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Title:
FOOTWEAR SECURING DEVICE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2017/201240
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A footwear securing device is provided. The device includes a front strap, a mid strap, a rear strap, an ankle strap, a connector strap, and a base plate; the base plate configured to attach to a sole of a shoe and comprising a front portion, a mid portion, and a rear portion, the front portion comprising a front slot, the mid portion comprising a mid slot, and the rear portion comprising a rear slot; and the front strap configured to enter the front slot, the mid strap configured to enter the mid slot, and the rear strap configured to enter the rear slot.

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Inventors:
KENISON, Emily (26 Carman Road, New York, New York, 10583, US)
Application Number:
US2017/033256
Publication Date:
November 23, 2017
Filing Date:
May 18, 2017
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
KENISON, Emily (26 Carman Road, New York, New York, 10583, US)
International Classes:
A43B3/12; A43C11/14
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
POSTOLSKI, David (GEARHART LAW LLC, 41 River RoadSummit, New Jersey, 07901, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A footwear securing device, the device comprising:

a strap and a base plate;

the base plate comprising a front slot and a rear slot, the base plate configured to attach to a shank of a shoe ; and

the strap configured to enter the front slot and the rear slot.

2. The footwear securing device of claim 1,

the strap comprising a proximal end, a distal end, and a counter loop, the proximal end comprising adjustor holes, the distal end comprising a buckle, the adjustor holes configured to engage with the buckle, the counter loop comprising a counter portion and a shank portion, the counter portion configured to encircle a counter of a shoe, the shank portion configured to encircle a shank of a shoe; and the base plate comprising a rear end and a front end, the rear end comprising a curve of at least 20 degrees and the front end of the base plate being approximately flat, the rear slot positioned at the rear end of the base plate, the rear slot further positioned adjacent to a curved portion of the base plate; the front slot positioned at the front end of the base plate, the front slot further positioned adjacent to a flat portion of the base plate. 3. The footwear securing device of claim 1, the strap comprising a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end comprising adjuster holes, the distal end comprising a buckle, the adjustor holes configured to engage with the buckle.

4. The footwear securing device of claim 3, the strap further comprising a counter loop, the counter loop comprising a counter portion and a shank portion, the counter portion configured to encircle a counter of a shoe, and the shank portion configured to encircle a shank of a shoe.

5. The footwear securing device of claim 1, the base plate comprising a rear end and a front end, the rear end comprising a curve of at least 20 degrees and the front end of the base plate being approximately flat.

6. The footwear securing device of claim 5, the rear slot positioned at the rear end of the base plate, the rear slot further positioned adjacent to a curved portion of the base plate; the front slot positioned at the front end of the base plate, the front slot further positioned adjacent to a flat portion of the base plate.

7. A footwear securing device, the device comprising:

a front strap, a mid strap, a rear strap, an ankle strap, a connector strap, and a base plate; the base plate configured to attach to a sole of a shoe and comprising a front portion, a mid portion, and a rear portion, the front portion comprising a front slot, the mid portion comprising a mid slot, and the rear portion comprising a rear slot; and

the front strap configured to enter the front slot, the mid strap configured to enter the mid slot, and the rear strap configured to enter the rear slot.

8. The footwear securing device of claim 7, the ankle strap comprising a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end comprising adjuster holes, the distal end comprising a buckle, the adjustor holes configured to engage with the buckle.

9. The footwear securing device of claim 7, the front strap configured to rest longitudinally across a dorsal side of a foot; the top strap comprising a front region, a mid region, and a loop region; the front strap attached to the front region of the top strap; the mid strap attached to the mid region of the top strap; the ankle strap attached to the loop region of the top strap.

10. The footwear securing device of claim 7, the base plate comprising a front end and a rear end; the rear end of the base plate comprising a curve of at least 20 degrees and the front end of the base plate being approximately flat.

11. The footwear securing device of claim 6, the base plate comprising a flat region, the front slot, the mid slot, and the rear slot positioned on the flat region of the base plate.

12. The footwear securing device of claim 6, the connector strap comprising a top connector loop and a bottom connector loop; the ankle strap configured to enter the top connector loop, and the counter strap configured to enter the bottom connector loop. 13. The footwear securing device of claim 12, the connector strap positioned at a counter of the shoe; the connector strap configured to hold the counter strap and the ankle strap at the counter of the shoe.

14. A footwear securing device, the device comprising:

a counter strap, a foot strap, and a base plate;

the base plate comprising one or more slots;

the counter strap comprising a distal end and a proximal end;

the foot strap comprising a distal region and a proximal region;

a distal end of the counter strap attached to the distal region of the foot strap, and a proximal end of the counter strap attached to the proximal region of the foot strap; the foot strap configured to enter through one or more slots;

the foot strap configured to encircle a dorsal portion of a foot; and

the foot strap configured to encircle a shank portion of a shoe. 15. The footwear securing device of claim 14, the foot strap further configured to lie on the dorsal portion and to conceal more than 60% of a dorsal side of the foot.

16. The footwear securing device of claim 14, the foot strap configured to lie on the dorsal portion, and to expose less than 20% of the dorsal side of the foot.

17. The shoe securing device of claim 14, the base plate configured to rest substantially flat against the shank portion of the shoe, the base plate configured to rest substantially flat against a pitch portion of the shoe. 18. The footwear securing device of claim 14, the base plate being substantially straight, the base plate configured to rest flat against the shank of a shoe.

19. The footwear securing device of claim 14, the counter strap configured to removably attach to the distal region of the foot strap and the counter strap configured to removably attach to the proximal region of the foot strap.

20. The footwear securing device of claim 19, the proximal end of the counter strap comprising adjuster holes, the distal end of the counter strap comprising a buckle, the adjuster holes configured to engage with the buckle.

Description:
F O O T W E A R SECURING D EVICE

PRIORITY

This application claims priority of the U.S. utility application number 15/158,429 filed on May 18, 2016, the contents of which are fully incorporated herein by reference.

INTRODUCTION

Certain types of heeled women's shoes such as pumps, high-heels, mules, backless sandals, etc., have a tendency to slip off the heel of the foot. Differences in the size and shape of women's feet may make it difficult to find shoes that perfectly fit. This problem is further exacerbated at times when feet exude sweat, causing the foot to slip and slide inside the shoe. These problems make it difficult to walk and may cause injury such as sprains from the lack of stability. The free movement of feet in such instances may also cause blisters on the heel and other parts of the foot. Embodiments of the invention provide a mechanism for holding the foot in place within the shoe in situations where an imperfect fit or design of the shoe may cause the foot to become loose during use. Embodiments of the invention enable the wearer to wear shoes that are several sizes larger than the wearer's normal shoe size. This added support can also help prevent injuries to a person's leg or foot. The system is interchangeable with different shoes, and thus allows for wearers to change the appearance of their various shoes for stylistic purposes. Embodiments of the invention are worn in pairs, one for the left foot and one for the right foot.

SUMMARY

A shoe strap assembly for women's shoes according to embodiments of the invention includes a base -plate which is positioned beneath the bottom of the shoe at the shank. Straps attached to the base-plate encircle the counter of a shoe and the upper/dorsal portion of a foot and a shoe, thus securely fastening the foot inside the shoe. The strap attached to the base -plate extends upwards from in between the shank and heel of the shoe forming a loop around the heel and longitudinally across the counter of the shoe. Two distinct ends extend towards the front of the shoe from in between the top of the counter and the seat of the shoe. The first end curves around outside (dorsal side) of the shoe having a buckle attached to it. The second end curves around the inside and across the upper portion of the shoe looping through the base plate and again over the outside portion of the shoe and attaching to the end. The removable strap mechanism will hold the foot against the up/down movement at the heel of the foot by exerting a downward pull on the top side of the foot.

The strap portion of an embodiment of the invention can be made from different materials including, but not limited to, leather, rubber, cloth, and/or plastic. Additionally, the strap portion can include hooks, buttons, snaps, buckles, loops and other mechanisms or attachments, which could be made of rubber, plastic, leather, jewels and/or metals. The base plate that is positioned under the sole of the shoe can be made of any flexible yet sturdy material, including, but no limited to metal (such as aluminum, copper, silver), plastic, rubber, and/or cardboard (such as bondex). Additionally, this base plate can be covered with different materials including, but not limited to, leather, rubber, cloth, and/or plastic, or attachments, which could be made of plastics, jewels, and/or metals. The base plate, which is positioned under the sole of the shoe, is in the shape of a malleable curve. The base plate can bend to fit the various inclines/arches that result from different heel heights. The base plate can come in various lengths, but will remain short enough so that it does not reach the ball of the foot. One end of the base plate is positioned at the point where the heel meets the sole of the shoe. The other end may extend along the heel toward the tip. The straps that cover the top of the feet are attached to the base plate which is positioned under the sole of the shoe using elastic, which allows for a slip-on application for wearers, or a loop mechanism, which allows for the wearer to self-adjust the fit of the straps. However, the straps can also be attached to the baseplate that is positioned under the sole of the shoe using other mechanisms, including, but not limited to, hooks, buttons, snaps, hook and loop fasteners, and/or buckles. The loop that is positioned around the heel can be attached directly to the base plate that is positioned under the sole of the shoe, or can attach directly to the straps. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of a right foot configuration of an embodiment of the invention, FIG. 2 is a rear perspective view of a right foot configuration of an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 3 is a front perspective vie w of an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 4 is a proximal perspective view of an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 5 is a rear perspective view of an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 6 is a distal perspective view of an embodiment of the invention. FIG. 7 is a top plan perspective view of an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 8 is a bottom plan perspective view of an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 9 is a front perspective view of a right foot configuration of an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 10 is a rear perspective view of a right foot configuration of an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 11 is a front perspective view of an embodiment of the invention. FIG. 12 is a proximal perspective view of an embodiment of the invention. FIG. 13 is a rear perspective view of an embodiment of the invention. FIG. 14 is a distal perspective view of an embodiment of the invention. FIG. 15 is a top plan perspective view of an embodiment of the invention. FIG. 16 is a bottom plan perspective view of an embodiment of the invention. FIG. 17 is a front perspective view of an embodiment of the invention. FIG, 18 is a rear perspective view of an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 19 is a front perspective view of an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 20 is a proximal perspective view of an embodiment of the invention. FIG. 21 is a rear perspective view of an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 22 is a left side elevation view of an embodiment of the invention. FIG. 23 is a front top perspective view of an embodiment of the invention. FIG. 24 is a bottom rear perspective view of an embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present invention is related to a detachable shoes strap system designed to secure a loose fitting heeled shoe to a user's foot during normal wear. FIG. 1 shows a front perspective view of a right foot configuration of one embodiment as it would appear on a shoe and user's foot during use. FIG. 2 shows a rear perspective view of the same embodiment as above. In this embodiment . the strap system primarily comprises of a main-strap 101 which encircles a foot and shoe during use and the base plate 201 which is positioned against a sole of a shoe. The base plate anchors the main strap at designated positions around a shoe and foot. Thus, in conjunction with the main strap, the base plate holds a foot in place against movement within a shoe.

As illustrated in FIG. 2, the base plate 201 comprises a top member 203 and a bottom member 205, which are permanently attached to one another. In the alternative top member 203 and bottom member 205 may be releasably attached. These members can come in various lengths, but will remain short enough so that they do not reach the ball of a shoe. The top and bottom members 203 and 205 can be attached to one another with glue or similar adhesive substance or they can be sewn together. The top member 203 further comprises a front base plate slot 207 and a rear base plate slot 209 where the top member 203 is not attached to the bottom member 205 as shown in Fig. 2. Instead, the top member 203 and bottom member 205 form openings through which the main strap 101 can pass through. During use, the bottom member 205 would be positioned against the shank 211 of a shoe, thus allowing the main strap 101 to pass through the base plate slots at designated points. A counter loop 213 extends from the main strap 101. The rear slot 209 may hold a portion of the main strap 101 from which the counter loop 213 extends, thereby securing the counter loop 213 at the rear of a shoe. The front slot 207 may provide a means for holding a proximal-end 103 of the main strap 101 at a position located at the front of a shoe.

The base plate can be made of any flexible yet sturdy material, including, but not limited to metal (such as aluminum, copper, silver), plastic, rubber, and/or cardboard (such as bondex). Additionally, the base plate can be covered with different materials including but not limited to leather, rubber, cloth, and/or plastic or attachments, which could be made of plastics, jewels, and/or metals, for secondary ornamental purposes. FIG. 3 shows a proximal perspective view of an embodiment of the securing device as it stands alone without a user's shoe and foot. As illustrated in FIG. 4 the base plate 201 is curved at the rear approximately where the rear base plate slot is located (approximately being within 1- 15 millimeters). This base plate curve 401 is malleable and during use rests approximately at the intersection of a heel and sole. The malleable feature of the base plate curve 401 allows it to bend to fit the various inclines and arches that result from different heel heights.

As further illustrated in FIG. 2, the main strap 101, when properly positioned on a user's shoe extends upwards from the rear base plate slot 209 across the distal and proximal sides of a shoe. Approximately one half of the distance across the counter, the main-strap 101 bifurcates extending upwards to form a loop around the counter 205 of a shoe, and toward the front of a shoe to form two distinct ends. The two ends formed are the distal-end 105 on the distal side 115 and the proximal-end 103 on the proximal side 113 of a shoe.

As depicted in FIG. 1, the two distinct ends, the proximal-end 103 and the distal-end 105 can be joined at the distal side 115 of a shoe, approximately where a user's ankle would rest. Attached to the distal-end is a buckle 107 comprising a frame 109 and a buckle-prong 111 that is permanently attached to the frame. The proximal-end 103 comprises adjuster holes 113 which provide attachment points for the buckle-prong 111 thus allowing a user to connect the two ends. During use, the proximal-end 103 and distal-end 105 are used to tighten the main strap 101 around a shoe and a user's foot and to firmly hold a foot within a shoe during use. The main strap 101 can be tightened around a user's foot by pulling the proximal-end 103 toward the back of a shoe and securing the buckle-prong 111 to successive adjuster holes 113 positioned away from the proximal-end 103. FIG. 6 shows the distal side view of the above proximal-end 103 and distal-end 105.

Thus, during use, the main-strap 101 encircles the top of a user's foot as well as the counter 205 and the shank 211 of a user's shoe thereby firmly securing a user's foot in place within a user's shoe. As shown in FIG. 3, the proximal-end 103 extends diagonally from the proximal side of a shoe towards the front and distal end of a shoe wrapping over the

superior/dorsal portion of a foot. As it continues to extend, the proximal-end 103 of the main- strap 101 travels through the front base plate slot 207 situated toward the front of a user's shoe. After passing through the front base plate slot 207, the proximal-end 103 extends diagonally in the posterior direction toward the ankle portion and distal side of the shoe. The main strap 101 can be made from different materials including, but not limited to, leather, rubber, cloth, and/or plastic. The material should be able to stretch while remaining resilient in order to provide the necessary support for a foot during use.

Another embodiment of the device is depicted in FIGS. 9 - 16. In FIG. 9 the securing device in a right foot configuration is shown as it would appear on a user's shoe and foot during use. In this embodiment, additional independent straps further aid in securing the foot firmly to the shoe. The additional straps also aid in use with additional styles of heeled shoes such as open toed shoes.

As depicted in FIG. 9, this embodiment comprises four main straps that encircle a user's shoe and foot, a counter strap 901, front-strap 903, mid strap 905, and an ankle-strap 907. An additional strap, the top-strap 917, runs vertically across the dorsal side of a user's foot and provides anchoring points for the front- strap 903, mid- strap 905, and ankle- strap 907 at three separate points. The ankle-strap further comprises two distinct ends, a proximal-end 909 comprising adjuster holes 911 and a distal-end 913 comprising a buckle 915. The ankle-strap 907 can be tightened around a user's ankle by joining the buckle 915 and adjuster holes 911 as previously described.

FIG. 10 illustrates the bottom perspective view of the securing device, as it would appear on a user's shoe and foot during use. As seen in FIG. 10 the securing device comprises a connector strap 1001 which provides an anchoring position for the counter strap 901 and ankle strap 907 at the counter 205 of a shoe. FIG. 12 shows a proximal side view of the securing device, as it stands alone without a user's shoe and foot. As illustrated in FIG. 12 the connector- strap 1001 comprises a bottom connector loop 1201 for securing the counter strap 901 and a top connector loop 1203 for securing the ankle strap 907. FIG. 14 shows a distal side view of the same embodiment above.

FIG. 10 further illustrates a modified baseplate 1003 underlying a shoe. As before, the modified baseplate 1003 is comprised of a top member and bottom member which are permanently attached to one another. However, the modified baseplate 1003 here comprises a front base plate slot 1005, rear base plate slot 1009 and an additional mid base plate slot 1007 to accommodate the mid-strap mentioned above. Additionally, in this embodiment, the rear base plate slot 1009 is positioned on the flat portion of the base plate in front and away from the curved portion 1011 and the apex 1013 of a shoe. This modified base plate is particularly beneficial when used with shoes that have a heel with unusual dimensions or in shoes where a heel is placed on a non-traditional part of a sole or in a non-traditional angle. This allows the curved portion 1011 to adjust to non-traditional angles of the at the apex or heel portion of a shoe while still allowing the counter strap 901 to encircle the counter 205 at the desired angle (not pictured here).

FIG. 11 shows the front perspective view of the securing device as it stands alone without a user's shoe and foot. Ass seen in FIG. 1 1, the front strap 903 is permanently attached in a perpendicularly fashion to the top-strap 917 at the front region 1101 while the mid-strap 905 is similarly attached to the top strap 917 at mid-region 1103. The top-strap further comprises a slot at the loop-region 1105 allowing the ankle-strap 907 to pass through the top-strap and anchor the ankle-strap at that position. The loop slot interface 1105 allows a user to adjust the tightness of the ankle strap without moving the top strap 917 from its ideal position on dorsal side of a users foot. FIG. 9 further illustrates the loop-interface 1005. FIG 13 shows the rear perspective view of the securing device as it stands alone without a user's shoe and foot.

FIG. 15 shows a top perspective view of the securing device as it stands alone without a user's shoes and foot. The front and mid straps can be attached to the base plate using elastic or a similar material, allowing for a slip-on application for a user. The straps above could also be attached to the base plate with a loop mechanism which would allow a user to self-adjust the tightness of the straps. Furthermore, the straps above can also be attached to the base plate using other mechanisms, including, but not limited to, hooks, buttons, snaps, and/or buckles. The loop that is positioned around the heel can be attached directly to the base plate that is positioned under the sole of the shoe, or can attach directly to the straps. FIG. 16 shows the bottom perspective view of the same embodiment above.

A third embodiment of the shoe strap system is depicted in FIGS. 17 - 24. In FIG. 17, the strap system is shown in the front perspective as it would appear on a user's shoe and foot during use. In this embodiment, the strap system may include a counter strap 1701 and a foot strap 1702. The counter strap 1701 wraps around the user's ankle but does not enclose the entire ankle. The foot strap 1702 wraps around the shoe's upper 1703 and shank 1704, enclosing the dorsal side 1705 and plantar side 1706 of the foot.

FIG. 18 depicts a rear perspective view of the footwear securing device as it would appear on a user's shoe and foot during use. As seen in FIG. 18, the base plate 1801 may be curved at the top end 1802 to conform to the shape of the shank 1704 and the pitch 1803. In another embodiment, the base plate 1801 may be straight and conform to just the shape of the shank 1704.

FIG. 21 shows the rear perspective view of the footwear securing device as it stands alone without the user's shoe and foot. As seen in FIG. 21, the base plate 1801 may be located on the centered lower half of the foot strap 1702. The base plate 1801 may comprise a slot 2001 and the foot strap 1702 may be insertable through the slot 2001. The size of the slot may vary depending on the size of the foot strap 1702. In one embodiment, the base plate may have more than one slot. For example, a second slot 2002 may be useful if the user decides to add another strap to the strap system.

FIG. 19 shows the front perspective view of the footwear securing device as it stands alone without the user's foot and shoe. The foot strap 1702 may vary in width. For example, the foot strap 1702 may be one to three inches wide, or even longer, thus covering most of the upper 1703 of the user's shoe. In another embodiment, the foot strap 1702 may be one inch wide or less. The various widths are advantageous for multiple reasons. First, it can provide a cover for shoes that normally expose the dorsal side 1705 of the foot. Second, such a cover can provide warmth or protection from the sun. And lastly, securing the entire dorsal side 1705 may provide comfort or more stability in the shoe.

The width of the foot strap may be uniform throughout the entire foot strap 1702. In another embodiment, the width of the foot strap may be different at various points of the foot strap 1702. This is advantageous for the user whose shoe may better conform to a foot strap with a certain width better in certain locations.

The counter strap 1701 may join the foot strap 1702 at one or more interfaces. As seen in in FIG. 22, the distal end 2201 of the counter strap 1701 may join the foot strap 1702 at a distal region 2202. As seen in FIG. 20, the proximal end 2003 of the counter strap 1701 may join the foot strap 1702 at a proximal region 2004. In one embodiment, the distal end 2201 and proximal end 2003 may join in one interface or region. The variances in the number interface regions may depend on decisions regarding style and comfort.

Different mechanisms may be used to join counter strap 1701 with the foot strap 1702 at the interface region. This may include, but is not limited to, sewing, hook and loop, buckles, buttons, and/or snaps. The mechanism joining the counter strap 1701 and the foot strap 1702 at the interface may be different for the distal end 2201 and second slot 2002, as seen in FIG. 22 and FIG. 20, respectively.

The counter strap 1701 may be removably attachable to the foot strap 1702 at the interfaces. This allows the user to use just the foot strap if desired.

FIG. 23 shows the front top perspective of the strap system as it stands alone without the user' s shoe and foot.

FIG. 24 shows the bottom rear perspective of the strap system as it stands alone without the user's shoe and foot.