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Title:
GAS BUOYANCY POWERED GENERATOR
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/028492
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
There is an apparatus for the generation of electrical energy. The apparatus includes a buoyancy chamber (1') slidable along a drive path (8') within a body of liquid 29A between a lower gas charging position (11B') and a upper gas release position (11C'), a source of pressurised gas (15) to charge the chamber at said lower position and a discharge valve (32) to vent the gas from said chamber at said upper position and said chamber having ribs (25) on the outside thereof and radial impeller blades (26) mounted on an onboard generator with the blades and ribs being pitched to rotate said generator and chamber in opposite directions to generate electrical energy from said generator as said chamber oscillates through the body of liquid between said lower and upper positions in accordance with cyclic charging and venting of gas from said chamber.

Inventors:
BERGIN, Eamon (Suite 8, 33 Gerrale StreetCronulla, New South Wales 2230, AU)
Application Number:
AU2018/000130
Publication Date:
February 14, 2019
Filing Date:
August 08, 2018
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
BERGIN, Eamon (Suite 8, 33 Gerrale StreetCronulla, New South Wales 2230, AU)
International Classes:
F03B17/02; F03B17/04; F15D1/12
Domestic Patent References:
WO2009026610A12009-03-05
WO2014104978A12014-07-03
Foreign References:
US20160160835A12016-06-09
US7656051B22010-02-02
ES2401178A22013-04-17
US20100148512A12010-06-17
US8125097B12012-02-28
US9683547B22017-06-20
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ANDERSON-TAYLOR, Michael (P.O.Box 710, Cronulla, New South Wales 2230, AU)
Download PDF:
Claims:
The claims:

1. An apparatus for the generation of electrical energy, said apparatus

including at least one buoyancy chamber slidable along a drive path within a body of liquid between a lower gas charging position and a upper gas release position, a source of pressurised gas to charge the chamber at said lower position and a discharge valve to vent the gas from said chamber at said upper position and said chamber having ribs on the outside thereof and radial impeller blades mounted on an onboard generator with the blades and ribs being pitched to rotate said generator and chamber in opposite directions to generate electrical energy from said generator as said chamber oscillates through the body of liquid between said lower and upper positions in accordance with cyclic charging and venting of gas from said chamber.

2. The apparatus as claimed in claim 1 wherein said ribs are spiral ribs arranged around the outside of the buoyancy chamber.

3. The apparatus as claimed in claim 2 wherein at said lower gas charging position said buoyancy chamber compresses a bottom spring and a hook at the bottom of said chamber also engages a latch which operates a calibrated air control lever to release pressurised gas from a holding tank into said buoyancy chamber.

4. The apparatus as claimed in claim 3 wherein when the buoyancy

chamber reaches a predetermined buoyancy said chamber is released by said latch whereby it rises in accordance with said predetermined buoyancy and the force of said bottom spring.

5. The apparatus as claimed in claim 4 wherein at said upper gas release position said buoyancy chamber engages an impact block at an upper surface of said body of liquid whereby spring loaded gas discharge valve components are displaced to discharge gas from said chamber.

6. The apparatus as claimed in claim 5 wherein said impact block is

mounted on floatation devices and engages an adjustable stop disc through a top spring.

7. The apparatus as claimed in claim 6 wherein said spring loaded gas

discharge valve components are displaced downward against impact springs mounted on a perforated internal base of said chamber.

8. The apparatus as claimed in claim 7 wherein said valve components are displaced away from seals to discharge gas from said chamber.

9. The apparatus as claimed in claim 8 wherein said drive path is formed by a hollow vertical column which extends between said lower and upper positions and said buoyancy chamber includes a bore which is slidable along said column.

10. The apparatus as claimed in claim 9 wherein the cross-sections of

said column and bore correspond and there is sufficient clearance therebetween to allow free rotation of said chamber on the column.

Description:
GAS BUOYANCY POWERED GENERATOR

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to an improved electrical generator. More particularly, although not exclusively, it discloses improvements in such devices which are powered by gas buoyancy

BACKGROUND TO THE INVENTION

The accepted laws of physics limit the output of motors or generators to a fraction of the input energy required for their operation. This results in wasted heat emissions and other pollutants which reduce performance, detract from the

environment and increase costs. It is therefore an object of this invention to produce through the ingenious use of an air or gas charged buoyancy chamber an extremely efficient non-polluting motor or generator.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Accordingly an apparatus is disclosed for the generation of electrical energy, said apparatus including at least one buoyancy chamber slidable along a drive path within a body of liquid between a lower gas charging position and a upper gas release position, a source of pressurised gas to charge the chamber at said lower position and a discharge valve to vent the gas from said chamber at said upper position and said chamber having ribs on the outside thereof and radial impeller blades mounted on an onboard generator with the blades and ribs being pitched to rotate said generator and chamber in opposite directions to generate electrical energy from said generator as said chamber oscillates through the body of liquid between said lower and upper positions in accordance with cyclic charging and venting of gas from said chamber.

Preferably the drive path comprises a column on which the chamber is slidable thereon.

It is further preferred that said column extends through a central bore extending the height of the chamber.

It is further preferred that the apparatus includes a power take off means whereby the reciprocal motion of the chamber is converted into electrical energy.

It is further preferred that said source of pressurised gas may include a foot valve with spring loaded arm which is mounted at or adjacent said lower gas charging position. It is further preferred that said column is hollow to comprise a gas supply conduit to said foot valve.

It is further preferred that said discharge valve may comprise a spring loaded valve which is located at or adjacent the top of said buoyancy chamber and is adapted to engage a trigger pin or impact block at said elevated gas release position.

It is further preferred that the buoyancy chamber is constructed from a non ferrous material. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

One currently preferred embodiment of the invention will now be described with reference to the attached drawings in which:- figure 1 is a schematic elevation view in partial cross- secton of part of a first embodiment of an energy generating apparatus according to said invention with the buoyancy chamber at the lower gas charging position, figure 2 is a schematic elevation view in of the apparatus of figure 1 in partial cross-section with the buoyancy chamber at the elevated gas release position which also shows the

compressor and shutoff valve. figure 3 is a schematic bottom view of the buoyancy chamber, figure 4 is a schematic top view of the buoyancy chamber, figure 5 is a schematic elevation view in partial cross- section of a second embodiment of an energy generating apparatus according to said invention with the buoyancy chamber intermediate the lower gas charging and upper gas release positions. figure 6 is a plan view of the impeller, figure 7 is a cross-sectional view along the line A-A of figure 6 which shows gas discharge valve components at the top of buoyancy chamber when the valve is closed, and figure 8 is a view similar to figure 7 which shows the gas discharge valve components when the valve is open.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Referring first to figures 1 and 2 there is a bell shaped buoyancy chamber 1 with a closed top 2 and open bottom 3. As shown by the partial cross-section there is a central bore 4 extending the height of the chamber which is open at both the top and bottom. There is a lug 5 extending down from the bottom of the chamber 1 , impellers 6 fitted to shafts 6 A extending out from the chamber sides and a discharge check valve 7 fitted at the top. The chamber 1 is slidable on a hollow vertical column 8 which extends between a foot valve 9 with spring lever 9A and discharge pipe 10 at its lower end and a compressor 1 1 (shown in figure 2) with shutoff valve 12 at its upper end. Intermediate the two ends is a trigger pin 13 which with this embodiment extends out laterally from the column 8. Preferably, with this embodiment the column 8 and bore 4 are close fitting with corresponding non circular cross- sections (in this case square as shown in figures 3 and 4) whereby the chamber is limited to vertical slidable motion without rotation. The whole device with the exception of the compressor 1 1 is immersed in a liquid 1 1 A which with this embodiment may be water. In operation the buoyancy chamber 1 when filled with water settles at the lower position 1 1 B of figure 1 so that the lug 5 depresses the valve lever 9 A to open the foot valve 9. Air under pressure from the compressor 1 1 then passes down the column 8 through said valve 9 and into the open bottom 3 of the chamber 1 via discharge pipe 10. As the chamber fills with air the water therein is displaced out the bottom. When the chamber becomes sufficiently buoyant it rises up the column 8. In order to ensure that the chamber is substantially filled with air to attain maximum buoyancy before rising a system of retaining magnets, timers or other like mechanisms (not shown) may be used. As the chamber rises impellers 6 attached to the shafts 6 A are rotated by the passing water flow. These impellers are preferably attached to electrical generators or alternators (not shown) to produce usable electrical power. When the rising chamber reaches the elevated position 1 C shown in figure 2 the trigger pin 13 engages check valve 7 whereby the trapped air is released from the top of said chamber so that it again fills with water through the open bottom. The chamber then sinks back down the column 8 to the lower position of figure 1 where the cycle is repeated. While the chamber is sinking the impellers 6 would similarly again turn to generate usable electrical power. It is envisaged that a portion of the power generated by the impellers could be used to operate the compressor so that the device would be largely self- energising.

With the second embodiment shown in figures 5 to 8 the

apparatus works in a similar cyclic fashion as the first

embodiment. Also, in figures 5 to 8 the components here which correspond to those in the first embodiment are indentified by the same numbers but are primed (') to distinguish them.

During operation of the apparatus gas (which may be air) is drawn in through the filter 14 by way of a compressor 1 1 ', check valve 7' and control valve 12'. It is forced down the vertical column 8' to continually replenish a holding tank 15. The air displaces any water in the holding tank out through pipes 16 and 17 and inline electrical generators 18, 19. Preferably there is also a bypass or overflow pipe 20 and valve 21 fitted to the tank 15 as shown.

The operation of the buoyancy chamber 1 ' as follows. When it is filled with water it sinks to the bottom 1 1 B' of the column 8' to compress the bottom spring 22 against a stop disc 22A. A hook 22B at the bottom of the chamber also engages a latch 23 which operates a calibrated air control lever 24 to release pressurised air accumulated from the holding tank 15 into the buoyancy chamber 1 '. With the gas discharge valve components 32 at the top of the chamber 1 ' closed as shown in figure 7 the air rises inside to the top of the chamber to displace water out the bottom of said chamber and thereby increase its buoyancy. Once the chamber reaches a predetermined buoyancy it is released by the hook 23 and calibrated air control lever 24 so the force of the compressed spring 22 and said buoyancy causes it to rise up along column 8'. As the chamber disengages the lever 24 the air valve closes prevent further air from leaving the holding tank 15. The chamber 1 ' then rises through the water and spins in a clockwise direction due to the spiral ribs 25 arranged around the outside of said chamber. With this embodiment the cross-sections of the column 8' and chamber bore 4' correspond and there is sufficient clearance provided to allow free rotation of the chamber on said column. Impeller blades 26 on the generator 26A within the chamber 1 'are preferably pitched to turn on bearings in the opposite direction to the chamber V in order to maximise the electrical output of the generator. The chamber rises in this fashion until an impact cone assembly 27 with valve components 32 (see figure 7) at the top of the buoyancy chamber engages the impact block 28 at the upper gas discharge position 1 1 C\ The impact block 28 is mounted on floatation devices 29 at water level 29A and engages through top spring 30 against an adjustable stop disc 31. The cone assembly 27 compresses the top spring 30 which pushes back down against said assembly and thereby displaces the valve components 32 downward against internal coil springs 33 mounted on a perforated internal base 33A. This displacement of the valve components away from seals 34 as shown in figure 8 discharges or vents the air from the chamber (see arrows B) and enables water to re-enter from the bottom 3'. The chamber then again sinks down along the column 8' whereby the impeller blades and chamber V then rotate in respective opposite directions to continue generation of electricity. When the chamber engages the bottom spring 22 and lever 24 it is refilled with air from the holding tank 15 so that the cycles can continue indefinitely to produce power.

As background information to assist a better an understanding of the advantages and operation of the invention compression data for 20.66 meters (three atmospheres) are provided hereunder.

The compression data is taken from Boyles Law and are cross referenced against Archimedes principle and Berrenolous Law for dynamic and static objects immersed in liquids (absolute pressure).

The kinetic energy formulas have been used to provide an idea of the accumulative forces involved in the upthrust of air contained in a chamber rising through a liquid.

The first 10.33 meters (two atmosphere) data shows the kinetic energy retrieved. It has the energy 55 times that of a cubic meter of water falling 10.33 meters or 5.5 times that of 10 cubic meters of water falling 10.33 meters at atmospheric pressure.

The formula is PxCVM.

Which is the density of water 833.33 multiplied by the

compressed volume per meters rise (Boyles Law).

NOTE: By doing every meter individually it allows for the accumulative forces (numbers on right of column) to be shown on the compression charts.

Standard compressors details for input power are 15Kw x3600 seconds=54000000Wh=15-kilowatt hour for a standard screwed compressor, air volume is 81CFM=137586.6 litre per hour at 150 PSI= (11 atmospheres) on the following tables two scenarios are provided regarding the different air volumes per cycle, the preferred volume is 1500 litres which provides 91.72 cycles per hour and built in contingency for the decent of the buoyancy chamber.

M-1.033=909.09L Compressor input to 10.33 meters M-2.066=833.22L Volume no l=1000Litres=137.58 times hour,

M-3.099=769.142L Volume no 2=1500Litres=91.72 times hour.

M-4.132=714.132L

M-5.165=666.533L 1500 litres volume (allowing 500L for weight of the chamber dropping)

M-6.198=624.82L

M-7.231=588.07L 5572902.70x91.72=141.98 KWH

M-8.264=555.370L 5572902.70xl37.58=212.97KWH M-9.297=526.149L

M-10.330=500L =6687.51=5572902.70(PxCVM) M-11.363=476.12L Compression to 20.660 metres

M-12.396=454.359L

5572902.70+3309011.764=8881914.46

M-13.429=434.61L

8881914.46x91.72=814649194.6=226.29Kwh M-14.465=416.43L 8881914.46xl37.58=339.43Kwh M-15.495=399.80L M-16.528=384.57L M-17.561=370.18L M-18.594=356.97L M-19.627=344.64L M-20.660=333.16L =3970.83L=3309011.764(PxCV

As can be seen from the above data the input power is between 4.5 to 10% of output power on up thrust, as existing kinetic and potential energy systems are rated per cubic meter, either horizontally or vertically through different strata. Most

commercial compressors are rated to eleven atmospheres, with an average of 395 watts per litre delivered at eleven

atmospheres. Weight can be manipulated to achieve ideal system conditions, because of the properties of air and water. This makes it an ideal environment to preferably incorporate a shroud over the prop on assent/decent mode, as the shroud will funnel the water in at higher velocities, which can further entrance the generators performance. It can be as much as three to four times its rated power output. By having a raised corkscrew designed rib on the outside of the rising & falling buoyancy chamber, it will work in with the shroud and the generators prop as they can be manipulated to turn in opposite directions to further enhance the polarity on the generator.

This form of energy extraction is commercially viable and a bi- product of this extraction process is a way of pulling existing carbon dioxide out the atmosphere and through a sodium-based scrubber (chemical exchange system) which preferably may be mounted on the intake side of the air compressor 11'.

The potential energy of a hydro head of one cubic meter of water delivered from atmospheric pressure of 10.33 meters, it is 1.81% of the energy of a cubic metre of air released at a depth of 10.33 meter, in water. This equates to return of 55 times that of a cubic meter of water at a height of 10.33 meters in

atmospheric pressure. By making the system, a closed energy loop, it can be reciprocated ranging from 360 times an hour to 30 times an hour. This depends upon the desired power to generator output. Power on the drop will be similar to a hydro head output, with speeds ranging from 6 to 10 meters per second, depending upon the weight of the piston on the drop (ideally 1/3 of the volume measured at atmospheric pressure) where P=N.P.G.H.Q. As water is being displaced in the bottom chamber to allow for the ingress of air an inline water turbine may preferably be installed to utilise the movement of the water, both on the storage and release cycles, as buoyancy chamber is filled at the lower gas charging mechanism.

It will thus be appreciated that this invention at least in the form of the embodiment disclosed provides a novel and improved form of energy efficient generator. Clearly however the example disclosed is only the currently preferred form of the invention and a wide variety of modifications may be made without departing from the scope of the invention. For example the number, design and configuration of buoyancy chambers, the shape and capacity of the body of liquid and the type of liquid used may all be changed following further development work by the inventor. It is also envisaged that the principle of the invention may in fact be applied in large scale using existing natural bodies of water such as lakes or even the ocean.