetable content;

fat; and

up to 1 % by weight of an emulsifier,

wherein the food product has a moisture content of less than 4% by weight and exhibits reduced moisture uptake such that the food product has a moisture content of less than 6.5% by weight after 4 weeks exposure to ambient conditions of 50% humidity at 23 °C, the food product further being substantially free of hydrocolloids and gluten.

14. A method of making a food product comprising:

mixing a composition comprising a fruit, vegetable or both, starch, and fat to form a dough, in which the composition is at least 50% by weight of the fruit or vegetable; and

removing moisture from the dough to an amount less than 4% by weight to form a crispy textured ambient shelf-stable food product that exhibits a moisture content of less than 7% by weight after 4 weeks exposure to ambient conditions of 50% humidity at 23 °C

15. The method of claim 14, wherein the step of mixing the composition comprises mixing a fruit or vegetable powder with an added starch and a fruit or vegetable puree.

16. The method of claim 14, wherein the step of removing moisture comprises baking.

17. The method of claim 16, wherein the baking is accomplished at atmospheric pressures.

18. The method of c!aim 14 further comprising a step of laminating the dough intermediate the steps of mixing and removing moisture.

19. The method of claim 14 further comprising sheeting the dough to a thickness between 1 and 3 mm prior to the step of removing moisture.

20. The method of claim 14, wherein the step of removing moisture comprises high pressure extrusion.

21. The method of claim 14, wherein the composition further comprises up to 1% by weight of an cmulsifier and wherein the composition is substantially free of gluten.

22. A food product manufactured by the process of any one of claims 14-21.

Description:
FOOD PRODUCT HAVING STABLE CRISPY TEXTURE

RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims the benefit of and priority to U.S. App. No, 62/203,433 filed August 1 1.2015, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

FIELD

[0002] This application is directed to a food product and a method of making the same. More particularly, the present invention is directed to a food product having a stable crispy texture formed of a dough having high amounts of fruit and/or vegetable solids.

BACKGROUND

[0003] The amount of natural sugars along with soluble and insoluble fibers in fruit gives most fruits a high propensity to hold moisture. As a result, food products with hard and crispy textures while also being stable at ambient conditions are difficult to obtain and not readily available in the marketplace. Most conventional fruit-based snacks are soft or chewy, or quickly become so, when exposed to ambient conditions.

[0004] This problem has been addressed by numerous technologies which have been designed to produce crispy fruit snacks that are dehydrated, vacuum dried, fried or freeze dried. Each of these technologies have drawbacks associated with them. Drying techniques such as freeze drying and vacuum drying are expensive and still do not produce crispy fruit textures that remain stable under ambient conditions. While the product may be crispy initially upon drying and can retain that crispiness for limited periods of time, particularly if well-packaged, freeze dried and vacuum dried fruits start absorbing moisture as soon as the package is opened by the consumer and the product exposed to ambient conditions. This results in the dried products softening and losing crispiness over time.

[0005] Frying can produce more stable textures, but results in a product that is high in calories from the fat of frying, reducing the overall nutritional value of the snack. Fried snacks are also often undesirable to consumers seeking healthy snack alternatives. Further, because of the high natural sugar contents in fruit (typically fructose and glucose), trying and baking can lead to browning and charring. SUMMARY

[0006] The present disclosure is directed to overcoming these and other drawbacks by providing snacks high in real fruit and low in moisture to achieve a hard and crispy texture, but which do not suffer from problems such as browning, charring and instability (moisture absorption) seen in known products high in real fruit content

[0007] Exemplary embodiments are directed to a food product having more than 50% by weight of real fruit or vegetable content, the food product also having a crispy texture that remains stable under ambient conditions.

[0008] fn an embodiment, a crispy textured mod product is formed of a dough in which the dough comprises at least 50% by weight of a fruit and/or vegetable, starch, and fat and the food product has a moisture content of less than 4% by weight and exhibits reduced moisture uptake such that the food product has a moisture content of less than 7% by weight even after 2 weeks and up to five weeks after exposure to ambient conditions of 50% humidity at 23 °C.

[0009] In one embodiment, a crispy textured food product is formed from a dough in which the dough comprises at least 70% by weight of a fruit and/or vegetable, with about 35% to 45% of the fruit or vegetable content present as a powdered fruit or vegetable; starch, the dough comprising about 35% to about 45% by weight starch, wherein the dough comprises about 5% to about 25% by weight added starch, the balance of starch provided by the fruit or vegetable content; fat; and up to 1% by weight of an emuisifier. The ibod product has a moisture content of less than 4% by weight and exhibits reduced moisture uptake such that the food product has a moisture content of less than 6.5% by weight after 4 weeks exposure to ambient conditions of 50% humidity at 23 °C.

[0010] In still another embodiment, a method of making a food product comprises mixing a composition comprising a fruit or vegetable, starch, and fat to form a dough, in which the composition is at least 50% by weight of the fruit or vegetable and removing moisture from the dough to an amount less than 4% by weight to form a crispy textured ambient shelf-stable food product that exhibits a moisture content of less than 7% by weight after 4 weeks exposure to ambient conditions of 50% humidity at 23 °C. [0011] Among the advantages of exemplary embodiments is that a food product is provided that has a high percentage of real fruit or vegetable content and has a hard and crispy texture and which does not quickly soften upon exposure to ambient conditions in the same way conventional products do, but instead the texture remains stable for longer periods.

[0012] Another advantage is that by adjusting the glass transition temperature above room temperature, the product does not readily absorb moisture under ambient conditions, retaining its hard and crispy texture even after the package is opened.

[0013] Yet another advantage is the product can be formed using baking at ordinary atmospheric conditions while avoiding charring,

[0014] Other features and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following more detailed description of exemplary embodiments that illustrate, by way of example, the principles of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EXEMPLARY EMBODIMENTS

[0015] Exemplary embodiments are directed to a food product having a crispy texture that is high in real fruit and/or vegetable content, typically made from at least 50% fruit and that has a stable, crisp texture even after several weeks of exposure to ambient room temperature conditions.

[0016] Exemplary embodiments employ an ingredient system that includes fruit, starch, fat, and optionally protein, leavening agent and/or other additives. While primarily described herein with respect to fruit, ii will be appreciated that the principles of the invention may be equally applied with vegetables, which may be used in combination with or in place of fruit.

[0017] The product formulation contains at least 50% by weight of real fruit, such as at least 60% by weight, at least 70% by weight or at least 80% by weight real fruit. The term fruit is used to refer to fleshy fruits (i.e., those foods generally classified as a fruit for nutritional, rather than biological, purposes). Fleshy fruits generally have greater than about 75% by weight water when in their natural form.

[0018] Exemplary types of fruits that may be used include, but are not limited to, apples, apricois, bananas, berries such as strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, acai berries, boysenberries, gooseberries, and elderberries cherries, citrus, such as grapefruit, oranges. lemons, limes, tangerines and ugli fruit, figs, grapes, guava, jackfruit, kiwi fruit, mangoes, melons, such as cantaloupe, honeydew, and watermelon, nectarines, peaches, pears, papaya, passion fruit, pawpaw, pineapple, plantains, plums, and quince.

[0019] The real fruit content comprises fruit flesh that may be present in any form or combination of forms that still yields a product as described herein and thus may contain any range of moisture content from their natural amount to fully dried. In some embodiments, the real fruit content is a combination of a puree and a powder (including, without limitation, fruit flours), with up to 70% by weight of the product formulation comprising fruii puree. It will further be appreciated that the fruit source for fruit content does not need to be a single fruit and that multiple different fruits may be combined in the same or different form. Additionally, the fruits may be used in either their ripened or green/unripe form and, as noted, may contain any range of moisture from their natural amount, such as in the form of a puree, to fruit eoncenirate, to fruits dried io remove or eliminate moisture content and then ground in the form of flour or other fruit powder.

[0020] In some embodiments, tine fruit content is a combination of fruit puree and fruit powder. Any dried fruit (or vegetable) ground into powder may be used, and in some embodiments the fruit powder is a flour or fiber powder of one or more of the banana family (e.g., any of the cultivars of the Musa genus) such as green banana flour, yellow banana flour and plantain flour, for example. Other suitable fruit (vegetable) flours include apple flour, apple fiber powder, and squash flour, for example. The relative amounts of fruit puree to fruit powder may vary. In some embodiments, the fruit may be entirely fruit puree, while in other embodiments up to 50% or more of the fruit may be in the powder form. Typically, the fruit powder is about 35% to about 45% by weight of the total real fruit content in the product formulation, although it will be appreciated that greater or lesser amounts may be used.

[0021] The fruit includes some starch content, particularly when fruit flour is employed. Some embodiments include an added starch so that the total starch content of the product formulation is about 25% up to about 50% by weight, typically in the range of about 35% io about 45% by weight starch, such as about 35%, about 36%, about 37%, about 38%, about 39%. about 40%, about 41%, about 42%, about 43%, about 44%, or about 45% by weight starch and any range or sub-range therebetween. Thus, in some embodiments, the product formulation contains up to about 40% by weight added starch, more typically in the range of 5% to 25% by weight added starch. However, it will be appreciated that both the particular amount of total start, as well as added starch, if any, may depend on a variety of factors including the form of the fruit content as well as the .specific fruits that are employed. For example, in some embodiments that use apple fiber powder or other high fiber, low starch fruit content, the total starch content of the dough may be as low as 4% by weight up to about 35% to 45% by weight.

[0022] Any culinary starch may be used as the added starch. In some embodiments, the added starch includes, but is not limited to, one or more of corn starch, potato starch or rice starch. Any other cereal or root vegetable starches, for example, may also be employed. In some embodiments, it may be desirable to use a gluten free starch as some exemplary embodiments may be formulated to produce food products that are substantially free of gluten (i.e., less than 20 ppm gluten).

[0023] In some embodiments, some or all of the fruit powder may be replaced with one or more other, preferably gluten free, flours, such as those derived from pulses. These include, for example, quinoa, lentil, and pea flours and various combinations.

[0024] In some embodiments, some or ail of the fruit powder may be replaced with one or more protein powders, such as protein concentrates and/or protein isolates, such that up to about 25%, up to about 50%, up to about 75% or all of the fruit powder is substituted with the protein powder. In certain embodiments, the dough is formulated with about 5% to about 15% by weight protein powder. Any suitable animal or vegetable protein powder may be used, including, but not limited to, soy protein, milk protein, whey protein, pea protein, peanut protein, rice protein, or a combination thereof.

[0025] The product formulation includes up to about 10% by weight of a fat, typically in the range of about 2% to about 8% by weight fat, such as about 4% to about 6% by weight fat. The fat includes solid fats, such as butter, lard, shortening or coconut oil, for example, and liquid fats, such as canola, peanut, safflower, sunflower, or other vegetable oil.

[0026] The product formulation may also optionally include up to about 1% by weight of a leavening agent, such as baking powder, baking soda, or cream of tartar, for example, while in other embodiments no leavening agent is included. [0027] Up to 1% by weight, more typically up to 0.5% by weight of an emulsifier, such as lecithin may be employed.

[0028] Other additives may also be incorporated into the production formulation, including a hydroeolloid, such as xanthan gum, as well as natural and artificial flavorings and preservatives. It will be appreciated however, that an advantage of exemplary embodiments is that a natural product can be provided while still achieving the shelf-stable benefits described without the use of added preservatives, which may be excluded entirely. Surprisingly, unlike many other gluten- free products, exemplary embodiments can still be formulated and produced without hydrocolloids, which are typically used in conventional gluten free products as a gluten replacer.

[0029] Furthermore, in some embodiments, additional moisture in the form of liquid content such as water or juice may be added to for adjusting consistency of the dough and/or to hydrate protein in embodiments employing protein powder. In some embodiments, moisture may be added through the introduction of yogurt, which can both provide moisture and protein.

[0030] Forming the product generally involves mixing the ingredients of the product formulation followed by moisture removal, such as by baking. The ingredients may be mixed in any order, although mixing dry ingredients such as fruit flour, added starch and/or leavening ageni may advantageously be carried out first to evenly combine these ingredients prior to adding fat and then fruit puree or any other fruit ingredients having a high moisture content.

[0031] The ingredients are mixed until a uniform mass of dough is achieved, with care to avoid overmixing, which is characterized by increased stickiness that can in turn make processing more difficult. The dough is then formed for baking, such as by sheeting and cutting, extruding, moulding, or any other desired method of forming, including straight sheeted or laminated techniques used in conventional cracker production. The dough can be formed to any thickness, although between 1 mm and 3 mm may be employed in some embodiments, such as about 1.5 to 2 mm. Surprisingly, dough formulated in accordance with exemplary embodiments permits the pulling of web scrap during processing, which can ordinarily not be accomplished with traditional gluten free doughs.

[0032] Once formed, the fruit dough is ready for baking, resulting in a food product having a crispy texture that may resemble a cracker in appearance, it will be appreciated that in some embodiments, such as those using a high pressure extruder, some moisture removal is contemporaneous wiih the extrusion and the moisture amount can be further decreased if necessary using an oven or dryer, for example.

[0033] in some embodiments, baking is carried out at atmospheric conditions. The baking may be carried out under a variety of conditions and it will be appreciated that time and temperature of baking can depend on a variety of factors relating to oven load, including size, shape and power, as well as piece size, dimension and weight. The baking or other moisture removal processes reduce the moisture content to less than 4% by weight, preferably between 2.25% and 3.25% by weight.

[0034] Jn some embodiments, baking may be accomplished in a single step, such as baking for 10-15 minutes at a temperature ranging from 300 to 375 °F. in other embodiments, a multi- zone oven may be used to bake the dough in as few as 5 to 6 minutes.

[0035] Alternatively, a multi-step baking process may be employed. It has been observed that a two step baking in which a first stage of baking at high temperatures for short times, followed by a second stage of baking at lower temperatures for longer times, achieves a crisp texture having the desired properties and which is less likely to exhibit browning or charring in the food product.

[0036] In one embodiment, a multi-stage baking process involves baking at a temperature in the range of 320 to 350 °F for three to six minutes followed by baking at a temperature in the range of 212 to 250 °F for twenty to thirty-five minutes.

[0037] The described baking steps in combination with the particular product formulations described herein result in a change in the glass transition temperature of the food system from less than room temperature to greater than room temperature (i.e., 23 °C). It will be appreciated thai a glass transition temperature for a baked food product may be difficult to identify with specificity using differential scanning calorimetry and other traditional methods of calculating Tg. However, DSC of food products formed in accordance with exemplary embodiments demonstrated no sharp peak over a range of 5 *C to 70 °C, meaning that the glass transition occurred over a broad range above 23 °C or was even higher than the range seen in the test. As a result of the Tg greater than 23 °C, the product once baked resists moisture pickup from the surrounding environment and maintains its hard, crispy texture even when exposed to ambient conditions, [0038] Exemplary embodiments start wiih an initial moisture content of less than 4% by weight and remain at a moisture content less than 7% by weight, such as less than 6.5% by weight even after 2 weeks, after 3 weeks, after 4 weeks and up to 5 weeks of exposure at ambient conditions (i.e., 23 °C and 50% relative humidity), still exhibiting a crispy texture that can be confirmed by sensory and technical evaluation.

[0039] Exemplary embodiments preferably exhibit a break force greater than 6.5 kg, more than 15 peaks of greater than 15 g when tested with a texture analyzer, or both.

[0040] Food products in accordance with exemplary embodiments thus maintain a stable, crispy texture, with up to five weeks for the unpackaged product to lose crispiness at ambient conditions, significantly higher than conventional freeze-dried crispy fruit snacks, which lose crispiness as soon as 20 minutes up to 24 hours under the same conditions.

EXAMPLES

[0041] The invention is further described in the context of the following examples which are presented by way of illustration, not of limitation.

Example 1.

[0042] Example 1 was made by formulating banana puree (51% wt), green banana flour (33.5% wt), rice starch (9% wt). butter {6% wt) and baking powder (0.5% wt). The green banana flour, starch, and baking powder were mixed until evenly combined, after which buiter was added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass.

[0043] The mass was formed into a log and rolled out on a sheeter to a thickness of 1.75 mm and then docked and cut into strips that were baked at 350 °F for 10-12 minutes.

Example 2.

[0044] Example 2 was made by formulating banana puree (53% wt), green banana flour (34% wt), rice starch (9% wt) and coconut oil (4% wt). lite green banana flour, starch, and baking powder were mixed until evenly combined, after which butter was added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass. |004S| The mass was formed into a log and rolled out on a sheeter to a thickness of 1.75 mm and then docked and cut into circles. The circles were baked on a sheet pan containing ho!es at 325 °F for 5 minutes followed by baking at 220 e F for 30 minutes.

[0046] The crisped food products of Examples 1 and 2 were subjected to further testing, with unpackaged pieces placed in chambers having 20%, 40%, 50%, 60% and 80% relative humidity at room temperature. Approximately ten pieces were removed from the chambers each week for seven weeks for texture and moisture analysis. When exposed to relative humidity of 50% or less, consistent with most conditioned spaces, die pieces maintained a crispy texture even after at least five weeks, with product from the 20% and 40% chambers maintaining a crispy texture through the end of the trial period.

Example 3.

[0047] Example 3 was made by formulating banana puree (51% wt), green banana flour (33.5% wt), pre-ge!atini/ed potato starch (9% wt), butter (6% wt) and baking powder (0.5% wt). The green banana flour, starch, and baking powder were mixed until evenly combined, after which butter was added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed unti l a dough formed into a single mass.

[0048] The mass was formed into a log and rolled out on a sheeter to a thickness of 1.75 mm and then docked and cut into strips that were baked at 350 °F for 13 minutes.

Example 4.

[0049] Example 4 was made by formulating banana puree (51% wt), green banana flour (33.5% wt), pre-gelatinized, high amylose corn starch (9% wt), butter (6% wt) and baking powder (0.5% wt). The green banana flour, starch, and baking powder were mixed until evenly combined, after which butter was added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed to form a dry, non-cohesive dough.

[0050] The dough was formed into a log and rolled out on a sheeter to a thickness of 1.75 mm and then docked and cut into strips that were baked at 350 °F for 1 1 minutes. Example 5.

[0051] Example 5 was made by formulating banana puree (51% wt), green banana flour (33.5% wt), pre-gelatini2ed, high amylopectin com starch (9% wt), butter (6% wt) and baking powder (0,5% wt). The green banana flour, starch, and baking powder were mixed until evenly combined, after which butter was added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass.

[0052] The mass was formed into a log and rolled out on a sheeter to a thickness of 1 ,75 mm and then docked and cut into strips that were baked at 350 T for 10 minutes.

Example 6.

[0053] Example 6 was made without any additional added starch by formulating banana puree (51 % wt), green banana flour (42.5% wt), butter (6% wt) and baking powder (0.5% wt). 1¾e green banana flour and baking powder were mixed until evenly combined, after which butter was added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass.

[0054] The mass was formed into a log and roiled out on a sheeter to a thickness of 1.75 mm and then docked and cut into strips that were baked at 350 °P for 9 minutes.

Example 7.

[0055] Example 7 was made by formulating banana puree (51% wt), green banana flour (21.25% wt), rice starch (21.25% wt), butter (6% wt) and baking powder (0.5% wt). The green banana flour, starch, and baking powder were mixed until evenly combined, after which butler was added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass.

[0056] The mass was formed into a log and rolled out on a sheeter to a thickness of 1.75 mm and then docked and cut into strips that were baked at 350 °F for 10 minutes.

Example 8.

[0057] Example 8 was made by formulating banana puree (51% wt), rice starch (42.5% wt), butter (6% wt) and baking powder (0.5% wt). The starch and baking powder were mixed until evenly combined, after which butter was added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed inio a single mass.

[0058] The mass was formed into a log and rolled out on a sheeter to a thickness of 1.75 mm. Undoeked dough was baked at 350 S F for 10 minutes.

Example 9.

[0059] Example 9 was made by formulating banana puree (65% wt), green banana flour (23.5% wt), rice starch (5% wt), butter (6% wt) and baking powder (0.5% wt). The green banana flour, starch, and baking powder were mixed until evenly combined, after which butter was added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass.

[0060] The mass was formed into a log and rolled out on a sheeter to a thickness of 1.75 mm and then docked and cut into strips that were baked at 350 °F for 10 minutes.

Example 10.

[0061] Example 10 was made by formulating banana puree (55% wt), green banana flour (33.5% wt), rice starch (9% wt), butter (2% wt) and baking powder (0.5% wt). The green banana flour, starch, and baking powder were mixed until evenly combined, after which butter was added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass.

[0062] The mass was formed into a log and rolled out on a sheeter to a thickness of 1.75 mm and then docked and cut into strips that were baked at 350 **F for 11 minutes.

Example 11.

[0063 { Example 1 1 was made by formulating banana puree (53% wt), green banana flour (33.5% wt), rice starch (9% wt), butter (4% wt) and baking powder (0.5% wt). The green banana flour, starch, and baking powder were mixed until evenly combined, after which butter was added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass. [0064] The mass was formed into a log and rolled out on a sheeter to a thickness of I ,75 mm and then docked and cut into strips that were baked at 350 °F tor 11 minutes.

Example 12.

[0065] Example 12 was made by formulating spinach puree (51% wt), green banana flour (33.5% wt), rice starch (9% wt), butler (6% wi) and baking powder (0.5% wt). Die green banana flour, starch, and baking powder were mixed until evenly combined, after which butter was added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The spinach puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass.

[0066] The mass was formed into a log and rolled out on a sheeter to a thickness of 1.75 mm and then docked and cut into circles that were baked at 350 °F for 12 minutes.

Example 13.

[0067] Example 13 was made by formulating banana puree (51% wt), green banana flour (18.5% wt), rice starch (9% wt). rice protein (7.5% wt). pea protein (7.5% wt), butter (6% wt) and baking powder (0.5% wt). The green banana flour, starch, protein and baking powder were mixed until evenly combined, after which butter was added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass.

[0068] The mass was formed into a log and rolled out on a sheeter to a thickness of 1.75 mm and then docked and cut into circles that were baked at 350 °F for 13 minutes,

Example 14,

[0069] Example 14 was made by formulating guava puree (50% wt), green banana flour (33% wt), rice starch (9% wt), butter (6% wt), lime juice ( 1.5% wt) and baking powder (0.5% wt). The green banana flour, starch, and baking powder were mixed until evenly combined, after which butter was added with continued stirring uniil the mixture resembled sand. Hie guava puree and lime juice were added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass.

[0070] The mass was formed into a log and rolled out on a sheeter to a thickness of 1.75 mm and then docked and cut into circles that were baked at 350 °F for 1 1 minutes. Example 15.

[007] j Example 15 was made by formulating pear puree (50% wt), green banana flour (33% wt), rice starch (9% wt), butter (6% wt), lime juice (1.5% wt) and baking powder (0.5% wt). The green banana flour, starch, and baking powder were mixed until evenly combined, after which butter was added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The pear puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass.

[0072] The mass was formed into a log and rolled out on a sheetcr to a thickness of 1.75 mm and then docked and cut into circles that were baked at 350 °V for 1 1 minutes.

Example 16.

[0073] Example 16 was made by formulating banana puree (52% wt). green banana flour (18.5% wt), rice starch (9% wt), rice protein (7,5% wt), pea protein (7.5% wt), coconut oil (5% wt), and flavoring (0.5% wt). The green banana flour, starch, and protein were mixed until evenly combined, after which oil was added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass.

[0074] The mass was formed into a log and rolled out on a sheeler to a thickness of 1.75 mm and then docked and cut into circles that were baked at 325 °F for 5 minutes, then at 220 °F for 30 minutes.

Example 17.

[0075] Example 17 was made by formulating banana puree (44.6% wt), green banana flour ( 19.4% wt), rice starch (17.2% wt), rice protein (6.5% wt), pea protein (6.5% wt), canola oil (5.4% wt) and lecithin (0.4% wt). The green banana flour, starch, and protein were mixed until evenly combined, after which the oil and lecithin were added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass.

[0076] The mass was laminated, sheeted, cut into circles and, after removing web scrap by pulling, baked for about 5 minutes in a multi-zone oven ranging between 275 S F and 420 °P. Example 18.

[0077] Example 18 was made the same as Example 17 except that the puree was a combination of strawberry and banana puree at 43.4 % by weight and the amount of rice starch was adjusted to 18.4% by weight.

Example 19.

[0078] Example 17 was made by formulating banana puree (48.7% wt), green banana flour (18.0% wt), rice starch (16.0% wt), rice protein (6.0% wt), pea protein (6.0% wt), cano!a oil (5.0% wt) and lecithin (0.3% wt). The green banana flour, starch, and protein were mixed until evenly combined, after which the oil and lecithin were added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass.

[0079] The mass was laminated, sheeted, cut into circles and, after removing web scrap by pulling, baked for about 5 minutes in a multi-zone oven ranging between 310 °F and 450 *F.

Example 20.

[0080] Example 20 was made by formulating banana puree (36.2% wt), apple flour (37.3% wt), rice starch (19.8% wt), canola oil (6.2% wt) and lecithin (0.5% wt). The apple flour and starch were mixed until evenly combined, after which the oil and lecithin were added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass.

[0081] The mass was laminated, sheeted, cut into circles and baked at 325 °F for 5 minutes followed by baking at 225 °F for another 25 to 40 minutes.

Example 21.

[0082] Example 21 was made by formulating banana puree (36.2% wt), apple flour (22.3% wt), rice starch (19.8% wt), rice protein (7.5% wt), pea protein (7.5% wt), canola oil (6.2% wt) and lecithin (0.5% wt). The apple flour, starch, and protein were mixed until evenly combined, after which the oil and lecithin were added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass. [0083] The mass was laminated, sheeted, cut into circles and baked at 325 °F for 5 minutes followed by baking at 225 °F for another 25 to 40 minutes.

Example 22.

[0084] Example 22 was made by formulating banana puree (44.6% wt), apple fiber powder (32.4% wt), rice starch (17.2% wt), canola oil (5.4% wt) and lecithin (0.4% wt). The apple fiber powder and starch were mixed until evenly combined, after which the oil and lecithin were added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass.

[0085] The mass was laminated, sheeted, cut into circles and baked at 325 f; F for 5 minutes followed by baking at 225 °V for another 25 to 40 minutes.

Example 23.

[0086] Example 23 was made by formulating banana puree (44.6% wt), apple fiber powder (19.4% wt), rice starch (17.2% wt), rice protein (6.5% wt), pea protein (6.5% wt), canola oil (5.4% wt) and lecithin (0.4% wt). The apple fiber powder, starch, and proiein were mixed until evenly combined, after which the oil and lecithin were added with continued stirring until the mixture resembled sand. The banana puree was added and mixed until a dough formed into a single mass.

[0087] The mass was laminated, sheeted, cut into circles and baked at 325 °F for 5 minutes followed by baking at 225 °F for another 25 to 40 minutes.

[0088] While the foregoing specification illustrates and describes exemplary embodiments, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes may be made and equivalents may be substituted for elements thereof without departing from the scope of the invention. In addition, many modifications may be made to adapt a particular situation or materia! to the teachings of the invention without departing from the essential scope thereof. Therefore, it is intended that the invention not be limited to the particular embodiment disclosed as the best mode contemplated for carrying out this invention, but that the invention will include all embodiments falling within the scope of the appended claims.