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Title:
FUNCTIONAL, SOCIALLY-ENABLED JEWELRY AND SYSTEMS FOR MULTI-DEVICE INTERACTION
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/013744
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An item of wearable jewelry, such as a bracelet, includes a support having an energizable indicator. A sensor detects a triggering event, and a control unit, energizes the indicator to generate a default indicating condition by default, and to change the default indicating condition in response to detection of the triggering event.

Inventors:
BRICKEN, Colin (2100 3rd Avenue, #1201Seattle, WA, 98121, US)
ALEVIZOS, Theodore (3051 NE 86th Street, Seattle, WA, 98115, US)
LION, David (1912 36th Street, Seattle, WA, 98103, US)
FOSTER, Jed (6542 Francis Avenue SE, Auburn, WA, 98092, US)
CHINOWSKY, Timothy (2409 E. Helen Street, Seattle, WA, 98112, US)
UNGER, Martin (532 29th Avenue, Seattle, WA, 98122, US)
BORWICK, Charles (414 14th Avenue E, Seattle, WA, 98112, US)
ADELSON, Alex (P.O. Box 145, Andes, NY, 13731, US)
Application Number:
US2017/041820
Publication Date:
January 18, 2018
Filing Date:
July 13, 2017
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
LOOP DEVICES, INC. (113 Cherry Street, #70880Seattle, WA, 98104, US)
International Classes:
A44C5/00; G06F21/35; G08B6/00; F21W121/06
Domestic Patent References:
WO2015099968A12015-07-02
Foreign References:
US20140266598A12014-09-18
US20160026326A12016-01-28
US9368006B12016-06-14
US20040263473A12004-12-30
US20080300055A12008-12-04
US20100268056A12010-10-21
US20100085279A12010-04-08
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ISRAEL, Alan (Kirschstein, Israel Schiffmiller & Pieroni, P.C.,425 Fifth Avenue, 5th Floo, New York NY, 10016-2223, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
WHAT IS CLAIMED IS:

1. An item of jewelry, comprising:

a support adapted to be worn on a user;

an energizable indicator on the support;

a sensor on the support for detecting a triggering event; and a control unit on the support for energizing the indicator to generate a default indicating condition by default, and to change the default indicating condition in response to detection of the triggering event,

2. The item of jewelry of claim 1 , wherein the support includes a display, and wherein the indicator includes a set of lights that are controlled by the control unit to generate a default light pattern on the display, and to change the default light pattern to a different light pattern in response to detection of the triggering event,

3. The item of jewelry of claim 2, wherein the sensor detects different levels of the triggering event, and wherein the control unit successively and dynamically changes the default light pattern to successively different light patterns in response to detection of the different levels of the triggering event.

4. The item of jewelry of claim 1 , wherein the support has detachable segments, and an avatar displayed on at least one of the segments.

5. The item of jewelry of claim 1 , wherein the indicator includes a vibration motor that is controlled by the control unit to emit vibrations as a default vibration pattern, and to change the default vibration pattern to a different vibration pattern in response to detection of the triggering event.

6. The item of jewelry of claim 1, wherein the sensor is selected from the group consisting of a microphone for detecting sounds, an acceleromeier for detecting motion, a gyroscope for detecting position and orientation, a transceiver for detecting signal availability, a color sensor for detecting color, and a timer for counting time,

7. A communication system, comprising:

at least one item of jewelry, the jewelry item including a support adapted to be worn on a user, an energizable indicator, a sensor for detecting a triggering event, and a control unit for energizing the indicator to generate a default indicating condition by default; and

a master device in wireless communication with the jewelry item, at least one of the master device and the control unit being operative to change the default indicating condition in response to detection of the triggering event,

8. The communication system of claim 7, wherein the master device is selected from the group consisting of a smart phone, a server, a tablet, and a computer,

9. The communication system of claim 7. wherein the support includes a display, and wherein the indicator includes a set of lights that are controlled by the control unit to generate a default light pattern on the display, and to change the default light pattern to a different light pattern in response to detection of the triggering event,

10. The communication system of claim 9, wherein the sensor detects different levels of the triggering event, and wherein the control unit successively and dynamically changes the default light pattern to successively different light patterns in response to detection of the different levels of the triggering event ,

1 1. The communication system of claim 7, wherein the indicator includes a vibration motor that is controlled by the control unit to emit vibrations as a. default vibration pattern, and to change the default vibration pattern to a different vibration pattern in response to detection of the triggering event.

12. The communication system of claim 7, wherein the sensor is selected from the group consisting of a microphone for detecting sounds, an accelerometer for detecting motion, a gyroscope for detecting position and orientation, a transceiver for detecting shared signal availability, a color sensor for detecting color, and a timer for counting time.

13. The communication system of claim 7, wherein there are multiple items of jewelry arranged in groups, and wherein the master device bidirectionally communicates with ail the items in each group.

14. The communication system of claim 7, wherein there are multiple items of jewelry arranged in a wireless mesh network in which the items communicate with one another,

Description:
FUNCTIONAL, SOCIALLY-ENABLED JEWELRY AND SYSTEMS FOR MULTI-DEVICE INTERACTION

TECHNICAL FIELD In general, the present disclosure relates to communication and signaling devices and, more particularly, to functional jewelry that can communicate with each other and can interact with users, and can allow users of the jewelry to communicate and interact with one another.

BACKGROUND

Functional, socially-enabled jewelry, particularly bracelets, is generally known from International Patent Application No. PCT/US2G 15/000484, filed December 23, 2015. The present disclosure is directed to improvements in such jewelry and to systems for, and methods of, interacting with such jewelry. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

The accompanying figures, where like reference numerals refer to identical or functionally similar elements throughout the separate views, together with the detailed description below, are incorporated in and form part of the specification, and serve to further illustrate embodiments of concepts of the present disclosure, and explain various principles and advantages of those embodiments.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a bracelet in accordance with one embodiment of this disclosure.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram of components mounted on the bracelet of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the bracelet of FIG. 1 and diagrammatically depicts various lighting effects that may be displayed thereon.

FIG, 4 is a pictorial view of another embodiment,

FIG. 5 is a pictorial view of another embodiment.

FIG. 6 is a pictorial view of another embodiment.

FIG. 7 is a pictorial view of another embodiment.

FIG. 8 is a pictorial view of another embodiment.

FIG. 9 is a pictorial view of another embodiment.

FIG, 10 is a pictorial view of another embodiment.

FIG, 1 1 is a pictorial view of another embodiment. FIG, 12 is a pictorial view of another embodiment.

FIG, 13 is a pictorial view of another embodiment.

FIG. 14 ss a pictorial view of another embodiment.

FIG. 15 is a perspective view of another embodiment.

FIG. 16 is a block diagram of another embodiment,

FIG. J 7 is a block diagram of another embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION FIG, 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of an item of jewelry, for example, a wrist-worn bracelet 10 having an interchangeable fascial layer 12 that, in the illustrated embodiment, is divided into a plurality of modular segments 13, 14, 16, 18, 20 that are preferably decorative. The segments may be iighi-transmissive or light-reactive. The segments may be configured in any size or any desired shape, such as curved, as illustrated. Typically, the segments 13, 14, 16, 18, 20 are detachably and removably mounted on the bracelet 10 and are backed by lighting elements, such as light-emitting diode (LED) assemblies 36 (see FIG. 2), which are selectively energized to emit light either through the segments, or to react with light- reactive materials on the segments, to generate a display on the segments that may be viewed by a user wearing the jewelry stem, or by another. The display can be any visible pattern or image that depicts any person, place, or thing and includes, by way of non-limiting example, any alphanumeric message or text, alert, graphic, game or like communication. Each of the LED assemblies 36 advantageously includes individual red, green, and blue LEDs that are controllable to emit any of millions of different colors and constitute the pixels of the displayed image. End portions 22, 24 of the bracelet 10 are typically not backed by any LEDs, but are provided with touch electrodes 72 (see FIG, 2) that they serve as touchpads and provide both input and output functions to control the bracelet. Joints 26 are preferably made of a flexible material, such as plastic, and provide a flexible seal between adjacent segments 13, 14, 16, 18, 20.

FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of the electronic components on the bracelet 10. The bracelet 10 is a portable, wireless device having a battery 50, preferably rechargeable via a wired or wireless, charging interface 52. The battery 50 is connected to a voltage regulator 54 that provides a steady and appropriate DC voltage to a main control unit 56. The main control unit 56 is typically a microcontroller, or any integrated circuit device capable of performing the control functions described herein, As illustrated, the main control unit 56 is connected to, and in communication with, an LED controller 58 that controls the LED assemblies 36 to energize and cause them to illuminate, a touch interface controller 60 that controls the touch electrodes 72 to detect and respond to touch, one or more positional or situational sensors 62 to detect and respond to various triggering events, a vibration motor 64 to emit vibrations upon command, and a radio transceiver 66, preferably operable under any wireless communication protocol, such as Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi) or Bluetooth, especially the Bluetooth low energy (BLE) version or its equivalent. The radio transceiver 66 provides the primary input-output wireless communication with other devices, such as other bracelets 10, as well as master devices that may be used to program or instruct the bracelets 10, such as desktop computers, laptop computers, smart phones, and tablets, in peer-to-peer, or master-slave, or mesh network, configurations.

The sensors 62 may vary from embodiment to embodiment, depending on the intended capabilities of the bracelet 10, The sensors 62 may, in some embodiments, comprise an acceierometer for detecting motion, such as an acceierometer, or a gyroscope for detecting gestures or movements. The gyroscope may be tri-axial in design, and may be configured as an analog device, such as a micro-electrical- mechanical-system (MEMS) device, or as a digital device, such as an attitude and heading reference system (AI-1R8) device. The sensors 62 trigger the main control unit 56 to take action, like pairing and unpairing of the transceiver 66, activation of the LED assemblies 36, activation of the vibration motor 64, and communication. The sensors 62 may also include a microphone for detecting sound, as well as a color sensor or colorimeter for detecting color, or a timer for counting time. The microphone could, for example, allow the bracelet 10 to detect the rhythm and beat or volume of speech or music, and to set or alter the frequency, intensity, or other characteristics of the light emitted by the LED assemblies 36, or of vibrations emitted by the vibration motor 64. The color sensor could, for example, allow the bracelet 10 to detect the color of a wearer's clothing and match the color output of the LED assemblies 36 to the detected color.

In accordance with another aspect of this invention, the jewelry item, as configured particularly as the bracelet 10 worn on a user's wrist, is controlled to achieve a compelling appearance while achieving acceptable battery life through the use of responsive variable light effects. The light effects may be generated not only by energizing the aforementioned LED assemblies 36, but also by energizing other different light sources, such as electroluminescent materials, fluorescent/incandescent light sources, lasers, light-reactive materials, and similar light sources. The characteristics of these light effects may include a change in appearance and intensity in response to detection by the sensor 62 of a triggering event. The event might be a predetermined volume or frequency of sound detected by the microphone 70, a predetermined position, gesture, motion, and/or orientation detected by the accelerorneter 68 or a gyroscope, a predetermined proximity or shared signal availability detected by the transceiver 66, a predetermined color detected by the color sensor 72, and a predetermined time detected by a timer, or any combination of these or other triggering events. The sensors 62 trigger the main control unit 56 to take action, like pairing and impairing of the transceiver 66, activation of the LED assemblies 36, activation of the vibration motor 64, and communication.

The characteristics of these light effects may advantageously be characterized by the use of broad and varied color palettes, smoothly running or deliberately distorted animations, and random unpredictable displays, which are attractive, surprising, and unusual.

Baseline activity or the default display is attractive and energy efficient. For example, the default display may be a simulated flickering "candle" effect (FIG. 3), that conserves energy consumption so that the bracelet battery 50 can support over a relatively long working lifetime an extended display of the baseline activity. In one embodiment, rotating one's wrist in one circumferential direction can be detected by the sensors 62 and trigger the main control unit 56 to make the default display of the simulated candle burn successively brighter, while rotating one's wrist in the opposite circumferential direction can be detected by the sensors 62 and trigger the main control unit 56 to make the simulated candle burn successively dimmer and eventually be extinguished.

A higher activity as measured by the bracelet sensors 62 may result in more intensive and progressive light effects. Since high activity displays consume more electrical power, the light display preferably quickly subsides to the baseline activity level or default display unless an ever increasing triggering event or additional amount of sensor activity is detected. Natural phenomena may be mimicked. For instance, as shown in FIG. 3, the bracelet 10 may exhibit a "fire" effect, in which case, a single white. LED may create and simulate a simulated fire as the baseline activity or default display. Any movement, such as tilting or rotating or thrusting, of the bracelet, as measured by its sensor 62, or waving one's other hand over the bracelet, would "fan the flames" and cause the default display of the simulated fire to grow in size, color, and intensity. When such movement subsides, the display will die down to the baseline activity, like a fire consuming its fuel. Tapping the bracelet, as detected by sensor 62, may cause the display of a simulated shower of "sparks" (white LEDs) that move across the display and quickly vanish. The more taps and the greater intensity of the taps, the more sparks will be displayed. As another instance shown in FIG. 3, the bracelet may exhibit a "rain" effect, in which case, a single blue LED may recreate and simulate a raindrop hitting the bracelet at a random location as the baseline activity or the default display, More LEDs can simulate the raindrop then moving in a direction according to the movement of the bracelet as indicated by the bracelet sensor 62 (raindrop slides off the bracelet). During increased activity, the raindrop may increase in size to be more like a puddle (more LEDs). Tapping the bracelet could result in the dynamic display of "ripples" in the puddle. Many other different effects are contemplated by this invention.

A color palette may be built around a single key color. This key color or the default display may be selected or changed by the user according to preference, for instance, to match a color of an outfit worn on a particular occasion. The pattern palette will then automatically adjust. For instance, the default key color of the "fire" effect may be orange, leading to a palette of reds, oranges, and yellows of varying saturation. If the user changed the key color to blue, then the "fire" palette would change to greens, blues, and violets. Many other different color palettes are contemplated by this invention,

A light animation may respond to sounds or music having a beat or rhythm to provide a clear visual indication of the beat or rhythm with a corresponding satisfying color or intensity, while conserving electrical power to enable long battery life. FIG. 3 depicts an exemplary change in color and a change in display animation (e.g., "fireworks") in response to sound or music detection. Different display animations may be combined. Time may serve as a primary sensor input to provide an attractive display that has a practical use as a timekeeper, Time may he arranged in linear patterns, e.g., ¾ time in music, or in non-linear, random or distorted patterns to create and vary the display.

A primary color may he selected from a color picker, or from an image from a user's library or camera. The selected color may be used as the primary color across different light patterns. Each light pattern uses a primary color and a color rule (e.g., complementary colors, a color triad, etc.) to determine the other colors in the light pattern. All the light sources may display a color from the color picker, or from the image selected by the user. Once the color is selected, the bracelet can return to normal operation with new colors applied to all or specific light patterns. The color can change based on such factors as music rhythm, tapping on the bracelet, wrist motion, time, etc.

Users can record a sequence of light effects/patterns, save the sequence, and then share that sequence with other users. The sequence may be a series of scenes, a chase, or any sequence programmed, for example, by using digital multiplex (DMX) language to control lighting.

in summary, the main control unit 56 or controller is operative to implement variable visual representations or visible light patterns, as well as to implement variable sound and/or tactile patterns generated by the onboard vibration motor 64 based, for example, on the combination of personal, social, and/or environmental information and/or triggering events. The sound patterns and the light patterns may be combined in hybrid animations. This information may be collected and stored in a master database by the main control unit 56, and by the supporting social network infrastructure of the bracelet. The personal information may include any number and/or combination of physical actions (e.g., walking, dancing, waving, clapping, etc.). The social information may include physical proximity to an individual and/or a group or groups. The individuals may be friends, acquaintances, or strangers in a descending order of intimacy. The social information may include different levels of social intercourse, such as body language, and all sorts of physical or signaling exchanges that are affected by frequency and/or duration of any or all of these activities. The environmental or location information may be communicated by a pattern, frequency and/or duration of time spent in specific locations (e.g., parks, concerts, sporting events), audible stimuli (e.g., music, conversation, applause), the time of day, or a specific time and/or date.

The bracelet 10 emits the output of a light responsive effect, which may be comprised of one or more lights, and/or may include one or more vibrations from the vibration motor 64. The lights and vibrations may change over time in different patterns. The main control unit 56 interprets data collected by the sensors 62 such as, but not limited to, motion, audio, color, time, and Bluetooth proximity or shared signal availability and connectivity, The main control unit 56 may evaluate social network graphs and metadata collected from all the sensors 62, and applies these factors to the visual and sound/tactile output. The main control unit 56 executes an effect algorithm that combines specific interpretations of network information with an effect style. A style provides a map of colors, patterns, graphics, avatars, a!phanumertcs, language, and vibrations to be triggered by real-time thresholds (e.g., sound level, motion activity) and evolving gathered intelligence (e.g., "the group is terrific", "six friends present", "I want to dance with you"). The effect algorithms running on the main control unit 56 are designed to minimize electrical power consumption by monitoring user activity and inactivity.

Bracelets 10 can receive messages over their radio transceivers 66, which cause the lights to produce distinctive light signals. These light signals are designed to provide clear and dramatic communication where other forms of communication such as text messaging or voice are not suitable or practical, such as in noisy environments, during activities where other communication devices are not available or accessible, or at a distance where voice cannot be discerned and where text cannot, be read.

A user can communicate with other users by exchanging light signals between one or more bracelets 10 that are paired. The light signals constitute a unique and meaningful light pattern animated by the lights that may be arranged in any desired arrangement or array, e.g., in a 2x10 LED light array. The light signals can be invoked by Bluetooth availability to one or more individuals meeting in one or more groups, or by using a social application on the Internet. In the application, a user can choose from a list of standard light signals, or define a custom light signal that only the user and other individuals, e.g., his/her friends, know. A light signal may be sent to one or more of the user's friends or acquaintances. The light signal is received in the recipient's application and automatically "played" on the bracelet over a Bluetooth channel or equivalent. T he light signal may be prefaced by one or more vibrations. The light signal may be paired with activation of the bracelet vibration motor 64 shortly before or after the signai displays, to notify the user to look at his/her bracelet to observe the light signais.

In a controller mode of operation, the bracelets continuously monitor for a signal and are able to respond to a controller, or they are monitoring each other in some type of wireless mesh network mode, or both in combination. This could be a local Bluetooth low energy (BLE) mode or its equivalent, or a cloud network, or both in combination. For example, a music disc jockey controller can send coordinated light effects across a crowd, or a crowd of people in a stadium connected in a mesh network can create coordinated light effects based on motion ("the Wave") or sound (music).

In a channels mode of operation, the users may subscribe to channels that automatically notify any number of bracelets (e.g., millions of bracelets globally in a short time, e.g., 0.25 milliseconds) as follows:

Subscribed Events - Users may subscribe to channels, e.g., sports, music, talk, etc. Subscribers receive event notifications in the form of light signals, e.g., a user ' s bracelet may turn pink at noon in remembrance of breast cancer survivors.

Scheduling and Automatic Triggering - Organizations that manage such channels can schedule the light signals to be sent based on (a) a triggering event; (b) simple conditional statements known as "recipes", (c) a trigger time; or (d) a triggering behavior (e.g., location, action, etc). For example, Starbucks could send a user a message based on proximity or shared signai availability to a nearby store.

The bracelet may output a predetermined, parameterized pattern of lights and/or vibrations. The parameters may include color, speed, and duration. The output pattern may be a responsive pattern of lights and/or vibrations, where some characteristics of the output pattern may be influenced by environmental sensors. These sensors 62 may include accelerometers, gyroscopes (MEMS and/or AHRS), magnetometers, photometers, microphones, buttons, and proximity-detection via Bluetooth or other wireless radio technologies. The sensors 62 may be on the bracelet 10, or on a smart phone or tablet in direct or indirect communication with the bracelet 10. If on the phone, the phone must communicate the sensor data to the bracelet, at least once, and possibly at regular intervals, by simple or duplex communication. The output pattern may also be a novel sequence of lights and/or vibrations. The output pattern may be a novel sequence of lights and/or vibrations, which accepts such parameters as color, speed, and duration. The output pattern may be a novel sequence of lights and/or vibrations that respond to the environmental sensors described above. The output pattern may be sent from one bracelet to another bracelet, point-to-point. The output pattern may be sent from one phone to one bracelet, point-to-point. The output pattern may be sent from one phone to another phone to a bracelet, point-to-point with intermediate hops. The output pattern may be sent to one or many recipients, in point-to-point, broadcast, and multicast topologies.

As described above, FIG. 3 diagrammatically depicts various lighting effects thai may be displayed on the bracelet 10.

In FIG. 4, a phone may use a built-in radio transceiver to bidireetionally communicate directly with the bracelet 30.

In FIG. 5, a phone may use a built-in radio transceiver to bidireetionally communicate directly with multiple bracelets 10.

In FIG. 6, a phone may use its network connection to bidireetionally communicate with another phone that is beyond the range of its built-in radio transceiver. The receiving phone relays the signal to the bracelet 10,

In FIG, 7, a server may bidireetionally send a signal over a network to a phone that is relayed to the bracelet 10.

In FIG. 8, multiple streams of signals "A", "B" "C", and "D" from a network server may be transmitted to a phone. The user may subscribe to one or more signal streams. In this figure, only signal "€" is bidireetionally relayed to the bracelet 10.

In FIG. 9, a virtual bracelet may be simulated by a phone or other portable computing device.

In FIG. 10, a phone may use its short-range radio transceiver to bidireetionally communicate directly both with the bracelet 10 and a virtual bracelet. The phone may use a network connection to bidireetionally send messages to multiple phones, which relay messages to multiple bracelets 10.

In FIG. 1 1 , multiple streams A, B, and C are available to multiple phones, simulating a broadcast network, such as television or cable TV.

In FIG. 12, the bracelet 10 may bidireetionally communicate directly with another bracelet 10 using its radio transceiver. In FIG, 33, the bracelet 10 may bidirectionally communicate directly with multiple other bracelets 10 using their radio transceivers.

In FIG. 14, the bracelet 10 may broadcast information using its radio transceiver. Other bracelets 10 may detect these transmissions and use that information. This behavior facilitates group behaviors, such as synchronization, coordinated light effects, etc.

In FIG. 15, at least one of the segments, for example, the central, or largest, or most appropriate, removable, modular segment 16 of the bracelet 10 displays the default display of an image of an avatar 94, which is an electronic or physical image that represents any person, place or thing selected by a user. The sensors 62 may then change the default avatar display, e.g., causing the avatar's eyes to wink, or head to nod, or arms to wave, or become brighter, etc., upon detection of any of the triggering events described above.

FIG. 16 depicts a plurality of smart phones 1 , 2, 3, ... , n, each paired with a respective bracelet 10. Each phone is able to execute an application, e.g., a local or slave app, over a plurality of wireless links, designated as A, B, C, and D. Another smart phone designated as a master is able to communicate with the phones 1 , 2, 3, ... , n through a cloud network. The master phone is able to execute an application, e.g., a master app, to communicate with the cloud network. The master phone accesses information stored in a master database, and initiates and organizes a deployment in which the phones L 2, 3, ... , n acknowledge that they are part of a group that will accept common input commands from the master phone. More particularly, the bracelets 10 shown in FIG. 16 have already acknowledged to the master database that they are all part of a group of friends that all wish to simultaneously receive and display the same data, in which case the master phone sends the common data via the cloud network to all the phones 1, 2, 3, , .. , n over a respective link A to a respective bracelet 10 for executing a function, request or task for the bracelet to perform. A data handshake may be sent over a respective link B. A manual task request may be sent over a respective link C, and a continuation program, e.g., a request or task is only compleied at a predetermined geographic location, may be sent over a respective link D.

FIG. 17 is analogous to FIG. 16, except that the master phone assigns a plurality of individual channels 1, 2, 3, ... , n to a plurality of individual cloud networks. The channels are dedicated and may be directed, for example, to sports, music, news, etc, Each group of friends that subscribe to a respective channel will simultaneously receive the information on that channel.

In a mesh network, bands share small quantities of information with a mesh network implemented using BLE advertising data. Several times per second, the bands advertise their presence over BLE by sending a small packet, of radio data. Part of this data is user-definable and is used to contain mesh messages.

Several times per second each band also "discovers," meaning that it sets its radio transceiver to a receive mode and monitors for advertising packets being sent by other bands. Hence, each band is continually receiving mesh messages sent by other bands, and sending out its own mesh messages. These messages are broadcast, in that that every band can receive any message, and they are connectionless, in that there is no handshaking or acknowledgement of receipt. When a band receives a message, it may change its state according to the message contents and/or rebroadcast the message,

The messages contain four parts: a Group Address (GA), an Individual

Address (1A), a Rebroadcast Counter (RC), and a Message Body (MB). When a band receives a message, it also receives an indicator of the Signal Strength (SS) of the message, which gives an approximate measure of how close the transmitter is to the receiver.

Each band is configured with parameters and algorithms which control how it generates and responds to these messages. These include a Band Group (BG), a Band Address (BA), a Message Generator (MG), and a Message Interpreter (MI). Jn addition, each band keeps a copy of the last message that it transmitted onto the mesh network.

The behavior of the MG and the MI define the specific behavior of the mesh network and will change with each application.

Example 1 : Arena light show. A band controlled by an event producer is used to produce coordinated light, effects on an arena full of bands, or a subgroup bands in the arena (for instance, grouped by seating area), or one band in the arena associated with a specific user.

In Example 1 , the GA and IA indicate what segment of the arena is to receive the message, and the MB indicates the color and pattern the bands are to display. The RC indicates the age of messages and allows newer messages to be prioritized. Each band has its own unique BA (Bluetooth ID) and non-unique BG (pre-assigned via app). A "Leader" band running special software transmits a message in which the message body contains codes for a desired light color and pattern. If it is desired to transmit to a certain BG, the Leader sets the GA of the message to the BG of the bands to be controlled, If all bands are to be controlled, then the BG is set to a special value ALL BANDS. If one band is to be controlled, the BG is set to a special value ONE_BAND, and the IA of the message is set to the BA of the recipient. The RC is set to 0, indicating the first transmission of the message.

All bands except the Leader are programmed to receive these messages, respond appropriately, and retransmit the message so that the message can spread rapidly throughout a large arena. To do this, first the hand compares the RC of the received message to the RC of the last message it sent ("last RC"), If RC is greater than or equal to the last RC, then the message is judged to be out of date information, and no action is taken. If RC is less than the last RC, then the message contains new information. The band then checks the GA and the IA against its BG and BA. If they match, the band extracts the desired light color and pattern from the MB and displays it. Whether or not the band displays the pattern, it then retransmits the same message it just received, but with the RC incremented by one. In other words, all bands help to spread the message, whether or not they are an intended recipient.

Example 2: Paint spatter game. Here the mesh is used to implement a game where users can shake their bands like a dripping paint brush and thereby spread their band's color to other nearby bands. There is no special Leader band. All bands are the same, and each user can initiate a message by shaking their band. When the band detects a shake, it transmits a message where the MB encodes the band's color and pattern. The GA can be used if it is desired to limit the bands participating in the game (for instance, to allow multiple independent games to go on in close proximity), but is otherwise not used.

When a band receives a message, it checks it to see if the message SS is above a pre-defined threshold (thereby limiting the ability to spatter on bands far away). If the SS is abos¾ that threshold, then the band has been spattered, and sets its color and pattern as encoded in the received MB. The message is NOT retransmitted, because in this application a spatially-localized effect is desired.

Refinements of this game could include the strength of the shake (as measured by the band's accelerometer) in the MB, and have the receiving band include this in the threshold calculation, so that stronger shakes would spread color farther.