Login| Sign Up| Help| Contact|

Patent Searching and Data


Title:
GH5 AND GH30 IN WET MILLING
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/023222
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The instant application provides methods to improve the total starch yield and/or gluten yield from corn kernels in a wet milling process, the method comprising admixing corn kernels or a fraction of the corn kernels with an enzyme composition comprising an effective amount of one or more hydrolytic enzymes, wherein at least one of said hydrolytic enzymes is selected from the group consisting of a GH30 polypeptide, a GH5 polypeptide or a combination thereof.

Inventors:
GIBBONS, Thomas Patrick (704 Little Tail Way, Wake Forest, North Carolina, 27587, US)
VIDAL, Bernardo (2004 Longmat Drive, Wake Forest, North Carolina, 27587, US)
LAVIGNE, James (4500 Capefield Drive, Wake Forest, North Carolina, 27587, US)
AKERMAN, Michael John (820 Vonkramer Court, Wake Forest, North Carolina, 27587, US)
SHEN, Xinyu (405 Otway Road, Wake Forest, North Carolina, 27587, US)
CAO, Yi (Xinxi Road, Shangdi ZoneHadian District,China Headquarters 14,Xinxi Road, Shangdi Zone, Hadian District Beijing Beijing 5, 100085, CN)
LI, Wei (China Headquarters 14 Xinxi Road, Shangdi Zone Hadian District, Beijing 5, 100085, CN)
ZHANG, Yu (China Headquarters 14 Xinxi Road, Shangdi Zone Haidian District, Beijing 5, 100085, CN)
NYMAND-GRARUP, Soeren (Helgesev 33-1, Aabyhoej, Aabyhoej, DK)
SHOUP, Madelyn Mallison (1009 Wade Avenue, Apt 321Raleigh, North Carolina, 27605, US)
JENSEN, Kenneth (Bavnager 232, Oelsted, Oelsted, DK)
KROGH, Kristian Bertel Romer M. (Kilrevaenget 35, Bagsvaerd, Bagsvaerd, DK)
PALMEN, Lorena Gonzalez (Alex Danielssons Vag 87, Malmo, Malmo, SE)
Application Number:
US2018/043471
Publication Date:
January 31, 2019
Filing Date:
July 24, 2018
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
NOVOZYMES A/S (Novozymes A/S, Krogshoejvej 36, Bagsvaerd, Bagsvaerd, DK)
GIBBONS, Thomas Patrick (704 Little Tail Way, Wake Forest, North Carolina, 27587, US)
International Classes:
C08H99/00; C08B30/04; C08H1/00; C08L3/02; C08L89/00; C12N9/42
Domestic Patent References:
WO2014082564A12014-06-05
WO2016005521A12016-01-14
WO2016005519A12016-01-14
WO2016005522A12016-01-14
WO2018095408A12018-05-31
WO2002000731A12002-01-03
WO2002000911A12002-01-03
WO2002002644A12002-01-10
WO2014082566A12014-06-05
WO2014082564A12014-06-05
WO1995017413A11995-06-29
WO1995022625A11995-08-24
WO1992006204A11992-04-16
WO1996000787A11996-01-11
WO2000056900A22000-09-28
WO1995033836A11995-12-14
WO2010039889A22010-04-08
WO2000024883A12000-05-04
WO2016005522A12016-01-14
Foreign References:
CN104812778A2015-07-29
US6566125B22003-05-20
US5066218A1991-11-19
US5223409A1993-06-29
US6011147A2000-01-04
EP0238023A21987-09-23
Other References:
JOHNSTON ET AL., CEREAL CHEM, vol. 81, 2004, pages 626 - 632
ZHANG ET AL., BIOTECHNOLOGY ADVANCES, vol. 24, 2006, pages 452 - 481
GHOSE, PURE APPL. CHEM., vol. 59, 1987, pages 257 - 68
NIELSEN, PROTEIN ENGINEERING, vol. 10, 1997, pages 1 - 6
NEEDLEMAN; WUNSCH, J. MOL. BIOL., vol. 48, 1970, pages 443 - 453
RICE ET AL.: "EMBOSS: The European Molecular Biology Open Software Suite", TRENDS GENET, vol. 16, 2000, pages 276 - 277, XP004200114, DOI: doi:10.1016/S0168-9525(00)02024-2
CUNNINGHAM; WELLS, SCIENCE, vol. 244, 1989, pages 1081 - 1085
HILTON ET AL., J. BIOL. CHEM., vol. 271, 1996, pages 4699 - 4708
DE VOS ET AL., SCIENCE, vol. 255, 1992, pages 306 - 312
SMITH ET AL., J. MOL. BIOL., vol. 224, 1992, pages 899 - 904
WLODAVER ET AL., FEBS LETT., vol. 309, 1992, pages 59 - 64
REIDHAAR-OLSON; SAUER, SCIENCE, vol. 241, 1988, pages 53 - 57
BOWIE; SAUER, PROC. NATL. ACAD. SCI. USA, vol. 86, 1989, pages 2152 - 2156
LOWMAN, BIOCHEMISTRY, vol. 30, 1991, pages 10832 - 10837
DERBYSHIRE ET AL., GENE, vol. 46, 1986, pages 145
NER ET AL., DNA, vol. 7, 1988, pages 127
NESS ET AL., NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY, vol. 17, 1999, pages 893 - 896
COOPER ET AL., EMBO J., vol. 12, 1993, pages 2575 - 2583
DAWSON ET AL., SCIENCE, vol. 266, 1994, pages 776 - 779
MARTIN ET AL., J. IND. MICROBIOL. BIOTECHNOL., vol. 3, 2003, pages 568 - 576
SVETINA, J. BIOTECHNOL., vol. 76, 2000, pages 245 - 251
RASMUSSEN-WILSON ET AL., APPL. ENVIRON. MICROBIOL., vol. 63, 1997, pages 3488 - 3493
WARD ET AL., BIOTECHNOLOGY, vol. 13, 1995, pages 498 - 503
CONTRERAS ET AL., BIOTECHNOLOGY, vol. 9, 1991, pages 378 - 381
EATON ET AL., BIOCHEMISTRY, vol. 25, 1986, pages 505 - 512
COLLINS-RACIE ET AL., BIOTECHNOLOGY, vol. 13, 1995, pages 982 - 987
CARTER ET AL., PROTEINS: STRUCTURE, FUNCTION, AND GENETICS, vol. 6, 1989, pages 240 - 248
STEVENS, DRUG DISCOVERY WORLD, vol. 4, 2003, pages 35 - 48
INNIS: "PCR: A Guide to Methods and Application", 1990, ACADEMIC PRESS
FORD ET AL., PROTEIN EXPRESSION AND PURIFICATION, vol. 2, 1991, pages 95 - 107
GEMS ET AL., GENE, vol. 98, 1991, pages 61 - 67
CULLEN, NUCLEIC ACIDS RES., vol. 15, 1987, pages 9163 - 9175
HAWKSWORTH ET AL.: "Ainsworth and Bisby's Dictionary of The Fungi", 1995, CAB INTERNATIONAL, UNIVERSITY PRESS
YELTON, PROC. NATL. ACAD. SCI. USA, vol. 81, 1984, pages 1470 - 1474
CHRISTENSEN ET AL., BIO/TECHNOLOGY, vol. 6, 1988, pages 1419 - 1422
MALARDIER ET AL., GENE, vol. 78, 1989, pages 147 - 156
"Protein Purification", 1989, VCH PUBLISHERS
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
REYNOLDS, Kelly et al. (Novozymes North America, Inc.77 Perrys Chapel Church Roa, Franklinton North Carolina, 27525, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

1. A method to improve the total starch yield and/or gluten yield from corn kernels in a wet milling process, the method comprising admixing corn kernels or a fraction of the corn kernels with an enzyme composition comprising an effective amount of one or more hydrolytic enzymes, wherein at least one of said hydrolytic enzymes is selected from the group consisting of a GH30 polypeptide, a GH5 polypeptide or a combination thereof.

2. The method according to claim 1 , wherein the amount of starch and/or gluten released from fiber during the wet milling process is increased.

The method according to any of the preceding claims, comprising the steps of: a) soaking the corn kernels in water to produce soaked kernels;

b) grinding the soaked kernels to produce soaked and ground kernels;

c) separating germs from the soaked and ground kernels to produce a corn kernel mass comprising fiber, starch and gluten; and

d) subjecting the resultant corn kernel mass to a fiber washing procedure.

4. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein said corn kernels or a fraction of said corn kernels is admixed with said one or more hydrolytic enzymes, before, during or after step d) according to claim 3.

5. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein said corn kernels or a fraction of said corn kernels is admixed with said one or more hydrolytic enzymes during step d) according to claim 3.

6. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein said corn kernels or a fraction of said corn kernels is allowed to react with said one or more hydrolytic enzymes for at least 15 minutes.

7. The method according to any of claims 3-6, wherein said fiber washing procedure comprises the use of a fiber washing system optimized for introduction of one or more hydrolytic enzymes and wherein the fiber washing system comprise a space configured to provide a total retention time in the fiber washing system of at least 35 minutes and less than 48 hours.

8. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the incubation time in said space configured into the fiber washing system is at least 5 minutes and less than 48 hours.

5 9. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the incubation temperature is between 25°C and 95°C.

10. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein said GH5 polypeptide has xylanase activity.

10

11. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein said GH30 polypeptide has xylanase activity.

12. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein said GH5 polypeptide 15 further comprise one or more of the following activities: endo^-1 ,4-glucanase / cellulase

(EC 3.2.1.4) activity and/or endo^-1 ,4-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) activity and/or β-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) activity and/or β-mannosidase (EC 3.2.1.25) activity and/or β- glucosylceramidase (EC 3.2.1.45) activity and/or glucan β-1 ,3-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.58) activity and/or licheninase (EC 3.2.1.73) activity and/or exo^-1 ,4-glucanase /

20 cellodextrinase (EC 3.2.1.74) activity and/or glucan endo-1 ,6^-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.75) activity and/or mannan endo^-1 ,4-mannosidase (EC 3.2.1.78) activity and/or cellulose β- 1 ,4-cellobiosidase (EC 3.2.1.91) activity and/or steryl β-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.104) activity or endoglycoceramidase (EC 3.2.1.123) activity and/or chitosanase (EC 3.2.1.132) activity and/or β-primeverosidase (EC 3.2.1.149) activity and/or xyloglucan-specific endo^-1 ,4-

25 glucanase (EC 3.2.1.151) activity and/or endo^-1 ,6-galactanase (EC 3.2.1.164) activity and/or hesperidin 6-0-a-L-rhamnosyl^-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.168) activity and/or β-1 ,3- mannanase (EC 3.2.1.-) activity and/or arabinoxylan-specific endo^-1 ,4-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.-) activity and/or mannan transglycosylase (EC 2.4.1.-) activity.

30 13. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein said GH30 polypeptide further comprise one or more of the following activities: endo^-1 ,4-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) activity and/or β-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) activity and/or β-glucuronidase (EC 3.2.1.31) activity and/or β-xylosidase (EC 3.2.1.37) activity and/or β-fucosidase (EC 3.2.1.38) activity and/or glucosylceramidase (EC 3.2.1.45) activity and/or β-1

35 (EC 3.2.1.75) activity and/or glucuronoarabinoxylan endo^-1 ,4-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.136) activity and/or endo^-1 ,6-galactanase (EC:3.2.1.164) activity and/or [reducing end] β- xylosidase (EC 3.2.1.-) activity.

14. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the GH5 polypeptide is selected from a group consisting of:

i) A mature polypeptide of the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 1-3, SEQ ID NO: 8, SEQ ID NO: 10 or SEQ ID NO: 12; ii) A mature polypeptide, which has at least 60% identity to the mature polypeptide in i)

iii) A subsequence of any one of the mature polypeptides in i) and ii).

15. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the GH30 polypeptide is selected from a group consisting of:

i) A mature polypeptide of the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ 15 ID NO: 4; SEQ ID NO:5; SEQ ID NO:6 or SEQ ID NO:7;

ii) A mature polypeptide, which has at least 60% identity to the mature polypeptide in i)

iii) A subsequence of any one of the mature polypeptides in i) and ii).

20 16. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein said enzyme composition comprising one or more hydrolytic enzymes further comprise one or more enzymes selected form the group consisting of cellulases (EC 3.2.1.4), xylanases (EC 3.2.1.8) arabinofuranosidases (EC 3.2.1.55 (Non-reducing end alpha-L- arabinofuranosidases); EC 3.2.1.185 (Non-reducing end beta-L-arabinofuranosidases)

25 cellobiohydrolase I (EC 3.2.1.150), cellobiohydrolase II (E.C. 3.2.1.91), cellobiosidase (E.C.

3.2.1.176), beta-glucosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.21), beta-xylosidases (EC 3.2.1.37) or proteases (E.C XXXX).

17. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the one or more 30 hydrolytic enzymes is expressed in an organism with a cellulase background, such as Trichoderma reesei.

18. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the one or more hydrolytic enzymes are purified.

35

19. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the one or more hydrolytic enzymes is/are in a liquid composition.

20. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the one or more 5 hydrolytic enzymes is/are in a solid composition.

21. The method according to any of the preceding claims, wherein the effective amount of one or more hydrolytic enzymes admixed with one or more fractions of said corn kernel mass, is between 0.005-0.5 kg enzyme protein/metric tonne corn kernels entering the wet

10 milling process.

22. A composition comprising corn fiber, said composition being obtainable by the method described in any of claims 1 - 21.

15 23. Use of a GH30 polypeptide and/or a GH5 polypeptide in a method to improve the total starch yield and/or gluten yield from corn kernels in a wet milling process as defined in any of claims 1 - 21.

20

Description:
GH5 AND GH30 IN WET MILLING

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a method of improving starch and/or gluten yield from corn kernels in a wet milling process, by contacting said corn kernels with an enzyme composition comprising a GH30 polypeptide, a GH5 polypeptide or a combination thereof, preferably during fiber washing.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Conventional wet milling of corn is a process designed for the recovery and purification of starch and several coproducts including germ, gluten (protein) and fiber. Fiber is the least valuable coproduct, so the industry has put substantial effort into increasing the yield of the more valuable products, such as starch and gluten, while decreasing the fiber fraction. High quality starch is valuable as it can be used for a variety of commercial purposes after further processing to products such as dried starch, modified starch, dextrins, sweeteners and alcohol. Gluten is usually used for animal feed, as corn gluten meal (Around 60% protein) or corn gluten feed (Around 20% protein).

The wet milling process can vary significantly dependent on the specific mill equipment used, but usually the process include: grain cleaning, steeping, grinding, germ separation, a second grinding, fiber separation, gluten separation and starch separation. After cleaning the corn kernels, they are typically softened by soaking in water or in a dilute SO2 solution under controlled conditions of time and temperature. Then, the kernels are grinded to break down the pericarp and the germ is separated from the rest of the kernel. The remaining slurry, mainly consisting of fiber, starch and gluten is finely ground and screened in a fiber washing process, to separate the fiber from starch and gluten, before the gluten and starch is separated and the starch can be purified in a washing/filtration process.

The use of enzymes in several steps of the wet milling process has been suggested, such as the use of enzymes for the steeping step of wet milling processes. The commercial enzyme product Steepzyme® (available from Novozymes A/S) has been shown suitable for the first step in wet milling processes, i.e., the steeping step where corn kernels are soaked in water.

More recently, "enzymatic milling", a modified wet milling process that uses proteases to significantly reduce the total processing time during corn wet milling and eliminates the need for sulfur dioxide as a processing agent, has been developed. Johnston et al., Cereal Chem, 81 , p. 626-632 (2004).

US 6,566, 125 discloses a method for obtaining starch from maize involving soaking maize kernels in water to produce soaked maize kernels, grinding the soaked maize kernels to produce a ground maize slurry, and incubating the ground maize slurry with enzyme (e.g., protease).

US 5,066,218 discloses a method of milling grain, especially corn, comprising cleaning the grain, steeping the grain in water to soften it, and then milling the grain with a cellulase enzyme.

WO 2002/000731 discloses a process of treating crop kernels, comprising soaking the kernels in water for 1-12 hours, wet milling the soaked kernels and treating the kernels with one or more enzymes including an acidic protease.

WO 2002/00091 1 discloses a process of starch gluten separation, comprising subjecting mill starch to an acidic protease.

WO 2002/002644 discloses a process of washing a starch slurry obtained from the starch gluten separation step of a milling process, comprising washing the starch slurry with an aqueous solution comprising an effective amount of acidic protease.

WO 2014/082566 and WO 2014/082564 disclose cellulolytic compositions for use in wet milling.

While the art has investigated the effect of using enzymes in corn wet milling, during steeping/soaking of corn kernels, during grinding of the corn kernels, and in starch gluten separation, there is still a need for improved enzyme technology that may lower the energy expenditure and costs associated with corn wet milling and provide increased yield of starch and gluten.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In a first aspect the present invention relates to a method to improve the total starch yield and/or gluten yield that can be obtained from corn kernels in a wet milling process, the method comprising: Admixing corn kernels or a fraction of the corn kernels with an enzyme composition comprising an effective amount of one or more hydrolytic enzymes, wherein at least one of said hydrolytic enzymes is selected from the group consisting of a GH30 polypeptide, a GH5 polypeptide and a combination thereof. In a second aspect, the present invention relates to an enzyme composition comprising an isolated GH30 polypeptide, an isolated GH5 polypeptide or both, as well as the use of such an enzyme compositions to improve the total starch yield and/or gluten yield that can be obtained from corn kernels in a wet milling process.

In a third aspect, the present invention relates to compositions comprising corn starch, corn gluten or corn fiber, said compositions being obtainable by the method described in a first aspect and in embodiments of the invention.

In other aspects the present invention relates to polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides.

In a fourth aspect the invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity, selected from the group consisting of:

(a) A polypeptide having at least 80% sequence identity to the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 10 or 12;

(b) A polypeptide encoded by a polynucleotide having at least 80% seqiuence identity to the mature polypeptide coding sequence of SEQ ID NO: 9 or SEQ ID NO: 1 1 ;

(c) A variant of the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 10 or 12 com, prising a substitution, seletion and/or insertion at one or more positions; and

(d) A fragment of the polypeptide of (a), (b), or (c) having xylanase activity.

In a fifth aspect, the invention relates to a composition comprising a polypeptide according to the fourth aspect of the invention.

The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs or expression vectors comprising a polynucleotide encoding a polypeptide of the fourth aspect of the invention operably linked to one or more control, sequences that directs the production of the polypeptide in an expression host.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

The present invention and in particular preferred embodiments according to the invention will be described in more detail with reference to the accompanying figures. The figures show ways of implementing the present invention and are not to be construed as being limiting to other possible embodiments falling within the scope of the attached claim set.

Figure 1 schematically illustrates a first embodiment of a counter current fiber wash system according to present invention,

Figure 2 schematically illustrates a further embodiment of a system according to the present invention. Figure 3 schematically illustrates a screen unit with an built-in incubator

Figure 4 schematically illustrates a screen unit in the form of a hydro-cyclone

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

It is an object of the present invention to provide a method to improve the starch and/or gluten yields that can be obtained from corn kernels in a wet milling process, by treating the corn kernels with a hydrolytic enzyme composition, preferably during the fiber washing procedure. The inventors of the present invention has surprisingly found that the enzymatic treatment of corn kernels with a GH5 polypeptide or a GH30 polypeptide or a combination thereof, improve the release of bound starch and gluten from fiber and thus improve the starch and/or gluten yields that can be obtained.

The wet milling process:

Corn kernels are wet milled in order to open up the kernels and separate the kernels into its four main constituents: starch, germ, fiber and gluten.

The wet milling process can vary significantly from mill to mill, however conventional wet milling usually comprises the following steps:

1. Steeping and germ separation,

2. Fiber washing procedure

3. Starch/gluten separation, and

4. Starch washing.

1. Steeping, grinding and germ separation

Corn kernels are softened by soaking in water for between about 30 minutes to about 48 hours, preferably 30 minutes to about 15 hours, such as about 1 hour to about 6 hours at a temperature of about 50°C, such as between about 45°C to 60°C. During steeping, the kernels absorb water, increasing their moisture levels from 15 percent to 45 percent and more than doubling in size. The optional addition of e.g. 0.1 percent sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and/or NaHSOs to the water prevents excessive bacteria growth in the warm environment. As the corn swells and softens, the mild acidity of the steepwater begins to loosen the gluten bonds within the corn and release the starch. After the corn kernels are steeped they are cracked open to release the germ. The germ contains corn oil. The germ is separated from the heavier density mixture of starch, gluten and fiber essentially by "floating" the germ segment free of the other substances under closely controlled conditions. This method serves to eliminate any adverse effect of traces of corn oil in later processing steps.

2. Fiber washing procedure

To get maximum starch and gluten recovery, while keeping any fiber in the final product to an absolute minimum, it is necessary to wash the free starch and gluten from the fiber during processing. The fiber is collected, slurried and screened to reclaim any residual starch or gluten.

3. Starch gluten separation

The starch-gluten suspension from the fiber-washing step, called mill starch, is separated into starch and gluten. Gluten has a low density compared to starch. By passing mill starch through a centrifuge, the gluten is readily spun out.

4. Starch washing

The starch slurry from the starch separation step contains some insoluble protein and much of solubles. They have to be removed before a top quality starch (high purity starch) can be made. The starch, with just one or two percent protein remaining, is diluted, washed 8 to 14 times, re-diluted and washed again in hydroclones to remove the last trace of protein and produce high quality starch, typically more than 99.5% pure.

Products of wet milling: Wet milling can be used to produce, without limitation, corn steep liquor, corn gluten feed, germ, corn oil, corn gluten meal, corn starch, modified corn starch, syrups such as corn syrup, and corn ethanol.

Definition of enzymes:

Cellulolytic enzyme or cellulase/polypeptide with cellulase activity or cellulolytic activity: The terms "cellulolytic enzyme", "cellulase" and polypeptide with cellulase activity or cellulolytic activity are used interchangeably herein and refer to one or more (e.g., several) enzymes that hydrolyze a cellulosic material, which comprise any material comprising cellulose, such as fiber. Cellulolytic enzymes include endoglucanase(s) (E.C 3.2.1.4), cellobiohydrolase(s) (E.C 3.2.1.91 and E.C 3.2.1.150), beta-glucosidase(s) (E.C. 3.2.1.21), or combinations thereof. The two basic approaches for measuring cellulolytic enzyme activity include: (1) measuring the total cellulolytic enzyme activity, and (2) measuring the individual cellulolytic enzyme activities (endoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases, and beta-glucosidases) as reviewed in Zhang et al., 2006, Biotechnology Advances 24: 452-481. Total cellulolytic enzyme activity can be measured using insoluble substrates, including Whatman N°1 filter paper, microcrystalline cellulose, bacterial cellulose, algal cellulose, cotton, pretreated lignocellulose, etc. The most common total cellulolytic activity assay is the filter paper assay using Whatman N°1 filter paper as the substrate. The assay was established by the International Union of Pure and 5 Applied Chemistry (lUPAC) (Ghose, 1987, Pure Appl. Chem. 59: 257-68).

Cellulolytic enzyme activity can also be determined by measuring the increase in production/release of sugars during hydrolysis of a cellulosic material by cellulolytic enzyme(s) under the following conditions: 1-50 mg of cellulolytic enzyme protein/g of cellulose in pretreated corn stover (PCS) (or other pretreated cellulosic material) for 3-7

10 days at a suitable temperature such as 40°C-80°C, e.g., 40°C, 45°C, 50°C, 55°C, 60°C, 65°C, 70°C, 75°C, or 80°C, and a suitable pH, such as 4-9, e.g., 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, 6.5, 7.0, 7.5, 8.0, 8.5, or 9.0, compared to a control hydrolysis without addition of cellulolytic enzyme protein. Typical conditions are 1 ml reactions, washed or unwashed PCS, 5% insoluble solids (dry weight), 50 mM sodium acetate 5 pH 5, 1 mM MnS04, 50°C, 55°C, or

15 60°C, 72 hours, sugar analysis by AMINEX® HPX-87H column chromatography (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc., Hercules, CA, USA).

Hydrolytic enzymes or hydrolase/polypeptide with hydrolase activity: "Hydrolytic enzymes" and polypeptide with hydrolase activity are used interchangeably herein and refer to any catalytic protein that use water to break down substrates. Hydrolytic enzymes include 20 cellulases (EC 3.2.1.4), xylanases (EC 3.2.1.8) arabinofuranosidases (EC 3.2.1.55 (Non- reducing end alpha-L-arabinofuranosidases); EC 3.2.1.185 (Non-reducing end beta-L- arabinofuranosidases) cellobiohydrolase I (EC 3.2.1.150), cellobiohydrolase II (E.C. 3.2.1.91), cellobiosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.176), beta-glucosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.21), beta- xylosidases (EC 3.2.1.37).

25 Xylanases/polypeptide with xylanase activity: The terms "xylanase" and polypeptide with xylanase activity are used interchangeably herein and refer to a 1 ,4-beta-D-xylan- xylohydrolase (E.C. 3.2.1.8) that catalyzes the endohydrolysis of 1 ,4-beta-D-xylosidic linkages in xylans. Xylanase activity can be determined with 0.2% AZCL-arabinoxylan as substrate in 0.01 % TRITON® X-100 and 200 mM sodium phosphate pH 6 at 37°C. One

30 unit of xylanase activity is defined as the amount of xylanase activity that produces 1.0 μηιοΐβ of azurine per minute at 37°C, pH 6 from 0.2% AZCL-arabinoxylan as substrate in 200 mM sodium phosphate pH 6.

Other definitions: In the present context, terms are used in manner being ordinary to a skilled person. Some of these terms are elucidated below:

Contact time: For one or more enzymes to react with a substrate, the one or more enzymes have to be in contact with the substrate. "Contact time" refers to the time period in which an effective amount of one or more enzymes is in contact with at least a fraction of a substrate mass. The enzymes may not be in contact with all of the substrate mass during the contact time, however mixing the one or more enzymes with a substrate mass allows the potential of enzymatically catalyzed hydrolysis of a fraction of the substrate mass during the contact time.

Corn kernel: A variety of corn kernels are known, including, e.g., dent corn, flint corn, pod corn, striped maize, sweet corn, waxy corn and the like.

Some corn kernels has an outer covering referred to as the "Pericarp" that protects the germ in the kernels. It resists water and water vapour and is undesirable to insects and microorganisms. The only area of the kernels not covered by the "Pericarp" is the "Tip Cap", which is the attachment point of the kernel to the cob.

Corn kernels or a fraction of the corn kernels: This term is used to describe the corn kernels through the process of wet milling. When the corn kernels are broken down and processed, all fractionated parts of the corn kernel are considered to be included when this term is used. The term include for example: soaked kernels, grinded kernels, corn kernel mass, a first fraction, a second fraction, one or more fractions of the corn kernel mass ect.

Corn kernel mass: is preferably used to reference a mass comprising fiber, gluten and starch, preferably achieved by steaming and grinding crop kernels and separating a mass comprising fiber, gluten and starch from germs. As the corn kernel mass move through the fiber washing, it is separated into several fractions, including a first fraction (s) and a second fraction (f). Hence, "fractions of corn kernel mass" and "one or more fractions of corn kernel mass" refer inter alia to these first (s) and second fractions (f).

cDNA: The term "cDNA" means a DNA molecule that can be prepared by reverse transcription from a mature, spliced, mRNA molecule obtained from a eukaryotic or prokaryotic cell. cDNA lacks intron sequences that may be present in the corresponding genomic DNA. The initial, primary RNA transcript is a precursor to mRNA that is processed through a series of steps, including splicing, before appearing as mature spliced mRNA. Coding sequence: The term "coding sequence" means a polynucleotide, which directly specifies the amino acid sequence of a polypeptide. The boundaries of the coding sequence are generally determined by an open reading frame, which begins with a start codon such as ATG, GTG, or TTG and ends with a stop codon such as TAA, TAG, or TGA. The coding sequence may be a genomic DNA, cDNA, synthetic DNA, or a combination thereof.

Control sequences: The term "control sequences" means nucleic acid sequences necessary for expression of a polynucleotide encoding a mature polypeptide of the present invention. Each control sequence may be native (i.e., from the same gene) or foreign (i.e., from a different gene) to the polynucleotide encoding the polypeptide or native or foreign to each other. Such control sequences include, but are not limited to, a leader, polyadenylation sequence, propeptide sequence, promoter, signal peptide sequence, and transcription terminator. At a minimum, the control sequences include a promoter, and transcriptional and translational stop signals. The control sequences may be provided with linkers for the purpose of introducing specific restriction sites facilitating ligation of the control sequences with the coding region of the polynucleotide encoding a polypeptide.

Expression: The term "expression" includes any step involved in the production of a polypeptide including, but not limited to, transcription, post-transcriptional modification, translation, post-translational modification, and secretion.

Expression vector: The term "expression vector" means a linear or circular DNA molecule that comprises a polynucleotide encoding a polypeptide and is operably linked to control sequences that provide for its expression.

Fragment: The term "fragment" means a polypeptide having one or more (e.g., several) amino acids absent from the amino and/or carboxyl terminus of a mature polypeptide, wherein the fragment has pectin lyase activity.

Germ: The "Germ" is the only living part of the corn kernel. It contains the essential genetic information, enzymes, vitamins, and minerals for the kernel to grow into a corn plant. In yellow dent corn, about 25 percent of the germ is corn oil. The endosperm covered or surrounded by the germ comprises about 82 percent of the kernel dry weight and is the source of energy (starch) and protein for the germinating seed. There are two types of endosperm, soft and hard. In the hard endosperm, starch is packed tightly together. In the soft endosperm, the starch is loose.

GH5 polypeptide: refers to a polypeptide with enzyme activity, the polypeptide being classified as member of the Glycoside hydrolase family 5 in the database of Carbohydrate- Active enZYmes (CAZymes) (http://www.cazy.org/). GH30 polypeptide: refers to a polypeptide with enzyme activity, the polypeptide being classified as member of the Glycoside hydrolase family 30 in the database of Carbohydrate- Active enZYmes (CAZymes) (http://www.cazy.org/).

Gluten: Gluten is a protein, made up from two smaller proteins, glutenin and gliadin.

Herein "gluten" refers to the majority of proteins found in corn kernels. The major products of gluten from corn wet milling is corn gluten meal (Approximately 60% protein) and corn gluten feed (Approximately 20% protein).

Grind or grinding: The term "grinding" refers to breaking down the corn kernels into smaller components.

Host cell : The term "host cell" means any cell type that is susceptible to transformation, transfection, transduction, or the like with a nucleic acid construct or expression vector comprising a polynucleotide of the present invention. The term "host cell" encompasses any progeny of a parent cell that is not identical to the parent cell due to mutations that occur during replication.

Isolated: The term "isolated" means a substance in a form or environment that does not occur in nature. Non-limiting examples of isolated substances include (1) any non-naturally occurring substance, (2) any substance including, but not limited to, any enzyme, variant, nucleic acid, protein, peptide or cofactor, that is at least partially removed from one or more or all of the naturally occurring constituents with which it is associated in nature; (3) any substance modified by the hand of man relative to that substance found in nature; or (4) any substance modified by increasing the amount of the substance relative to other components with which it is naturally associated (e.g., recombinant production in a host cell; multiple copies of a gene encoding the substance; and use of a stronger promoter than the promoter naturally associated with the gene encoding the substance).

Incubation time: Time in which the one or more fractions of the corn kernel mass is in contact with hydrolytic enzyme during fiber washing, without being screened.

In many preferred embodiments, a method according to the present invention utilises a system comprising a space (V), or "incubator", inside which the material is "left to be affected" by the enzymes and in such situations, the incubation time may be determined by: volume of incubator [m 3 ] * density of inflow to incubator [^/ m s]

Alternatively, if the inflow to the incubator is expressed in terms of volume per time unit:

£ = volume of incubator \m 3 ]

.

volume inflow per time unit to the incubator ^ 3 / s j

Mature polypeptide: The term "mature polypeptide" means a polypeptide in its final form following translation and any post-translational modifications, such as N-terminal processing, C-terminal truncation, glycosylation, phosphorylation, etc. In one aspect, the mature polypeptide is amino acids 21 to 678 of SEQ ID NO: 2 based on the computer program SignalP (Nielsen et al., 1997, Protein Engineering 10: 1-6) that predicts amino acids 1 to 20 of SEQ ID NO: 2 are a signal peptide. It is known in the art that a host cell may produce a mixture of two of more different mature polypeptides (i.e., with a different C-terminal and/or N-terminal amino acid) expressed by the same polynucleotide. It is also known in the art that different host cells process polypeptides differently, and thus, one host cell expressing a polynucleotide may produce a different mature polypeptide (e.g., having a different C-terminal and/or N-terminal amino acid) as compared to another host cell expressing the same polynucleotide.

Mature polypeptide coding sequence: The term "mature polypeptide coding sequence" means a polynucleotide that encodes a mature polypeptide.

Mill equipment: "Mill equipment" refers to all equipment used on a mill. The wet milling process will vary dependent on the available mill equipment. Examples of mill equipment can be steeping tanks, evaporator, screw press, rotatory dryer, dewatering screen, centrifuge, hydrocyclone ect. The size, and number of each mill equipment/milling lines can vary on different mills, which will affect the milling process. For example, the number of fiber washing screen units can vary and so can the size of a centrifuge.

Nucleic acid construct: The term "nucleic acid construct" means a nucleic acid molecule, either single- or double-stranded, which is isolated from a naturally occurring gene or is modified to contain segments of nucleic acids in a manner that would not otherwise exist in nature or which is synthetic, which comprises one or more control sequences.

Operably linked: The term "operably linked" means a configuration in which a control sequence is placed at an appropriate position relative to the coding sequence of a polynucleotide such that the control sequence directs expression of the coding sequence. Retention time: The time in which one or more hydrolytic enzymes and corn kernels or a fraction of the corn kernels are allowed to react during the fiber washing procedure. In some embodiments, the retention time is the time period in which the corn kernel mass, received in the first screen unit (S1) and one or more fractions thereof, are contacted with an effective amount of one or more hydrolytic enzymes before leaving the fiber washing system again. During the retention time, the one or more fractions of corn kernel mass is incubated with one or more hydrolytic enzymes in a space (V), before it leaves the fiber washing system, as part of a first fraction (s1) from the most upstream screen unit (S1) or as part of a second fraction (f4) from the most downstream screen unit (S4).

Retention time may preferably be estimated as the average duration of time solid matter spends in a fiber washing system as defined in relation to the present invention. This may be estimated by the following relation:

mass inflow per time unit to the system ^ ^/s\

Alternatively, if the inflow to the system is expressed in terms of volume per time unit:

volume of system [m 3 ]

ttt =

volume inflow per time unit to the system [™ 3 / s

The volume of the system is typically set equal to the sum of the volumes of all voids in the system; however, as the tubing in the system typically is made small, it may be preferred to disregard the volume of the tubing.

Screened: The term "screened" or "screening" refers to the process of separating corn kernel mass into a first fraction s and a second fraction f and movement of these fractions from one screen unit to another. A non-screening period is a non-separating period provided for incubation of corn kernel mass or fractions thereof with enzymes.

Sequence identity: The relatedness between two amino acid sequences or between two nucleotide sequences is described by the parameter "sequence identity".

For purposes of the present invention, the degree of sequence identity between two amino acid sequences is determined using the Needleman-Wunsch algorithm (Needleman and Wunsch, 1970, J. Mol. Biol. 48: 443-453) as implemented in the Needle program of the EMBOSS package (EMBOSS: The European Molecular Biology Open Software Suite, Rice et al., 2000, Trends Genet. 16: 276-277), preferably version 3.0.0 or later. Version 6.1.0 was used.

The optional parameters used are gap open penalty of 10, gap extension penalty of 0.5, and the EBLOSUM62 (EMBOSS version of BLOSUM62) substitution matrix. The output of Needle labelled "longest identity" (obtained using the -nobrief option) is used as the percent identity and is calculated as follows: (Identical Residues x 100)/(Length of Alignment - Total Number of Gaps in Alignment).

Starch: The term "starch" means any material comprised of complex polysaccharides of plants, composed of glucose units that occurs widely in plant tissues in the form of storage granules, consisting of amylose and amylopectin, and represented as (C6HioOs)n, where n is any number.

Steeping or soaking: The term "steeping" means soaking the crop kernel with water and optionally SO 2 .

Description of the invention:An aspect of the present invention is to provide a method to improve the total starch yield and/or gluten yield that can be obtained from corn kernels in a wet milling process, the method comprising: Admixing corn kernels or a fraction of the corn kernels with an enzyme composition comprising an effective amount of one or more hydrolytic enzymes, wherein at least one of said hydrolytic enzymes is selected from the group consisting of a GH30 polypeptide, a GH5 polypeptide or a combination thereof.

Some of the starch and/or gluten in corn kernels or fractions of corn kernels, may be bound to the fiber fraction and never released during the wet milling process. However, addition of hydrolytic enzymes, which may include any catalytic protein that can use water to break down substrates present in corn kernels, may release some of the bound starch and/or gluten and thus improve the total yield of starch and/or gluten in the wet milling process. The present inventors has surprisingly found that GH5 polypeptides and GH30 polypeptides are particularly effective in decreasing the amount of bound starch and gluten in the fiber fraction.

In one embodiment, the method of the present invention leads to an increase in the amount of starch and/or gluten released from fiber during the process, such as during the fiber washing procedure.

The specific procedure and the equipment used in the wet milling process can vary, but the main principles of the process remains the same (See description on wet milling process). In one embodiment, the method of the invention comprise the steps of:

a) soaking the corn kernels in water to produce soaked kernels;

b) grinding the soaked kernels to produce soaked and ground kernels; c) separating germs from the soaked and ground kernels to produce a corn kernel mass comprising fiber, starch and gluten; and

d) subjecting the resultant corn kernel mass to a fiber washing procedure.

To get maximum starch and gluten recovery, while keeping any fiber in the final product to an absolute minimum, it is necessary to wash the free starch and gluten from the fiber fraction during processing. The fiber is collected, slurried and screened, typically after soaking, grinding and separation of germs from the corn kernels (See description of wet milling process), to reclaim any residual starch or gluten in the corn kernel mass. This process is herein referred to as the fiber washing procedure.

In one embodiment, said corn kernels or a fraction of said corn kernels is admixed with said one or more hydrolytic enzymes, before, during or after the step of subjecting the corn kernel mass to a fiber washing procedure.

In one embodiment, said corn kernels or a fraction of said corn kernels are admixed with said one or more hydrolytic enzymes, before the step of subjecting the corn kernel mass to a fiber washing procedure. According to this embodiment, the corn kernels are preferably admixed with said one or more hydrolytic enzymes during steeping during grinding and/or during germ separation.

In one embodiment, said corn kernels or a fraction of said corn kernels is admixed with said one or more hydrolytic enzymes, after the step of subjecting the corn kernel mass to a fiber washing procedure.

In a preferred embodiment, said corn kernels or a fraction of said corn kernels is admixed with said one or more hydrolytic enzymes during the step of subjecting the corn kernel mass to a fiber washing procedure.

In one embodiment, said corn kernels or a fraction of said corn kernels is allowed to react with said one or more hydrolytic enzymes for at least 15 minutes, such as at least 20 minutes, at least 25 minutes, at least 30 minutes, at least 35 minutes, at least 40 minutes, at least 45 minutes, at least 50 minutes, at least 55 minutes, at least 60 minutes, at least 70 minutes, at least 80 minutes, at least 90 minutes, at least 100 minutes, at least 110 minutes or at least 120 minutes.

The specific equipment used in the fiber washing procedure can vary, but the main principle of the process remains the same.

In one embodiment, said fiber washing procedure comprise the use of a fiber washing system optimized for introduction of one or more hydrolytic enzymes, wherein the fiber washing system comprise a space (V) configured to provide a total reaction time in the fiber washing system (retention time) of at least 35 minutes, such as at least 40 minutes, at least 45 minutes, at least 50 minutes, at least 60 minutes, at least 70 minutes, at least 80 minutes, at least 90 minutes, at least 100 minutes, at least 1 10 minutes or at least 120 minutes and less than 48 hours, such as less than 40 hours, less than 36 hours, less than 30 hours, less than 24 hours, less than 20 hours, less than 12 hours, less than 10 hours, less than 8 hours, less than 6 hours, less than 5 hours, less than 4 hours, less than 3 hours. In one embodiment the total retention time in the fiber washing system is between 35 minutes and 48 hours such as between 35 minutes and 24 hours, 35 minutes and 12 hours, 35 minutes and 6 hours, 35 minutes and 5 hours, 35 minutes and 4 hours, 35 minutes and 3 hours, 35 minutes and 2 hours, 45 minutes and 48 hours, 45 minutes and 24 hours, 45 minutes and hours, 45 minutes and 6 hours, 45 minutes and 5 hours, 45 minutes and 4 hours, 45 minutes and 3 hours, 45 minutes and 2 hours 1-48 hours, 1-24 hours, 1-12 hours, 1-6 hours, 1-5 hours, 1-4 hours, 1-3 hours, 1-2 hours.

In one embodiment, the fiber washing system comprises:

a plurality of screen units (S1... S4) being fluidly connected in a counter current washing configuration; each screen unit being configured for separating a stream of corn kernel mass and liquid into two fractions: a first fraction (s) and a second fraction (f), said second fraction (f) containing a higher amount measured in wt% fiber than the first fraction (s);

a space (V) arranged in the system and being fluidly connected to receive said first fraction (s), said second fraction (f), or a mixed first and second fraction (s,f), preferably only a second fraction (f), and configured to provide an incubation time for one or both fractions received in the space; and outletting the thereby incubated one or both fractions to a downstream screen unit (S4),

wherein the system is configured for

inletting corn kernel mass and liquid to the most upstream screen unit (S1) outletting the first fraction (s1) from the most upstream screen unit (S1) as a product stream containing starch,

- inletting process water, preferably arranged for inletting process water to a most downstream screen unit (S4),

outletting the second fraction (f4) from most downstream screen unit (S4) as a washed corn kernel mass containing a lower amount of starch and gluten than the original corn kernel mass.

- introducing hydrolytic enzymes into the system. Figure 1 schematically illustrates an embodiment of a fiber washing system as described above. As illustrated in figure 1 , the fiber washing system comprises a plurality of screen units S1 , S2, S3, S4 being fluidly connected in a counter current washing configuration. "Fluidly connected" typically means that the screen units are connected by use of flow lines, such as pipes for transporting matter between the screen units. Each of the screen units S1-S4 is configured for separating a stream of corn kernel mass and liquid into two fractions: a first fraction s (s1 , s2, s3, s4) and a second fraction f (f1 , f2, f3, f4). As the skilled person will understand, the number of first fractions produced in the fiber washing system depends on the number screen units included in the system. The number of screen units in the system is preferably between 2-8, and in such embodiments the number of firsts and second fractions will also be between 2-8. The screen units are typically configured so that the solid matter is separated out in a separate stream whereby the second fraction f contains a higher amount measured in wt% fiber than the first fraction s. In the figure, notation "s" preferably refers to a fibreless stream (containing starch) and notation "f preferably refers to a fiber containing stream. Index on f and s refers to the origin of the stream. It is noted that although it is preferred that the first fractions s does not contain any fiber, this may in a practical set-up be difficult to achieve.

The flow in the system has a downstream direction and an upstream direction: each screen unit; e.g. screen unit S3, receives a stream; e.g. f2, from an upstream screen unit, e.g. S2 and delivers a stream; e.g. s3, to the upstream screen unit; e.g. S2. Similarly, the screen unit S3 receives a stream s4 from a downstream screen unit S4 and delivers a stream f3 to the downstream screen unit S4.

As illustrated in figure 1 , process water, that is typically water that is used as washing water in the system, is provided to the most downstream screen unit S4, and the process water is typically water not containing fiber. Corn kernel mass is typically a liquid suspension (typically a suspension in water), provided at the most upstream screen unit S1. This is in fig. 1 indicated by the arrow labelled "From milling". Thereby, and by the fluid connection between the screen units, the corn kernel mass and fractions f thereof flow downstream in the system and the process water moves upstream in the system. Thus, the fluid configuration in the system can be seen as the corn kernel mass is washed in the most upstream screen unit S1 by a fluid containing high amount of starch and in the most downstream screen unit S4 washed by a fluid containing low amount of starch. Further, the corn kernel mass in the most upstream screen unit S1 contains a higher amount of starch than the fraction f of the corn kernel mass in the most downstream screen unit S4. One aim of using the fiber washing system described above, is to provide a contact time of at least 35 minutes, such as at least 40 minutes, at least 45 minutes, at least 50 minutes, at least 60 minutes, at least 70 minutes, at least 80 minutes, at least 90 minutes, at least 100 minutes, at least 1 10 minutes or at least 120 minutes, between corn kernel mass or 5 fractions thereof and enzymes in the system, in order to increase the efficiency of the removal of the starch from fiber. The contact time/reaction time between enzymes and corn kernel mass or fractions thereof in the fiber washing system is also referred to as retention time. The contact time/reaction time between enzymes and corn kernel mass or fractions thereof in the space (V) is referred to as incubation time.

10 In one embodiment, the incubation time in said space (V) configured into the fiber washing system is at least 5 minutes such as at least 10 minutes, at least 15 minutes, at least 20 minutes, at least 30 minutes, at least 40 minutes, at least 45 minutes, at least 50 minutes, at least 60 minutes, at least 70 minutes, at least 80 minutes, at least 90 minutes, at least 100 minutes, at least 110 minutes or at least 120 minutes and less than 48 hours, such as

15 less than 40 hours, less than 36 hours, less than 30 hours, less than 24 hours, less than 20 hours, less than 12 hours, less than 10 hours, less than 8 hours, less than 6 hours, less than 5 hours, less than 4 hours, less than 3 hours.

In one embodiment the incubation time in said space (V) is between 35 minutes and 48 hours such as between 35 minutes and 24 hours, 35 minutes and hours, 35 minutes and 6 20 hours, 35 minutes and 5 hours, 35 minutes and 4 hours, 35 minutes and 3 hours, 35 minutes and 2 hours, 45 minutes and 48 hours, 45 minutes and 24 hours, 45 minutes and 12 hours, 45 minutes and 6 hours, 45 minutes and 5 hours, 45 minutes and 4 hours, 45 minutes and 3 hours, 45 minutes and 2 hours 1-48 hours, 1-24 hours, 1-12 hours, 1-6 hours, 1-5 hours, 1-4 hours, 1-3 hours, 1-2 hours.

25 In one embodiment, the incubation temperature in said space (V) is between 25 and 95 °C, such as between 25 and 90 °C, 25 and 85 °C, 25 and 80 °C, 25 and 75 °C, 25 and 70 °C, 25 and 65 °C, 25 and 60 °C, 25 and 55 °C, 25 and 53 °C, 25 and 52 °C, 30 and 90 °C, 30 and 85 °C, 30 and 80 °C, 30 and 75 °C, 30 and 70 °C, 30 and 65 °C, 30 and 60 °C, 30 and 55 °C, 30 and 53 °C, 30 and 52 °C, 35 and 90 °C, 35 and 85 °C, 35 and 80 °C, 35 and

30 75 °C, 35 and 70 °C, 35 and 65 °C, 35 and 60 °C, 35 and 55 °C, 35 and 53 °C, 35 and 52 °C, 39 and 90 °C, 39 and 85 °C, 39 and 80 °C, 39 and 75 °C, 39 and 70 °C, 39 and 65 °C, 39 and 60 °C, 39 and 55 °C, 39 and 53 °C, 39 and 52 °C. It has been found advantageous to add enzymes at position being downstream of a most upstream screen unit S1 and upstream of a most downstream screen unit S4; in the embodiment of fig. 1 , the addition of enzymes is illustrated as being at the fluid position of the screen unit S3 (illustrated by the arrow in fig. 1 labelled "Enzymes".

By adding the enzymes at an optimal point in the fiber washing system, the retention time can be prolonged, which may increase the efficiency of the removal or separation of starch from fiber. In order to provide a longer retention time than that provided by a typical mill, a space V (not shown in fig. 1) may be arranged in the system and being fluidly connected to receive one of said first fractions s, one of said second fractions f, or a mixed first and second fraction s, f, preferably only a second fraction f, and configured to provide an incubation time for one or both fractions received in the space; and outletting the thereby incubated fraction or fractions to a downstream screen unit S4. It is noted that while it may be preferred to have a separate incubator unit arranged in the system, the flow lines connecting the screen units may also be used to provide the space.

According to embodiments wherein the fiber washing system comprises 2 screen units, dosing is preferred between the first and second screen unit or in a space configured between screen unit 1 and screen unit 2.

According to embodiments wherein the fiber washing system comprises 3 screen units, dosing is preferred in the second screen unit or in a space configured between screen unit 1 and screen unit 3, most preferred in screen unit 2, or a space configured between screen unit 2 and 3.

According to embodiments wherein the fiber washing system comprise 4 screen units, dosing is preferred in the second or third screen unit or in a space configured between screen unit 1 and screen unit 4, most preferred in screen unit 2, or a space configured between screen unit 2 and 3.

According to embodiments wherein the fiber washing system comprise 5 screen units, dosing is preferred in the second, third or fourth screen unit, or in a space configured between screen unit 1 and screen unit 5, most preferred in screen unit 3 or a space configured between screen unit 3 and 4.

According to embodiments wherein the fiber washing system comprise 6 screen units, dosing is preferred in the second, third, fourth or fifth screen unit, or in a space configured between screen unit 1 and screen unit 6, most preferred in screen unit 4, or a space configured between screen unit 4 and 5. According to embodiments wherein the fiber washing system comprise 7 screen units, dosing is preferred in the second, third, fourth, fifth or sixth screen unit, or in a space configured between screen unit 1 and screen unit 7, most preferred in screen unit 4 or a space configured between screen unit 4 and 5.

According to embodiments wherein the fiber washing system comprise 8 screen units, dosing is preferred in the second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh screen unit, or in a space configured between screen unit 1 and screen unit 8, most preferred in screen unit 5 or a space configured between screen unit 5 and 6.

Thus, a system according to preferred embodiments of the invention is configured for - inletting corn kernel mass and liquid to the most upstream screen unit S1 , preferably by comprising an inlet into system feeding the matter to the most upstream screen unit SI ;

outletting the first fraction s1 from the most upstream screen unit S1 as a product stream containing starch, preferably by comprising an outlet from the most upstream screen unit feeding a fibreless stream out from the system;

inletting process water, preferably arranged for inletting process water to a most downstream screen unit S4; the inlet of process water is preferably an inlet to the most downstream screen unit S4;

outletting the second fraction f4 from most downstream screen unit S4 as a washed corn kernel mass containing a lower amount of starch and gluten than the original corn kernel mass; preferably by comprising an outlet from the most downstream screen unit.

The system is also configured for introducing hydrolytic enzymes into the system, which may be an inlet arranged at a preferred position to allow contact between the corn kernel mass or fractions thereof and the one or more hydrolytic enzymes.

Reference is made to fig. 2 schematically illustrating a further embodiment of a system according to the present invention. The same notation as used in fig. 1 is used in fig. 2. As presented in fig. 2, the screen units S1 to S4 all comprises a screening element (screen) indicated by a slanted, dotted line inside the screen units. This slanted dotted line illustrate a device configured for separating out a fraction f containing fiber and a fraction preferably not containing any fiber; this could for instance be provided by a band filter or a filter in general arranged inside wall parts defining an interior void of a screen unit.

In the embodiment shown in fig. 2, the various fraction to be mixed are illustrated as being mixed outside the screen units S1-S4. However, they may be mixed inside the screen units. As also illustrated in fig. 2, the space V is a separate container being fluidly connected to the screen unit S3 so that the screen unit S3 receives fluid with fiber and enzymes after the fluid with fiber and enzymes has had an incubation time in the space V. As schematically illustrated in fig. 2, the space V may have baffle plates for assuring the fluid does not flow in a straight line from inlet to outlet of the container, which could otherwise short-cut the flow to provide an incubation time.

Fig. 2 also illustrates that enzymes are applied to the streams f2 and s4 going into the space V. In the embodiment shown, the enzymes are dosed by a dosing pump 10 illustrated schematically be a piston pump driven by a crank shaft where the amount of enzymes dosed is controlled by the rotation of the crank shaft (one-way inlet and outlet valves are present in the cylinder or cylinder head but not illustrated).

Thus, a system according to the present invention is preferably configured for introducing hydrolytic enzymes into said first fraction (s), and/or into said second fraction (f), and/or into a mixed first and second fraction and/or into the stream of process water supplied to the system.

The number of screen units S may be selected according to e.g. the volumetric capacity to separate into two stream and/or the other design aims. However, a system according to present invention will in general have a most upstream screen unit, a most downstream screen unit and preferably one or more intermediate screen units fluidic arranged in between the most upstream and most downstream screen units. That is, with reference to figs 1 and 2, a preferred system will comprise a most upstream screen unit S1 and a most downstream screen unit S4 and a number of screen units (e.g. 2) arranged in between, where arranged in between refers to being fluidly connected as illustrated in the figs 1 and 2.

In detail, the fluidly connected counter current washing configuration, as disclosed in figs 1 and 2, typically comprising the plurality of screen units S1 ... S4 being arranged in a manner so:

a second fraction f1 produced by an upstream screen unit S1 is mixed with a first fraction s3 produced by a downstream screen unit S3, and said mixed fractions being separated by a screen unit S2, being intermediate between said upstream and said downstream screen units S1 , S3, into a first fraction s2 and a second fraction f2.

While this disclosure is made with reference to screen unit S3, the same description may apply for any intermediate screen units, such as screen S2, or other intermediate screen units where intermediate screen unit refers to a screen unit being arranged downstream of the most upstream screen unit and upstream of a most downstream screen unit.

As illustrated in fig. 2, it is in some embodiments preferred that mixing of a second fraction f1 and a first fraction s3 occurs prior to being inlet into an intermediate screen unit S2. Such 5 a mixing may be provided by inletting the two fractions into a mixing chamber comprising stirring means providing typically a vigorous agitation of the fluid or the mixing may be provide by a manifold having an inlet for each stream and an outlet for the mixed stream.

As an alternative to mixing prior to be inlet into a screen unit, mixing of a second fraction f1 and a first fractions 3 may occur inside an intermediate screen unit S2. This may for instance 10 be accomplished by the interior of the screen unit being equipped with a stirring means providing typically a vigorous agitation of the fluid inside the screen unit.

Although the embodiments disclosed in figs. 1 and 2 are shown to comprise more than two screen units, a system is considered to be fully operational with as little as two screen units. Thus, it is generally preferred that the system comprising 2-8 screen units typically arranged 15 as illustrated in fig. 1 or 2.

Further, the dimension of the space (in m 3 ) is preferably configured to provide an incubation time of at least at least 5 minutes, such as at least 10 minutes, at least 15 minutes, at least 20 minutes at least 25 minutes, at least 30 minutes, at least 35 minutes, at least 40 minutes, at least 45 minutes, at least 50 minutes, at least 55 minutes, at least 60 minutes, at least

20 70 minutes, at least 80 minutes, at least 90 minutes, at least 100 minutes, at least 1 10 minutes, at least 120 minutes. The space (V) designated for incubation preferably has a volume of at least 30 m 3 , at least 40 m 3 , at least 50 m 3 , at least 60 m 3 , at least 70, m 3 , at least 80, m 3 , at least 90, m 3 , at least 100 m 3 , at least 110 m 3 , at least 120 m 3 , at least 130 m 3 , at least 140 m 3 , at least 150 m 3 , at least 160 m 3 , at least 170 m 3 , at least 180 m 3 , at

25 least 190 m 3 , at least 200 m 3 , at least 210 m 3 , at least 220 m 3 , at least 230 m 3 , at least 240 m 3 , at least 250 m 3 , at least 260 m 3 , at least 270 m 3 , at least 280 m 3 , at least 290 m 3 , at least 300 m 3 , at least 400 m 3 , or at least 500 m 3 . The incubation time may also be in more than one space V with a total or combined volume of at least 100 m 3 , at least 1 10 m 3 , at least 120 m 3 , at least 130 m 3 , at least 140 m 3 , at least 150 m 3 , at least 160 m 3 , at least 170

30 m 3 , at least 180 m 3 , at least 190 m 3 , at least 200 m 3 , at least 210 m 3 , at least 220 m 3 , at least 230 m 3 , at least 240 m 3 , at least 250 m 3 , at least 260 m 3 , at least 270 m 3 , at least 280 m 3 , at least 290 m 3 , at least 300 m 3 , at least 400 m 3 , at least 500 m 3

During the incubation time, it is preferred that the fluid received in the space V is not screened. Thus, the fluid leaving the space V has the same composition, e.g. of starch and fiber, as the fluid received in the space V, although it preferably contains a higher proportion of starch that has been released from the fibers.

To assure intimate contact between the enzymes and the fiber, it may be preferred to configure the space V for agitation of matter contained in said space V, such as by comprising a rotor or impeller.

As illustrated in fig. 2, it is preferred to arrange the space V downstream of the most upstream screen unit S1 and upstream of said most downstream screen unit S4; in particular, the embodiment of fig. 2 illustrates that the space V is arranged to feed fluid into the second most downstream screen unit S3.

As disclosed herein, the space may be provided in different manner and as illustrated in fig. 2 the space V may preferably be provided as a separate incubator unit. The incubator unit may be configured by suitable fluid lines to receive a first fraction s, a second fraction f or a combination of a first and a second fraction s,f, preferably only a second fraction f, and deliver the thereby incubated material to a downstream screen unit S3.

Reference is made to fig. 3 schematically illustrating a screen unit with an build-in incubator/space V. As illustrated the screen unit/incubator comprising at the lower end, a screening element 14 and above that a space V. Inside the space baffle plates are arranged to avoid short-cut in the fluid flow from the upper end (receiving in the disclosed embodiment of fig. 3 fractions f1 and s3) towards the screening element 14. As also illustrated, the fiberless stream s2 is screened out providing a fiber containing fraction f2.

The enzyme used in releasing the starch from the corn kernel mass typically has a thermal window inside which the release of enzyme is most efficient and it may therefore be advantageous to be able to control the temperature at selected positions in the system, such as in the space V. To this, a system according to the present invention may preferably comprising thermo elements for providing an incubation temperature of the fluid inside said space (V), preferably in the range 35-70°C, such as in the range of 40-60°C, such as in the range of 39-53°C, such as in the range of 45-53°C, such as in the range of 39-48°C, such as 47°C. In the embodiment where the space is provided as a separate incubation unit (as in fig. 2) the thermo elements may be arranged inside the incubation unit and/or on a shell defining the enclosure of the incubation unit.

The thermo elements are preferably thermostat-able heating/cooling elements being adapted to measure the temperature and change the heat flux into/out from the space to control the temperature of material contained in the space to be within a predefined range. In some preferred embodiments, the thermostat-able heating elements comprising electrical heating/cooling elements or liquid heating/cooling elements and temperature sensors.

As presented herein, the screen unit provides a separation of fluid into two fractions s and f and the screen unit typically screens in a mechanical manner where one or more, such as all the screen units, comprises one or more screening element having openings (as illustrated e.g. in fig. 2 with a slanted, dotted lines) configured for allowing passage of solid matter below a predefined size. The predefined size may be defined according to a number of design criteria. However, it typically preferred than no fiber is allowed to pass through the opening. On the other hand to small opening may have a tendency to become blocked and in many instances the actual size of openings is selected by taking the blocking aspect and the screening aspect into consideration, which may result in that smaller amounts of fibers are allowed to pass through.

In some preferred embodiments, one or more such as all screen units comprises rotor blade and/or sieves configured for providing said two fractions s, f. As an alternative to screening elements made up by openings one or more such as all screen units may be hydro-cyclones 16 as illustrated schematically in fig. 4.

As disclosed above, the system is configured to introduce hydrolytic enzymes into said first fraction s and/or into said second fraction f and/or into a mixed first and second fraction and/or into the process water, by means of a dosing device - see fig. 2.

Such a dosing device is typically adapted to provide a controllable dosing quantity of enzymes, preferably according to a predetermined specific ratio between amount of enzymes and infeed of corn kernel mass to the system. To accomplish this, the dosing device 10 could be a metering pump as illustrated by a piston pump in fig. 2.

Alternatively, the dosing device may be a gravity flow dispenser having a controllable outflow valve configured for controlling the amount of enzyme flowing through the flow valve.

In one embodiment, the GH5 polypeptide of the present invention has xylanase activity. In one embodiment, the GH30 polypeptide of the present invention has xylanase activity. In one embodiment the GH5 polypeptide of the present invention has an amount of xylanase activity which is sufficient to release an amount of starch and gluten which is at least 15% (w/w) of fiber dry matter, such as at least 16%, 17%, 18%, 19%, 20% 21 % or at least 22% (w/w) of fiber dry matter, in a procedure comprising the steps of: i. Providing a sample of pressed fiber from a corn wet-mill plant; ii. Re-suspending the sample in buffer (pH 4, 0.02M Na Acetate) to provide a slurry containing 5% dry solids.

iii. Adding GH5 polypeptide to the slurry in amounts corresponding to 35μg enzyme protein (EP) per g dry-solids substrate, such as 7C^g enzyme protein (EP) per g dry-solids substrate, in combination with cellulolytic enzymes at an amount corresponding to 280 μg enzyme protein (EP) per g dry-solids substrate;

iv. Incubation of sample at a temperature of 40 or 52 °C in an air-heated incubator with constant shaking for 120 minutes.

v. Quick cooling of sample in ice-water (5°C) before processing

vi. Transferring of slurry to a 150-micron sieve and collection of filtrate passing through.

vii. Pressing of retaining fiber on sieve and collection of filtrate passing through, combining the collected filtrate with the first filtrate.

viii. Transferring of pressed fiber to a 200 ml water containing beaker and stirring of the mixture.

ix. Transferring the slurry to a 150-micron sieve and collection of filtrate passing through, combining the collected filtrate with the first filtrate.

x. Pressing of retaining fiber on sieve and collection of filtrate passing through, combining the collected filtrate with the first filtrate.

xi. Repetition of step viii to x one more time.

xii. Vacuum filtration of combined filtrate through a glass micro filter paper (Whatman) which retains the insoluble solids that were released from the fiber passed through the 150 micron sieve.

xiii. Passing 200 ml water over the filter paper to remove any trace solubles xiv. Drying and weighing of the total insoluble solids retained on the filter paper, reported as starch and gluten released (w/w) of fiber dry matter.

In one embodiment, the GH5 polypeptide of the present invention further comprises one or more of the following activities: endo^-1 ,4-glucanase / cellulase (EC 3.2.1.4) activity, endo^-1 ,4-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) activity, β-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) activity, β- mannosidase (EC 3.2.1.25) activity, β-glucosylceramidase (EC 3.2.1.45) activity, glucan -1 ,3-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.58) activity, licheninase (EC 3.2.1.73) activity, βχο-β-1 ,4- glucanase / cellodextrinase (EC 3.2.1.74) activity and/or glucan endo-1 ,6^-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.75) activity, mannan endo^-1 ,4-mannosidase (EC 3.2.1.78) activity, cellulose -1 ,4-cellobiosidase (EC 3.2.1.91) activity, steryl β-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.104) activity, endoglycoceramidase (EC 3.2.1.123) activity, chitosanase (EC 3.2.1.132) activity, β- primeverosidase (EC 3.2.1.149) activity, xyloglucan-specific endo^-1 ,4-glucanase (EC 3.2.1.151) activity, endo^-1 ,6-galactanase (EC 3.2.1.164) activity, hesperidin 6-O-a-L- rhamnosyl^-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.168) activity, β-Ι (EC 3.2.1.-) activity and arabinoxylan-specific endo^-1 ,4-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.-) activity and mannan transglycosylase (EC 2.4.1.-) activity.

In one embodiment, the GH30 polypeptide of the present invention further comprise one or more of the following activities: endo^-1 ,4-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) activity, β-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) activity, β-glucuronidase (EC 3.2.1.31) activity, β-xylosidase (EC 3.2.1.37) activity, β-fucosidase (EC 3.2.1.38) activity, glucosylceramidase (EC 3.2.1.45) activity, β- 1 ,6-glucanase (EC 3.2.1.75) activity, glucuronoarabinoxylan endo^-1 ,4-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.136) activity, endo^-1 ,6-galactanase (EC:3.2.1.164) activity, and [reducing end] β- xylosidase (EC 3.2.1.-) activity.

In one embodiment, the GH5 polypeptide of the present invention, is selected from a group consisting of:

i) A mature polypeptide of the amino acid sequence set forth in any one of SEQ ID NO: 1-3; SEQ ID NO: 8, SEQ ID NO: 10 or SEQ ID NO: 12;

ii) A mature polypeptide, which has at least 60% sequence identity to the mature polypeptide in i), such as at least 65%, 70%, 75%, 80%,

85%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, 99% or 100% sequence identity. iii) A subsequence of any one of the mature polypeptides in i) and ii); preferably the subsequence has xylanase activity.

In one embodiment, the GH30 polypeptide of the present invention, is selected from a group consisting of:

i) A mature polypeptide of the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 4; SEQ ID NO:5; SEQ ID NO:6 or SEQ ID NO:7;

ii) A mature polypeptide, which has at least 60% sequence identity to the mature polypeptide in i), such as at least 65%, 70%, 75%, 80%, 85%, 90%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, 99% or 100% sequence identity. iii) A subsequence of any one of the mature polypeptides in i) and ii); preferably the subsequence has xylanase activity. The term "mature polypeptide" means a polypeptide in its final form following translation and any post-translational modifications, such as N-terminal processing, C-terminal truncation, glycosylation, phosphorylation, etc.

In one embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 1 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 1 to 655. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 1 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 28 to 655 of SEQ ID NO: 1 , amino acids 1 to 27 of SEQ ID NO: 1 being a signal peptide. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ I D NO: 1 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 36 to 655 of SEQ ID NO: 1 , amino acids 28 to 35 of SEQ ID NO: 1 being a his-tag. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 1 comprises/consists/consists essentially of at least amino acids 37 to 655 of SEQ ID NO: 1. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 1 comprises/consists/consists essentially of at least amino acids 40 to 655 of SEQ ID NO: 1. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 1 comprises/consists/consists essentially of at least amino acids 45 to 655 of SEQ ID NO: 1.

In one embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 2 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 1 to 555 of SEQ I D NO: 2. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 2 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 7 to 555 of SEQ ID NO: 2, amino acids 1 to 6 of SEQ ID NO: 2 being a his-tag. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 2 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 10 to 555 of SEQ ID NO: 2. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 2 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 15 to 555 of SEQ ID NO: 2. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 2 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 20 to 555 of SEQ ID NO: 2. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 2 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 30 to 555 of SEQ ID NO: 2.

In one embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 3 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 1 to 585 of SEQ ID NO: 3. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 3 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 28 to 585 of SEQ ID NO: 3, amino acids 1 to 27 of SEQ ID NO: 3 being a signal peptide. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 3 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 36 to 585 of SEQ ID NO: 3, amino acids 28 to 35 of SEQ ID NO: 3 being a his-tag. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 3 comprises/consists/consists essentially of at least amino acids 37 to 585 of SEQ ID NO: 3. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 3 comprises/consists/consists essentially of at least amino acids 40 to 585 of SEQ ID NO: 3. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 3 comprises/consists/consists essentially of at least amino acids 45 to 585 of SEQ ID NO: 3. In one embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 4 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 1 to 391 of SEQ I D NO: 4. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 4 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 5 to 391 of SEQ ID NO: 4. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 4 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 10 to 391 of SEQ ID NO: 4. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 4 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 15 to 391 of SEQ ID NO: 4. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 4 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 20 to 391 of SEQ ID NO: 4. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 4 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 30 to 391 of SEQ ID NO: 4.

In one embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 5 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 1 to 417 of SEQ I D NO: 5. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 5 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 27 to 417 of SEQ ID NO: 5, amino acids 1 to 26 of SEQ ID NO: 5 being a signal peptide.

In one embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 6 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 1 to 417 of SEQ I D NO: 6. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 6 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 27 to 417 of SEQ ID NO: 6, amino acids 1 to 26 of SEQ ID NO: 6 being a signal peptide.

In one embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 7 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 1 to 417 of SEQ ID NO: 7. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 7 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 27 to 417 of SEQ ID NO: 7, amino acids 1 to 26 of SEQ ID NO: 7 being a signal peptide.

In one embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 8 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 1 to 557. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 8 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 8 to 557 of SEQ ID NO: 8, amino acids 1 to 7 of SEQ ID NO: 8 being a his-tag. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ I D NO: 8 comprises/consists/consists essentially of at least amino acids 28 to 557 of SEQ ID NO: 8. In one embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ I D NO: 10 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 1 to 576 of SEQ I D NO: 10. In another embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ I D NO: 10 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 24 to 576 of SEQ I D NO: 10, amino acids 1 to 23 of SEQ I D NO: 10 being a signal peptide. In one embodiment, the mature polypeptide of SEQ I D NO: 12 comprises/consists/consists essentially of amino acids 1 to 565 of SEQ I D NO: 12.

In the context of the present invention, the term "subsequence" means a polypeptide in which one or more (e.g., several) amino acid residues are absent from the amino (N-) terminus and/or from the carboxy (C-) terminus of a mature polypeptide ; wherein the subsequence has xylanase activity. In some embodiments, the number of amino acid residues which are absent in a "subsequence" is at the most 20, such as at the most 19, 18, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 1 1 , 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2 or at the most 1 amino acid residue.

In some embodiment, a subsequence of any one of the mature polypeptides may be at least 150 amino acids in length or at least 200 amino acids in length or at least 250 amino acids in length or at least 300 amino acids in length or at least 350 amino acids in length or at least 400 amino acids in length or at least 450 amino acids in length or at least 500 amino acids in length or at least 550 amino acids in length or at least 600 amino acids in length or at least 650 amino acids in length.

In one embodiment, a subsequence of SEQ I D NO: 1 of the mature polypeptides may be at least 200 amino acids in length or at least 250 amino acids in length or at least 300 amino acids in length or at least 350 amino acids in length or at least 400 amino acids in length or at least 450 amino acids in length or at least 500 amino acids in length or at least 550 amino acids in length or at least 600 amino acids in length or at least 650 amino acids in lenght.

In one embodiment, a subsequence of SEQ I D NO: 2 of the mature polypeptides may be at least 200 amino acids in length or at least 250 amino acids in length or at least 300 amino acids in length or at least 350 amino acids in length or at least 400 amino acids in length or at least 450 amino acids in length or at least 500 amino acids in length or at least 550 amino acids in length.

In one embodiment, a subsequence of SEQ I D NO: 3 of the mature polypeptides may be at least 200 amino acids in length or at least 250 amino acids in length or at least 300 amino acids in length or at least 350 amino acids in length or at least 400 amino acids in length or at least 450 amino acids in length or at least 500 amino acids in length or at least 550 amino acids in length or at least 560 amino acids in length or at least 570 amino acids in length or at least 580 amino acids in length.

In one embodiment, a subsequence of SEQ ID NO: 4 of the mature polypeptides may be at least 150 amino acids in length or at least 200 amino acids in length or at least 250 amino acids in length or at least 300 amino acids in length or at least 350 amino acids in length or at least 360 amino acids in length or at least 370 amino acids in length or at least 380 amino acids in length or at least 390 amino acids in length.

In one embodiment, a subsequence of SEQ ID NO: 5 of the mature polypeptides may be at least 150 amino acids in length or at least 200 amino acids in length or at least 250 amino acids in length or at least 300 amino acids in length or at least 350 amino acids in length or at least 360 amino acids in length or at least 370 amino acids in length or at least 380 amino acids in length or at least 390 amino acids in length.

In one embodiment, a subsequence of SEQ ID NO: 6 of the mature polypeptides may be at least 150 amino acids in length or at least 200 amino acids in length or at least 250 amino acids in length or at least 300 amino acids in length or at least 350 amino acids in length or at least 360 amino acids in length or at least 370 amino acids in length or at least 380 amino acids in length or at least 390 amino acids in length.

In one embodiment, a subsequence of SEQ ID NO: 7 of the mature polypeptides may be at least 150 amino acids in length or at least 200 amino acids in length or at least 250 amino acids in length or at least 300 amino acids in length or at least 350 amino acids in length or at least 360 amino acids in length or at least 370 amino acids in length or at least 380 amino acids in length or at least 390 amino acids in length.

In one embodiment, a subsequence of SEQ ID NO: 8 of the mature polypeptides may be at least 200 amino acids in length or at least 250 amino acids in length or at least 300 amino acids in length or at least 350 amino acids in length or at least 400 amino acids in length or at least 450 amino acids in length or at least 500 amino acids in length or at least 550 amino acids in length or at least 600 amino acids in length or at least 650 amino acids in length. In one embodiment, a subsequence of SEQ ID NO: 10 of the mature polypeptides may be at least 200 amino acids in length or at least 250 amino acids in length or at least 300 amino acids in length or at least 350 amino acids in length or at least 400 amino acids in length or at least 450 amino acids in length or at least 500 amino acids in length or at least 550 amino acids in length or at least 600 amino acids in length or at least 650 amino acids in length. In one embodiment, a subsequence of SEQ ID NO: 12 of the mature polypeptides may be at least 200 amino acids in length or at least 250 amino acids in length or at least 300 amino acids in length or at least 350 amino acids in length or at least 400 amino acids in length or at least 450 amino acids in length or at least 500 amino acids in length or at least 550 amino acids in length or at least 600 amino acids in length or at least 650 amino acids in length.

In one embodiment, the enzyme composition comprising one or more hydrolytic enzymes further comprise one or more enzymes selected form the group consisting of: cellulases (EC 3.2.1.4), xylanases (EC 3.2.1.8) arabinofuranosidases (EC 3.2.1.55 (Non-reducing end alpha-L-arabinofuranosidases); EC 3.2.1.185 (Non-reducing end beta-L- arabinofuranosidases) cellobiohydrolase I (EC 3.2.1.150), cellobiohydrolase II (E.C. 3.2.1.91), cellobiosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.176), beta-glucosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.21), beta- xylosidases (EC 3.2.1.37) and proteases (E.C 3.4).

In one embodiment, the one or more hydrolytic enzymes is expressed in an organism with a cellulase background, such as Trichoderma reesei. According to these embodiments the GH5 and/or the GH30 polypeptides defined according to the invention is/are expressed together with endogenous cellulases from Trichoderma.

In one embodiment, the enzyme composition comprising one or more hydrolytic enzymes may comprise cellulases expressed in Trichoderma reesei and other hydrolotic enzymes which are added to the enzyme composition in a purified or semi-purified form.

In one embodiment, the one or more hydrolytic enzymes are purified. The purified enzymes may be used in an enzyme composition as described in other embodiments of the present invention.

In one embodiment, the one or more hydrolytic enzymes is/are in a liquid composition. The composition may be homogenous or heterogeneous.

In one embodiment, the one or more hydrolytic enzymes is/are in a solid composition.

In one embodiment, the effective amount of one or more hydrolytic enzymes admixed with one or more fractions of said corn kernel mass, is between 0.005-0.5 kg enzyme protein (EP)/metric tonne (MT) corn kernels entering the wet milling process, such as between 0.010-0.5 kg EP/MT corn kernel, such as between 0.05-0.5 kg/MT corn kernel or 0.075- 0.5 kg/MT or 0.1-0.5 kg/MT corn kernel or 0.005-0.4 kg/MT corn kernel or 0.01-0.4 kg/MT corn kernel or 0.05-0.4 kg/MT corn kernel or 0.075-0.4 kg/MT corn kernel or 0.1-0.4 kg/MT corn kernel or 0.005-0.3 kg/MT corn kernel or 0.01-0.3 kg/MT corn kernel or 0.05-0.3 kg/MT corn kernel or 0.075-0.3 kg/MT or 0.1 -0.3 kg/MT corn kernel or 0.005-0.2 kg/MT corn kernel or 0.010-0.2 kg/MT corn kernel or 0.05-0.2 kg/MT corn kernel or 0.075-0.2 kg/MT or 0.1- 0.2 kg/MT corn kernel or such as 0.075-0.10 kg/MT corn kernel or 0.075-0.11 kg/MT corn kernel.

Enzymatic treatment of corn kernels or a fraction of corn kernels with a hydrolytic enzyme composition, comprising at least one GH5 polypeptide or at least one GH30 polypeptide or a combination of at least one GH5 and at least one GH30 polypeptide, provide corn starch, corn gluten and corn fiber products, that differ from products produced by other methods known in the art.

In one aspect, the present invention relates to a composition comprising corn starch, said composition being obtainable by the method of the invention.

In one aspect, the present invention relates to a composition comprising corn gluten, said composition being obtainable by the method of the invention.

In one aspect, the present invention relates to a composition comprising corn fiber, said composition being obtainable by the method of the invention.

In one aspect, the present invention relates to an enzyme composition comprising an isolated GH30 polypeptide as defined herein.

In one aspect, the present invention relates to an enzyme composition comprising an isolated GH5 polypeptide as defined herein.

In one aspect, the present invention relates to an enzyme composition comprising an isolated GH30 polypeptide as defined herein and an isolated GH5 polypeptide as defined herein.

In one embodiment, the enzyme composition according to the invention, wherein at least one of said hydrolytic enzymes is selected from the group consisting of a GH30 polypeptide, a GH5 polypeptide or a combination thereof, further comprises one or more enzymes selected from the group consisting of cellulases (EC 3.2.1.4), xylanases (EC 3.2.1.8) arabinofuranosidases (EC 3.2.1.55 (Non-reducing end alpha-L-arabinofuranosidases); EC 3.2.1.185 (Non-reducing end beta-L-arabinofuranosidases) cellobiohydrolase I (EC 3.2.1.150), cellobiohydrolase II (E.C. 3.2.1.91), cellobiosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.176), beta- glucosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.21), beta-xylosidases (EC 3.2.1.37) or proteases (E.C 3.4).

In preferred embodiments the enzyme composition comprises cellulase obtained from a culture of Trichoderma reesei, such as a culture of Trichoderma reesei ATCC 26921. Suitable cellulases are available; e.g. from Novozymes A/S under the commercial name Celluclast®. A further aspect of the invention relates to the use of a GH30 polypeptide in corn wet milling.

The GH30 polypeptide may in particular be a polypeptide as defined herein above. Preferably, the corn wet milling is performed using a wet milling process as defined above.

In another aspect, the invention provides the use of a GH5 polypeptide in corn wet milling. The GH5 polypeptide may in particular be a polypeptide as defined herein above. Preferably, the corn wet milling is performed using a wet milling process as defined in any above.

Yet another aspect of the invention provides the use of an enzyme composition as described defined above in corn wet milling, preferably in a corn wet milling process as defined above.

Preferably, the GH30 polypeptide, the GH5 polypeptide and/or the enzyme composition, when used according to the invention is used for the purpose of increasing the total starch yield and/or gluten yield from corn kernels in a wet milling process.

Polypeptides Having Xylanase Activity

In an embodiment, the present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having a sequence identity to the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 10 of at least 80%, at least 85%, at least 90%, at least 91 %, at least 92%, at least 93%, at least 94%, at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97%, at least 98%, at least 99%, or 100%, which have xylanase activity. In one aspect, the polypeptides differ by up to 10 amino acids, e.g., 1 , 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, or 10, from the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 10.

A polypeptide of the present invention preferably comprises or consists of the amino acid sequence of SEQ I D NO: 10 or an allelic variant thereof; or is a fragment thereof having xylanase activity. In another aspect, the polypeptide comprises or consists of the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 10. In another aspect, the polypeptide comprises or consists of amino acids 24 to 576 of SEQ ID NO: 10.

In an embodiment, the present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having a sequence identity to the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 12 of at least 80%, at least 85%, at least 90%, at least 91 %, at least 92%, at least 93%, at least 94%, at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97%, at least 98%, at least 99%, or 100%, which have xylanase activity. In one aspect, the polypeptides differ by up to 10 amino acids, e.g., 1 , 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, or 10, from the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 12.

A polypeptide of the present invention preferably comprises or consists of the amino acid sequence of SEQ I D NO: 12 or an allelic variant thereof; or is a fragment thereof having xylanase activity. In another aspect, the polypeptide comprises or consists of the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 12.

In another embodiment, the present invention relates to an isolated polypeptide having pectin lyase activity encoded by a polynucleotide having a sequence identity to the mature polypeptide coding sequence of SEQ ID NO: 9 orSEQ ID NO: 11 , or the cDNA sequence thereof of at least 80%, at least 85%, at least 90%, at least 91 %, at least 92%, at least 93%, at least 94%, at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97%, at least 98%, at least 99%, or 100%.

In another embodiment, the present invention relates to variants of the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 10 or SEQ ID NO: 12 comprising a substitution, deletion, and/or insertion at one or more (e.g., several) positions. In an embodiment, the number of amino acid substitutions, deletions and/or insertions introduced into the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 10 or SEQ ID NO: 12 is up to 10, e.g., 1 , 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, or 10. The amino acid changes may be of a minor nature, that is conservative amino acid substitutions or insertions that do not significantly affect the folding and/or activity of the protein; small deletions, typically of 1-30 amino acids; small amino- or carboxyl-terminal extensions, such as an amino-terminal methionine residue; a small linker peptide of up to 20-25 residues; or a small extension that facilitates purification by changing net charge or another function, such as a poly-histidine tract, an antigenic epitope or a binding domain.

Examples of conservative substitutions are within the groups of basic amino acids

(arginine, lysine and histidine), acidic amino acids (glutamic acid and aspartic acid), polar amino acids (glutamine and asparagine), hydrophobic amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine), aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine), and small amino acids (glycine, alanine, serine, threonine and methionine). Amino acid substitutions that do not generally alter specific activity are known in the art and are described, for example, by H. Neurath and R.L. Hill, 1979, In, The Proteins, Academic Press, New York. Common substitutions are Ala/Ser, Val/lle, Asp/Glu, Thr/Ser, Ala/Gly, Ala/Thr, Ser/Asn, Ala/Val, Ser/Gly, Tyr/Phe, Ala/Pro, Lys/Arg, Asp/Asn, Leu/lle, Leu/Val, Ala/Glu, and Asp/Gly.

Alternatively, the amino acid changes are of such a nature that the physico-chemical properties of the polypeptides are altered. For example, amino acid changes may improve the thermal stability of the polypeptide, alter the substrate specificity, change the pH optimum, and the like.

Essential amino acids in a polypeptide can be identified according to procedures known in the art, such as site-directed mutagenesis or alanine-scanning mutagenesis (Cunningham and Wells, 1989, Science 244: 1081-1085). In the latter technique, single alanine mutations are introduced at every residue in the molecule, and the resultant mutant molecules are tested for pectin lyase activity to identify amino acid residues that are critical to the activity of the molecule. See also, Hilton et al., 1996, J. Biol. Chem. 271 : 4699-4708. The active site of the enzyme or other biological interaction can also be determined by 5 physical analysis of structure, as determined by such techniques as nuclear magnetic resonance, crystallography, electron diffraction, or photoaffinity labeling, in conjunction with mutation of putative contact site amino acids. See, for example, de Vos et al., 1992, Science 255: 306-312; Smith et al. , 1992, J. Mol. Biol. 224: 899-904; Wlodaver et al., 1992, FEBS Lett. 309: 59-64. The identity of essential amino acids can also be inferred from an

10 alignment with a related polypeptide.

Single or multiple amino acid substitutions, deletions, and/or insertions can be made and tested using known methods of mutagenesis, recombination, and/or shuffling, followed by a relevant screening procedure, such as those disclosed by Reidhaar-Olson and Sauer, 1988, Science 241 : 53-57; Bowie and Sauer, 1989, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86: 2152-

15 2156; WO 95/17413; or WO 95/22625. Other methods that can be used include error-prone PCR, phage display {e.g., Lowman et al., 1991 , Biochemistry 30: 10832-10837; U.S. Patent No. 5,223,409; WO 92/06204), and region-directed mutagenesis (Derbyshire et al., 1986, Gene 46: 145; Ner ef a/., 1988, DNA 7: 127).

Mutagenesis/shuffling methods can be combined with high-throughput, automated

20 screening methods to detect activity of cloned, mutagenized polypeptides expressed by host cells (Ness et al., 1999, Nature Biotechnology 17: 893-896). Mutagenized DNA molecules that encode active polypeptides can be recovered from the host cells and rapidly sequenced using standard methods in the art. These methods allow the rapid determination of the importance of individual amino acid residues in a polypeptide.

25 The polypeptide may be a hybrid polypeptide in which a region of one polypeptide is fused at the N-terminus or the C-terminus of a region of another polypeptide.

The polypeptide may be a fusion polypeptide or cleavable fusion polypeptide in which another polypeptide is fused at the N-terminus or the C-terminus of the polypeptide of the present invention. A fusion polypeptide is produced by fusing a polynucleotide

30 encoding another polypeptide to a polynucleotide of the present invention. Techniques for producing fusion polypeptides are known in the art, and include ligating the coding sequences encoding the polypeptides so that they are in frame and that expression of the fusion polypeptide is under control of the same promoter(s) and terminator. Fusion polypeptides may also be constructed using intein technology in which fusion polypeptides are created post-translationally (Cooper et ai, 1993, EMBO J. 12: 2575-2583; Dawson et ai, 1994, Science 266: 776-779).

A fusion polypeptide can further comprise a cleavage site between the two polypeptides. Upon secretion of the fusion protein, the site is cleaved releasing the two polypeptides. Examples of cleavage sites include, but are not limited to, the sites disclosed in Martin et al., 2003, J. Ind. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 3: 568-576; Svetina et ai, 2000, J. Biotechnol. 76: 245-251 ; Rasmussen-Wilson et ai , 1997, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63: 3488-3493; Ward et ai, 1995, Biotechnology 13: 498-503; and Contreras et ai, 1991 , Biotechnology 9: 378-381 ; Eaton et ai, 1986, Biochemistry 25: 505-512; Collins-Racie et a/., 1995, Biotechnology 13: 982-987; Carter et ai, 1989, Proteins: Structure, Function, and Genetics 6: 240-248; and Stevens, 2003, Drug Discovery World 4: 35-48.

Sources of Polypeptides Having xylanase Activity

A polypeptide having xylanase activity of the present invention may be obtained from microorganisms of any genus. For purposes of the present invention, the term "obtained from" as used herein in connection with a given source shall mean that the polypeptide encoded by a polynucleotide is produced by the source or by a strain in which the polynucleotide from the source has been inserted. In one aspect, the polypeptide obtained from a given source is secreted extracellularly.

The polypeptide may be a bacterial polypeptide. For example, the polypeptide may be a Gram-positive bacterial polypeptide such as a Bacillus, Clostridium, Enterococcus, Geobacillus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Oceanobacillus, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, or Streptomyces polypeptide having pectin lyase activity, or a Gram-negative bacterial polypeptide such as a Campylobacter, E. coli, Flavobacterium, Fusobacterium, Helicobacter, llyobacter, Neisseria, Pseudomonas, Salmonella, or Ureaplasma polypeptide.

In one aspect, the polypeptide is a Bacillus alkalophilus, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus brevis, Bacillus circulans, Bacillus clausii, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus firmus, Bacillus lautus, Bacillus lentus, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Bacillus subtilis, or Bacillus thuringiensis polypeptide.

In another aspect, the polypeptide is a Streptococcus equisimilis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus uberis, or Streptococcus equi subsp. Zooepidemicus polypeptide.

In another aspect, the polypeptide is a Streptomyces achromogenes, Streptomyces avermitilis, Streptomyces coelicolor, Streptomyces griseus, or Streptomyces lividans polypeptide. The polypeptide may be a fungal polypeptide. For example, the polypeptide may be a yeast polypeptide such as a Candida, Kluyveromyces, Pichia, Saccharomyces, Schizosaccharomyces, or Yarrowia polypeptide; or a filamentous fungal polypeptide such as an Acremonium, Agaricus, Alternaria, Aspergillus, Aureobasidium, Botryospaeria, Ceriporiopsis, Chaetomidium, Chrysosporium, Claviceps, Cochliobolus, Coprinopsis, Coptotermes, Corynascus, Cryphonectria, Cryptococcus, Diplodia, Exidia, Filibasidium, Fusarium, Gibberella, Holomastigotoides, Humicola, Irpex, Lentinula, Leptospaeria, Magnaporthe, Melanocarpus, Meripilus, Mucor, Myceliophthora, Neocallimastix, Neurospora, Paecilomyces, Penicillium, Phanerochaete, Piromyces, Poitrasia, Pseudoplectania, Pseudotrichonympha, Rhizomucor, Schizophyllum, Scytalidium, Talaromyces, Thermoascus, Thielavia, Tolypocladium, Trichoderma, Trichophaea, Verticillium, Volvariella, or Xylaria polypeptide.

In another aspect, the polypeptide is a Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces diastaticus, Saccharomyces douglasii, Saccharomyces kluyveri, Saccharomyces norbensis, or Saccharomyces oviformis polypeptide.

In another aspect, the polypeptide is an Acremonium cellulolyticus, Aspergillus aculeatus, Aspergillus awamori, Aspergillus foetidus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus japonicus, Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus oryzae, Chrysosporium inops, Chrysosporium keratinophilum, Chrysosporium lucknowense, Chrysosporium merdarium, Chrysosporium pannicola, Chrysosporium queenslandicum, Chrysosporium tropicum, Chrysosporium zonatum, Fusarium bactridioides, Fusarium cerealis, Fusarium crookwellense, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium graminum, Fusarium heterosporum, Fusarium negundi, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium reticulatum, Fusarium roseum, Fusarium sambucinum, Fusarium sarcochroum, Fusarium sporotrichioides, Fusarium sulphureum, Fusarium torulosum, Fusarium trichothecioides, Fusarium venenatum, Humicola grisea, Humicola insolens, Humicola lanuginosa, Irpex lacteus, Mucor miehei, Myceliophthora thermophila, Neurospora crassa, Penicillium funiculosum, Penicillium purpurogenum, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Thielavia achromatica, Thielavia albomyces, Thielavia albopilosa, Thielavia australeinsis, Thielavia fimeti, Thielavia microspora, Thielavia ovispora, Thielavia peruviana, Thielavia setosa, Thielavia spededonium, Thielavia subthermophila, Thielavia terrestris, Trichoderma harzianum, Trichoderma koningii, Trichoderma longibrachiatum, Trichoderma reesei, or Trichoderma viride polypeptide. It will be understood that for the aforementioned species, the invention encompasses both the perfect and imperfect states, and other taxonomic equivalents, e.g. , anamorphs, regardless of the species name by which they are known. Those skilled in the art will readily recognize the identity of appropriate equivalents.

Strains of these species are readily accessible to the public in a number of culture collections, such as the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC), Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH (DSMZ), Centraalbureau Voor Schimmelcultures (CBS), and Agricultural Research Service Patent Culture Collection, Northern Regional Research Center (NRRL).

The polypeptide may be identified and obtained from other sources including microorganisms isolated from nature (e.g., soil, composts, water, etc.) or DNA samples obtained directly from natural materials (e.g., soil, composts, water, etc.) using the above- mentioned probes. Techniques for isolating microorganisms and DNA directly from natural habitats are well known in the art. A polynucleotide encoding the polypeptide may then be obtained by similarly screening a genomic DNA or cDNA library of another microorganism or mixed DNA sample. Once a polynucleotide encoding a polypeptide has been detected with the probe(s), the polynucleotide can be isolated or cloned by utilizing techniques that are known to those of ordinary skill in the art (see, e.g., Sambrook et al., 1989, supra). Polynucleotides

The present invention also relates to isolated polynucleotides encoding a polypeptide of the present invention, as described herein.

The techniques used to isolate or clone a polynucleotide are known in the art and include isolation from genomic DNA or cDNA, or a combination thereof. The cloning of the polynucleotides from genomic DNA can be effected, e.g., by using the well known polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or antibody screening of expression libraries to detect cloned DNA fragments with shared structural features. See, e.g., Innis et al., 1990, PCR: A Guide to Methods and Application, Academic Press, New York. Other nucleic acid amplification procedures such as ligase chain reaction (LCR), ligation activated transcription (LAT) and polynucleotide-based amplification (NASBA) may be used.

Modification of a polynucleotide encoding a polypeptide of the present invention may be necessary for synthesizing polypeptides substantially similar to the polypeptide. The term "substantially similar" to the polypeptide refers to non-naturally occurring forms of the polypeptide. These polypeptides may differ in some engineered way from the polypeptide isolated from its native source, e.g., variants that differ in specific activity, thermostability, pH optimum, or the like. The variants may be constructed on the basis of the polynucleotide presented as the mature polypeptide coding sequence of SEQ ID NO: 9 or SEQ ID NO: 11 or the cDNA sequence thereof, e.g., a subsequence thereof, and/or by introduction of nucleotide substitutions that do not result in a change in the amino acid sequence of the polypeptide, but which correspond to the codon usage of the host organism intended for production of the enzyme, or by introduction of nucleotide substitutions that may give rise to a different amino acid sequence. For a general description of nucleotide substitution, see, e.g., Ford et ai, 1991 , Protein Expression and Purification 2: 95-107. Nucleic Acid Constructs

The present invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs comprising a polynucleotide of the present invention operably linked to one or more control sequences that direct the expression of the coding sequence in a suitable host cell under conditions compatible with the control sequences.

The polynucleotide may be manipulated in a variety of ways to provide for expression of the polypeptide. Manipulation of the polynucleotide prior to its insertion into a vector may be desirable or necessary depending on the expression vector. The techniques for modifying polynucleotides utilizing recombinant DNA methods are well known in the art.

The control sequence may be a promoter, a polynucleotide that is recognized by a host cell for expression of a polynucleotide encoding a polypeptide of the present invention. The promoter contains transcriptional control sequences that mediate the expression of the polypeptide. The promoter may be any polynucleotide that shows transcriptional activity in the host cell including mutant, truncated, and hybrid promoters, and may be obtained from genes encoding extracellular or intracellular polypeptides either homologous or heterologous to the host cell.

Examples of suitable promoters for directing transcription of the nucleic acid constructs of the present invention in a filamentous fungal host cell are promoters obtained from the genes for Aspergillus nidulans acetamidase, Aspergillus niger neutral alpha- amylase, Aspergillus niger acid stable alpha-amylase, Aspergillus niger or Aspergillus awamori glucoamylase (glaA), Aspergillus oryzae TAKA amylase, Aspergillus oryzae alkaline protease, Aspergillus oryzae triose phosphate isomerase, Fusarium oxysporum trypsin-like protease (WO 96/00787), Fusarium venenatum amyloglucosidase (WO 00/56900), Fusarium venenatum Daria (WO 00/56900), Fusarium venenatum Quinn (WO 00/56900), Rhizomucor miehei lipase, Rhizomucor miehei aspartic proteinase, Trichoderma reesei beta-glucosidase, Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I, Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase II, Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase I, Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase II, Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase III, Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase V, Trichoderma reesei xylanase I, Trichoderma reesei xylanase II, Trichoderma reesei xylanase III, Trichoderma reesei beta-xylosidase, and Trichoderma reesei translation elongation factor, as well as the NA2-tpi promoter (a modified promoter from an Aspergillus neutral alpha-amylase gene in which the untranslated leader has been replaced by an untranslated leader from an Aspergillus triose phosphate isomerase gene; non-limiting examples include modified promoters from an Aspergillus niger neutral alpha- amylase gene in which the untranslated leader has been replaced by an untranslated leader from an Aspergillus nidulans or Aspergillus oryzae triose phosphate isomerase gene); and mutant, truncated, and hybrid promoters thereof. Other promoters are described in U.S. Patent No. 6,011 , 147.

The control sequence may also be a transcription terminator, which is recognized by a host cell to terminate transcription. The terminator is operably linked to the 3'-terminus of the polynucleotide encoding the polypeptide. Any terminator that is functional in the host cell may be used in the present invention.

Preferred terminators for filamentous fungal host cells are obtained from the genes for Aspergillus nidulans acetamidase, Aspergillus nidulans anthranilate synthase, Aspergillus niger glucoamylase, Aspergillus niger alpha-glucosidase, Aspergillus oryzae TAKA amylase, Fusarium oxysporum trypsin-like protease, Trichoderma reesei beta- glucosidase, Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I, Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase II, Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase I, Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase II, Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase III, Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase V, Trichoderma reesei xylanase I, Trichoderma reesei xylanase II, Trichoderma reesei xylanase III, Trichoderma reesei beta-xylosidase, and Trichoderma reesei translation elongation factor.

The control sequence may also be an mRNA stabilizer region downstream of a promoter and upstream of the coding sequence of a gene which increases expression of the gene.

The control sequence may also be a leader, a nontranslated region of an mRNA that is important for translation by the host cell. The leader is operably linked to the 5'-terminus of the polynucleotide encoding the polypeptide. Any leader that is functional in the host cell may be used.

Preferred leaders for filamentous fungal host cells are obtained from the genes for Aspergillus oryzae TAKA amylase and Aspergillus nidulans triose phosphate isomerase. The control sequence may also be a polyadenylation sequence, a sequence operably linked to the 3'-terminus of the polynucleotide and, when transcribed, is recognized by the host cell as a signal to add polyadenosine residues to transcribed mRNA. Any polyadenylation sequence that is functional in the host cell may be used.

Preferred polyadenylation sequences for filamentous fungal host cells are obtained from the genes for Aspergillus nidulans anthranilate synthase, Aspergillus niger glucoamylase, Aspergillus n/ ' ger alpha-glucosidase Aspergillus oryzae TAKA amylase, and Fusarium oxysporum trypsin-like protease.

The control sequence may also be a signal peptide coding region that encodes a signal peptide linked to the N-terminus of a polypeptide and directs the polypeptide into the cell's secretory pathway. The 5'-end of the coding sequence of the polynucleotide may inherently contain a signal peptide coding sequence naturally linked in translation reading frame with the segment of the coding sequence that encodes the polypeptide. Alternatively, the 5'-end of the coding sequence may contain a signal peptide coding sequence that is foreign to the coding sequence. A foreign signal peptide coding sequence may be required where the coding sequence does not naturally contain a signal peptide coding sequence. Alternatively, a foreign signal peptide coding sequence may simply replace the natural signal peptide coding sequence in order to enhance secretion of the polypeptide. However, any signal peptide coding sequence that directs the expressed polypeptide into the secretory pathway of a host cell may be used.

Effective signal peptide coding sequences for filamentous fungal host cells are the signal peptide coding sequences obtained from the genes for Aspergillus niger neutral amylase, Aspergillus niger glucoamylase, Aspergillus oryzae TAKA amylase, Humicola insolens cellulase, Humicola insolens endoglucanase V, Humicola lanuginosa lipase, and Rhizomucor miehei aspartic proteinase.

The control sequence may also be a propeptide coding sequence that encodes a propeptide positioned at the N-terminus of a polypeptide. The resultant polypeptide is known as a proenzyme or propolypeptide (or a zymogen in some cases). A propolypeptide is generally inactive and can be converted to an active polypeptide by catalytic or autocatalytic cleavage of the propeptide from the propolypeptide. The propeptide coding sequence may be obtained from the genes for Bacillus subtilis alkaline protease (aprE), Bacillus subtilis neutral protease (nprT), Myceliophthora thermophila laccase (WO 95/33836), Rhizomucor miehei aspartic proteinase, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha- factor. Where both signal peptide and propeptide sequences are present, the propeptide sequence is positioned next to the N-terminus of a polypeptide and the signal peptide sequence is positioned next to the N-terminus of the propeptide sequence.

It may also be desirable to add regulatory sequences that regulate expression of the polypeptide relative to the growth of the host cell. Examples of regulatory sequences are those that cause expression of the gene to be turned on or off in response to a chemical or physical stimulus, including the presence of a regulatory compound. In filamentous fungi, the Aspergillus niger glucoamylase promoter, Aspergillus oryzae TAKA alpha-amylase promoter, and Aspergillus oryzae glucoamylase promoter, Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I promoter, and Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase II promoter may be used. Other examples of regulatory sequences are those that allow for gene amplification. In eukaryotic systems, these regulatory sequences include the dihydrofolate reductase gene that is amplified in the presence of methotrexate, and the metallothionein genes that are amplified with heavy metals. In these cases, the polynucleotide encoding the polypeptide would be operably linked to the regulatory sequence.

Expression Vectors

The present invention also relates to recombinant expression vectors comprising a polynucleotide of the present invention, a promoter, and transcriptional and translational stop signals. The various nucleotide and control sequences may be joined together to produce a recombinant expression vector that may include one or more convenient restriction sites to allow for insertion or substitution of the polynucleotide encoding the polypeptide at such sites. Alternatively, the polynucleotide may be expressed by inserting the polynucleotide or a nucleic acid construct comprising the polynucleotide into an appropriate vector for expression. In creating the expression vector, the coding sequence is located in the vector so that the coding sequence is operably linked with the appropriate control sequences for expression.

The recombinant expression vector may be any vector (e.g., a plasmid or virus) that can be conveniently subjected to recombinant DNA procedures and can bring about expression of the polynucleotide. The choice of the vector will typically depend on the compatibility of the vector with the host cell into which the vector is to be introduced. The vector may be a linear or closed circular plasmid.

The vector may be an autonomously replicating vector, i.e. , a vector that exists as an extrachromosomal entity, the replication of which is independent of chromosomal replication, e.g., a plasmid, an extrachromosomal element, a minichromosome, or an artificial chromosome. The vector may contain any means for assuring self-replication. Alternatively, the vector may be one that, when introduced into the host cell, is integrated into the genome and replicated together with the chromosome(s) into which it has been integrated. Furthermore, a single vector or plasmid or two or more vectors or plasmids that together contain the total DNA to be introduced into the genome of the host cell, or a transposon, may be used.

The vector preferably contains one or more selectable markers that permit easy selection of transformed, transfected, transduced, or the like cells. A selectable marker is a gene the product of which provides for biocide or viral resistance, resistance to heavy metals, prototrophy to auxotrophs, and the like.

Selectable markers for use in a filamentous fungal host cell include, but are not limited to, adeA (phosphoribosylaminoimidazole-succinocarboxamide synthase), adeB (phosphoribosyl-aminoimidazole synthase), amdS (acetamidase), argB (ornithine carbamoyltransferase), bar (phosphinothricin acetyltransferase), hph (hygromycin phosphotransferase), niaD (nitrate reductase), pyrG (orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase), sC (sulfate adenyltransf erase), and trpC (anthranilate synthase), as well as equivalents thereof. Preferred for use in an Aspergillus cell are Aspergillus nidulans or Aspergillus oryzae amdS and pyrG genes and a Streptomyces hygroscopicus bar gene. Preferred for use in a Trichoderma cell are adeA, adeB, amdS, hph, and pyrG genes.

The selectable marker may be a dual selectable marker system as described in WO

2010/039889. In one aspect, the dual selectable marker is an hph-tk dual selectable marker system.

The vector preferably contains an element(s) that permits integration of the vector into the host cell's genome or autonomous replication of the vector in the cell independent of the genome.

For integration into the host cell genome, the vector may rely on the polynucleotide's sequence encoding the polypeptide or any other element of the vector for integration into the genome by homologous or non-homologous recombination. Alternatively, the vector may contain additional polynucleotides for directing integration by homologous recombination into the genome of the host cell at a precise location(s) in the chromosome(s). To increase the likelihood of integration at a precise location, the integrational elements should contain a sufficient number of nucleic acids, such as 100 to 10,000 base pairs, 400 to 10,000 base pairs, and 800 to 10,000 base pairs, which have a high degree of sequence identity to the corresponding target sequence to enhance the probability of homologous recombination. The integrational elements may be any sequence that is homologous with the target sequence in the genome of the host cell. Furthermore, the integrational elements may be non-encoding or encoding polynucleotides. On the other hand, the vector may be integrated into the genome of the host cell by non-homologous recombination.

For autonomous replication, the vector may further comprise an origin of replication enabling the vector to replicate autonomously in the host cell in question. The origin of replication may be any plasmid replicator mediating autonomous replication that functions in a cell. The term "origin of replication" or "plasmid replicator" means a polynucleotide that enables a plasmid or vector to replicate in vivo.

Examples of origins of replication useful in a filamentous fungal cell are AMA1 and

ANSI (Gems et al. , 1991 , Gene 98: 61-67; Cullen et al., 1987, Nucleic Acids Res. 15: 9163- 9175; WO 00/24883). Isolation of the AMA1 gene and construction of plasmids or vectors comprising the gene can be accomplished according to the methods disclosed in WO 00/24883.

More than one copy of a polynucleotide of the present invention may be inserted into a host cell to increase production of a polypeptide. An increase in the copy number of the polynucleotide can be obtained by integrating at least one additional copy of the sequence into the host cell genome or by including an amplifiable selectable marker gene with the polynucleotide where cells containing amplified copies of the selectable marker gene, and thereby additional copies of the polynucleotide, can be selected for by cultivating the cells in the presence of the appropriate selectable agent.

The procedures used to ligate the elements described above to construct the recombinant expression vectors of the present invention are well known to one skilled in the art (see, e.g., Sambrook et al., 1989, supra).

Host Cells

The present invention also relates to recombinant host cells, comprising a polynucleotide of the present invention operably linked to one or more control sequences that direct the production of a polypeptide of the present invention. A construct or vector comprising a polynucleotide is introduced into a host cell so that the construct or vector is maintained as a chromosomal integrant or as a self-replicating extra-chromosomal vector as described earlier. The term "host cell" encompasses any progeny of a parent cell that is not identical to the parent cell due to mutations that occur during replication. The choice of a host cell will to a large extent depend upon the gene encoding the polypeptide and its source. The host cell may be a fungal cell. "Fungi" as used herein includes the phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota as well as the Oomycota and all mitosporic fungi (as defined by Hawksworth et al., In, Ainsworth and Bisby's Dictionary of The Fungi, 8th edition, 1995, CAB International, University Press, Cambridge, UK).

The fungal host cell may be a filamentous fungal cell. "Filamentous fungi" include all filamentous forms of the subdivision Eumycota and Oomycota (as defined by Hawksworth et al., 1995, supra). The filamentous fungi are generally characterized by a mycelial wall composed of chitin, cellulose, glucan, chitosan, mannan, and other complex polysaccharides. Vegetative growth is by hyphal elongation and carbon catabolism is obligately aerobic.

The filamentous fungal host cell may be an Acremonium, Aspergillus, Aureobasidium, Bjerkandera, Ceriporiopsis, Chrysosporium, Coprinus, Coriolus, Cryptococcus, Filibasidium, Fusarium, Humicola, Magnaporthe, Mucor, Myceliophthora, Neocallimastix, Neurospora, Paecilomyces, Penicillium, Phanerochaete, Phlebia, Piromyces, Pleurotus, Schizophyllum, Talaromyces, Thermoascus, Thielavia, Tolypocladium, Tra metes, or Trichoderma cell.

For example, the filamentous fungal host cell may be an Aspergillus awamori, Aspergillus foetidus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus japonicus, Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus oryzae, Bjerkandera adusta, Ceriporiopsis aneirina, Ceriporiopsis caregiea, Ceriporiopsis gilvescens, Ceriporiopsis pannocinta, Ceriporiopsis rivulosa, Ceriporiopsis subrufa, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, Chrysosporium inops, Chrysosporium keratinophilum, Chrysosporium lucknowense, Chrysosporium merdarium, Chrysosporium pannicola, Chrysosporium queenslandicum, Chrysosporium tropicum, Chrysosporium zonatum, Coprinus cinereus, Coriolus hirsutus, Fusarium bactridioides, Fusarium cerealis, Fusarium crookwellense, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium graminum, Fusarium heterosporum, Fusarium negundi, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium reticulatum, Fusarium roseum, Fusarium sambucinum, Fusarium sarcochroum, Fusarium sporotrichioides, Fusarium sulphureum, Fusarium torulosum, Fusarium trichothecioides, Fusarium venenatum, Humicola insolens, Humicola lanuginosa, Mucor miehei, Myceliophthora thermophila, Neurospora crassa, Penicillium purpurogenum, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Phlebia radiata, Pleurotus eryngii, Thielavia terrestris, Trametes villosa, Trametes versicolor, Trichoderma harzianum, Trichoderma koningii, Trichoderma longibrachiatum, Trichoderma reesei, or Trichoderma viride cell. Fungal cells may be transformed by a process involving protoplast formation, transformation of the protoplasts, and regeneration of the cell wall in a manner known per se. Suitable procedures for transformation of Aspergillus and Trichoderma host cells are described in EP 238023, Yelton et ai, 1984, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81 : 1470-1474, and Christensen et ai, 1988, Bio/Technology 6: 1419-1422. Suitable methods for transforming Fusarium species are described by Malardier et al., 1989, Gene 78: 147-156, and WO 96/00787.

Methods of Production

The present invention also relates to methods of producing a polypeptide of the present invention, comprising (a) cultivating a recombinant host cell of the present invention under conditions conducive for production of the polypeptide; and optionally, (b) recovering the polypeptide.

The host cells are cultivated in a nutrient medium suitable for production of the polypeptide using methods known in the art. For example, the cells may be cultivated by shake flask cultivation, or small-scale or large-scale fermentation (including continuous, batch, fed-batch, or solid state fermentations) in laboratory or industrial fermentors in a suitable medium and under conditions allowing the polypeptide to be expressed and/or isolated. The cultivation takes place in a suitable nutrient medium comprising carbon and nitrogen sources and inorganic salts, using procedures known in the art. Suitable media are available from commercial suppliers or may be prepared according to published compositions (e.g., in catalogues of the American Type Culture Collection). If the polypeptide is secreted into the nutrient medium, the polypeptide can be recovered directly from the medium. If the polypeptide is not secreted, it can be recovered from cell lysates.

The polypeptide may be detected using methods known in the art that are specific for the polypeptides. These detection methods include, but are not limited to, use of specific antibodies, formation of an enzyme product, or disappearance of an enzyme substrate. For example, an enzyme assay may be used to determine the activity of the polypeptide.

The polypeptide may be recovered using methods known in the art. For example, the polypeptide may be recovered from the nutrient medium by conventional procedures including, but not limited to, collection, centrifugation, filtration, extraction, spray-drying, evaporation, or precipitation. In one aspect, a fermentation broth comprising the polypeptide is recovered.

The polypeptide may be purified by a variety of procedures known in the art including, but not limited to, chromatography (e.g., ion exchange, affinity, hydrophobic, chromatofocusing, and size exclusion), electrophoretic procedures {e.g., preparative isoelectric focusing), differential solubility (e.g., ammonium sulfate precipitation), SDS-PAGE, or extraction (see, e.g., Protein Purification, Janson and Ryden, editors, VCH Publishers, New York, 1989) to obtain substantially pure polypeptides.

In an alternative aspect, the polypeptide is not recovered, but rather a host cell of the present invention expressing the polypeptide is used as a source of the polypeptide.

Enzyme Compositions

The present invention also relates to compositions comprising a polypeptide of the present invention.

The compositions may comprise a polypeptide of the present invention as the major enzymatic component, e.g., a mono-component composition. Alternatively, the compositions may comprise multiple enzymatic activities, such as one or more (e.g., several) enzymes selected from the group consisting of hydrolase, isomerase, ligase, lyase, oxidoreductase, or transferase, e.g., an alpha-galactosidase, alpha-glucosidase, aminopeptidase, amylase, beta-galactosidase, beta-glucosidase, beta-xylosidase, carbohydrase, carboxypeptidase, catalase, cellobiohydrolase, cellulase, chitinase, cutinase, cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase, deoxyribonuclease, endoglucanase, esterase, glucoamylase, invertase, laccase, lipase, mannosidase, mutanase, oxidase, pectinolytic enzyme, peroxidase, phytase, polyphenoloxidase, proteolytic enzyme, ribonuclease, transglutaminase, or xylanase.

The compositions may be prepared in accordance with methods known in the art and may be in the form of a liquid or a dry composition. The compositions may be stabilized in accordance with methods known in the art.

PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The invention is further described by following numbered embodiments: 1. A method to improve the total starch yield and/or gluten yield from corn kernels in a wet milling process, the method comprising admixing corn kernels or a fraction of the corn kernels with an enzyme composition comprising an effective amount of one or more hydrolytic enzymes, wherein at least one of said hydrolytic enzymes is selected from the group consisting of a GH30 polypeptide, a GH5 polypeptide or a combination thereof. 2. The method according to embodiment 1 , wherein the amount of starch and/or gluten released from fiber during the wet milling process is increased.

3. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, comprising the steps of:

a) soaking the corn kernels in water to produce soaked kernels;

b) grinding the soaked kernels to produce soaked and ground kernels;

c) separating germs from the soaked and ground kernels to produce a corn kernel mass comprising fiber, starch and gluten; and

d) subjecting the resultant corn kernel mass to a fiber washing procedure.

4. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein said corn kernels or a fraction of said corn kernels is admixed with said one or more hydrolytic enzymes, before, during or after step d) according to embodiment 3.

5. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein said corn kernels or a fraction of said corn kernels is admixed with said one or more hydrolytic enzymes during step d) according to embodiment 3. 6. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein said corn kernels or a fraction of said corn kernels is allowed to react with said one or more hydrolytic enzymes for at least 15 minutes.

7. The method according to any of embodiment 3-6, wherein said fiber washing procedure comprises the use of a fiber washing system optimized for introduction of one or more hydrolytic enzymes and wherein the fiber washing system comprise a space configured to provide a total retention time in the fiber washing system of at least 35 minutes and less than 48 hours. 8. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein the incubation time in said space configured into the fiber washing system is at least 5 minutes and less than 48 hours.

9. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein the incubation temperature is between 25°C and 95°C. 10. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein said GH5 polypeptide has xylanase activity. 1 1. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein said GH30 polypeptide has xylanase activity.

12. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein said GH5 polypeptide further comprise one or more of the following activities: endo^-1 ,4-glucanase / cellulase (EC 3.2.1.4) activity and/or endo^-1 ,4-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) activity and/or β- glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) activity and/or β-mannosidase (EC 3.2.1.25) activity and/or β- glucosylceramidase (EC 3.2.1.45) activity and/or glucan β-1 ,3-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.58) activity and/or licheninase (EC 3.2.1.73) activity and/or exo^-1 ,4-glucanase / cellodextrinase (EC 3.2.1.74) activity and/or glucan endo-1 ,6^-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.75) activity and/or mannan endo^-1 ,4-mannosidase (EC 3.2.1.78) activity and/or cellulose β- 1 ,4-cellobiosidase (EC 3.2.1.91) activity and/or steryl β-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.104) activity or endoglycoceramidase (EC 3.2.1.123) activity and/or chitosanase (EC 3.2.1.132) activity and/or β-primeverosidase (EC 3.2.1.149) activity and/or xyloglucan-specific endo^-1 ,4- glucanase (EC 3.2.1.151) activity and/or endo^-1 ,6-galactanase (EC 3.2.1.164) activity and/or hesperidin 6-0-a-L-rhamnosyl^-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.168) activity and/or β-1 ,3- mannanase (EC 3.2.1.-) activity and/or arabinoxylan-specific endo^-1 ,4-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.-) activity and/or mannan transglycosylase (EC 2.4.1.-) activity.

13. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein said GH30 polypeptide further comprise one or more of the following activities: endo^-1 ,4-xylanase

(EC 3.2.1.8) activity and/or β-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) activity and/or β-glucuronidase (EC 3.2.1.31) activity and/or β-xylosidase (EC 3.2.1.37) activity and/or β-fucosidase (EC 3.2.1.38) activity and/or glucosylceramidase (EC 3.2.1.45) activity and/or β-1

(EC 3.2.1.75) activity and/or glucuronoarabinoxylan endo^-1 ,4-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.136) activity and/or endo^-1 ,6-galactanase (EC:3.2.1.164) activity and/or [reducing end] β- xylosidase (EC 3.2.1.-) activity.

14. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein the GH5 polypeptide is selected from a group consisting of: A mature polypeptide of the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 1-3, SEQ ID NO: 8, SEQ ID NO: 10 or SEQ ID NO: 12; A mature polypeptide, which has at least 60% identity to the mature polypeptide in i)

A subsequence of any one of the mature polypeptides in i) and ii).

15. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein the GH30 polypeptide is selected from a group consisting of:

i) A mature polypeptide of the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 4; SEQ ID NO:5; SEQ ID NO:6, or SEQ ID NO:7;

ii) A mature polypeptide, which has at least 60% identity to the mature polypeptide in i)

iii) A subsequence of any one of the mature polypeptides in i) and ii). 16. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein said enzyme composition comprising one or more hydrolytic enzymes further comprise one or more enzymes selected form the group consisting of cellulases (EC 3.2.1.4), xylanases (EC 3.2.1.8) arabinofuranosidases (EC 3.2.1.55 (Non-reducing end alpha-L- arabinofuranosidases); EC 3.2.1.185 (Non-reducing end beta-L-arabinofuranosidases) cellobiohydrolase I (EC 3.2.1.150), cellobiohydrolase II (E.C. 3.2.1.91), cellobiosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.176), beta-glucosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.21), beta-xylosidases (EC 3.2.1.37) or proteases (E.C XXXX).

17. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein the one or more hydrolytic enzymes is expressed in an organism with a cellulase background, such as Trichoderma reesei.

18. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein the one or more hydrolytic enzymes are purified.

19. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein the one or more hydrolytic enzymes is/are in a liquid composition.

20. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein the one or more hydrolytic enzymes is/are in a solid composition. 21. The method according to any of the preceding embodiments, wherein the effective amount of one or more hydrolytic enzymes admixed with one or more fractions of said corn kernel mass, is between 0.005-0.5 kg enzyme protein/metric tonne corn kernels entering

5 the wet milling process.

22. A composition comprising corn fiber, said composition being obtainable by the method described in any of embodiments 1 - 21.

10 23. Use of a GH30 polypeptide and/or a GH5 polypeptide in a method to improve the total starch yield and/or gluten yield from corn kernels in a wet milling process as defined in any of embodiments 1 - 21.

24. An isolated polypeptide having xylanase activity, selected from the group consisting 15 of:

(a) a polypeptide having at least 80% sequence identity to the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 10 or SEQ ID NO: 12;

(b) a polypeptide encoded by a polynucleotide having least 80% sequence identity to the mature polypeptide coding sequence of SEQ ID NO: 9 or SEQ ID NO: 11 or

20 the cDNA sequence thereof;

(c) a variant of the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 10 or SEQ ID NO: 12 comprising a substitution, deletion, and/or insertion at one or more positions; and

(d) a fragment of the polypeptide of (a), (b), or (c) that has pectin lyase activity.

25 25. The polypeptide of embodiment 24, having at least 88%, at least 89%, at least 90%, at least 91 %, at least 92%, at least 93%, at least 94%, at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97%, at least 98%, at least 99% or 100% sequence identity to the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 10 or SEQ ID NO: 12.

30 26. The polypeptide of embodiment 24 or 25, which is encoded by a polynucleotide that hybridizes under medium-high stringency conditions to very high stringency conditions with (i) the mature polypeptide coding sequence of SEQ ID NO: 9 or SEQ ID NO: 11 , (ii) the cDNA sequence thereof, or (iii) the full-length complement of (i) or (ii). 27. The polypeptide of any of embodiments 24-26, which is encoded by a polynucleotide having at least 88%, at least 89%, at least 90%, at least 91 %, at least 92%, at least 93%, at least 94%, at least 95%, at least 96%, at least 97%, at least 98%, at least 99% or 100% sequence identity to the mature polypeptide coding sequence of SEQ ID NO: 10 or SEQ ID NO: 12 or the cDNA sequence thereof.

28. The polypeptide of any of embodiments 24-27, comprising or consisting of SEQ ID NO: 10 or SEQ ID NO; 12; or the mature polypeptide of SEQ ID NO: 0 or SEQ ID NO: 1. 29. A composition comprising the polypeptide of any of embodiments 24-28.

30. An isolated polynucleotide encoding the polypeptide of any of embodiments 24-28.

31. A nucleic acid construct or expression vector comprising the polynucleotide of embodiment 30 operably linked to one or more control sequences that direct the production of the polypeptide in an expression host.

32. A recombinant host cell comprising the polynucleotide of embodiment 30 operably linked to one or more control sequences that direct the production of the polypeptide.

33. A method of producing a polypeptide having xylanase activity, comprising the steps of:

a) cultivating the host cell of embodiment 32 under conditions conducive for production of the polypeptide; and, optionally,

b) recovering the polypeptide.

EXAMPLES Example 1 :

In this example, the amount of starch and gluten separated from fiber, after incubation with and without enzyme, was measured.

The fiber sample was obtained from a wet-mill plant after fiber pressing with a total dry matter content of 20%. The sample was re-suspended in buffer (pH 4, 0.02M Na Acetate) to 100-g slurry containing 5% dry solids. To this slurry enzyme was added at a final ratio of 35C^g per g dry-solids substrate (DS). See sample details in table 1.

Table 1

Table 1 : Temperature and enzyme composition in each sample tested. *The cellulolytic enzymes composition used is Celluclast® from Novozymes. The GH5 polypeptide used is the mature polypeptide of SEQ I D NO: 3. " The GH30 polypeptide used is the mature polypeptide of SEQ I D NO: 4. The samples were incubated at a temperature of 52° and 40°C (See table 1) in an air- heated incubator with constant shaking for 120 minutes. After incubation, the samples were cooled quickly in ice-water (5°C) before processing. The slurry was transferred on to a 150- micron sieve, while collecting the filtrate passing through.

The fiber that retained over the sieve was pressed using a spatula to recover as much filtrate as possible. The pressed fiber was then transferred to a beaker containing 200-ml of water and stirred. The slurry was passed through the 150-micron sieve and the collected filtrate was combined with the first. The pressing, washing and filtering steps above was repeated once more, so that a final filtrate is recovered and combined with the first two. The combined filtrate was then vacuum filtered, this time through a glass micro filter paper (Whatman) which retains the insoluble solids that were released from the fiber and passed through the 150-micron screen. After passing 200 ml water over the filter paper to remove any trace of solubles, the total insoluble solids retained on the filter paper is dried and weighed. The dry weight is reported as Starch+Gluten released as percentage (w/w) of fiber dry matter of starting substrate. The results are shown in table 2. Table 2

The effect of GH5 and/or GH30 enzyme addition is apparent from the increase in starch and gluten yields at 40°C and 52°C.

Example 2:

Enzymes:

GH30 Xylanase A: GH30 xylanase derived from Bacillus subtilis (SEQ I D NO:5)

GH30 Xylanase B: GH30 xylanase derived from Bacillus subtilis (SEQ I D NO:6)

GH30 Xylanase C: GH30 xylanase derived from Bacillus subtilis (SEQ ID NO:7)

Celluclast/Celluclast 1.5 L: A commercially available cellulase composition (Novozymes A/S, Denmark). A 10-g fiber assay was performed at pH 3.8, with incubation at 52°C for 1 hour and a dosage of 35 ug enzyme protein per gram corn; using enzyme blends containing GH30 Xylanase A, GH30 Xylanase B or GH30 Xylanase C, in combination with Celluclast. The Blends consisted of 20% (w/w) GH30 Xylanase A, GH30 Xylanase B or GH30 Xylanase C, and the remaining 80% (w/w) from Celluclast. For comparison, an enzyme composition containing only Celluclast was included. A corn fiber with 15.52% residual starch and 12.00% residual protein in fiber was used as substrate in the fiber assay. Release of starch + gluten (dry substance) from the corn fiber at the specified dosage was measured; the results are provided in the table below. Table 3.

The addition of GH30 Xylanase A, GH30 Xylanase B and GH30 Xylanase C in combination with a cellulase enzyme, such as, Celluclast, can significantly increase the yield of starch + gluten in a corn wet-milling process.

Example 3: Laboratory corn wet-mill fiber treatment with GH5 Xylanase Enzymes:

GH5 Xylanase: GH5_21 xylanase derived Cryseobacterium sp., having the amino acid sequence of the mature protein of SEQ ID NO: 8 ( SEQ ID NO: 26 of WO 2016/005522 ). Enzyme cocktail D: consists mainly of cellobiohydrolases (CBH I and II), from an exogenous donor, and endoglucanases (EG1 and 2) from the native Trichoderma host.

Enzyme cocktail T: consists mainly (-80%) of cellobiohydrolases and endoglucanases from the native Trichoderma host, and remaining -20% of total protein consisting of xylanase GH10 from an exogenous donor.

Frontia Fiberwash® is a commercial product, consisting of a cocktail of xylanases and cellulases. (Novozymes A/S, Denmark).

The 10-g fiber assay generally includes incubating wet fiber samples obtained from wet- milling plant, in the presence of enzymes, at conditions relevant to the process (pH 3.5 to 4, Temp around 52°C) and over a time period of between 1 to 4 hr. After incubation, the fiber is transferred and pressed over a screen (typically 75 micron or smaller), where the filtrates consisting mainly of the separated starch and gluten are then collected. A number of washes are done over the screen, and the washings are collected together with the initial filtrate. The collected filtrate are then passed over a funnel filter (glass filter with 0.45 micron opening) to further separate the insoluble solids (mostly starch and gluten) from the rest of the filtrates (mostly dissolved solids). These recovered insoluble solids are washed and then oven dried to dryness. The insoluble dry mass is weighed and then

analyzed for starch content, using a modification of Ewers method (acid hydrolysis and

measurement of glucose by liquid chromatography).

10-g fiber assay is performed at pH 4, incubating fiber at 50°C for 2 hour with different

enzyme treatments as described in the following. Control is fiber incubation without any

enzyme added. Frontia Fiberwash® is a commercial product used for this industrial

application, consisting of a cocktail of xylanases and cellulases. GH5 is dosed in

combination with two different enzyme cocktails, both of which are derived from

Trichoderma reesei fermentations. GH5 was dosed at 20% of the total enzyme protein

added, with the remaining 80% consisting of the enzyme cocktail background. The total

amount of enzyme proteins added in all treatments was 500 micrograms per gram dry

fiber. Enzyme cocktail D consists mainly of cellobiohyrolases (CBH I and II), from an

exogenous donor, and endoglucanases (EG1 and 2) from the native Trichoderma host.

Enzyme cocktail T consists mainly (-80%) of cellobiohydrolases and endoglucanases

from the native Trichoderma host, and remaining -20% of total protein consisting of

xylanase GH10 from an exogenous donor. Results are reported in Table below:

Table 4

(± one standard deviation, n=3)

EXAMPLE 4

Method Description 15ml_ Fiber Washing Assay

The 15ml_ fine fiber assay generally includes incubating wet fine fiber samples obtained

from a corn wet-milling plant in the presence of enzymes, at conditions relevant to the

process (pH 4.0, temp approximately 40 D<2)4with thorough mixin

Hybridization Incubator for one hour. After incubation, the fiber is vacuum filtered through a Millipore steriflip tube top filter unit. The fiber is resuspended to a volume of 30ml_ with

distilled water, thoroughly vortexed and vacuumed filtered a second time. The collected

filtrate consists of the extracted starch and gluten. The filtrate is centrifuged in an Avanti J- E at 5,000rpm for 7 minutes to pellet the starch. The supernatant is slowly removed using

a 50ml_ serological pipette as to not disturb the starch and gluten pellet. This washing and

centrifugation procedure is repeated twice more to remove solubilized oligomers.

After washing, a total volume of 5ml_ remains, including starch pellet. The excess water is

removed using a EZ-2 Elite Solvent Evaporator (method: aqueous, maximum 65 C, 3 hours, 3,000rpm, 120mbar). After this, the pellet (containing starch and gluten) is

resuspended in 500ul_ of 1.6M hydrochloric acid and heated at 90 C for 45 minut

1 ,000rpm. This incubation breaks down the starch granule into sugar monomers. After

acid hydrolysis, the reaction is quenched using 625uL of 1.4M sodium hydroxide and

cooled to room temperature. The amount of reducing sugars is then determined via the

addition of 345uL of dinitrosalicyclic acid reagent (DNS). Samples are incubated for 10

minutes at 95 C, 300rpm. increase in the red-orange spectra (Miller, Analytical Chemistry 1959). The samples are

then centrifuged at 5,000rpm, 30 seconds to collect condensate and cooled to ambient

temperature. 800uL of each sample is transferred to a 96 deep well plate, and diluted in

distilled water using a multichannel pipette. 200uL is then transferred using a multichannel pipette to a Nunc F 96 well plate. Absorbance at 560 nanometers (nm) is read using a

Tecan Infinite M1000

GH5 improvement over Frontia Fiberwash®

The 15ml_ fine fiber assay is performed at pH 4, incubating fiber for one hour at 40 C

with different enzyme treatments. Control is fiber incubation with no enzyme. Frontia

Fiberwash® is a commercial enzyme used for releasing starch from fibres in a wet

milling process. GH5 Blend consist of a complete Trichoderema reesei cellulose complex

(80%) and the GH5 xylanase having the amino acid sequence of the mature protein of

SEQ ID NO:8 (20%). All enzyme blends were added with a total of 500 micrograms of

enzyme protein per gram dried fiber solids (ug/gDS). All treatments were run in triplicate.

Absorbance was read at 560nm, and converted to glucose (g/L) using a glucose standard.

The calculated glucose was then normalized using fiber dry solids and reported as starch

released from fiber. Absorbance values and starch release from fiber are reported in

Table 5. Table 5: Results from 15ml_ fiber assay

(± standard deviation, n=3)

Example 5 - GH5 diversity

The 15ml_ fine fiber assay is performed at pH 4, incubating fiber for one hour at 40 C with different enzyme treatments in Table 6. Control is fiber incubation with no enzyme. All enzyme blends contained the 400ug/gDS of T. reesei (Control). Auxiliary GH5's were added to the appropriate treatments at 25 ug/gDS as indicated in Table 6. Absorbance was read at 560nm, and converted to glucose (g/L) using a glucose standard. The calculated glucose was then normalized using fiber dry solids and reported as starch released from fiber. Absorbance values and starch release from fiber are reported in Table 7.

Table 7: GH5 diversity tested

*lncludes n-his tag. All wild type enzymes have n-his tag, which has been shown to ower enzyme activity.

Table 8: GH5 diversity results

(± standard deviation, n=3)