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Title:
FORCE-DETECTING INPUT STRUCTURE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/022254
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An input mechanism, such as a crown, detects amounts of applied force. In various examples, an assembly including an input mechanism has an enclosure; a stem coupled to the enclosure such that the stem is rotatable, translatable, and transversely moveable with respect to the enclosure; a sensor, coupled between the stem and the housing, to which force is transferred when the stem moves with respect to the housing; and a processing unit coupled to the sensor. The processing unit is operable to determine a measurement of the force, based on a signal from the sensor.

Inventors:
ELY, Colin M. (One Infinite Loop, MS: 305-1PHCupertino, California, 95014, US)
DE JONG, Erik G. (One Infinite Loop, MS: 305-1DRCupertino, CA, 95014, US)
ROTHKOPF, Fletcher R. (One Infinite Loop, MS: 305-1PHCupertino, CA, 95014, US)
Application Number:
US2017/040462
Publication Date:
February 01, 2018
Filing Date:
June 30, 2017
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
APPLE INC. (One Infinite Loop, Cupertino, California, 95014, US)
International Classes:
G01D5/241; G04C3/00; G04G21/00; G06F3/0346; G06F3/0362; H03K17/975
Domestic Patent References:
WO2014200766A12014-12-18
Foreign References:
US20160033342A12016-02-04
Other References:
None
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HEMENWAY, S. Craig et al. (410 Seventeenth Street, Suite 2200Denver, Colorado, 80202, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

What is claimed is:

1 . An electronic device, comprising:

a housing;

a collar, coupled to the housing, comprising:

a moveable conductor;

a conductive element; and

a separation defined between the moveable conductor and the conductive element; and

an input structure extending from the collar;

wherein movement of the input structure changes a capacitance between the moveable conductor and the conductive element.

2. The electronic device of claim 1 , further comprising a processing unit operative to determine an amount of force applied to the input structure based on the change in capacitance.

3. The electronic device of claim 1 , further comprising silicone disposed within the separation.

4. The electronic device of claim 1 , wherein the conductive element comprises a flex circuit that extends through at least part of the collar into the housing. 5. The electronic device of claim 1 , wherein the collar comprises:

an inner core to which the conductive element is coupled; and

a compliant material disposed in the separation that couples the conductive element and the moveable conductor.

6. The electronic device of claim 1 , wherein the input structure is operable to move without changing the capacitance between the moveable conductor and the conductive element.

7. An input mechanism assembly, comprising:

an enclosure;

a stem coupled to the enclosure, such that the stem is:

rotatable with respect to the enclosure;

translatable toward and away from the enclosure; and

transversely moveable with respect to the enclosure; a sensor, coupled between the stem and the enclosure, to which force is transferred when the stem moves transversely with respect to the enclosure; and

a processing unit, coupled to the sensor, operable to determine a measurement of the force, based on a signal from the sensor.

8. The input mechanism assembly of claim 7, wherein the processing unit is operative to determine a direction in which the stem moves transversely.

9. The input mechanism assembly of claim 7, wherein the sensor comprises a strain gauge.

10. The input mechanism assembly of claim 7, wherein the sensor comprises:

a first conductor;

a second conductor; and

a dielectric separating the first and second conductors.

1 1 . The input mechanism assembly of claim 10, wherein the dielectric comprises a compliant material.

12. The input mechanism assembly of claim 7, further comprising:

a collar coupled to the enclosure; wherein

the sensor couples the stem to the collar.

13. The input mechanism assembly of claim 7, further comprising a wireless

transmission mechanism that wirelessly couples the processing unit and the sensor.

14. The input mechanism assembly of claim 7, further comprising:

an additional sensor coupled between the stem and the processing unit; wherein the processing unit is operable to determine a measurement of a force that translates the stem, based on a signal from the additional sensor.

15. An electronic device, comprising:

a body;

a coupler positioned at least partially within the body;

an input mechanism, connected to the coupler, operable to move with respect to the body;

a capacitive sensor, coupled to the input mechanism, to which force is transferred when the input mechanism moves; and

a processing unit operable to ascertain an amount of the force based on a change in a capacitance of the capacitive sensor.

16. The electronic device of claim 15, wherein the coupler includes the capacitive sensor.

17. The electronic device of claim 15, wherein the capacitive sensor comprises:

a first capacitive element;

a second capacitive element; and

a compliant material positioned between the first and second capacitive elements; wherein

the compliant material:

extends between the coupler and the body; and

seals the coupler to the body. 18. The electronic device of claim 17, wherein a change in proximity between the first and second capacitive elements is proportional to the amount of the force.

19. The electronic device of claim 15, wherein the input mechanism moves transverse with respect to the body.

20. The electronic device of claim 15, wherein a portion of the input mechanism moves closer to the body.

Description:
FORCE-DETECTING INPUT STRUCTURE

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

[0001] This Patent Cooperation Treaty patent application claims priority to U.S. non- provisional application No. 15/219,253, filed July 25, 2016, and titled "Force-Detecting Input Structure," the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.

FIELD

[0002] The described embodiments relate generally to input mechanisms such as crowns. More particularly, the present embodiments relate to an input mechanism, such as a crown, that detects the amount of force applied.

BACKGROUND

[0003] Many devices, such as wearable electronic devices, use various input mechanisms to receive user input. Many devices, particularly small form factor devices, such as watches, smart watches, wearable devices, and so on, may have a limited number of input mechanisms

[0004] For example, many watches include a crown or similar input mechanisms. Some crowns can be rotated to wind the watch. Other crowns may be translated into a time- changing position whereupon they may be rotated to change the time of the watch.

SUMMARY

[0005] The present disclosure relates to an input mechanism, such as a crown, button, key, surface, or the like, that detects applied force. The input mechanism may be included in an electronic device. A user may provide input by rotating the input mechanism, translating the input mechanism, moving the input mechanism transversely, and so on. The input mechanism may include one or more force sensors that the electronic device may use to determine a non-binary amount of the force applied to the input mechanism. As the electronic device may determine non-binary amounts of force corresponding to different types of movement, the input mechanism may be used to receive a variety of different input.

[0006] In various embodiments, an electronic device includes a housing, a collar coupled to the housing, and an input structure extending from the collar. The collar includes a moveable conductor, a conductive element, and a separation defined between the moveable conductor and the conductive element. Movement of the input structure changes a capacitance between the moveable conductor and the conductive element.

[0007] In some examples, the electronic device further includes a processing unit operative to determine an amount of force applied to the input structure based on the change in capacitance. In numerous examples, the electronic device further includes silicone disposed within the separation.

[0008] In various examples, the conductive element includes a flex circuit that extends through at least part of the collar into the housing. In some examples, the collar includes an inner core to which the conductive element is coupled and a compliant material disposed in the separation that couples the conductive element and the moveable conductor. In numerous examples, the input structure is operable to move without changing the capacitance between the moveable conductor and the conductive element.

[0009] In some embodiments, an input mechanism assembly includes an enclosure and a stem coupled to the enclosure, such that the stem is rotatable with respect to the enclosure, translatable toward and away from the enclosure, and transversely moveable with respect to the enclosure. The input mechanism assembly further includes a sensor, coupled between the stem and the enclosure, to which force is transferred when the stem moves transversely with respect to the enclosure and a processing unit, coupled to the sensor, operable to determine a measurement of the force, based on a signal from the sensor. The processing unit may also be operative to determine a direction in which the stem moves transversely.

[0010] In various examples, the sensor is a strain gauge. In other examples, the sensor includes a first conductor, a second conductor, and a dielectric separating the first and second conductors. The dielectric may be a compliant material.

[0011] In numerous examples, input mechanism assembly further includes a collar coupled to the housing and the sensor couples the stem to the collar. In various examples, input mechanism assembly further includes a wireless transmission mechanism that wirelessly couples the processing unit and the sensor. In some examples, input mechanism assembly further includes an additional sensor coupled between the stem and the processing unit and the processing unit is operable to determine a measurement of a force that translates the stem, based on a signal from the additional sensor.

[0012] In numerous embodiments, an electronic device, comprising: a body; a coupler positioned at least partially within the body; an input mechanism, connected to the coupler, operable to move with respect to the body; a capacitive sensor, coupled to the input mechanism, to which force is transferred when the input mechanism moves; and a processing unit operable to ascertain an amount of the force based on a change in a capacitance of the capacitive sensor.

[0013] In various examples, the coupler includes the capacitive sensor. In some examples, the capacitive sensor includes a first capacitive element, a second capacitive element, and a compliant material positioned between the first and second capacitive elements. In some implementations of such examples, the compliant material extends between the coupler and the body and seals the coupler to the body.

[0014] In some examples, the input mechanism moves transverse with respect to the body. In various examples, a portion of the input mechanism moves closer to the body. In numerous examples, a change in proximity between the first and second conductors is proportional to the amount of the force.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0015] The disclosure will be readily understood by the following detailed description in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference numerals designate like structural elements.

[0016] FIG. 1 depicts an example electronic device including a force-detecting input structure.

[0017] FIG. 2A depicts a schematic cross-sectional view of the electronic device of FIG. 1 , taken along A-A of FIG. 1 , illustrating a first example of the force-detecting input structure.

[0018] FIG. 2B depicts the electronic device of FIG. 2A while a user is exerting force to move the input structure transversely with respect to a housing of the electronic device.

[0019] FIG. 2C depicts the electronic device of FIG. 2A while a user is exerting force to translate the input structure towards the housing of the electronic device.

[0020] FIG. 3 depicts a second example of a force-detecting input structure in accordance with further embodiments.

[0021 ] FIG. 4 depicts a third example of a force-detecting input structure in accordance with further embodiments.

[0022] FIG. 5 depicts a fourth example of a force-detecting input structure in accordance with further embodiments.

[0023] FIG. 6 depicts a fifth example of a force-detecting input structure in accordance with further embodiments.

[0024] FIG. 7 depicts a sixth example of a force-detecting input structure in accordance with further embodiments.

[0025] FIG. 8 depicts a seventh example of a force-detecting input structure in accordance with further embodiments.

[0026] FIG. 9 depicts an eighth example of a force-detecting input structure in accordance with further embodiments. [0027] FIG. 10 depicts a flow chart illustrating an example method for detecting force applied to a crown. This method may be performed by the electronic devices of FIGs. 1 -6.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0028] Reference will now be made in detail to representative embodiments illustrated in the accompanying drawings. It should be understood that the following descriptions are not intended to limit the embodiments to one preferred embodiment. To the contrary, it is intended to cover alternatives, modifications, and equivalents as can be included within the spirit and scope of the described embodiments as defined by the appended claims.

[0029] The description that follows includes sample systems, methods, and apparatuses that embody various elements of the present disclosure. However, it should be understood that the described disclosure may be practiced in a variety of forms in addition to those described herein.

[0030] The following disclosure relates to a crown or other input mechanism or structure, such as a button, key, switch, surface, or the like, that may be included in an electronic device. The input structure may rotate, translate, move transversely, and so on. The input structure may include one or more force sensors positioned in the input structure that may be used to determine an amount of applied force applied. As the electronic device may determine applied force corresponding to different types of movement, the input structure may be used to receive a variety of different inputs.

[0031] These and other embodiments are discussed below with reference to FIGs. 1 - 10. However, those skilled in the art will readily appreciate that the detailed description given herein with respect to these Figures is for explanatory purposes only and should not be construed as limiting.

[0032] FIG. 1 depicts an example electronic device 100, including a force-detecting input structure 101 . The electronic device 100 may be operable to receive input from a user. The electronic device 100 may also be operable to perform various actions in response to input received via the force-detecting input structure 101. The electronic device 100 may receive different inputs based on rotation of the force-detecting input structure 101 , translation of the force-detecting input structure 101 , transverse movement of the force-detecting input structure 101 , application of force to the force-detecting input structure 101 , and so on.

[0033] When force is exerted on the force-detecting input structure 101 , the electronic device 100 may ascertain or measure the force. Generally, the electronic device 100 may interpret different amounts of force as different inputs.

[0034] FIG. 2A depicts a schematic cross-sectional view of the electronic device 100 of FIG. 1 , taken along A-A of FIG. 1 , illustrating a first example of a force-detecting input structure 101 . The input structure 101 includes a stem 203 that is coupled to a housing 204, body, or other enclosure of the electronic device 100. The input structure 101 is coupled to the housing 204 via a collar 208 or other coupler, bushing 207, and one or more gaskets 209.

[0035] With reference to FIGs. 2A-2C, the input mechanism assembly involving the input structure 101 will now be described in more detail. The collar 208 may be positioned an aperture defined by the housing 204 (e.g., a first aperture). A gasket 21 1 may be compressed between the collar 208 and the housing 204, coupling the collar 208 to the housing 204. The gasket 21 1 may form a seal or other barrier against passage of contaminants. The seal may be a liquid seal. The collar 208 may define an aperture (e.g., a second aperture). A portion of the stem 203 is positioned in the aperture defined by the collar 208.

[0036] The collar 208 includes an inner core 225. Flex circuits 214a, 214b or other conductors are coupled to the inner core 225. The collar 208 also includes compliant silicone 213a, 213b or other compliant dielectric material coupled to the flex circuits 214a, 214b. The compliant silicone 213a, 213b may be a portion of the gasket 21 1 that extends at least partially through the collar 208. The collar 208 further includes moveable conductors 212a, 212b coupled to the compliant silicone 213a, 213b.

[0037] The stem 203 is slideably coupled at least partially around the collar 208 by one or more bushings 207. The portion of the stem 203 extending from the collar 208 is further slideably coupled at least partially within the collar 208 by one or more gaskets 209 (such as one or more o-rings). These slideable couplings allows the stem 203 to rotate with respect to the housing 204 and the collar 208.

[0038] In some embodiments, the bushing 207 and/or the gasket 209 may be formed from compliant materials such as high molecular weight polyethylene, elastomer, and so on. In various embodiments, the stem 203 and/or the collar 208 may be formed of polished or coated titanium or other suitable materials that further permit the stem 203 to slide within and around the collar 208. The bushing 207 and the gasket 209 may bear the majority of the stress relating to sliding of the stem 203.

[0039] A cap 202, knob, or similar structure may be coupled to the stem 203. In some implementations, the stem 203 may snap to fit into the cap 202. In various implementations, the stem 203 may be bonded or otherwise attached to the cap 202, such as by an adhesive.

[0040] Force detection using the input structure 101 will now be described. The collar 208 includes a number of capacitive sensors formed by the flex circuits 214a, 214b, compliant silicone 213a, 213b, and the moveable conductors 212a, 212b. A capacitance of these respective capacitive sensors may be dependent on the proximity of the respective capacitive elements (e.g., the moveable conductors 212a, 212b and the flex circuits 214a, 214b) across separations defined between the respective capacitive elements. Compliant silicone 213a, 213b is positioned within the separations. The compliant silicone 213a, 213b deforms under the application of force to allow the moveable conductors 212a, 212b to move closer to and further away from the flex circuits 214a, 214b, altering the capacitance between these respective capacitive elements.

[0041] The movement of the moveable conductors 212a, 212b with respect to the flex circuits 214a, 214b may be proportional to the force exerted. Similarly, the changes in capacitance of the capacitive sensors may be proportional to the movement of the moveable conductors 212a, 212b with respect to the flex circuits 214a, 214b. Thus, the changes in capacitance between the capacitive elements may be proportional to the force exerted.

[0042] A processing unit 223 is electrically coupled to the flex circuits 214a, 214b or other conductive elements. The processing unit 223 receives signals that indicate changes in capacitance between the respective capacitive elements. The processing unit 223 correlates these changes in capacitance to amounts of force to determine the force applied to the input structure 101. For example, the processing unit 223 may utilize a lookup table or other data structure stored in a non-transitory storage medium correlating capacitances and force amounts. The processing unit 223 may be able to determine non-binary amounts forces that are applied.

[0043] Transverse movement of the input structure 101 (e.g., movement in one of the directions 262 shown in FIG. 2B) will now be described. Force applied to the input structure 101 is transferred by the stem 203 to the respective moveable conductors 212a, 212b, and therefore to the compliant silicone 213a, 213b. This transferred force deforms the compliant silicone 213a, 213b, thereby changing the proximity between the moveable conductors 212a, 212b and the flex circuits 214a, 214b. These changes in proximity may alter capacitance between the moveable conductors 212a, 212b and the flex circuits 214a, 214b.

[0044] FIG. 2B depicts the electronic device 100 of FIG. 2A while a user 230 is exerting force to transversely move the input structure 101 in one of the directions 261 shown in FIG. 2B. The stem 203 receives and transfers the exerted force to the collar 208. This transferred force deforms the compliant silicone 213a, 213b. This shifts the moveable conductor 212a closer to the flex circuit 214a. This also shifts the moveable conductor 212b further from the flex circuit 214b. The change in proximity between the moveable conductors 212a, 212b and the flex circuits 214a, 214b changes the capacitance of the respective capacitive sensors formed thereby. The processing unit 223 analyzes these changes in capacitance to determine the amount of the force exerted on the input structure 101 . [0045] Additionally, the processing unit 223 may analyze changes in capacitance to determine other information. For example, the processing unit 223 may analyze changes in capacitance to determine a direction in which the force is applied, additional forces applied to the input structure 101 , a direction of the transverse movement of the input structure 101 , and so on. For example, force applied in the direction shown in FIG. 2B may result in an increase in the capacitance of the capacitive sensor (e.g., force sensor) formed by the moveable conductor 212a and the flex circuit 214a and a decrease in capacitance of the capacitive sensor formed by the moveable conductor 212b and the flex circuit 214b. The processing unit 223 may compare the changes in capacitance to determine that the force is applied in the direction shown in FIG. 2B.

[0046] Translational movement (e.g., movement in one of the directions 262 shown in FIG. 2C) of the input structure 101 will now be described. The slideable coupling of the stem 203 with respect to the collar 208 by the bushing 207 and the gasket 209 also allows the stem 203 to move toward the housing 204 and the collar 208 and/or away from the housing 204 and the collar in one of the directions 262 shown in FIG. 2C. Thus, the stem 203 is translatable. Similarly to rotational movement, the bushing 207 and the gasket 209 may bear the majority of the stress related to the sliding of the stem 203.

[0047] FIG. 2C depicts the electronic device 100 of FIG. 2A while a user 230 is exerting force to move the input structure 101 towards the housing 204. Translation of the input structure 101 towards the housing 204 decreases gaps between the cap 202 and the housing 204 and/or the collar 208.

[0048] Although the moveable conductors 212a, 212b are illustrated and described as separate components with respect to FIGs. 2A-2C, it is understood that this is an example. In various implementations, the moveable conductors 212a, 212b may be a single, unitary component. For example, in some implementations, the moveable conductors 212a, 212b may be a ring positioned around the compliant silicone 213a, 213b.

[0049] In various implementations, the electronic device 100 may include additional components that interact with movement of the input structure 101. In some embodiments, the electronic device 100 may include one or more components that resist translation of the input structure 101 towards the housing 204 and/or reverse such translation after force is exerted. For example, in some implementations, the electronic device 100 may include a dome switch or similar actuator mechanism connected in various ways to the stem 203. Translation of the stem 203 may compress the dome switch. Thus, the dome switch may resist translation of the stem 203. However, sufficient force translating the stem 203 may overcome the resistance and compress the dome switch. After exertion of the force, the dome switch may uncompress. This may reverse the translation of the stem 203. [0050] In various embodiments, compression of the dome switch may also provide a tactile output in response to translation of the stem 203. In various implementations, the processing unit 223 may receive one or more signals related to compression or activation of the dome switch. By way of example, see the fourth example of a force-detecting input structure of FIG. 5.

[0051] In numerous embodiments, the electronic device 100 may include various mechanisms for detecting rotation, translation, or other movement of the stem 203. For example, in various implementations, one or more detectable elements may be positioned on the stem 203 and/or other components coupled to the stem 203. The detectable element may be any mechanism that is detectable by a detector. The detector may detect the detectable element to track translational, rotational, and/or transverse movement of the stem 203. In some implementations, the detector may be an optical detector, and the detectable element may be a series of coded markings that the optical detector detects to determine position and/or movement of the stem 203 with respect to the detector.

[0052] The electronic device 100 may include various additional components. For example, a cover glass 224 and/or display, touch display, and so on may be coupled to the housing 204. Various configurations are possible and contemplated without departing from the scope of the present disclosure.

[0053] Although FIGs. 2A-2C illustrate the input structure 101 as having capacitive sensors disposed in the collar 208 that may be used to detect the amount of force applied to transversely move the input structure 101 , it is understood that this is an example. Various configurations of the input structure 101 are possible and contemplated without departing from the scope of the present disclosure.

[0054] For example, FIG. 3 depicts a second example of a force-detecting input structure 301 in accordance with further embodiments. Similar to the input structure 101 of FIGs. 2A- 2C, the force-detecting input structure 301 includes a stem 303 slideably coupled to the housing 304, body, or other enclosure via the collar 308 or other coupler. However, in this example, the collar 308 may not include capacitive sensors. Instead, the bushings 307a, 307b may include capacitive sensors that may be used to detect force applied to the force- detecting input structure 301 . The capacitive sensors may respectively include first conductors 341 a, 341 b and second conductors 343a, 343b separated by compliant material 342a, 342b. The compliant material 342a, 342b allows movement of the first conductors 341 a, 341 b and second conductors 343a, 343b in response to transverse movement of the stem 303. The flex circuits 314a, 314b extend through the collar 308 to the bushings 307a, 307b to connect the respective capacitive sensors to the processing unit 323. [0055] In this example, the first conductors 341 a, 341 b and second conductors 343a, 343b may be formed of materials that are conductive but still allow sliding of the stem 303 with respect to the collar 308. For example, compliant capacitive materials such as metal- doped polymers may be used. In other implementations, conductive materials that do not allow sliding may be embedded in material that does allow sliding.

[0056] In other implementations, the bushings 307a, 307b may not include such conductive materials but may be compliant to allow movement of the stem 303 and the collar 308. In such other implementations, portions of the stem 303 and the collar 308 may be the first and second conductors that form the respective capacitive sensors. For example, the entire bushings 307a, 307b may be formed of such a compliant material, the bushings 307a, 307b may include compliant material within the bushings 307a, 307b that allow the movement, and so on.

[0057] Although the bushings 307a, 307b are illustrated as including components forming capacitive sensors in the example shown in FIG. 3, it is understood that this is an example. In other implementations, capacitive sensors may be formed by elements in other components, such as the gasket 309 without departing from the scope of the present disclosure. Further, although the input structures 101 and 301 of FIGs. 2A-2C and 3 illustrate capacitive sensors that are used to detect amounts of force that move the input structures 101 and 301 transversely, it is understood that these are examples. Input structures in other implementations may be configured to detect amounts of force exerted in other directions without departing from the scope of the present disclosure.

[0058] For example, FIG. 4 depicts a third example of a force-detecting input structure 401 in accordance with further embodiments where amounts of force that translate the input structure 401 toward and/or away from the housing 404 may be detected. Similar to the input structure 101 of FIGs. 2A-2C, the input structure 401 includes compliant material 444a, 444b, moveable portions 412a, and flex circuits 414a, 414b or other conductive materials. However, in this example, the moveable portions 412a, 412b are moveable by translation of the input structure 401 . Thus, capacitive sensors formed by the moveable portions 412a, 412b, the flex circuits 414a, 414b, and the compliant material 444a, 444b may be used to detect amounts of force that translate the input structure 401 .

[0059] In still other examples, capacitive sensors may be formed by other components of the input structure 401 and/or electronic devices that include such input structures 401 . FIG. 5 depicts a fourth example of a force-detecting input structure 501 in accordance with further embodiments where a shear plate 521 positioned between the stem 503 and a dome switch 522 or other actuator includes such a capacitive sensor. [0060] In this embodiment, a structure 517 couples the collar 508 to the housing 504. The dome switch 522 is mounted to the structure 517 so that translation of the stem 503 may compress the dome switch 522. The shear plate 521 separates the dome switch 522 from the stem 503. Flex circuit 518 and/or other electrical connections connect the dome switch 522 and the processing unit 523.

[0061] In this example, the shear plate 521 includes a capacitive sensor formed by a first conductor 545 separated from a second conductor 547 by a compliant material 546. The capacitive sensor may be used to detect amounts of force that translate the input structure 501 .

[0062] Contrasted with the input structure 101 of FIGs. 2A-2C, this implementation may allow detection of force using the input structure 501 while allowing use of a unitary collar 508. This implementation may also allow detection of force using the input structure 501 without extending the flex circuit 514 through the collar 508, gasket 51 1 , and so on.

[0063] Although the examples illustrated in FIGs. 2A-5 directly connect the processing units 223-523 to the respective capacitive sensors, it is understood that these are examples. Other configurations are possible and contemplated without departing from the scope of the present disclosure. For example, in various implementations, wireless connections and/or wireless transmission mechanisms may be used that allow unitary collars 208-508 and/or do not extend electrical connections through gaskets 21 1 -51 1 and/or other components.

[0064] For example, FIG. 6 depicts a fifth example of a force-detecting input structure 601 in accordance with further embodiments that uses inductive coils 649, 650 as a wireless transmission mechanism to electrically connect capacitive sensors with processing unit 623 (via a flex circuit 648 and/or other electrical connection). In this example, inductive coils 649, 650 inductively exchange power such that the processing unit 623 receives changes in capacitance of capacitive sensors formed by moveable portions 612a, 612b, compliant material 613a, 613b, flex circuits 614a, 614b and/or other electrical connection. In this way, the processing unit 623 may determine applied force without extending the flex circuit 648 through the gasket 61 1 .

[0065] Although the examples illustrated in FIGs. 2A-6 detect force applied to the various input structures 101 -601 using the various respective capacitive sensors, it is understood that these are examples. In various implementations, force detection sensors other than and/or in addition to capacitive sensors may be used without departing from the scope of the present disclosure. For example, in various implementations, piezoelectric material that generates a voltage when deformed may be used. In such examples, the voltage may be proportional to the amount of deformation, and thus the force exerted. As such, the voltage generated by the piezoelectric material may be correlated to force amounts to determine the force exerted.

[0066] By way of another example, strain gauges may be used as force detection sensors in various implementations instead of and/or in addition to capacitive sensors. FIG. 7 depicts a sixth example of a force-detecting input structure 701 in accordance with further embodiments that utilize strain gauges 751 a, 751 b to determine force exerted on the input structure 701 .

[0067] In this example, the collar 708 may be formed from materials that can be strained by force transferred by the stem 703. Strain gauges 751 a, 751 b are disposed on the collar 708 in areas of the collar 708 that are strained by the transferred force. The processing unit 723 receives signals indicating the strain via flex circuits 714a, 714b and/or electrical connections and may correlate the strain to force amounts to determine force applied to the input structure 701 .

[0068] Although FIG. 7 illustrates a particular configuration of strain gauges 751 a, 751 b, it is understood that this is an example. In various implementations, various components may be strained by force applied to the input structure 701 and strain gauges 751 a, 751 b may be disposed on and/or in such components.

[0069] By way of example, FIG. 8 depicts a seventh example of a force-detecting input structure 801 in accordance with further embodiments. In this example, a shaft of the stem 803 may be formed from a material that is strained by force exerted on the stem 803 and strain gauges 852a, 852b may be disposed on the shaft. The processing unit 823 may wirelessly receive strain data from the strain gauges 852a, 852b via inductive coils 853, 854 (to which the processing unit 823 may be coupled via the flex circuit 814 and/or other electrical connections). The processing unit 823 may correlate the strain to force amounts to determine force applied to the input structure 801 .

[0070] By way of another example, FIG. 9 depicts an eighth example of a force-detecting input structure 901 in accordance with further embodiments. In this example, arms 955a, 955b of the stem 903 may be formed from a material that is strained by force exerted on the stem 903 and strain gauges 952a, 952b may be disposed on the arms 955a, 955b. The processing unit 923 may wirelessly receive strain data via inductive coils 953, 954 and the flex circuit 914 and/or other electrical connection and correlate the strain to force amounts.

[0071] Although FIGs. 2A-9 illustrate and describe various force sensors that are variously configured and positioned to detect the amount of forces applied to the respective input structures 101 -901 in various directions, it is understood that these are examples. In various implementations, any kind of force sensors may be located in a variety of different areas to detect the amount of a variety of different forces that may be exerted on the input structures 101 -901 without departing from the scope of the present disclosure.

[0072] Further, although the input structures 101 -901 are illustrated as crowns with respect to FIGs. 2A-9, it is understood that these are examples. In various implementations, the techniques discussed herein may be utilized with a variety of different input mechanisms and/or input mechanism assemblies without departing from the scope of the present disclosure. Such input mechanisms may be operable to receive translational input, rotational input, input related to transverse movement, and/or a variety of different movement related input.

[0073] Additionally, although the electronic devices 100 of FIGs. 1 -9 are illustrated as a smart watch, it is understood that these are examples. In various implementations, the techniques illustrated and described herein may be utilized with a variety of different devices without departing from the scope of the present disclosure. Such devices may include wearable electronic devices, laptop computing devices, cellular telephones, displays, tablet computing devices, mobile computing devices, smart phones, digital media players, desktop computing devices, printers, speakers, input devices, and so on.

[0074] FIG. 10 depicts a flow chart illustrating an example method 1000 for detecting force applied to a crown or other input structure. This method 1000 may be performed by the electronic devices 100 of FIGs. 1 -6.

[0075] At 1010, an electronic device operates. The flow proceeds to 1020 where the electronic device monitors the capacitance of one or more capacitive sensors associated with force exerted on an input mechanism such as a crown. Next, the flow proceeds to 1030 where the electronic device determines whether or not the capacitance has changed.

[0076] If the capacitance has not changed, the flow returns to 1010 where the electronic device continues to operate. Otherwise, the flow proceeds to 1040.

[0077] At 1040, after the electronic device determines that the capacitance of one or more capacitive sensors associated with force exerted on an input mechanism such as a crown has changed, the electronic device correlates the capacitance change to an amount of force. The flow then proceeds to 1050 where the electronic device performs one or more actions corresponding to the force amount.

[0078] For example, the electronic device may interpret the force amount as input indicating to select an icon displayed on a display and/or to execute an application associated with such an icon. In some examples, the electronic device may interpret the force amount as input indicating to select the icon displayed on the display if the force amount exceeds a first force threshold and to execute the application associated with the icon if the force amount exceeds a second, greater threshold. In this way, application of force may be used by a user to signal actions typically triggered by a single mouse click and a double mouse click of the icon without utilization of a mouse as an input device.

[0079] From 1050, after the electronic device performs the one or more actions corresponding to the amount of force, the flow returns to 1010. At 1010, the electronic device continues to operate.

[0080] Although the example method 1000 is illustrated and described as including particular operations performed in a particular order, it is understood that this is an example. In various implementations, various orders of the same, similar, and/or different operations may be performed without departing from the scope of the present disclosure.

[0081] For example, the example method 1000 is illustrated and described as monitoring changes in the capacitance of a capacitive sensor and determining force amounts based on such changes. However, in various implementations, force sensors other than capacitive sensors may be used without departing from the scope of the present disclosure. Use of such other force sensors may include monitoring voltages generated by deformation of piezoelectric material, receiving signals from one or more strain gauges, and so on.

[0082] As described above and illustrated in the accompanying figures, the present disclosure relates to a crown or other input mechanism included in an electronic device, such as a button, key, switch, surface, or the like. The crown may rotate, translate, move transversely, and so on. The crown may include one or more force sensors positioned in the input mechanism that may be used to determine an amount of force applied to the crown. In this way, the crown may be used to receive a variety of different inputs from the user.

[0083] In the present disclosure, the methods disclosed may be implemented as sets of instructions or software readable by a device. Further, it is understood that the specific order or hierarchy of steps in the methods disclosed are examples of sample approaches. In other embodiments, the specific order or hierarchy of steps in the method can be rearranged while remaining within the disclosed subject matter. The accompanying method claims present elements of the various steps in a sample order, and are not necessarily meant to be limited to the specific order or hierarchy presented.

[0084] The foregoing description, for purposes of explanation, used specific

nomenclature to provide a thorough understanding of the described embodiments.

However, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art that the specific details are not required in order to practice the described embodiments. Thus, the foregoing descriptions of the specific embodiments described herein are presented for purposes of illustration and description. They are not targeted to be exhaustive or to limit the embodiments to the precise forms disclosed. It will be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art that many modifications and variations are possible in view of the above teachings.