Login| Sign Up| Help| Contact|

Patent Searching and Data


Title:
A GROCERY TRANSPORT PACKAGING SYSTEM
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2016/182492
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A method for providing a collapsible transport container, wherein said collapsible carrier bag has a collapsed state for enabling transportation of the transport container in a substantially flat state, and an expanded state for transporting food items in a transport container enclosure, the method comprising: - providing a substantially planar sheet comprising kraft paper; the substantially planar sheet having a first sheet surface and a second sheet surface on opposite sides of the substantially planar sheet; the kraft paper having a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer; - cutting the planar sheet according to a pre-determined pattern so that a resulting planar sheet has at least two edges; - forming or folding the substantially planar sheet such that the at least two edges overlap so as to allow a first overlap area of the first sheet surface to meet a second overlap area of the second sheet surface and so that the first sheet surface forms an interior surface of the-bag-to-be; - attaching the first overlap area to the second overlap area, e.g. by gluing or melt-bonding; - forming or folding the sheet so as to form outer surfaces of the transport container; - providing closure means suitable for closing the transport container.

Inventors:
FALLGREN, Carl (Åkerbyvägen 206, Täby, 187 37, SE)
Application Number:
SE2016/050409
Publication Date:
November 17, 2016
Filing Date:
May 04, 2016
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
IFOODBAG AB (Box 2828, Täby, 187 28, SE)
International Classes:
B65D30/08; B65D30/18; B65D30/20; B65D33/02; B65D33/10; B65D33/16
Domestic Patent References:
WO2006010732A12006-02-02
WO2015147776A12015-10-01
WO2015183973A12015-12-03
WO2014187582A12014-11-27
Foreign References:
US20100310195A12010-12-09
US5401102A1995-03-28
US20130236128A12013-09-12
US20140294322A12014-10-02
US20070084142A12007-04-19
EP2368706A12011-09-28
DE8904678U11989-06-01
DE8904678U11989-06-01
US20130315507A12013-11-28
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ZACCO SWEDEN AB (Box 5581, Valhallavägen 117N, Stockholm, 114 85, SE)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Claims

1. A collapsible kraft paper chill bag for use in an air atmosphere environment, the kraft paper chill bag having

a collapsed state for enabling transportation of the kraft paper chill bag in a substantially flat state, and

an expanded state such that the kraft paper chill bag, in its expanded state, provides an interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods, the kraft paper chill bag comprising:

a kraft paper layer being shaped and folded so as to form

a front wall panel (S 1 A),

a back wall panel (S IB),

two mutually opposing side wall panels (S2A, S2B); and

a bottom panel comprising overlapping sheet edges of said folded kraft paper layer; wherein the wall panels and the bottom panel cooperate to form said interior storage space to a volume of between 10 litres and 50 litres in the expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag; and

said kraft paper layer having a surface weight of at least 60 grams per square meter and a density less than 1000 kg/cubic metre;

said kraft paper layer having a membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer, said kraft paper layer together with said membrane having a thermal conductivity of less than 0,2 W/(K*m ); wherein the membrane is adapted to reduce or prevent passage of air between the environment and the interior storage space, said membrane having an air permeability less than 0.35 the kraft paper chill bag further comprising:

a bottom panel cover sheet (700) attached to the bottom panel, the bottom panel cover sheet (700) including a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane adapted to reduce or prevent passage of air, water vapour and water between the environment and the interior storage space via the bottom panel;

wherein a rim portion of the wall panels facing away from the bag bottom panel provides a bag opening; and wherein

the kraft paper chill bag has a mechanical interlock attached to said rim portion; said mechanical interlock being arranged and positioned to provide

an open expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag for loading and/or unloading chilled and/or frozen goods to be transported, and

a closed expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag such that the kraft paper chill bag, in its closed expanded state, provides a substantially closed interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods; wherein

the mechanical interlock is closable such that, in the closed expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag, the mechanical interlock cooperates with said wall panels, said bottom panel, and said bottom panel cover sheet (700) so as to close and substantially seal the interior storage space from the environment so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space such that the kraft paper chill bag is adapted to minimize or prevent the occurrence of condensation on the chilled and/or frozen goods within the interior storage space during transport of the chilled and/or frozen goods; wherein

the mechanical interlock is a reclosable interlock including

a first elongated closure element attached to said rim portion; the first elongated closure element being attached to the front wall panel (S 1 A) and to first parts of both side wall panels (S2A, S2B) adjacent to the front wall panel (S 1A), and a second elongated closure element attached to said rim portion; the second elongated closure element being attached to the back wall panel (S IB) and to second parts of both side wall panels (S2A, S2B) adjacent to the back wall panel (S IB); the first elongated closure element having a cavity adapted to receive a protrusion of the second elongated closure element.

2. The collapsible kraft paper chill bag according to claim 1, further comprising: a slider (280) slidably mounted to the elongated closure elements for movement between a closed position and an open position, and

at least one end stop located at each end of the mechanical interlock so as to retain the slider (280) on the reclosable interlock.

3. The collapsible kraft paper chill bag according to claim 1 or 2 wherein

the kraft paper chill bag is adapted to minimize energy transfer, from the air atmosphere environment to the frozen goods in the interior storage space, such that when the air atmosphere environment has a constant temperature and the product of the mass m of the frozen goods and the specific heat capacity of the frozen goods exceeds 20 000 Joule then

it takes more than 4 hours to increase the mean temperature of the frozen goods by 20 K, while maintaining its frozen state, when the initial temperature difference between the warmer ambient air and frozen goods is 5 OK.

4. The kraft paper chill bag according to any preceding claim, further comprising a first handle adapted to allow gripping by a human hand for enabling carrying the container, the first handle comprising a material layer strip formed in a U-shape and having two material layer strip end portions; the material layer strip end portions of the first handle being attached to said rim portion of said front wall panel (S 1 A); and

a second handle adapted to allow gripping by a human hand for enabling carrying the container, the second handle comprising a second material layer strip formed in a U-shape and having two material layer strip end portions; the second material layer strip end portions of the second handle being attached to said rim portion of said back wall panel (S IB).

5. The kraft paper chill bag according to any of claims 1-3, wherein

said rim portion of said front wall panel (S 1 A) comprises at least one die cut opening so as to form a first handle; and wherein

the first elongated closure element is attached to the rim portion of the front panel between said at least one die cut opening and said bag bottom panel.

6. The kraft paper chill bag according to claim 5, wherein

said rim portion of said back wall panel (S IB) comprises at least one second die cut opening so as to form the first handle; and wherein the second elongated closure element is attached to the rim portion of the back panel between said at least one second die cut opening and said bag bottom panel.

7. The kraft paper chill bag according to any preceding claim, wherein

the kraft paper layer is shaped and folded such that

the front wall panel (S 1 A),

the back wall panel (S IB),

said two mutually opposing side wall panels (S2A, S2B); and said bottom panel

co-operate to form said interior storage space such that, in the closed expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag, said bottom panel forms a flat plane or a substantially flat plane.

8. The kraft paper chill bag according to any preceding claim, wherein

the bottom panel cover sheet (700) is adapted to provide stiffness to the bottom panel.

9. The kraft paper chill bag according to claim 8 when dependent on claim 7 and any of claims 4-6, wherein

the bottom panel cover sheet (700) is adapted to provide such an amount of stiffness to the bottom panel that when lifting the kraft paper chill bag by said handle or handles during transport of the chilled and/or frozen goods

said bottom panel maintains said flat plane shape or a substantially flat plane shape. 10. A method for providing a collapsible transport container, wherein said collapsible carrier bag has a collapsed state for enabling transportation of the transport container in a substantially flat state, and an expanded state for transporting food items in a transport container enclosure, the method comprising:

- providing a substantially planar sheet comprising kraft paper; the

substantially planar sheet having a first sheet surface and a second sheet surface on opposite sides of the substantially planar sheet; the kraft paper having a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer;

- cutting the planar sheet according to a pre-determined pattern so that a resulting planar sheet has at least two edges;

- forming or folding the substantially planar sheet such that the at least two edges overlap so as to allow a first overlap area of the first sheet surface to meet a second overlap area of the second sheet surface and so that the first sheet surface forms an interior surface of the-bag-to- be;

- attaching the first overlap area to the second overlap area, e.g. by

gluing or melt-bonding;

- forming or folding the sheet so as to form outer surfaces of the

transport container;

- providing closure means suitable for closing the transport container.

11. The method according to claim 10, further comprising providing a handle for allowing a user to carry the transport container.

12. The method according to any of claims 10 or 11, further comprising forming or folding the sheet so as to form a front panel (S 1 A), a back panel (S IB), and two mutually opposing side panels (S2A, S2B) of the transport container-to-be.

13. The method according to any of claims 10, 11 or 12, further comprising forming or folding the sheet so as to create a bottom portion (BP) of the transport container- to-be.

14. A method according to claim 13, where the bottom portion is formed or folded in so that the bottom portion (BP) connects to the panels (S 1 A, S IB, S2A, S2B), thereby obtaining a semi-manufactured transport container which in an expanded state exhibits four wall panels, a bag bottom panel and a bag opening formed by an opening rim of the four wall panels facing away from the bag bottom.

15. The method according to any of claims 10, 11, 12, 13 or 14, further comprising the step of collapsing the semi-manufactured transport container.

16. The method according to claim 15 when dependent on claim 12, wherein the collapsing is done by folding along a folding edge where the front panel (S 1 A) connects with the bottom panel (BP) and providing a mid-fold in each of the side panels (S2A, S2B), the mid-fold of a side panel running in a direction substantially parallel to a fold where that side panel (S2A, S2B) connects with the front panel.

17. The method according to claim 16, wherein the collapsing step is performed such that a side panel mid-fold is bent outwardly so as to cause a front most interior surface portion of that side panel to face a back most secondary interior surface portion of that side panel.

1 8 . A method for providing an improved transport container or an improved carrier bag, the method comprising the steps: providing a transport container according to any of claims 10 to 17, or providing a carrier bag according to embodiment C40, C41, or C42; and providing a cover sheet for said provided transport container or said provided carrier bag.

19. The method according to claim 18, wherein the step of providing said cover sheet comprises the step of cutting the cover sheet from a piece of material for the cover sheet.

20. The method according to any of claims 18 or 19, wherein the step of providing said cover sheet comprises the step of folding said cover sheet.

21. The method according to any of claims 18, 19, or 20, wherein the step of providing said cover sheet comprises the step of attaching said cover sheet to a bottom portion of the transport container or the carrier bag.

22. The method according to claim 21, wherein said attaching comprises gluing.

23. The method according to any of claims 21 or 22, wherein said attaching comprises heating of the cover sheet and/or the bottom portion.

24. The method according to any of claims 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, or 23, wherein the cover layer comprises a water vapour impermeable membrane.

Description:
A Grocery Transport Packaging System Technical Field of the Invention

The present application relates to a container for transporting goods, such as e.g. chilled or frozen goods. The present application also relates to a collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag. It also relates to a method for providing a collapsible carrier bag, and to a method for providing a carrier bag. The present application also relates to a method of delivering goods. The present application also relates to a handle-carryable grocery carrier bag package.

It also relates to a kit of parts including a carrier bag, and to a grocery transport system. Description of Related Art

Grocery stores are retail stores that primarily sells food. A piece of grocery, or a food item, in a modern grocery store may be provided in a separate package, the size of a grocery package being adapted to contain an amount of food intended to be convenient for the customer. Thus, the grocery store customer may select to purchase food by selecting a plurality of food item packages. The purchasing process typically involves the customer collecting several food item packages in a physical transportation cart and the

transportation of the cart to a check-out or cash register for paying. Once the customer has purchased the collected food item packages, the customer faces the problem of transporting the collected grocery items from the grocery store. Accordingly, grocery stores commonly provide carrier bags for enabling their customers to carry the groceries from the store in a convenient manner. The German Utility Model Application DE 89 04 678 discloses such a carrier bag for groceries. The carrier bag according to DE 89 04 678 is made solely of paper and it has handles attached to the open upper part of the side walls for enabling convenient carrying of the grocery carrier bag. According to DE 89 04 678, the production of a paper bag involves forming a tubular paper web from a planar piece of paper by placing two edges so that they overlap. The overlapping area is glued so as to form the tubular paper web. The tubular paper web is folded to form a carrier bag having four sides and a square bottom. The carrier bag embodiment disclosed in DE 89 04 678 also has two handles made of reinforced paper strips. Each handle is made by a folding a paper strip to form a U-shape. The two end portions of the U-shaped handle strip of a handle are glued, at a distance from each other, to the exterior surface of one side wall of the carrier bag.

Another carrier bag is disclosed by US 2013/0315507. More particularly, US

2013/0315507 discloses a bag, made of paper, essentially characterized in that the handle for grabbing and transporting it is built into its own body, formed by some die cut holes. The die cut holes are located at a sufficient distance from the top edge of the paper bag to allow performing some folds to close the bag in a way such that the die cut holes are just below the folds allowing for the users fingers to go through in order to grab the bag.

Summary

In view of the state of the art, a problem to be addressed by an aspect of the invention, is how to achieve an improved, yet cost-efficient, transportation of goods, e.g. grocery items, using a transport container or a carrier bag.

This problem is addressed by solutions according to the embodiments disclosed in this document.

An aspect of this problem is addressed by a collapsible kraft paper chill bag for use in an air atmosphere environment, the kraft paper chill bag having

a collapsed state for enabling transportation of the kraft paper chill bag in a substantially flat state, and

an expanded state such that the kraft paper chill bag, in its expanded state, provides an interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods, the kraft paper chill bag comprising:

a kraft paper layer being shaped and folded so as to form

a front wall panel,

a back wall panel,

two mutually opposing side wall panels; and

a bottom panel comprising overlapping sheet edges of said folded kraft paper layer; wherein the wall panels and the bottom panel cooperate to form said interior storage space to a volume of between 10 litres and 50 litres in the expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag; and said kraft paper layer having a surface weight of at least 60 grams per square meter and a density less than 1000 kg/cubic metre;

said kraft paper layer having a membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer, said kraft paper layer together with said membrane having a thermal conductivity of less than 0,2 W/(K*m ); wherein the membrane is adapted to reduce or prevent passage of air between the environment and the interior storage space, said membrane having an air permeability less than 0.35 μm/( pa.s.); the kraft paper chill bag further comprising:

a bottom panel cover sheet attached to the bottom panel, the bottom panel cover sheet including a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane adapted to reduce or prevent passage of air, water vapour and water between the environment and the interior storage space via the bottom panel; wherein a rim portion of the wall panels facing away from the bag bottom panel provides a bag opening;

and wherein

the kraft paper chill bag has a mechanical interlock attached to said rim portion; said mechanical interlock being arranged and positioned to provide

an open expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag for loading and/or unloading chilled and/or frozen goods to be transported, and

a closed expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag such that the kraft paper chill bag, in its closed expanded state, provides a substantially closed interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods; wherein

the mechanical interlock is closable such that, in the closed expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag, the mechanical interlock cooperates with said wall panels, said bottom panel, and said bottom panel cover sheet so as to close and substantially seal the interior storage space from the environment so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space such that the kraft paper chill bag is adapted to minimize or prevent the occurrence of condensation on the chilled and/or frozen goods within the interior storage space during transport of the chilled and/or frozen goods;

wherein

the mechanical interlock is a reclosable interlock including

a first elongated closure element attached to said rim portion; the first elongated closure element being attached to the front wall panel and to first parts of both side wall panels adjacent to the front wall panel, and a second elongated closure element attached to said rim portion; the second elongated closure element being attached to the back wall panel and to second parts of both side wall panels adjacent to the back wall panel;

the first elongated closure element having a cavity adapted to receive a protrusion of the second elongated closure element.

Advantageously, according to embodiments disclosed in this document, heating by condensation and/or frosting within the container or carrier bag is reduced or eliminated, since entry of air is reduced or prevented when the bag is closed, thereby basically rendering heat conduction through the walls the only remaining manner by which energy can seep into the interior of the container or bag.

In this context it is to be noted that the air in the atmosphere of the earth inherently has a certain humidity. In other words, the air contains a certain amount of water in vapour form. In this context, it deserves mentioning that the absolute humidity is the mass of water vapour per unit volume of total air and water vapour mixture. Absolute humidity in the atmosphere reaches roughly 30 grams per cubic meter when the air is saturated at 30 °C. The absolute humidity in southern Sweden in the month of Juli (average value for the years 1996 to 2012) ranged from 9 grams/cubic metre to 12 grams/cubic metre, according to the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI).

In fact, if 12 grams of water vapour is allowed to turn into a frost layer of ice on a package of frozen grocery, the energy released (just over 31 kJ) suffices to warm that grocery by several degrees. The exact temperature change depends on the specific heat capacity of that particular piece of grocery. Fresh water ice has a specific heat capacity of 2200 J/(kg *K), and thus 12 grams of frost being formed on a package containing one kilogram of fresh water ice would suffice to warm that one kilogram of fresh water ice by about 14 degrees Centigrade.

According to an embodiment, the collapsible kraft paper chill bag further comprises:

a slider being slidably mounted to the elongated closure elements for movement between a closed position and an open position, and

at least one end stop located at each end of the mechanical interlock so as to retain the slider on the reclosable interlock. According to an embodiment, the kraft paper chill bag is adapted to minimize energy transfer, from the air atmosphere environment to the frozen goods in the interior storage space, such that when the air atmosphere environment has a constant temperature and the product of the mass m of the frozen goods and the specific heat capacity of the frozen goods exceeds 20 000 Joule then

it takes more than 4 hours to increase the mean temperature of the frozen goods by 20 K, while maintaining its frozen state, when the initial temperature difference between the warmer ambient air and frozen goods is 50K.

According to an embodiment, the kraft paper chill bag further comprises

a first handle adapted to allow gripping by a human hand for enabling carrying the container, the first handle comprising a material layer strip formed in a U-shape and having two material layer strip end portions; the material layer strip end portions of the first handle being attached to said rim portion of said front wall panel; and

a second handle adapted to allow gripping by a human hand for enabling carrying the container, the second handle comprising a second material layer strip formed in a U-shape and having two material layer strip end portions; the second material layer strip end portions of the second handle being attached to said rim portion of said back wall panel.

According to an embodiment, the rim portion of said front wall panel comprises at least one die cut opening so as to form a first handle; and

the first elongated closure element is attached to the rim portion of the front panel between said at least one die cut opening and said bag bottom panel.

This location of the closure element advantageously enables the provision of a handle formed by a die cut opening in the wall panels above the closure elements while also enabling the closing and sealing of the interior storage space.

According to an embodiment, the rim portion of said back wall panel comprises at least one second die cut opening so as to form the first handle; and wherein

the second elongated closure element is attached to the rim portion of the back panel between said at least one second die cut opening and said bag bottom panel. According to an embodiment, the kraft paper layer is shaped and folded such that the front wall panel,

the back wall panel,

said two mutually opposing side wall panels; and

said bottom panel

co-operate to form said interior storage space such that, in the closed expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag, said bottom panel forms a flat plane or a substantially flat plane. According to an embodiment, the bottom panel cover sheet is adapted to provide stiffness to the bottom panel.

According to an embodiment, the bottom panel cover sheet is adapted to provide such an amount of stiffness to the bottom panel that when lifting the kraft paper chill bag by said handle or handles during transport of the chilled and/or frozen goods

said bottom panel maintains said flat plane shape or a substantially flat plane shape.

Another aspect of the above mentioned problem is addressed by a method for providing a collapsible transport container, wherein said collapsible carrier bag has a collapsed state for enabling transportation of the transport container in a substantially flat state, and an expanded state for transporting food items in a transport container enclosure, the method comprising:

- providing a substantially planar sheet comprising kraft paper; the substantially planar sheet having a first sheet surface and a second sheet surface on opposite sides of the substantially planar sheet; the kraft paper having a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer;

- cutting the planar sheet according to a pre-determined pattern so that a

resulting planar sheet has at least two edges;

- forming or folding the substantially planar sheet such that the at least two edges overlap so as to allow a first overlap area of the first sheet surface to meet a second overlap area of the second sheet surface and so that the first sheet surface forms an interior surface of the-bag-to-be; - attaching the first overlap area to the second overlap area, e.g. by gluing or melt-bonding;

- forming or folding the sheet so as to form outer surfaces of the transport container;

- providing closure means suitable for closing the transport container.

According to an embodiment, the method further comprises providing a handle for allowing a user to carry the transport container.

According to an embodiment, the method further comprises forming or folding the sheet so as to form a front panel, a back panel, and two mutually opposing side panels of the transport container-to-be.

According to an embodiment, the method further comprises forming or folding the sheet so as to create a bottom portion of the transport container-to-be. According to an embodiment, the bottom portion is formed or folded in so that the bottom portion connects to the panels, thereby obtaining a semi-manufactured transport container which in an expanded state exhibits four wall panels, a bag bottom panel and a bag opening formed by an opening rim of the four wall panels facing away from the bag bottom.

According to an embodiment, the method further comprises the step of collapsing the semimanufactured transport container. According to an embodiment, the collapsing is done by folding along a folding edge where the front panel connects with the bottom panel and providing a mid-fold in each of the side panels, the mid-fold of a side panel running in a direction substantially parallel to a fold where that side panel connects with the front panel. According to an embodiment, the collapsing step is performed such that a side panel mid- fold is bent outwardly so as to cause a front most interior surface portion of that side panel to face a back most secondary interior surface portion of that side panel.

Yet another aspect of the above mentioned problem is addressed by a method for providing an improved transport container or an improved carrier bag, the method comprising the steps: providing a transport container as defined above, or providing a carrier bag according to embodiment C40, C41, or C42; and providing a cover sheet for said provided transport container or said provided carrier bag. According to an embodiment, the step of providing said cover sheet comprises the step of cutting the cover sheet from a piece of material for the cover sheet.

According to an embodiment, the step of providing said cover sheet comprises the step of folding said cover sheet.

According to an embodiment, the step of providing said cover sheet comprises the step of attaching said cover sheet to a bottom portion of the transport container or the carrier bag. According to an embodiment, the attaching comprises gluing.

According to an embodiment, the attaching comprises heating of the cover sheet and/or the bottom portion.

According to an embodiment, the cover layer comprises a water vapour impermeable membrane.

As mentioned above, if 12 grams of water vapour is allowed to turn into a frost layer of ice on a package of frozen grocery, the energy released (just over 31 kJ) suffices to warm that grocery by several degrees. The exact temperature change depends on the specific heat capacity of that particular piece of grocery. Fresh water ice has a specific heat capacity of 2200 J/(kg *K), and thus 12 grams of frost being formed on a package containing one kilogram of fresh water ice would suffice to warm that one kilogram of fresh water ice by about 14 degrees Centigrade. Thus, whereas a collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according the state of the art, as disclosed by the German Utility Model Application DE 89 04 678 provides handles for conveniently carrying the groceries, any frozen grocery packages would appear to inherently cause vapour to condense into liquid water when the open carrier bag is transported in a warm air atmosphere environment having air humidity allowing such air to reach the dew point on a frozen grocery package surface. Such a condensation process may actually cause a rapid warming of the frozen grocery. Moreover, if the state of the art carrier bag according to DE 89 04 678 is carried by a walking person in a warm air environment, the movement would appear to inherently cause an exchange of air between the bag interior, which is chilled by the frozen groceries, and the warmer air surrounding the carrier bag, and this air exchange process will further drive the process of condensing vapour into liquid water by supplying new warm air to surfaces of the frozen groceries. Not only does this process cause thawing of initially frozen groceries and warming of initially frozen or chilled groceries, but it may also produce liquid water by condensation inside the carrier bag, which may jeopardize the integrity of the bag bottom or side wall, since it is made solely of paper, according to DE 89 04 678. Thus, the strength of carrier bag made solely of paper may decrease, and the risk of breaking increases when the paper-only- carrier bag becomes wet.

By contrast, the carrier bag according to the above defined solution is closable so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space such that when a grocery package comprising frozen food is transported in said interior storage space the grocery bag is adapted to minimize or prevent the occurrence of condensation within the interior storage space.

Thus, for example, if a carrier bag, having a volume of 50 litres in the expanded state of the carrier bag, is filled by 75% with frozen groceries, there will remain about 25% of the total volume which can be filled by air in connection with the loading of the bag. Thus, as an example, about 12,5 liters of air having an initial temperature of about 18 degrees

Centigrade and, about 10 grams of water per cubic metre (example relating to approximate average absolute outdoor humidity in southern Sweden in the month of Juli) may be enclosed in the bag when it is sealed after packing. In this connection it is noted that the term "litre" means "metric litre" i.e. one litre equals one cubic decimetre. Accordingly, the

12,5 liters of contained air may include about 0, 125 grams of water in vapour form. Air contained within the bag together with frozen groceries may be caused to cool, and during this decreasing of the air temperature the water vapour in that air may first condense into water, releasing 282,5 J of energy, and then it may freeze releasing 41,75 J of energy. Thus, the two phase changes during the transformation of 0, 125 grams of water from vapour form into ice may deliver 324 kJ. The energy released may suffice to increase the temperature of 5 kg of frozen water by about 0,03 degrees, i.e. much less than half a degree Centigrade. The energy released by cooling the 0,125 grams of water by 19 degrees Centigrade is comparatively small and may actually be regarded as negligible is comparison.

In effect, the grocery bag being adapted to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space advantageously contributes to maintaining the frozen or chilled state of the groceries for a significantly extended duration of time, while also preserving the integrity of the carrier bag by minimizing or preventing the formation of liquid water within the interior storage space, and by the kraft paper layer having a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer, thereby reducing or preventing paper disintegration due to paper wetness.

Brief Description of the Drawings

For simple understanding of the present invention, it will be described by means of examples and with reference to the accompanying drawings, of which

Figure 1 is a schematic illustration of an environment 10 in which embodiments of a grocery bag 20 may be used.

Figure 2 is an elevational view of an embodiment of a single collapsed grocery carrier bag 20A.

Figure 3 is a front view of the collapsed grocery carrier bag 20A; and

Figure 4 is a rear view of the collapsed grocery carrier bag 20A.

Figure 5 is a side view of the collapsed grocery carrier bag 20A, as seen in the direction of arrow A in figure 4.

Figure 6 is an elevational view of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in an open expanded state 20B. In Figure 6 the folds of the paper walls are illustrated, and several parts on the inside of the carrier bag are also indicated.

Figure 7 is another elevational view of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in an open expanded state 20B, illustrating an exterior look of an embodiment of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20, 20B.

Figure 8 is a top plan view of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in an open expanded state 20B. Figure 9 is an elevational view of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in a closed expanded state 20C.

Figure 10 is a top plan view of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in the closed expanded state 20C.

Figure 11 is a front view of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in the closed expanded state 20C.

Figure 12 is a side view of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in the closed expanded state 20C, as seen in the direction of arrow B in figure 1 1.

Figure 13 is a cross-sectional view of the wall material at a point indicated by arrow C in FIG 1 1.

Figure 14 is an illustration of an embodiment of the closure device 240.

Figure 15 is an illustration of Kraft Pulp Fibres.

Figure 16 is an illustration of an embodiment of the first elongated closure element 240A, and the second elongated closure element 240B.

Figure 17A is a perspective view of a part of the closure device 240 shown in figure 14.

Figure 17B is a side view of the closure device 240.

Figure 18 is an illustration of an embodiment of an insulator device.

Figure 19 is an elevational view of an embodiment of the expanded grocery carrier bag in an open expanded state, placed next to an embodiment of a collapsible grocery inner chill bag.

Figure 20 is an elevational view of an embodiment of a handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package.

Figure 21 is a schematic block diagram of an embodiment of a system for delivering goods.

Figure 22 is a schematic block diagram of an embodiment of a storage facility comprising plural storage rooms.

Figure 23A-C is a schematic block diagram of an example of a method for delivering chilled or frozen goods according to an embodiment.

Figure 24 is an illustration embodiment of a substantially sealed container.

Figure 25 is an illustration of test results.

Figure 26 illustrates two examples of graphs of the temporal progression of temperature in two positions in a block of ice which was placed in a bag. Figure 27 lustrates two examples of graphs of the temporal progression of temperature in two positions in a 4,7 litre canister of fresh water which was placed in a bag.

Figure 30A-B are flowcharts of a method for providing a carrier bag.

Figure 31 is a flowchart of a method for providing a transport container.

Figure 32 is a flowchart of a method for providing a handle.

Figure 33 is a flowchart of a method for providing closure means for a transport container. Figure 34A is an elevated view of a cone shaped container in its expanded form.

Figure 34B is an illustration of a cone shaped container in its flat form.

Figure 35A-B are illustrations of examples of stacked cone shaped containers.

Figure 36A-B is an elevated view and a flat view, respectively, of a container with a truncated cone.

Figure 39 is an illustration of a method for providing a bag with a closure.

Figure 40 is an illustration of an example of a pre-determined pattern.

Figure 40A-N are illustrations of possible steps of how the pre-determined pattern from Fig. 40 can be formed and folded to arrive at a bag.

Figure 41 is an illustration of an example of a pre-determined pattern.

Figure 42 is an illustration of an example of a pre-determined pattern.

Figure 43 is a front view of a section of an example of a protrusion in its unfolded state.

Figure 44 is a side view of an example of a protrusion in its folded state.

Figure 45A-C are illustrations of examples of handles.

Figure 46A is an illustration of a flat state of a carrier with a handle.

Figure 46B is an illustration of an expanded state of the carrier with the handle in Fig. 46A.

Figure 47 is an illustration of a string as a provided handle.

Figure 48A-E are illustrations of different kinds of attaching a closure device.

Figure 49 is an illustration of an example of providing a closure element.

Figure 50 is a side view of an elongated closure element.

Figure 51A-C are illustrations of examples of closure elements.

Figure 52A-C are illustrations of examples of how the folding described in relation to

Fig.43 and Fig. 44 can be applied to a bag with the pre-determined pattern of Fig. 40.

Figure 53A-C are illustrations of examples of folding processes.

Figure 54a-g shows one embodiment of a carrier bag.

Figure 55a-g shows another embodiment of a carrier bag.

Figures 56-61 illustrate elevated views of yet other embodiments of a carrier bag. Figure 62a shows schematically a bag to illustrate the principle of determining an area A. Figure 62b shows, schematically, a side view of a handle, a bag and a sheet for distributing forces, applied to handles, to outer walls of the bag.

Figure 63-66 are illustrations of measurement results of the temperature behaviour of several bags.

Figure 67a is a cross-sectional view of a plastic chill bag according to the state of the art. Figure 67b is a cross-sectional view of an embodiment of a closed kraft paper bag. Figure 67c is a cross-sectional view of an embodiment of a closed kraft paper bag, the kraft paper having a membrane bonded to one side of the kraft paper, the membrane being adapted to reduce or prevent passage of air between the environment and the interior of the closed kraft paper bag.

Detailed Description of Embodiments In the following description similar features in different embodiments will be indicated by the same reference numerals.

Figure 1 is a schematic illustration of an environment 10 in which embodiments of a container 20 for goods may be used. According to an embodiment, the container 20 is a grocery bag 20. The environment may include a grocery store 30, wherein a large number of grocery items 40 are provided. A piece of grocery 40, or a food item 40, in a modern grocery store 30 may be provided in a separate package 40 A, the size of a grocery package 40A being adapted to contain an amount of packaged food 40B intended to be convenient for the customer.

Thus, a grocery store customer 60 may select to purchase food by selecting a plurality of food item packages 40. The purchasing process may typically involve the customer walking through the grocery store while collecting several food item packages 40 in a physical transportation cart 70, and transporting the cart to a check-out 80, or cash register 80, for paying.

The grocery packages 40 collected by a customer 60 may comprise fresh produce, such as fruit or mushroom, which may be provided in separate portion sized packages or containers 40A. Fresh produce may be provided at a cool temperature of about 15-18 degrees

Centigrade, being held in a slightly cooled part of the grocery store. Thus, some grocery goods may be provided at a first, cool, temperature range of about 15-18 degrees

Centigrade.

The grocery may comprise dairy products, such as milk, cream and butter. The dairy products may be provided in separate individual packages, and they may be provided in fridges at a temperature of about 6- 8 degrees Centigrade. An individual dairy product package may typically range in size from around 100 grams to about 4 kg. Dairy product packages intended for use in private household commonly have a size of between 200 grams to 2 kg. For example milk may be provided in a carton package, such as a Tetra Pak® package containing e.g. 1 litre of milk, weighing about 1 kg. Thus, some grocery goods may be provided at a second, cold non-freezing, temperature range. The cold non- freezing temperature range may be a range of about +6 to +8 degrees Centigrade.

Alternatively, the cold non-freezing temperature range may be a range of about +1 to +4 degrees Centigrade.

The grocery, which may be collected by the customer, may also comprise frozen food packages 40, provided in a freezer within the grocery store. Thus, the frozen food items 40B, for delivery at a temperature of e.g. about -18 degrees Centigrade, may be collected by the customer directly from a freezer. The frozen food 40B may be separately packaged e.g. in a carton box 40A. The frozen food may, for example include frozen fish, meat, or vegetables. The frozen food may have been frozen in a raw state, or, alternatively, it may be provided in a prepared manner such that it is ready to eat after thawing or heating. Thus, some grocery goods may be provided at a freezing temperature range of about -18 degrees Centigrade, or colder. In general, frozen goods does not suffer any harm from being chilled to a lower temperature than -18 degrees Centigrade, and accordingly frozen grocery goods may be provided at a freezing temperature in a range of between -25 to -40 degrees Centigrade. Providing frozen goods within such a low temperature range advantageously extends the time required for the frozen goods to warm towards minimum freezing temperatures, such as e.g. -10 or -4 degrees Centigrade.

In order to achieve cost-efficient handling of the goods 40, sold in the grocery store, the grocery store typically receives a large variety of food items, each food item typically being received in bulk, i.e. an individual received food item type is received as a large number of smaller packages. As mentioned above, the smaller packages are adapted to contain an amount of packaged food 40B intended to be convenient for the customer, who typically buys just one or a few packs of each item.

Similarly, it is important to provide the grocery bags 20 in bulk to the grocery store, so as to allow cost-efficiency. Accordingly, the grocery bag 20 should preferably be collapsible. The collapsible grocery bag 20 may advantageously be delivered in bulk to the grocery store, thus requiring a very small storage volume, thereby contributing to cost-efficiency. Hence, a large plurality of collapsible grocery bags may advantageously be delivered in a collapsed state 20A, thereby enabling transportation of the carrier bag in a substantially flat state 20A. In this manner, a large plurality of collapsible grocery bags may be conveniently provided at a location in the grocery store. In this manner, customers can conveniently collect and bring a desired number of grocery bags for transporting groceries. According to another embodiment, the container 20 may be shaped in such a manner that plural containers 20 can be piled on top of each other in a space conservative manner. An example of such a space saving shape is a cone shaped container. In this manner plural cone shaped containers may be stacked by placing one cone container on top of the other such that the space required for storing ten containers is only slightly larger than the space required for storing one cone container. According to an embodiment the container may be shaped as a truncated cone such that there is provided a substantially flat bottom area inside the truncated cone container, the cone wall leaning outwardly from the bottom area. In this manner the truncated cone container may also be stacked or piled so that one container fits inside the next substantially identical container, thus enabling transport of a large number of stacked containers within a very small space. This feature of the container

advantageously contributes to enable transporting containers 20 in bulk at a low cost.

The collapsed grocery bag 20A comprising kraft paper, as described below, has a balanced rigidity and flexibility allowing it to be easily expanded. In its expanded state 20C the carrier bag provides an interior storage space which is sufficiently large for transporting a plurality of grocery packages, even when the individual grocery packages are larger than 1 litre. According to some embodiments, the carrier bag has a volume of between 10 litres and 50 litres in the expanded state of the carrier bag. Having collected the desired combination of grocery packages 40 in the physical transportation cart 70, the customer 60 may transport the cart to a check-out 80, or cash register 80, for paying. With reference to Figure 1, the customer 60 may collect a collapsed grocery carrier bag 20A from a pile 90 of collapsed grocery carrier bags 20A. The customer 60 may then unfold the grocery carrier bag 20A it to its open expanded state 20B (See Fig 6, Fig 7 and Figure 8), so that it is ready be loaded with groceries. Figure 2 is an elevational view of an embodiment of a single collapsed grocery carrier bag 20A.

Figure 3 is a front view of the collapsed grocery carrier bag 20A; and

Figure 4 is a rear view of the collapsed grocery carrier bag 20A.

Figure 5 is a side view of the collapsed grocery carrier bag 20A, as seen in the direction of arrow A in figure 4.

Figure 6 is an elevational view of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in an open expanded state 20B. In Figure 6 the folds of the paper walls are illustrated, and several parts on the inside of the carrier bag are also indicated. Figure 7 is another elevational view of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in an open expanded state 20B, illustrating an exterior look of an embodiment of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20, 20B.

Figure 8 is a top plan view of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in an open expanded state 20B.

When the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 has been filled with chilled or frozen grocery packages 40, the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 can be closed.

Figure 9 is an elevational view of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in a closed expanded state 20C, illustrating an exterior look of an embodiment of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in its closed state 20C. Figure 10 is a top plan view of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in the closed expanded state 20C.

Figure 11 is a front view of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in the closed expanded state 20C.

Figure 12 is a side view of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in the closed expanded state 20C, as seen in the direction of arrow B in figure 1 1.

As illustrated in Figure 12, the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in the closed expanded state 20C may have a larger cross-sectional area Al near the bottom panel 140 and a smaller cross-sectional area A2 near the closed opening, i.e. in the vicinity of the rim portion 150. As schematically illustrated in Figure 1, the grocery carrier bag 20 in its closed expanded state 20C may have a generally tapered shape, having a larger cross- sectional area near the bottom panel and a smaller cross-sectional area near the opening. Accordingly, an embodiment of the collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag 20 is suitable for use in an air atmosphere environment. The carrier bag has a collapsed state 20A (See Figs 2, 3 and 4) for enabling transportation of the carrier bag in a substantially flat state. As mentioned above, the carrier bag may also have an expanded state 20B, 20C such that the carrier bag, in its expanded state, provides an interior storage space 100 (Fig 6 and 8) for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages 40 (See Fig 8). The carrier bag may comprise a paper layer being shaped and folded so as to form

a front wall panel 1 10, S I A (See fig 3),

a back wall panel 120, S IB (See fig 4),

two side wall panels 130A, S2A, 130B, S2B (See fig 1 1); and a bottom panel 140 (See Fig 4).

The wall panels, i.e. the front wall panel 1 10, the back wall panel 120, the two side wall panels 130A and 130B and the bottom panel 140 may cooperate to form said interior storage space 100. The interior storage space 100 may be of a volume larger than 10 litres in the expanded state of the carrier bag. The volume depends on the dimensions of the bottom panel and the wall panels. A rim portion 150 of the wall panels 110, 120, 130A and 130B facing away from the bag bottom panel 140 may provide a bag opening 160 (Fig 6 & 7). The carrier bag may further comprise a first handle 170A being associated with said rim portion 150, 150A of said front wall panel SI A. The first handle 170 A may be shaped and dimensioned to allow gripping by a human hand such as to enable convenient carrying of the grocery carrier bag. In some businesses where carrier bags are utilized, it is considered necessary for a carrier bag to be provided with a handle, since a handle-carryable grocery carrier bag is considered to be a fundamental customer convenience requirement. Thus, in some cases, a grocery bag which is capable of being carried by means of a handle, or a pair of handles, is considered to be a fundamental customer convenience requirement. According to some embodiments, the carrier bag is therefore advantageously provided with an integrated handle, or an integrated pair of handles such that a handle-carryable grocery carrier bag is supplied. This solution advantageously allows a person to carry the loaded bag by the built-in handle, or handles, in a convenient and ergonomically advantageous manner.

As mentioned above, the carrier bag may have an open expanded state 20B (Figs 6 & 7) for loading and/or unloading grocery packages to be transported, and a closed expanded state 20C (See Figs 9 & 10). In its closed expanded state 20C, the carrier bag may provide a substantially closed interior storage space 100. The bag opening 160 (Fig 6 & 7) is a closable opening which, in the closed expanded state (Fig 9) of the carrier bag may cooperate with the wall panels and the bottom panel so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space. Hence, the substantially closed interior storage space may advantageously be used for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages, since the carrier bag, in its closed expanded state 20C, may exhibit a very good ability to maintain a low temperature of chilled or frozen items that are stored in the closed interior storage space.

A Container Wall

The advantageous cold keeping properties of embodiments of the container 20 is believed to rely on a combination of container features. For example, in the carrier bag 20, the choice of material forming the front wall panel SI A, the back wall panel SIB, the side wall panels S2A, S2B; and the bottom panel contributes to the advantageous cold keeping properties. It is to be noted that the design of the container walls is not limited to the above shape. Instead, the word wall is to be understood as a material forming the boundaries of the interior storage space of the container 20. The wall or walls of the container 20 forms the boundaries of the interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods. According to some embodiments the walls of the container 20 comprise a kraft paper layer 180. Kraft paper is a material which is available at a reasonable cost, and it is readily available in large quantities. Additionally, kraft paper bags, such as the carrier bag disclosed in DE 89 04 678, are mass produced at low cost using readily available production machines. Accordingly, embodiments of the carrier bag 20 may be produced using such readily available machines, or by just some minor modifications to existing kraft paper bag production machines. This availability of existing paper bag production machines, in conjunction with embodiments of the bag design enabling the use of such existing production machines for the production of kraft paper carrier bags having a chill conserving function contribute to enabling an advantageously low production cost. Thus, the fact that existing manufacturing machines can be used contributes to enabling cost effective manufacture of the chill conserving kraft paper bag according to embodiment of the invention. This is particularly important for facilitating market entry, i.e. for enabling market introduction and sales of kraft paper carrier bags according to embodiments of the invention in the short term to medium time frame, since use of existing machines contributes to enabling the low production cost. Embodiments of methods for the production of kraft paper carrier bags are discussed further below in this document.

Moreover, Kraft paper is advantageous in that it is biodegradable and environmentally friendly. The kraft paper layer 180 may have a surface weight in the range between 40 and 240 grams per square metre, and a density lower than 1200 kg per cubic metre. The surface weight of the kraft paper may be selected in dependence on the tensile strength to which the bag will be exerted when in use. In this connection it is noted that a carrier bag may be produced in various sizes, such as e.g. a ten litre bag, a twenty litre bag, a thirty litre bag, a forty litre bag, or a fifty litre bag. It is possible to use kraft paper with as low surface weight as 40 g/square metre and a density lower than 1200 kg/cubic metre, at least for the small size bags of ten or twenty litre storage space, when the small size bag will be used for carrying lower weights. The maximum weight of the goods to be transported will, to some extent, be limited by the size of the bag.

Thus, the walls, including the bottom panel, may comprise a kraft paper layer 180 (Fig 13). It has been found that a grocery bag having a Kraft paper layer having a surface weight of between 60 and 160 grams per square metre generally provides a satisfactory strength while also providing sufficient flexibility so as to be user friendly. According to preferred embodiments of the kraft paper bag, the kraft paper is selected to have a surface weight of at least 60 g/square metre and a density lower than 1000 kg/cubic metre.

According to a preferred embodiment of the Kraft paper grocery bag the Kraft paper layer has a surface weight of between 100 and 140 grams per square metre, and a density lower than 1000 kg/cubic metre.

The inventors have considered the following in terms of choice of kraft paper quality: A) An increased surface weight of the paper, with an unchanged paper density, leads to an increased thickness of the paper layer. Since the internal thermal resistance R tw of a wall, in terms of heat conduction, is proportional to the wall thickness, the increased thickness of the paper layer advantageously increases the thermal resistance of the kraft paper wall thereby leading to reduced conduction of heat through the container wall from the environment.

B) Moreover, it is noted that a lowered density of the paper layer, with a maintained surface weight, will advantageously lead to an increased thermal resistance of the kraft paper wall, thereby leading to reduced conduction of heat through the container wall from the environment when the bag is in use. In fact, the effect on thermal resistance is advantageously two-fold when the density of the paper layer is lowered with a maintained surface weight, since this will lead to

I) an increased wall thickness, and

II) an increase of the amount of air being trapped inside the kraft paper.

This is illustrated with reference to Figure 12B, Figure 12C, and Figure 12D. Figure 12B illustrates a portion of a kraft paper wall layer 180B, having a wall thickness ti and a density Di. The thermal resistance Rtwl of the wall is a function of the thickness tl and the density Dl : R tw i = f (ti, Di)

With reference to Figure 12C, the wall 180C has been made with a larger thickness t 2 = Ki*ti, K being a number larger than 1. The thermal resistance Rtw2 will be increased proportionally to

Rtw2 = f (t 2 , Di) = Ki * R f wi

With reference to Figure 12D, a wall 180D has been made with the larger thickness t 2 and it also has a decreased density D 2 = K 2 * Di, K 2 being a number smaller than 1. Thus, in comparison to the wall 180B of figure 12B, the thermal resistance Rtw3 will first be increased proportionally to the increase in thickness and then it will also be further increased due to the decreased density.

Rtw3 = f (t 2 , D 2 ) > Ki * R tw i

When the density is decreased, there will be a larger proportion of air in the kraft paper layer. The following assumption may be made for the purpose of understanding the effect of a changed density: The proportion of gas PG, such as nitrogene or air, in the kraft paper layer may be expressed as:

PG = V G /V,o, = (D mean - Da) / (D gas - D fib )

Assuming a mean density of the paper fibres and the gas contents (the apparent density of the kraft paper) of, for example, 901 kg/m 3 and an air density of 1.2 kg/m 3 , the proportion of air in the kraft paper is about 40%. At NTP, i.e. Normal Temperature and Pressure dry air has a density of 1,204 kg/m 3 .

In this connection it is noted that air has a very low heat conductivity of about 0,024 W/(m K), and thus an increased proportion of air in the kraft paper proves to have a dramatic effect in terms reducing heat conductivity of the kraft paper layer.

C) An increased surface weight of the kraft paper in combination with a lower density leads to a yet a further increase of the internal thermal resistance of the kraft paper wall.

Thus, the inventors concluded that, when designing a kraft paper bag, it may be done by a procedure as follows: 51. First select a surface weight of the kraft paper in dependence on the tensile strength to which the bag will be exerted when in use.

52. Reduce the density of the selected paper layer, with a maintained surface weight, so as to achieve an increased thermal resistance of the kraft paper wall.

S3. When a reduced density of the kraft paper may have a somewhat weakening effect on the tensile strength, the surface weight selected in step 1, may be increased by a safety margin so as to ensure the integrity of the paper bag when in use.

The tensile strength needed is generally higher for a larger bag, since a larger bag will enclose a larger volume, and weight, of goods. Thus, when transporting a certain amount of frozen or chilled goods, an appropriate size container should the selected. The bag size should be selected sufficiently large that the chilled goods fits inside, of course, but for optimum chill conserving ability of the bag, the chilled or frozen goods should preferably fill more than 30 % of the inside volume of the container 20. Hence, when packing chilled goods into the container, the container size should be selected sufficiently small so that, when packed with the cold or frozen goods, the cold or frozen goods fill up more than 30 % of the inside volume of the selected container 20. The selection of an appropriate size container contributes to the chill conserving properties of the packed container, since the thermal resistance of the wall is decreased in dependence on an increased wall surface area. According to an embodiment of the disclosure it was found that a good filling degree of a bag 20 is between 25% and 75%. In terms of designing the bag, the step of determining the desired tensile strength therefore may begin by assuming a 50% filling degree of goods having a density of about 1 kg per cubic decimetre.

Thus, in one example it is assumed that a bag with an interior storage space of X litres should be designed to enable carrying a mass of at least 0,5 *X kg. Therefore, in one example it is assumed that a bag with an interior storage space of 10 litres should be designed to enable carrying a mass of at least 5kg. Likewise, a bag with an interior storage space of 20 litres may be designed to enable carrying a mass of 10kg, and so on. A bag with an interior storage space of 50 litres would according to this example be able to carry a mass of 25 kg.

In one example, the bag comprises walls with a layer of wall material, the layer having a pre-determined tensile strength. For a bag designed to carry 5kg, said pre-determined tensile strength exceeds 0.133 N/mm 2 . For a bag designed to carry 10kg, said pre- determined tensile strength exceeds 0.267 N/mm 2 . For a bag designed to carry 15kg, said pre-determined tensile strength exceeds 0.399 N/mm 2 . For a bag designed to carry 20kg, said pre-determined tensile strength exceeds 0.533 N/mm 2 . For a bag designed to carry 25kg, said pre-determined tensile strength exceeds 0.667 N/mm 2 . This can be seen in the following way: The tensile strength δ is defined as 5=F/A, where F denotes a force and A an area. The force F which a mass m will exhibit can be determined as F=g-m, where g denotes the acceleration due to gravity, which in one example is assumed to be g=9,82m/s 2 . The mass m is in principle the added mass of the bag and the goods carried in it. In practice, the mass of the goods might be predominant. The area A is an area over which the force F is distributed.

A principle of determining the relevant area is shown in Fig. 62a and Fig. 62b. Fig 62a shows schematically a bag to illustrate the principle of determining the area A. The bag has a rectangular bottom with length and width of di and d 2 , respectively. The bag comprises two handles. The bag further comprises two sheets for distributing the forces applied to the handles to the outer walls of the bag. The handles and the sheets for distributing the forces applied to the handles to the outer walls of the bag are the same on the front side and on the back side of the bag. Each sheet for distributing the forces applied to the handles to the outer walls of the bag is substantially rectangular and has a length and a width of d 4 and d 3 , respectively. Fig.62b shows, schematically, a side view of the handle, the bag and the sheet for distributing the forces applied to the handles to the outer walls of the bag. The sizes in Fig. 62b are not to scale, neither in relation to Fig. 62, nor in relation to each other. In Fig. 62b three thicknesses are illustrated, wherein a first thickness d 5 denotes the thickness of the handle, d 6 denotes the thickness of the sheets for distributing the forces applied to the handles to the outer walls of the bag, and d 7 denotes the thickness of the wall of the bag. It should be understood that the sheet for distributing the forces applied to the handles to the outer walls of the bag and the outer wall of the bag will in reality touch each other, opposite to what is shown in Fig. 62b.

In the example of Fig. 62a and Fig. 62b the relevant area A can be defined as A=d 3 *( d 5 + d 6 + d 7 ). In one example d 3 =180mm, d 5 =0.8mm, d6=0.1mm, and d 7 =0.123mm. With these input values, and assuming the force is equally distributed over both handles, the above values for the tensile strength will be achieved. In practice, an attachment of the handle often might be the weakest point. If, however, no handle is present, other values need to be taken into account for determining A. Even when a handle is present, the other parts of the bag have to be taken into account to check that there tensile strength does not have to be stronger than the tensile strength at the part of the bag where the handle is attached.

Especially the tensile strength of the bottom portion has to be taken into account. In practice, however, the tensile strength of the bottom can in principle be orders of magnitudes weaker than the tensile strength at the part of the bag where the handle is attached.

A kraft paper layer advantageously provides a good tensile strength and it also contains a certain amount of air or gas, thus contributing to the thermal insulation capacity of the container 20.

Another embodiment comprises non-woven as wall material. This advantageously enables a non-expensive bag with a material having high air content, and it is therefore a good alternative. Non-woven material may comprise slender fibers which are not woven or knitted but are kept together in other ways, such as by entanglement. Non-woven materials may include textile-like materials. Here below there is a list of other materials suitable for being comprised in the wall panels and or bottom panel of the container 20:

- Conventional textiles

- Film of foamed/porous thermoplastic. The thermoplastic may be a conventional oil-based plastic such as polyethylene, polypropylene or polyurethane. It is also possible to use a bio- based plastic, polylactic acid (PLA)

- Film of foamed/porous rubber (rubber can be of many types, but neoprene (chloroprene rubber) are preferred. Said non-woven materials and conventional textiles have a tensile index value exceeding 50 kNm/kg. All these container wall materials are selected to have a thermal conductivity value less than 0,2 W/(m K): λ < 0,2 W/(m K).

Hence, according to embodiments of the disclosure the wall panels and or bottom panel of the container 20 may be made of one of the above listed materials ( a Non-woven material, a Conventional textile, a film of foamed or porous thermoplastic, a film of foamed or porous rubber).

An insulating air gap

Preferably, bag size should be selected such that an air gap is allowed to form between the inner surface of the container and the outer surface of the cold or frozen goods. Such an air gap is advantageous in that the air gap renders extra insulation against the exterior environment, which may be warm. According to an embodiment, the middle portion of interior the surface of the bag bottom may be marked so as to indicate that it is a loading zone for chilled goods. This advantageously indicates to the user of the chill container that goods to be transported should preferably be placed within the indicated area for optimum chill conserving effect during transport. In this manner a simple marking of the bag bottom will be indicative of a three-dimensional bag loading zone volume within the bag, the bag loading zone volume being separated from the side wall(s) of the bag by an air gap.

According to another embodiment, there is provided a number of strips, e.g. kraft paper strips, having lengths commensurate with a width and a breadth of the paper bag; the strips being attached to the inner surfaces of the walls such that, when the bag is in its expanded state, the strips are arranged to stretch from wall to wall. In this manner the strips may advantageously provide a visual indication of the loading zone volume of the bag. The strips may also advantageously provide support for goods to be transported so as to prevent such goods from leaning against the bag wall when the bag is transported.

According to an embodiment, the middle portion of interior the surface of the bag bottom may be marked so as to indicate that it is a loading zone for chilled goods (as described above), and the strips may be attached and positioned to the bag walls so that when goods- to-be-transported is stacked on the marked loading zone on the bag bottom (which may lead to the marked bottom area being covered), the paper strips will still indicate the loading zone volume of the bag.

Thus, for optimum cold conserving properties of the packed container, the container size should be selected sufficiently small so that, when packed with the cold or frozen goods, the cold or frozen goods fill up more than 30 % of the inside volume of the selected container 20, while also allowing for an air gap to be formed between the cold or frozen goods and the inner surface of the container wall or walls. Moreover, the kraft paper layer 180 may have a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane 190 bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer.

A Membrane 190 on the Wall

According to an embodiment the polymer membrane layer 190 may comprise Low-density polyethylene (LDPE). The LDPE membrane may have a density in the range from 910 to 940 kg/m3. The LDPE- membrane layer may have an air permeability of less than

0,35 μm/( pa.s.) in accordance with ISO 5636-3 :2013. According to a preferred embodiment the polymer membrane layer 190 may comprise a biodegradable plastic, such as e.g. Polylactic acid (PLA),

polyhydroxyallkanoates (PHAs) such as poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB). The polymer membrane layer 190 may alternatively comprise a biodegradable plastic such as polyhydroxyvalerate (PHV) , or polyhydroxyhexanoate (PHH), polybutylene succinate (PBS), polycaprolactone (PCL), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The polymer membrane layer 190 may alternatively comprise biodegradable plastics such as a starch based plastics, plastics based on natural oils and fats (fatty acid esters obtained by transesterification of naturally occurring fats and oils).

The polymer membrane layer 190 may alternatively comprise a biodegradable plastic such as a cellulose-based plastics (eg cellulose acetate).

The polymer membrane layer 190 comprising a biodegradable plastic as defined above may be extrusion coated on a kraft paper layer.

Alternatively a biodegradable plastic as defined above may be dispersion coated on a kraft paper layer. The dispersion coated biodegradable plastic can advantageously be recycled in a conventional paper recycling process.

The use of biodegradable plastic for the polymer membrane layer 190 is preferred since it may be combined with a wall material having a sufficient tensile strength and also being biodegradable, such as e.g. kraft paper, thus rendering a kraft paper carrier bag which not only provides outstanding chill retaining properties, but also is fully biodegradable. According to another embodiment, the polymer membrane layer 190 comprises a non- biodegradable plastic which may be produced from fossil oil. Such a plastic membrane advantageously provides a good water vapour barrier. Figure 13 is a cross-sectional view of the wall material at a point indicated by arrow C in FIG 11. Figure 13 is illustration of an embodiment of material layers at rim portion 150 of the front wall 110 at a position where the handle strip is attached to the front wall 110. According to an embodiment the water impermeable and water vapour impermeable membrane 190 may be provided on the side of the kraft paper layer 180 facing the interior of the bag, as illustrated in Figure 13. According to an embodiment, the water vapour impermeable membrane 190 is distributed over substantially all of the surface on one side of the paper layer 180. According to an embodiment the water vapour impermeable membrane 190 comprises a polymer. According to an embodiment the polymer layer 190 may be a layer of PE or Polyethylene.

As shown, e.g in Figure 6, the first handle 170A may comprise a paper strip formed in a U- shape and having two paper strip end portions 200 A and 21 OA. The paper strip end portions 200A and 21 OA of the first handle 170A may be attached to said rim portion 150 of said front wall panel 110, SI A. With reference to Figure 13, the paper strip end portion 21 OA may be attached to the membrane 190 by means of a glue layer 220.

A first substantially planar reinforcement sheet 230 (See Fig 6 and 13) having a certain size may be provided in order to distribute the lifting force from the first handle paper strip end portions to a larger surface area of the front wall panel 110, SI A. The first

substantially planar reinforcement sheet 230 may have a first sheet surface 230A and a second sheet surface 230B on opposite sides of the substantially planar reinforcement sheet 230. The first reinforcement sheet 230 may be attached to the paper strip end portion 210A of the first handle 170A and to said rim portion 150 of said front wall panel 110, SI A such that said paper strip end portion 21 OA of the first handle 170 is located between the front wall panel 110, SI A and the reinforcement sheet 230.

The first surface 230A of the first reinforcement sheet 230 faces the paper strip end portion 210A of the first handle 170A and said rim portion 150 of the front wall panel 110, SI A. The first surface 230A of the first reinforcement sheet 230 may be bonded to the paper strip end portion 210A and to said rim portion 150 of said front wall panel 110 SI A so as to distribute lifting force from said paper strip end portions to said front wall panel via said first reinforcement sheet.

With reference to Figure 6 in conjunction with Figure 9, the bag opening 160 is closable by means of a mechanical interlock 240, or closure device 240 attached to said rim portion 150. The closure device 240, in the closed expanded state of the carrier bag, cooperates with the wall panels and the bottom panel to minimize or prevent air from the environment from entering the interior storage space. The closure device 240 includes a first elongated closure element 240 A, and a second elongated closure element 240B.

Figure 14 is an illustration of an embodiment of the closure device 240. The first elongated closure element 240A is integrated with a second substantially planar reinforcement sheet 250A, the second reinforcement sheet 250A having a predetermined area extension which is larger than the above mentioned certain size of the first substantially planar reinforcement sheet 230. The second substantially planar

reinforcement sheet 250A may be attached to the first reinforcement sheet 230 and to the rim portion 150 of said front wall panel 110, SI A such that the first reinforcement sheet 230 is located between the front wall panel 110, SI A and the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet 250A. The second substantially planar reinforcement sheet 250A may be attached by a glue layer 260. According to an embodiment the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet 250A comprises polymer material. According to another embodiment the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet comprises paper.

The second substantially planar reinforcement sheet being bonded to the second sheet surface of the first substantially planar reinforcement sheet advantageously achieves two effects. On the one hand, the elongated closure device is thereby attached to the bag wall, and on the other hand the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet 250A also acts to distribute lifting force from said first substantially planar reinforcement sheet to said front wall panel via said second reinforcement sheet, the lifting force originating from the handle when the bag is carried by lifting the handlel70A (See Fig 6). As illustrated in Figures 14 and 6, the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet 250A may have a lower edge 270, and the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet 250A may have a physical extension of between 10% and 30% of the height of a wall panel 110.

The second substantially planar reinforcement sheet 250A may be attached to an interior surface of the rim portion 150 of the front panel 110 and to a part of an interior surface of the rim portion 150 of a side panel, as shown in Figure 6.

The paper strip end portions of the first handle and said first reinforcement sheet are sized and dimensioned so as to withstand a force exceeding 100 Newton.

The kraft paper layer comprises a certain amount of air being trapped within the kraft paper layer. This trapped air is believed to contribute to good insulating property of the bag walls and bag bottom. In fact, embodiments of the carrier bag have been tested and the tests included a measurement with an Infra-red camera for a duration of more than 24 hours, while the closed carrier bag was placed in a warm room at a temperature of 25° Centigrade. The bag was placed such that the bottom panel 140 was placed on the floor, and the bag was standing with the rim portion 150 facing upwards. During this testing, the temperature on the outer surface of a closed carrier bag was detected and the temperature development was registered as time passed. The closed carrier bag was packed with a number of chilled and frozen grocery packages. Whereas, these measurements indicated that outer surface of the lower part of the bag side walls stayed colder than the outer surface of the upper rim portion 150, the tests also indicated that it was not possible to detect, from the outer surface temperature as detected with the IR camera the shape of the grocery bag contents. In other words, individual frozen or chilled packages 40 which were positioned in the interior storage space 100 (Fig 8) could not be distinguished by measurements of the outer surface temperature of the bag wall. This was considered to indicate that the material of the wall is an efficient isolator for infrared radiation i.e. heat radiation.

A Kraft paper layer of more than 140 grams per square metre may be advantageous for certain uses of the carrier bag, but the embodiment of the grocery carrier bag intended for use in grocery stores, allowing end user customers to pack their groceries into the bag, will preferably have a Kraft paper layer of 140 grams per square metre, or less than 140 grams per square metre. This is because the Kraft paper layer of more than 140 grams per square metre may be experienced to be a bit too stiff, whereas a Kraft paper layer of 140 grams per square metre or less than 140 grams per square metre will be more flexible, and thus more convenient to handle. Figure 15 is an illustration of Kraft Pulp Fibres. According to an embodiment the kraft paper layer may comprise a plurality of Kraft Pulp Fibres 270 which are arranged one above the other so as to form plural air gaps within the kraft paper layer. According to one embodiment the kraft paper layer comprises a plurality of Kraft Pulp Fibres which are arranged one above the other so as to form plural air gaps within the kraft paper layer, and at least some of the Kraft Pulp Fibres have a length in the range between 1 and 3 mm and/or a width in the range between 10 and 50 micrometer. At at least some of the plural air gaps have a volume exceeding 200 000 cubic micrometers according to that embodiment.

According to an embodiment the substantially water vapour impermeable membrane is bonded to the side of the kraft paper layer facing the outside of the bag. This solution advantageously allows user to place bag on ground even when its rainy and wet without causing deteriorated strength of the bag, since the water vapour impermeable membrane may prevent or minimize the absorption, by the kraft paper, of any water deposited on the exterior surface of the bag.

Closability of Container Opening

Figure 16 is an illustration of an embodiment of the first elongated closure element 240A, and the second elongated closure element 240B. The first elongated closure element 240 A, and the second elongated closure element 240B are adapted to mate with each other in the closed state. According to an embodiment the first elongated closure element 240A comprises an elongated cavity having lips forming a slit along its length, so as to enable a mating protrusion to enter the slit between the lips. The lips of the elongated cavity may be compliant so as to close around the protrusion so as to hold once it has entered into the cavity. According to an embodiment the first elongated closure element 240A comprises at least two elongated cavities provided in parallel so as to receive at least two corresponding elongated protrusions of the second elongated closure element 240B which are provided in parallel. According to an embodiment an elongated cavity of the first elongated closure element 240A forms an elongated tubular hollow which is adapted to receive the protrusion of the second elongated closure element 240B. Figure 17A is a perspective view of a part of the closure device 240 shown in figure 14. Figure 17B is a side view of the closure device 240.

A movable pressure device 280, also referred to as "runner" 280, may be provided, according to an embodiment, for the purpose of forcing the protrusion of the second elongated closure element 240B to enter into the elongated cavity of the first elongated closure element 240A. This solution provides for an advantegeosly simple handling of the bag 20. In particular, a customer, having loaded chilled groceries into the bag 20, may easily close the bag by simply sliding the movable pressure device 280 from one edge 290 to the other edge 300 (see Figure 14 in conjunction with Figure 8 or 7) . In this manner, the customer may easily close and substantially seal the interior storage space from the environment so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space

In this connection it is noted that the grocery bag 20 exhibits an ability to maintain the frozen state of initially frozen groceries during a remarkably long time, thereby maintaining the initial quality and/or flavour of the frozen food stored in the bag.

With reference to Figures 1, 7 and 8 a customer 60 may easily close the carrier bag 20, e.g. by sliding the "runner" or slider 280, thereby achieving a closed and sealed state 20C of the carrier bag, as shown in Figure 9. With reference to Figure 1 the customer 60 may then carry the bag 20 by lifting the handles 170 and thus bring the frozen or chilled groceries to a destination 330, such as e.g. a freezer 310 or fridge 320 in the customer's home.

Figure 18 is an illustration of an embodiment of an insulator device. The insulator device may be arranged and positioned on at least a portion of the bottom panel in the interior storage space 100 of the bag 20 so as to reduce heat transfer through the bottom panel. According to an embodiment the insulator device comprises a piece of material being shaped and adapted to provide cellular air cushions so as to reduce heat transfer through said bottom panel.

According to an embodiment the insulator device comprises paper and a substantially water vapour impermeable material. This solution advantageously enables the insulator device to withstand a damp or wet environment without absorbing water. According to an

embodiment the substantially water vapour impermeable material of the insulator device comprises at least one layer of a polymer material. According to another embodiment the insulator device comprises at least one layer of a plastic material. This solution advantageously enables the insulator device to withstand a damp or wet environment without absorbing water. According to an embodiment the insulator device comprises BubbleWrap®. Figure 19 is an elevational view of an embodiment of the expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in an open expanded state 20B, placed next to an embodiment of a collapsible grocery inner chill bag 400.

The collapsible grocery inner chill bag 400 is suitable for use inside of the carrier bag 20. In likeness to the grocery carrier bag 20, the inner chill bag 400 may have:

a collapsed state 20A for enabling transportation of the inner chill bag in a substantially flat state, and

an expanded state such that the inner chill bag, in its expanded state, provides a second interior storage space 410 for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages. The inner chill bag 400 may comprise:

inner walls and an inner bottom cooperating to form said second interior storage space; wherein a second rim portion of the inner walls facing away from the inner bottom provides an inner bag opening 420. The inner chill bag 400 may have an open expanded state for loading and/or unloading grocery packages to be transported, and

a closed expanded state such that the inner chill bag, in its closed expanded state, provides a substantially closed second interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages. The inner bag opening 420 may be closable opening which, in the closed expanded state of the inner chill bag cooperates with said inner walls and said inner bottom so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the second interior storage space.

According to an embodiment the collapsible grocery inner chill bag 400, in its expanded state, is shaped and dimensioned to fit inside of the carrier bag 20.

Figure 20 is an elevational view of an embodiment of a handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package 450. The chill bag package 450 illustrated in figure 20 includes an expanded grocery carrier bag 20 in the closed expanded state 20C, and the collapsible grocery inner chill bag 400, in its expanded state; the inner chill bag 400 being shaped and dimensioned to fit inside of the carrier bag 20.

An embodiment of the handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package 450 may thus comprise a collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag 20 and a collapsible grocery inner chill bag 400. Hence, the handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package, in use, may include include the collapsible grocery inner chill bag 400 in its closed expanded state; and the collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag 20 in its closed expanded state, wherein the collapsible grocery inner chill bag is placed in the interior storage space 100 of the collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag 20. This solution advantageously enables the packing of frozen grocery packages in the second interior storage space 410. This solution therefore enjoys a high thermal resistance from a frozen grocery package in the second interior storage space to the environment outside of the outer handle-carryable grocery carrier bag, since any air inside of the first interior storage space 100 functions as insulation between the second interior storage space and the environment outside of the outer handle-carryable grocery carrier bag. Additionally, there are double barriers for minimizing or preventing entry of air from the environment outside of the outer handle-carryable grocery carrier bag into the second interior storage space when both of the bags are in their closed expanded states, since the second interior storage space is sealed by the closed inner bag as well as by the closed outer bag. As mentioned above, the interior of the bag 20, when in use, may be initially chilled by the low temperature of frozen or chilled grocery packages which are placed in the interior storage space 100. Although this is sufficient for maintaining the frozen or chilled state of frozen or chilled grocery packages for an extended period of time, the inventor realized that this time period may be further extended.

According to an embodiment, there is provided a means 460 for cooling the interior of the bag 20 so as to enable a further extended period of time during which the frozen or chilled state of frozen or chilled grocery packages is maintained.

According to an embodiment the handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package 450 may, in use, further comprise a means 460 for cooling the interior 100 of the bag 20 and/or for cooling the second interior storage space 410.

According to an embodiment of the means 460 for cooling the interior of the bag, there is provided a cooling agent. A piece of dry ice is an embodiment of such a cooling agent. Dry ice is the solid form of carbon dioxide. The chemical formula of carbon dioxide is C02. Thus a carbon dioxide molecule comprises two oxygen atoms bonded to a single carbon atom. It is colourless, non-flammable, and slightly acidic. Carbon dioxide can change from a solid to a gas with no intervening liquid form, through a process called sublimation. The opposite process is called deposition, where C02 changes from the gas to solid phase (dry ice). At earth atmospheric pressure, sublimation/deposition occurs at -78.5 °C. Its enthalpy of sublimation is 571 kJ/kg (25.2 kJ/mol).

The density of dry ice varies, but usually ranges between about 1.4 and 1.6 g/cm3. The low temperature and direct sublimation to a gas makes dry ice an effective coolant, since it is colder than water ice and leaves no residue as it changes state.

According to an embodiment of the Dry Ice cooling agent, there is provided pellets of dry ice, the size of the pellets being suitable for placing in the interior storage space 100 of the bag 20, when the bag 20 is in use as a chill bag. Thus, as the dry ice pellets gradually change from a solid form to gaseous carbon dioxide with no intervening liquid form

(sublimation) there is a corresponding energy consumption of 571 kJ/kg which causes a decrease of the temperature of any food packages surrounding the dry ice pellets. The dry ice may be provided in a piece of a suitable size, dependent on the amount of refrigeration desired. According to an embodiment, a single piece of dry ice may comprise one kilogram of dry ice. According to another embodiment, a single piece of dry ice may comprise e.g. 10 grams of dry ice. According to yet another embodiment, a single piece of dry ice may comprise e.g. 100 grams of dry ice. Such relatively small pieces of dry ice may be referred to as dry ice pellets. One or several dry ice pellets may be used simultaneously in the interior storage space 100 of the chill bag 20, dependent on duration of the period of time it is desired to keep the interior storage space 100 at freezing temperatures.

According to another embodiment of the means for cooling the interior of the bag, there is provided a pressurized container holding a gas.

According to an embodiment, the container may hold pressurized air. According to another embodiment the container may hold pressurized carbon dioxide gas. The container may be embodied by a cylinder. Thus, the cooling means may comprise a cylinder in which carbon dioxide gas is stored under pressure. The pressurized cylinder may be provided with a valve. According to an embodiment, the valve of the pressurized cylinder is adjustably settable between a completely closed state and a state in which the valve allows pressurized carbon dioxide gas to flow out from the pressurized cylinder.

According to a preferred embodiment the valve is settable to a predetermined amount of openness, so as to attain a suitable amount of cooling effect.

According to an embodiment, a user may take a pressurized cylinder having a closed valve, and the user may set the valve to the predetermined amount of openness so as to activate the pressurized cylinder cooling means. The activated pressurized cylinder cooling means is placed in the interior storage space 100 of the chill bag 20, together with frozen or chilled grocery packages.

As the carbon dioxide gas, or air, exits from the pressurized cylinder and enters the comparatively much lower pressure (earth atmospheric pressure) in the interior storage space 100 of the chill bag 20 there is a corresponding drop in the temperature of the exiting gas, thus causing a cooling effect. Additionally, the carbon dioxide, or air, slowly seeping out of the pressurized cylinder may cause a slight increase in the pressure of the air inside of the chill bag 20. This slight increase in the pressure of the air inside of the chill bag 20 may advantageously further minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space 100 of the chill bag 20. According to an embodiment of the bag 20, there is provided a valve in one of the walls of the bag 20 so as to prevent any build-up of any significant pressure in the bag 20. The valve may be a check valve adapted to allow passage of air only in the direction from the interior storage space 100 of the chill bag 20 to the surrounding environment.

Hence, the cylinder containing pressurized carbon dioxide gas may interact with the chill bag 20 such that when a grocery package comprising frozen food is transported in said interior storage space the grocery bag is adapted to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space (100) by providing a controlled flow of gaseous carbon dioxide from the interior storage space to the environment. This solution may advantageously further minimize or prevent the occurrence of condensation within the interior storage space (100).

According to an embodiment, cylinder containing pressurized carbon dioxide may be kept in a freezer at a temperature of about - 18 °C (degrees Centigrade). The carbon dioxide pressure in the pressurized cylinder may then be about 18 bar. In this manner, the low initial temperature pressurized cylinder will also contribute to maintaining a frozen or chilled state of any grocery package comprising frozen food being transported in the interior storage space 100 of the chill bag 20. According to an embodiment, the pressurized carbon dioxide cylinder may contain e.g. 2 kg of carbon dioxide at 0,75 kg of carbon dioxide per litre of cylinder volume. According to another embodiment, the pressurized carbon dioxide cylinder may contain carbon dioxide at 0,67 kg of carbon dioxide per litre of cylinder volume. According to an embodiment the pressurized carbon dioxide cylinder may contain less than 0,5 kg of carbon dioxide at a filling level of less than 0,75 kg of carbon dioxide per litre of cylinder volume. According to an embodiment the pressurized carbon dioxide cylinder may initially contain less than 0,5 kg of carbon dioxide at a filling level of less than 0,67 kg of carbon dioxide per litre of cylinder volume. One or several pressurized carbon dioxide cylinders may be used simultaneously in the interior storage space 100 of the chill bag 20, dependent on duration of the period of time it is desired to keep the interior storage space 100 at freezing temperatures.

According to yet another embodiment of the means for cooling the interior of the bag, there is provided an ice pack for retaining a frozen temperature for an extended period of time. According to an embodiment of the cooling means, the ice pack may comprise a sachet containing a gel that can be frozen and that retains a frozen temperature for an extended period of time. According to an embodiment, an ice pack may comprise a sachet made of PE material, and the gel filled sachet may have a weight of about 100 grams (0,1 kg). One or several ice packs may be used simultaneously in the interior storage space 100 of the chill bag 20, dependent on duration of the period of time it is desired to keep the interior storage space 100 at freezing temperatures. A Container Production Method

Figure 30a shows a flowchart of a method 1300 for providing a carrier bag. The method 1300 starts with step 1301. In step 1301 a carrier bag is provided, wherein said carrier bag has a carrier bag enclosure formed by a front wall panel SI A, a back wall panel SIB, two mutually opposing side wall panels S2A, S2B. Said carrier bag further has a substantially rectangular bottom portion BP. Said wall panels and said bottom portion BP of said carrier bag cooperate to form said enclosure. A portion of said wall panels facing away from said bag bottom comprises a closable enclosure opening. After step 1301 the method 1300 ends. Figure 30b shows a flowchart of a method 1302 for providing a carrier bag. The method 1302 starts with step 1303. In step 1303 a collapsible carrier bag is provided, wherein said collapsible carrier bag has a collapsed state for enabling transportation of the carrier bag in a substantially flat state, and an expanded state for transporting food items in a carrier bag enclosure which, in the expanded state of the carrier bag, has a volume larger than 10 litres. Said carrier bag further can have a front wall panel SI A, a back wall panel SIB, two mutually opposing side wall panels S2A, S2B. Said carrier bag further can have a substantially rectangular bottom portion BP. Said wall panels and said bottom portion BP of said carrier bag can cooperate to form an enclosure. This enclosure can be a carrier bag enclosure. A portion of said wall panels facing away from said bag bottom can comprise a closable enclosure opening.

Figure 31 shows a method 1305 for providing a transport container. Said transport container can be a collapsible carrier bag.

The method 1305 will be illustrated in several examples which can be seen in Fig. 40-49. Fig. 40, 41, and 42 show examples of pre-determined patterns. The pre-determined patterns there can then be formed and folded to provide a bag as will be described in the following. In Fig. 40, 41, and 42 solid lines show the outer borders of the pre-determined patterns and possible cuts in these patterns. In the other figures out of Fig. 40-49, solid lines show the borders of the bag, or the bag-to-be respectively, or parts thereof, as seen from the viewing direction. In the three-dimensional views, solid lines can also show lines where the bag or the bag-to-be has been folded. The dashed lines show possible folding edges in Fig. 40-47. In Fig. 48-49 dashed lines show elements or parts of elements which are covered by another element when seen in the viewing direction. The areas delimitated by dotted lines in Fig. 40-47 show areas which are described in the following. These areas might be delimited by folding edges and/or borders of a sheet or other physical borders. These areas might, however, also be thought areas which do not necessarily have physical borders, as can for example be seen by the horizontal lines of the triangles 4030a, 4030b, 4030c, 403 Od in Fig. 40. It should be understood that the dotted lines delimitating these areas are basically always drawn slightly outside the areas which they should delimit in the figures. This is to make the dotted lines visible in the figures, as they otherwise often might be covered by solid lines and/or dashed lines.

The half dashed lines in Fig. 40a-40n show some lines along which the bag or the bag-to-be has been folded and which are covered by other elements when seen in the viewing direction. All figures out of Fig. 40-49 are front view, except Fig. 40f, 40h, 40j, 401, and 40n which are elavated views of the bag, or the bag-to-be and thus provide a three- dimensional view. Fig. 44 is another example and shows a side view in the viewing direction D of Fig. 43. The side view is, however, of a different state of the part of the bag which is shown in Fig. 43. This will be explained in more detail later on.

Fig. 40a-n show possible steps of how the pre-determined pattern from Fig. 40 can be formed and folded to arrive at a bag. The bag can be a flattened bag according to the invention. The figures are in a possible chronological order, where the elevated views correspond to the front views above them. Fig. 40n is an alternative to what is shown in Fig. 40f. One of the big differences between Fig. 40 and Fig. 41 are said triangles 4030a, 4030b, 4030c, 403 Od which are not present in Fig. 41. The pattern in Fig. 41 could, however be formed and folded in a corresponding way as is shown in Fig. 40a-40m when one would remove the triangles from these figures. Since the triangles are well visible in Fig. 40a-40m and it would be clear how to fold the pattern when it does not have triangles, an explicit sketch of the folding procedure of Fig. 41 is omitted.

In Fig. 40a-40n, only examples of the most important folding edges for the current steps of the method 1305 are shown for not overloading the figures. These shown folding edges correspond preferably to the folding edges in Fig. 40. The dashed arrows indicate the directions towards which areas along the shown folding edges can be folded in preferred examples. Straight solid arrows without reference numbers show directions in which the bag or the bag-to-be can be pulled or pushed, depending on the direction of the arrows. When looking at Fig. 40 or Fig. 41, the area which is delimitated by the uppermost horizontal solid line and by the folding edges F3a, F3c, and F4a can at the end of method 1305 form the front panel S 1A of the bag. The area which is delimitated by the lowermost horizontal solid lines and the folding edges F3b, F3d, and F4b can at the end of method 1305 form the back panel SIB of the bag. The two areas which are delimitated by the folding edges F6 on the left side of the figure, F3a, F4a, and by the uppermost horizontal line, respectively by the folding edges F6 on the left side of the figure, F3b, F4b, and by the lowermost horizontal line can at the end of method 1305 form one side panel S2A of the bag. The two areas which are delimitated by the folding edges F6 on the right side of the figure, F3c, F4a, and by the uppermost horizontal line, respectively by the folding edges F6 on the right side of the figure, F3d, F4b, and by the lowermost horizontal line can at the end of method 1305 form another side panel S2B of the bag. The bottom portion BP can at the end of method 1305 be formed by the area which is delimitated by the folding edges F4a, F4b, and the two vertical folding lines of which the folding edges F3a and F3b, and F3c and F3d, respectively, are part of.

In Fig. 42 the front panel S I A, the back panel S IB, and the side panels S2A, S2B can at the end of the method 1305 be delimitated on one side by the folding edge F4' and on another side by the leftmost solid vertical line in the figure. The front panel S I A can further be delimitated by the folding edge F3a and by the uppermost solid horizontal line of the figure. The back panel S IB can further be delimitated by the folding edges F3b and F3c. One side panel S2A can further be delimitated by the folding edges F3a and F3b. Another side panel S2B can further be delimitated by the folding edges F3c and F3d. The area delimitated by the folding edge F4', by the leftmost solid vertical line, by the uppermost horizontal line, and by the lowermost horizontal line can be part of the bottom portion BP of the bag. The outer portions of the bottom portion can at the end of method 1305 preferably be

constituted by the folding edge F4' . In one example the bottom portion BP will at the end of method 1305 have a substantially rectangular shape with the four sides of the rectangular shape being constituted by the section of F4' between the uppermost horizontal solid line and folding edge F3a, by folding edge F3a and folding edge F3b, by folding edge F3b and folding edge F3c, and by folding edge F3c and folding edge F3d, respectively.

The method 1305 starts with step 1310.

In step 1310 a sheet is provided. The provided sheet may be a substantially planar sheet of a multilayer material. Said substantially planar sheet has a first sheet surface and a second sheet surface on opposite sides of the substantially planar sheet. The multilayer material comprises preferably a layer of kraft paper having a substantially water vapour

impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer. The method 1305 continues with step 1320.

In step 1320, said sheet is cut. The cut is done according to a pre-determined pattern so that a resulting planar sheet has at least two edges. Some examples of pre-determined patterns are given in Fig. 40-42.

In one example, the pre-determined pattern is substantially rectangular 4210. An example is shown in Fig. 42. In one example, the pre-determined pattern comprises a substantially rectangular base pattern 4010, 4110, further comprising at least one protrusion 4020, 4120 at or close to at least one of the corners of the rectangular base pattern. In one example said at least one protrusion 4020, 4120 is at least two protrusions 4020a, 4020c; 4020a, 4020b; 4120a, 4120c; 4120a, 4120b; ... In one example said at least one protrusion 4020, 4120 is at least four protrusions 4020a, 4020b, 4020c, 4020d; 4120a, 4120b, 4120c, 4120d. In one example two protrusions are at or close to two corners of the rectangular base pattern 4010, 4110. In one example four protrusions are at or close to the four corners of the rectangular base pattern 4010, 4110. In one example said at least one protrusion 4020, 4120 comprises at least one protrusion having a substantially rectangular form, for example two protrusions 4020a, 4020c; 4020a, 4020b; 4120a, 4120c; 4120a, 4120b; ... or four protrusions 4020a, 4020b, 4020c, 4020d; 4120a, 4120b, 4120c, 4120d having a substantially rectangular form. A shorter side of said protrusions 4020, 4120 is preferably oriented parallel or at least substantially parallel to a long side of the substantially rectangular base pattern 4020, 4120. As a result the long sides of said protrusions 4020, 4120 are preferably parallel or at least substantially parallel to a short side of the substantially rectangular base pattern 4020, 4120. The long sides of the protrusions 4020, 4120 are preferably much longer than the short sides of the protrusions 4020, 4120. This is in one example for enabling forming a handle of the protrusions 4020, 4120, as will be described later on in more details. In one example the long sides are at least twice, thrice, four times, six times, or eight times as long as the short sides. An example is shown in Fig. 41. Examples of short sides in Fig. 40 and Fig. 41 are W4020b and W4120b. Examples of long sides in Fig. 40 and Fig. 41 are L4020b and

L4120b. It should be understood that also the other protrusions 4020, 4120 in these figures have corresponding long and short sides, which are however, not especially denoted in the figures for not overloading them. Even other shapes of protrusions or base patterns are possible. In one example the protrusion has the shape of a rectangle 4020 with an attached triangle 4030. In one example one side of the triangle attaches the longer side of the rectangle and another side of the triangle attaches the longer side of the base pattern. An example can be seen in Fig. 40. Such a pattern would allow a more convenient opening of the bag when in use. This can be seen in Fig. 40n, where such a bag has a larger opening on the top compared to the size of the bottom. This might make it especially easy to put products in the bag. It has also the advantage that the protrusion attaches to a side panel S2A, S2B, or another part of the bag- to-be, along a longer line than without a triangle. This might distribute lifting forces better between handle/and or closure and the bag and thus increase the stability of the bag.

In one example the shape of a substantially rectangular base pattern extends on its shorter sides into a bottle-like shape, i.e. a shape which narrows, and thus has a diameter which is shorter than the short side of the substantially rectangular base pattern, and then extends again. After extending again it can have a diameter which is longer than the short side of the substantially rectangular base pattern.

In one example the pre-determined pattern comprises at least one or two openings 4510. This at least one or two openings 4510 have preferably such a size that the four fingers of a human hand, preferably of a grown-up person, easily can get through at least one or two of these openings. The openings 4510 are then intended to provide the handle 4520, 4530 when the carrier bag is used.

In one example the pre-determined shape comprises two additional rectangular or substantially rectangular shapes 4040.1, 4040.2; 4140.1, 4140.2 which are attached to the substantially rectangular base pattern 4010, 41 10. The two additional rectangular shapes 4040.1, 4040.2; 4140.1, 4140.2 preferably have long sides 4040.1L, 4040.2L; 4140.1L, 4140.2L which are equal or less than half of a long side of the rectangular base pattern

4010, 41 10. The two additional rectangular shapes 4040.1, 4040.2; 4140.1, 4140.2 are preferably oriented in such a way that one of their long sides 4040.1L, 4040.2L; 4140.1L, 4140.2L attaches to one of the long sides 4010a, 4010b; 4010c, 4010d; 41 10a, 41 10b; 41 10c, 41 lOd of the rectangular base pattern 4010, 41 10 each. The two additional rectangular shapes 4040.1, 4040.2; 4140.1, 4140.2 are preferably also situated in such a way that at least half 4010b, 4010d, 41 10b, 41 lOd of each long side 4010a, 4010b; 4010c, 4010d; 41 10a, 41 10b; 41 10c, 41 lOd of the rectangular base pattern 4010, 41 10 is not covered by the two additional rectangular shapes 4040.1, 4040.2; 4140.1, 4140.2. The not- covered half 4010b, 4010d, 4110b, 41 lOd of each long side of the rectangular base pattern 4010, 4110 is preferably connected and thus not intercepted by one of the two additional rectangular shapes 4040.1, 4040.2; 4140.1, 4140.2.

The pre-determined pattern is preferably arranged in such a way that an overlap 4050, 4150, 4250 will be provided in step 1340. This overlap 4050, 4150, 4250 will be constituted by a first overlap area 4050a, 4050c, 4050e, 4050g; 4150a, 4150c; 4250a and a second overlap area 4050b, 4050d, 4050f, 4050h; 4150b, 4150d; 4250b. The first overlap area 4050a, 4050c, 4050e, 4050g; 4150a, 4150c; 4250a is preferably on the first sheet surface and the second overlap area 4050b, 4050d, 4050f, 4050h; 4150b, 4150d; 4250b preferably on the second sheet surface. The first and the second overlap area are preferably equal in size. One example of how an overlap will be provided is given in step 1330. In another example, said two additional rectangular shapes 4040.1, 4040.2; 4140.1, 4140.2 are one part of the overlap which is referred to in step 1340. The first sheet surface parts of the two additional rectangular shapes 4040.1, 4040.2; 4140.1, 4140.2 are, for example, a first overlap area 4050a, 4050c; 4150a, 4150c.

After step 1320 an optional step 1331 and/or an optional step 1330 is performed.

In step 1330 said sheet is formed or folded into a substantially tubular shape. The tubular shape is preferably such that the at least two edges overlap so as to allow a first overlap area 4250b of the first sheet surface to meet a second overlap area 4250a of the second sheet surface. The first sheet surface forms then an interior surface of the-bag-to-be. It should be understood that in another example the reference 4250a could denote the first overlap area and the reference 4250b the second overlap area. Performing a forming or folding into a tubular shape can give the advantage that only one first overlap area 4250b and only one second overlap area 4250a are needed, thus only requiring a small number of production steps when these areas are attached to each other.

In step 1331 said sheet is folded. In one example said folding is performed in such a way that substantial parts of the base pattern overlap each other. In one example, at least 60% of the area of the base pattern overlaps each other. In one example, the amount of the area of the base pattern which overlaps each other is at least 70%, at least 80%, at least 90%, or at least 95%. In case the pre-determined shape is substantially rectangular 4210 or has a substantially rectangular base pattern 4010, 4110, the sheet is preferably folded along a line Fl which is parallel or at least substantially parallel to the short sides of the rectangular shape 4010, 4110, 4210. Said line Fl is preferably equidistant or at least substantially equidistant from the short sides of said rectangular shape 4010, 4110, 4210. In one example the folding is performed in such a way that approximately half of the rectangular base pattern 4010, 4110 covers the other half of the rectangular base pattern 4010, 4110. The folding is preferably done in such a way that a part of the first sheet surface faces to another part of the first sheet surface. An example of the result of such a folding is given in Fig. 40a and Fig. 40b.

The step of folding can also comprise providing folding edges on the base pattern 4010, 4110. In one example, when the pre-determined pattern comprises said two additional rectangular shapes 4040.1, 4040.2; 4140.1, 4140.2, folding edges F2 are provided basically where these two additional rectangular shapes 4040.1, 4040.2; 4140.1, 4140.2 attach to the rectangular base pattern 4010, 4110. Further examples of folding edges which can be provided are described in relation to step 1350 or to step 1360. It should be understood that the kind of folding edges being described there easily could be provided already in step 1331.

After the optional steps 1330 and/or 1331 the step 1340 is performed.

In step 1340 the first overlap area 4050a, 4050c, 4050e, 4050g; 4150a, 4150c; 4250a is attached to the second overlap area 4050b, 4050d, 4050f, 4050h; 4150b, 4150d; 4250b. An example is shown in Fig. 40b. In case the pre-determined base pattern comprises said two additional rectangular shapes 4040.1, 4040.2; 4140.1, 4140.2, the second overlap area 4050b, 4050d, 4050f, 4050h; 4150b, 4150d; 4250b can be constituted a part of the second sheet surface of the rectangular base pattern 4010, 4110, which part has approximately the same shape as said two additional rectangular shapes 4040.1, 4040.2; 4140.1, 4140.2. Said part is preferably constituted by the part of the rectangular base shape 4010, 4110 which can be achieved when mirroring said two additional rectangular shapes 4040.1, 4040.2; 4140.1, 4140.2 at the long sides 4040.1L, 4040.2L; 4140.1L, 4140.2L of the rectangular base pattern 4010, 4110 and on said line Fl in step 1331. However, many other possibilities are possible of what can be the first and the second overlap area. The attaching is in one example done by gluing. In one example the attaching is done by melt-bonding.

In one example, parts or the whole of the protrusions 4020a, 4020b, 4020c, 4020d; 4120a, 4120b, 4120c, 4120d are attached on overlap areas. In one example, some of the protrusions, for example 4020a, 4020b; 4120a, 4120b have a different length than the other protrusions, for example 4020c, 4020d; 4120c, 4120d. The protrusions with the longer length can then provide a first overlap area and the protrusions with the shorter length can then provide a second overlap area. The first overlap area corresponds in one example to the area formed by the length difference between the protrusions with the longer and the shorter length. The second overlap area can in this example correspond to an area of corresponding size at the protrusions with the shorter length. This is described in more detail in relation to 43.

After step 1340 the method continues with step 1350.

In step 1350 the sheet is formed or folded so as to form outer surfaces of the transport container. Said outer surfaces are in one example a front panel SI A, a back panel SIB, and two mutually opposing side panels S2A, S2B of the-bag-to be. An example is shown in Fig. 40c-40f. It should be understood that folding edges corresponding to those in Fig. 40c and Fig. 40d are present on the other side of the bag-to-be. These corresponding folding edges are shown in Fig. 40. The corresponding edges are preferably folded as well, as is indicated by the dashed arrows in Fig. 40c and Fig. 40d which indicate preferably different folding directions for the folding edges shown in the figures and the corresponding folding edges on the other side of the bag-to-be. Fig. 40n is an alternative example of how Fig. 40f could look like. In Fig. 40f, for example, the protrusions could have been directly attached to each other, for example for providing a very stable connection between protrusions and the side panels of the bag. In Fig. 40n the triangular protrusions are not attached to each other, except via the previous described overlap areas. This allows a greater opening of the bag. The outer parts of the protrusion which have a substantially rectangular shape might well be attached to each other also in Fig. 40n. Similar alternatives as between Fig. 40f and Fig. 40n could easily be presented for Fig. 40h, 40j, and 401, but are not shown here since the difference in shape of the bag would correspond to the difference in shape of the bag between Fig. 40f and Fig. 40n. In one example the forming or folding of the sheet is done in such a way that a substantially cuboid-like base-form is achieved. In one example this is done in such a way that a substantially parallelepiped-like base-form is achieved. The surface area of the parallelepiped-like base-form comprises preferably four substantially rectangular areas. These four substantially rectangular areas are on four different sides of the parallelepiped-like base-form. In the following we will refer to the parallelepiped-like base-form as the cuboid is a special form of it.

The front panel S1A and the back panel SIB of the bag-to-be are preferably two mutually opposing sides of the parallelepiped. The two mutually opposing side panels S2A, S2B of the-bag-to be are preferably two mutually opposing sides of the parallelepiped. In one example the front panels S1A, the back panel SIB, and the two mutually opposing side panels S2A, S2B have substantially rectangular shapes. One side of each side panel S2A, S2B attaches to a side of the front panel SI A and one side of each side panel S2A, S2B attaches to a side of the back panel SIB. Preferably, the attaching sides between the side panels S2A, S2B and the front panel SI A and the back panel SIB comprise folding edges F3, for example folding edges F3a, F3b, F3c, and F3d.

In one example a mid-fold F6 is provided in each of the side panels S2A, S2B. The mid- fold F6 of a side panel runs in one example in a direction substantially parallel to a fold where that side panel S2A, S2B connects with the front panel SI A, for example fold F3. In one example the mid-folds F6 are provided at a later step, for example at step 1370.

In one example no bottom and no closure are provided yet. Thus two opposing sides of the parallelepiped-like base-form are in one example not covered by the sheet in step 1350. In another example, especially if a folding along said line Fl in step 1330 was performed, only one side of the parallelepiped-like base-form is not covered by the sheet in step 1350. In that case the sheet is folded along a folding edge F4 which is substantially parallel to said line Fl in step 1330. This folding edge F4 is on all four panels of the bag to be. Although the folding edge F4 usually will be continuous or close to continuous when the providing of the bag is finished, the folding edge F4 might not be continuous at this point yet. Thus, the folding edge F4 does in one example comprise two folding edges F4a and F4b. The folding is preferably in such a way that the folding is towards the first sheet surface at the front panel S1A and the back panel SIB. The folding is preferably in such a way that the folding is towards the second sheet surface along the side panels S2A, S2B. After that folding, a bottom panel will be provided in addition to the other four panels SI A, SIB, S2A and S2B. For achieving that, preferably four additional folding edges F5, for example F5a, F5b, F5c, and F5d, are provided. These four additional folding edges F5 are preferably towards the first sheet surface. These four additional folding edges preferably start from the points where the folding edge F4 intercepts the folding edges F3 and end at an end point of the line Fl . The end point of line Fl is preferably the end point which is closest to the start of the respective folding edge F4.

The method can continue with the optional step 1360.

In step 1360 a bottom is created. An example is given in Fig. 40e - Fig. 40j . The creation of the bottom is done in by forming or folding the multilayer sheet so as to create a bottom portion BP of the bag-to-be. The bottom portion BP connects the panels SI A, SIB, S2A, and S2B. Thereby a semi-manufactured bag is obtained, which in an expanded state exhibits four wall panels, a bag bottom panel and a bag opening. The bag opening is preferably formed by an opening rim of the four wall panels facing away from the bag bottom. If, for example, a transport container according to Fig. 34a+b is provided, a creation of the bottom might not be necessary.

In one example, the forming of the bag bottom comprises folding the sheet along a folding edge F4', F4 which is substantially perpendicular to the folding edges F3. In one example, at least some of the folding described here, is already performed at an earlier step, for example at step 1330. This could, for example, be a folding along the folding edge F4. In one example the folding along the folding edge F4' is towards the first sheet surface. Further, additional four folding edges F5', for example F5a', F5b', F5c', and F5c' are provided. These four addition folding edges F5' preferably start at the interception of the folding edge F4' with the folding edges F3. These four additional folding edges F5' preferably enclose an angle of substantially 45 degrees to the folding edge F4' . These four folding edges are situated on the bottom portion BP.

In one example, after folding along the four folding edges F5, F5', overlapping areas due to that folding are attached, for example via bonding or gluing.

In one example, the distance between the folding edge F4' and a bottom edge of the sheet is larger than the length of the folding edge F4' on the side panels S2A, S2B. By that it is assured that there will be overlapping portions of the parts of the sheets which attach to the front panel SI A and the back panel SIB and which are folded along the folding line F4' . These overlapping portions are preferably attached, for example via bonding or gluing. In one example, in case a folding along the folding edge F4 has been previously performed towards the second sheet surface, this folding is now performed in the reverse direction. After that a substantially rectangular bottom portion BP is achieved. Overlapping portions due to the folding in the reverse direction are in one example attached, for example via bonding or gluing.

Creating a bottom of a pre-determined pattern like in Fig. 40 or in Fig. 41 has the advantage that there will be no gap at the bottom of the bag. As can be seen from these figures, the bottom portion BP comprises a connected substantially rectangular part of the sheet which covers the whole bottom portion BP. This is in contrast to the bottom portion from a predetermined pattern like in Fig. 42, where one first has to overlap some parts of the predetermined pattern to cover the whole bottom portion. An advantage of having no gap in the bottom portion is that no way is provided for moisture from the ground to enter the space of the bag through the bottom portion BP. Further, an air exchange will be prevented as well. In one example, creating the bottom area comprises adding additional elements to the bag to be. This additional element can for example be an insulator device. The insulator device can comprise a piece of material being shaped and adapted to provide cellular air cushions so as to reduce heat transfer through said bottom panel BP. According to an embodiment, the insulator device comprises paper and a substantially water vapour impermeable material. In one embodiment the substantially water vapour impermeable material of the insulator device comprises at least one layer of a polymer material. The insulator device can, for example, be put in the bag through the bag opening. The insulator device can have substantially the same from and size as the bottom panel BP. In such a way it can cover the whole bottom panel BP after inserting it. This could make the bag and/or the insulator device to withstand a damp or wet environment without absorbing water. The insulator device can be attached to the bottom panel BP from the inside of the bag. The insulator device can also be put loosely on the bottom panel BP from the inside of the bag. The insulator device can also be attached to the bottom panel BP from the outside of the bag.

The method continues with step 1370.

In step 1370 the semi-manufactured bag is collapsed. An example is given in Fig. 40k-m. This collapsing is done by folding along a folding edge where the front panel SI A connects with the bottom panel, for example along folding edge F4. In case not being provided before, a mid-fold F6 in each of the side panels S2A, S2B can be provided, the mid-fold F6 of a side panel running in a direction substantially parallel to a fold where that side panel S2A, S2B connects with the front panel, for example F3.

In one example the collapsing step is performed such that a side panel mid-fold F6 is bent outwardly so as to cause a foremost interior surface portion of that side panel to face a backmost secondary interior surface portion of that side panel. In another example the collapsing step is performed in such a way that a side panel mid-fold F6 is bent inwardly so as to cause one interior surface of each side portion to face an interior surface of the front panel, and to cause another interior surface of each side portion to face an interior surface of the back panel.

In a preferred example, two or four collapsing folding edges F7, F7', for F7a and F7b, or F7a', F7b', F7c', and F7d' are provided in step 1370 or a previous step such as step 1331, step 1350, or step 1360. These collapsing folding edges start preferably at the interceptions between the folding edge F4, F4' and the folding edges F3. If only two collapsing folding edges F7 are provided, these two collapsing folding edges F7 preferably start either both at said interceptions at the front panel, or at said interceptions at the back panel. Two collapsing folding edges F7 are preferred when the side panel mid-fold F6 is bent outwardly, and four collapsing folding edges F7' are preferred when the side panel mid- fold F6 is bent inwardly.

The collapsing folding edges F7, F7' enclose an angle of substantially 45 degrees with the folding edge F4, F4', and are situated on the side panels S2A, S2B. The collapsing folding edges F7, F7' stop at the interceptions with the side panel mid-fold F6. The bag-to-be is folded along the collapsing folding edges F7, F7' . In one example the folding along the collapsing folding edges F7 is outwardly. In another example, the folding along the collapsing folding edges F7' is inwardly.

Preferably, an additional collapsing folding edge F8, F8' is provided. What has been said before regarding that the collapsing folding edges F7, F7' can be provided at an earlier step applies to the additional collapsing folding edge F8, F8' as well. This additional collapsing folding edge F8, F8' starts at a point where one of the collapsing folding edges F7, F7' stops at a side panel mid-fold F6. The additional collapsing folding edge F8, F8' is substantially parallel to the folding edge F4, F4' and stops at a point where another of the collapsing folding edges F7, F7' stops at the other side panel mid-fold F6. The additional folding edge F8, F8' will thus be situated either on the front panel SI A or on the back panel SIB. When collapsing the bag, the bag is folded along the additional collapsing folding edge F8, F8' . The folding along the additional collapsing folding edge F8 is preferably in such a way that the outer part of the front panel SI A or the back panel SIB on both sides of the additional collapsing folding edge F8, F8' and close to said additional collapsing folding edge F8, F8' face each other. In case the additional folding along the collapsing folding edge F7 is outwardly, the outer part of the side panels S2A, S2B on both sides of the additional collapsing folding edge F8 and close to said additional collapsing folding edge F8 preferably face each other. In case the additional folding along the collapsing folding edge F7' is inwardly, the outer part of the side panels S2A, S2B on both sides of the additional collapsing folding edge F8' and close to said additional collapsing folding edge F8' are preferably turned away from each other.

The method continues with step 1380. It should be understood that the folding edges described so far in relation to method 1305 are not necessarily exhaustive. Instead, possible additional folding edges can easily be provided in the aforementioned steps.

In the optional step 1380 a closure and/or a handle is provided. In one example the provided handle is a handle for allowing a user to carry the transport container. In one example, the handle is associated with the front panel SI A and the back panel SIB. The handle and/or the closure can be part of the provided sheet. In one example, the handle is part of the predetermined pattern which is used in step 1320 for cutting. That pre-determined pattern can for example have openings 4510 as has been described before. An example is given in Fig. 45c, where a handle 4520 is part of the pre-determined pattern. The shown form of the handle 4520 is only an example. Any other form of a handle, for example the handle 4530 in Fig. 45a, could also be used and would thus provide an opening similar to the opening 4510 in Fig, 45c. As an example, when starting with a sheet as shown in Fig. 42, the handle 4520 as shown in any of Fig. 45a-c would be rotated clockwise by 90 degrees and situated on the right side of the shown rectangular sheet, for example in the middle of the right side of the front panel SI A to-be and/or the back panel SIB to be. The handle and/or the closure can also comprise additional elements which are attached to the sheet.

The providing of the handle and/or a closure is quite independent of how the other parts of transport container have been provided. It should thus be understood that everything which is discussed in relation to the handle and/or the closure can be easily interchanged and/or combined between different embodiments and/or examples of transport containers which are described in this disclosure.

Different kinds of providing the handle and/or the closure will soon be described.

The method 1305 preferably ends after the optional step 1380.

Other methods than 1305 are possible as well for providing a transport container.

According to one embodiment, the container 20 may be shaped in such a manner that plural containers 20 can be piled on top of each other in a space conservative manner. An example of such a space saving shape is a cone shaped container. An example is shown in Fig. 34a and Fig. 34b. In Fig. 34a a cone shaped container is shown in its expanded state in an elevated view. In Fig. 34b a cone shaped container is shown in its flat state. In this manner plural cone shaped containers may be stacked by placing one cone container on top of the other such that the space required for storing ten containers is only slightly larger than the space required for storing one cone container. An example is shown in Fig. 35a and Fig. 35b, where three cone shaped containers are stacked in an expanded state and in a substantially flat state, respectively. Fig. 35a and Fig. 35b are only for illustrating the principle. In practice, such containers might be stacked more tightly than in the figures. According to an embodiment the container may be shaped as a truncated cone such that there is provided a substantially flat bottom area inside the truncated cone container, the cone wall leaning outwardly from the bottom area. An example is shown in Fig. 36a and Fig. 36b, where such a container is shown in an elevated view and in a flat view, respectively. In this manner the truncated cone container may also be stacked or piled so that one container fits inside the next substantially identical container, thus enabling transport of a large number of stacked containers within a very small space. This feature of the container advantageously contributes to enable transporting containers 20 in bulk at a low cost.

Fig. 32 shows a flowchart about a method 3200 of providing a handle. The method 3200 is in one example part of step 1380 of method 1305. In one example, the method 3200 is performed several times in step 1380, for example two times. The method 3200 comprises the step 3210.

In step 3210 a handle is provided for the transport container. In one example, the handle is attached to the transport container, for example via gluing or bonding. In the following we will describe providing a handle for a carrier bag. It should be understood, however, that the same applies for other kinds of transport containers. In one example, the handle is attached to the interior side of the carrier bag. This is in one example done by attaching the handle to the first sheet surface. In one example, the handle is attached to the outer side of the carrier bag. This is in one example done by attaching the handle to the second sheet surface. The handle is preferably attached to the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB. It is, however, in principle possible to attach the handle to a side panel S2A, S2B as well. The handle can have a U-shape as comparable to the handle 4530 in Fig. 45a. The handle can have a cornered U-shape as comparable to the handle 4520 in Fig. 45b. Any other shape might work as well. The handle might be thicker than the sheet of the bag for providing more strength. The handle might be of the same material as the sheet. The handle might comprise several layers of the sheet of the bag. These several layers could be provided by folding one layer. When attaching a handle similar to the ones shown in Fig. 45a-b, the two parallel vertical sections are preferably longer than indicated in Fig. 45a-b. Said longer parts of the two parallel sections are then preferably attached to the sheet. In one example an optional step 3220 is performed after step 3210. The additional step is, in one example, preferable when attaching a handle similar to the ones shown in Fig. 45a-b for increasing the robustness of the carrier bag when carried in the handle.

In one example a handle as described in WO 2014/187582 Al is provided. WO

2014/187582 Al is therefore included in total by reference in this disclosure. An example of such a handle is shown in Fig. 46a+b. In this example, a handle 4610 and a support sheet 4620 are preferable complementary in their shape. In a flat state of the carrier, as shown in Fig. 46a, the handle 4610 and the support sheet 4620 are arranged in a flattened state as well. In this flattened state the handle 4610 and the support sheet 4620 are oriented so that the handle 4610 is situated at its complementary part of the support sheet 4620. The thickness of the combination of the handle 4610 and the support sheet 4620 will then equal the thickness of the handle 4610 and/or the support sheet 4620 alone. In step 1310 the support sheet 4620 is in one example attached to the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB. The handle 4610 is attached to the support sheet via a folding edge 4630. Preferably, the handle is not directly attached to the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB. This allows a user to fold up and use the handle when the bag is in an expanded state, as is shown in Fig. 46b.

In one example the provided handle is a string 4710. The string 4710 can, for example, be attached close to the upper side 4060A, 4060B; 4160A, 4160B; 4260A, 4260B; 4660; 4760 of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB. The term upper side relates in one example to the side of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB which is upwards when the bag is in an upright position. The string 4710 can be placed substantially parallel to the upper side 4060 A, 4060B; 4160 A, 4160B; 4260 A, 4260B; 4660; 4760 of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB. The string 4710 can have a length that exceeds the width of the upper side 4060A, 4060B; 4160A, 4160B; 4260A, 4260B; 4660; 4760 of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB. The string 4710 can have a length that exceeds twice the width of the upper side 4060A, 4060B; 4160A, 4160B; 4260A, 4260B; 4660; 4760 of the front panel S1A and/or the back panel SIB. In one example, the string 4710 is arranged to provide a closed loop 4713. This can, for example, be done by providing a knot 4720 between the two ends of the string 4710. The string can then be arranged substantially parallel to the upper side 4060A, 4060B; 4160A, 4160B; 4260A, 4260B; 4660; 4760 of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB, so that the looped string has two portions 4711, 4712 of the string 4710 substantially parallel and preferably close to each other at the upper side 4160A, 4160B; 4260A, 4260B; 4660; 4760 of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB. When the length of the string exceeds twice the width of the upper side 4160A, 4160B; 4260A, 4260B; 4660; 4760 of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB, two loops 4714, 4715 will be provided at each side of the upper side 4160A, 4160B; 4260A, 4260B; 4660; 4760 of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB. The length of the string is preferably so long that said two loops 4714, 4715 can be extended by moving the string which forms said two loops 4714, 4715, so that preferably at least a human hand, or at least the four fingers of a human hand can then grab through said two loops 4714, 4715. In alternative embodiments only one if the loops 4714, 4715 is provided. In one

embodiment the string is attached vertically to the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB. The material of the string is in one example cotton twine. In one example the string comprises plastics.

In one example a handle is provided by protrusions 4020a, 4020b, 4020c, 4020d; 4120a, 4120b, 4120c, 4120d of the pre-determined base pattern. This is described in more detail in relation to Fig 52a-c and Fig. 53a-c. In one example, said protrusions 4020a, 4020b, 4020c, 4020d; 4120a, 4120b, 4120c, 4120d are not part of the pre-determined base pattern. Instead, these protrusions are separate stripes which are attached to the base pattern. This attaching can in principle be done at any stage during method 1305, but is preferably done after step 1320. An advantage of attaching the stripes after the pre-determined base-pattern is cut is that the loss of material due to the cut pattern is minimised. When, for example, looking at Fig. 41, one could cut the basically rectangular base-pattern 4110, maybe in combination with the two additional rectangular shapes 4140.1, 4140.2 out of one sheet of material. One could then cut out the protrusions 4120a, 4120b, 4120c, 4120d separately and attach them to the basically rectangular base-pattern 4110. One could also provide long stripes where the protrusions are the end portions of the stripe. In one example, a stripe goes from the left edge of protrusion 4120a to the right edge of protrusion 4120c. Such a stripe would thus also cover parts of the side portions S2A, S2B and of the front panel SI A when attached to the rectangular base-pattern 4110. The corresponding applies to the protrusions 4120b and 4120d. The attachment can be done of the first sheet surface of the pre-determined base- pattern or on the second sheet surface of the pre-determined base-pattern. When discussing in relation to Fig. 52a-c and Fig. 53a-c how a handle can be provided by the protrusions 4020a, 4020b, 4020c, 4020d; 4120a, 4120b, 4120c, 4120d it should thus be understood that the same applies to protrusions 4020a, 4020b, 4020c, 4020d; 4120a, 4120b, 4120c, 4120d which are part of the pre-determined base pattern, as does apply for protrusions which are achieved via attachment of stripes. It should also be noted that said stripes do not necessarily have rectangular forms, but can have different forms for providing different forms of protrusions when attached to the pre-determined base pattern.

The method 3200 continues with an optional step 3220. In the optional step 3220 a reinforcement is provided. The provided reinforcement can be a reinforcement sheet. The reinforcement sheet can be substantially planar. The reinforcement is preferably attached to the same side of the front panel S I A and/or the back panel S IB as the handle. The attaching is, for example, done by gluing or bonding. The part of the handle which is attached to the front panel S I A and/or the back panel SIB is preferably situated between the front panel S I A and/or the back panel S IB and the reinforcement. In one example, the reinforcement attaches directly to parts of the handle and to the front panel SI A and/or the back panel S IB. In one example, the width of the reinforcement sheet is larger than the width of the handle. In one example, the width of the reinforcement sheet is at least 1.5 times the width of the handle. The width of the reinforcement sheet is preferably not larger than the width of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel S IB on which the reinforcement sheet is attached. One advantage when providing a reinforcement sheet is that the lifting force can be distributed from the handle to a larger area of the front panel S I A and/or back panel S IB than the overlap between the handle and the front panel S I A and/or back panel S IB. The reinforcement sheet has a certain height. This certain height is preferably larger than the height of the overlap between the handle and the front panel S I A and/or back panel SIB. In one example, the term overlap refers here to the area on which the handle is attached to the front panel S I A and/or the back panel S IB.

In one example, the optional step 3220 is repeated. By doing this a second reinforcement is provided. This second reinforcement has preferably a larger area than the first

reinforcement sheet. When referring to the first reinforcement sheet here, it is intended the reinforcement sheet which was provided the previous time the step 3220 was performed. Preferably the width of the second reinforcement sheet is larger than the width of the first reinforcement sheet. Preferably the height of the second reinforcement sheet is larger than the height of the first reinforcement sheet. The second reinforcement sheet can then be attached to the first reinforcement sheet and the front panel S I A and/or the back panel SIB. Preferably the second reinforcement sheet covers a substantial part of the first

reinforcement sheet, for example at least 80%, at least 90%, or at least 95%. The first reinforcement sheet is then in one example situated between the front panel S I A and/or back panel SIB and the second reinforcement sheet. One advantage when providing a second reinforcement sheet is that the lifting force can be distributed from the first reinforcement sheet to a larger area of the front panel S I A and/or back panel S IB than the overlap between the first reinforcement sheet and the front panel S I A and/or back panel S IB.

The method 3200 can end after step 3220.

In Fig. 33 a flowchart of a method 3300 for providing closure means for a transport container is shown. The method 3300 is in one example part of step 1380 of method 1305. The method starts with step 3310.

In step 3310 at least one closure means is provided at the transport container. In the following we will describe providing closure means for a carrier bag. It should be understood, however, that the same applies for other kinds of transport containers. In one example, the closure means comprises said one or more protrusions 4020a, 4020b, 4020c, 4020d; 4120a, 4120b, 4120c, 4120d of the pre-determined base pattern. It is described in relation to Fig. 43 and Fig. 44 how these protrusions 4020a, 4020b, 4020c, 4020d; 4120a, 4120b, 4120c, 4120d can form the closure means. It should be understood that what has been said above in relation to providing said protrusions 4020a, 4020b, 4020c, 4020d; 4120a, 4120b, 4120c, 4120d via stripes which are attached to the pre-determined base pattern applies here as well. In other words, what is described in relation to said protrusions 4020a, 4020b, 4020c, 4020d; 4120a, 4120b, 4120c, 4120d applies independently of whether the protrusions are part of the pre-determined base pattern or whether they are attached to in at a later step. In one example, said stripes are thus attached to the predetermined pattern as described above.

In one example said provided closure means is a closure device. In one example, the provided closure device is integrated in a reinforcement sheet. In one example, said reinforcement sheet is the second reinforcement sheet which has been described in relation to step 3220 of method 3200. In one example, said reinforcement sheet is another reinforcement sheet than the second reinforcement sheet which has been described in relation to step 3220.

In one example said closure device is a closure device 240 as described in relation to Fig. 14-17. In one example, the closure device has a first elongated closure element 250A and a second elongated closure element 250B.The first and second elongated closure elements 250A, 250B, respectively can have an upper section and a lower section. The lower section is in one example attached to the bag-to-be. In one example, the lower section is attached to the front panel S I A and/or the bag panel S IB. This attaching is, for example, via gluing or bonding. The lower section can comprise a reinforcement sheet. The upper section is in one example not attached to the front panel SI A and/or the bag panel S IB. The upper section of the first and the second elongated closure element can have complementary patterns. These complementary patterns can be provided in such a way that the first and second elongated closure elements can interact to provide a closing between them, and thus a closing of the bag. The closing can, for example, be caused by a movable pressure device 280, also referred to as a "runner", or a "slider". Even a later opening of the bag can be provided by said runner/slider 280.

In the following, different kinds of attaching the closure device are described in relation to Fig. 48a-d. In these figures only one side of the bag is shown, for example the side of the front panel SI A. In a preferred example the other side of the bags looks similar, for example the side of the back panel S IB. Same elements which are covered by another element are drawn in dashed lines. In Fig. 48a+b a handle 4820 is attached to the outer surface of the front panel SI A and/or the bag panel S IB. In Fig. 48c+b the handle 4820 is attached to the interior surface of the front panel S I A and/or the bag panel S IB. Said attaching can be directly or include some other elements in between the handle 4820 and the outer and/or inner surface of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel S IB. In Fig. 48 the handle 4820 is integrated in the front panel S I A and/or back panel SIB as, for example, being described in relation to Fig. 45c. In Fig. 48a-d a reinforcement sheet 4810 is attached to the handle and to the same surface of the front panel S I A and/or the back panel S IB as the handle 4820 is attached to. Thus, in Fig. 48a+b the reinforcement sheet 4810 is attached to the outer surface of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel S IB and covers a lower part of the handle 4820. In Fig. 48c+d the reinforcement sheet 4810 is attached to the inner surface of the front panel S I A and/or the back panel SIB and covers a lower part of the handle 4820. In the shown examples, there is a vertical distance 4890 between the reinforcement sheet 4810 and the upper side of the front panel S I A and/or the back panel S IB. In one example this distance is zero or basically zero. In another example, this distance is at least one centimetre, for example 1 cm, 2 cm or 3cm, 4 cm, or 5 cm. A runner/slider 4880 or another element which can cause the actual closing is shown in Fig. 48a-e as well. In the following, when referring to an elongated closure element, this could be the first or the second elongated closure element. In Fig. 48a an elongated closure element 4870a is attached on the outer side of the front panel S I A and/or the back panel SIB. The attachment is done in such a way that the handle is outside the elongated closure element 4870a, thus not intercepting a closing action by the runner/slider 4880. The elongated closure element 4870a has in one example a width which is longer than the width of the upper side of the front panel S I A and/or the back panel SIB. This has the advantage that a first and a second elongated closure element can be attached to each other at an overlapping area outside the front panel S I A and/or the back panel S IB, thus providing an especially good closing of the transport container since the air exchange will be well prevented at the corners of the upper side of the front panel S I A and/or the back panel S IB.

In Fig. 48b an elongated closure element 4870b is attached on the inner side of the front panel S I A and/or the back panel S IB. Thus the handle will automatically be outside the elongated closure element 4870b, thus not intercepting a closing action by the runner/slider 4880. The elongated closure element 4870a has preferably a width which is substantially the width of the upper side of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB. Thus a good enclosing of the transport container will be provided.

In Fig. 48c an elongated closure element 4870c is attached on the inner side of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel S IB. The attachment is done in such a way that the handle is in between the elongated closure element 4870c and the front panel S I A and/or the back panel SIB, thus not intercepting a closing action by the runner/slider 4880. The elongated closure element 4870c has preferably a width which is substantially the width of the upper side of the front panel S I A and/or the back panel S IB.

In Fig. 48d an elongated closure element 4870c is attached on the inner side of the front panel S I A and/or the back panel S IB. The attachment is done in such a way that the handle is in between the elongated closure element 4870d and the front panel S I A and/or the back panel SIB, thus not intercepting a closing action by the runner/slider 4880. The elongated closure element 4870d has preferably a width which is substantially the width of the upper side of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel S IB. The difference between Fig. 48c and Fig. 48d is that the vertical distance of the lower part in Fig. 48d is larger than in Fig. 48c.

In Fig. 48d the whole reinforcement sheet is covered by the lower part of the elongated closure element. This has the additional advantage that the attached lower side of the elongated closure element provides an additional barrier for air to prevent air exchange between the inside and the outside of the bag when the bag is in a closed state.

In Fig. 48e an elongated closure element 4870e is attached on the inner side of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB. Since the handle is part of the sheet which provides the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB, the handle is not intercepting a closing action by the runner/slider 4880. The elongated closure element 4870e has preferably a width which is substantially the width of the upper side of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB. The lower side of the lower part of the elongated closure element 4870e is not indicated, but can in one example be like in Fig. 48c or in Fig. 48d.

In Fig. 48a-e a runner/slider 4880 is shown. This is, however, in one example not required. Any of the elongated closure elements 4870a, 4870b, 4870c, 4870d, 4780e could have a first pattern 5010 on the side which is faced to the interior of the bag. A corresponding elongated closure element which is situated at the panel which is opposite to the panel shown panel in Fig. 48a-48e can have a second pattern 5020 on its side which is faced to the interior of the bag. The second pattern 5020 can be complementary to the first pattern 5010. By pressing together the elongated closure element on the front panel SI A and the back panel SIB one could then make the first and the second pattern to interact in such a way that their corresponding parts of the pattern are brought together. This can provide an attaching between the first 5010 and the second pattern 5020 due to a locking of these patterns by their form. An example of a side view of a first 5010 and a second pattern 5020 of the elongated closure element is shown in Fig. 50.

Another example of providing a closure element is shown in Fig. 49. A closure element 4910 is provided at the inner and/or outer side of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB. This closure element can have the size of a stripe and has preferable substantially the width of the upper side of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB. The closure element 4910 can be attached to the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB. The attaching can be done by gluing or bonding. The closure element 4910 can be a glue strip. The closure element 4910 can be an adhesive tape. Thus, when pressing the front panel SI A to the back panel SIB, the glue strip and/or the adhesive tape can keep the front panel SI A and the back panel SIB close to each other, thus providing a closing of the transport container. In one example the front panel SI A and the back panel SIB are kept attached to each other by the closure element 4910 once they touch each other via the closure element 4910. In one example the closure element 4910 is only at the front panel SI A or only at the back panel SIB. This might be enough for providing a closure of the bag via adhesive forces. The closure element 4910 can comprise an additional strip of protection material (not shown in the figure). This strip can have substantially the same size as the glue strip/the adhesive tape. The additional strip can be provided in such a way that it has to be removed before allowing the glue strip/the adhesive tape to provide its adhesive force between the front panel S I A and the back panel S IB. This prevents the front panel S I A and the back panel S IB to stick permanently together when the transport container is in a flat state.

In one example the closure element 4910 is on the outside of the front panel S I A and/or the back panel SIB. Assuming the closure element 4910 being on the outside of the front panel S I A, the back panel S IB could have a larger vertical height than the front panel S I A. A folding edge could be provided at the back panel SIB. The folding edge can be

substantially parallel to the upper side of the back panel S IB. The folding edge could be situated at a distance from the upper side of the back panel S IB. Said distance could be approximately the distance of which the vertical height of the back panel S IB differs from the vertical height S I A of the front panel. One could then fold the back panel S IB along the folding edge in the direction of the front panel SI A. The folded section of the back panel S IB can then be put over the front panel S1A so that it covers the outer part of the front panel which comprises the closure element 4910. In that way a closure of the bag can be provided as well. Of course the closure element 4910 could also or instead be situated at the inner side of the folded part of the back panel S IB. The role of the front panel S I A and the back panel SIB can also easily be interchanged.

The closure element 4910 can also be an element which allows closing the transport element with the help of an external closure element. As an example, the closure element 4910 can comprise a welding strip. The welding strip can be formed from a layer of PE.

The welding strip can be made of a weldable material so as to enable closing the bag opening by heat welding such that entry of air into the bag interior is minimized or prevented. Said external element is in one example a sealing element, for example a hot sealing element. It could also be an impulse sealing element. The external element could be a welding element. The external element could be a so-called hot weld pistol. One could, for example, attach said external element at the upper side of the front panel S I A and the back panel S IB so that it encloses said upper side of the front panel S I A and the back panel S IB at the part where the closure element 4910 is situated. One could thus close the transport container at a later state with the help of the external element. In one example, the closure element is part of sheet which is provided for being cut in a method like method 1305. Thus, in one example the closure element 4910 is not an additional element which has to be attached to the front panel S I A and/or the back panel S IB, but is already part of the front panel S 1A and the back panel S IB. The closure element 4910 is in one example of the same material as the front panel S I A and/or the back panel S IB. According to an embodiment the water vapour impermeable membrane 190 forms the welding strip.

The closure element 4910 can also be provided at the outside of the front panel S I A and/or the back panel S IB when the front panel SI A and the back panel S IB have the same size. This might be advantageous when providing a closure as described in relation to Fig. 43 and Fig. 44.

Other examples of closure elements are presented in Fig. 51a+b. In Fig. 51a the closure element 5170a is provided by a tape or another adhesive material. This tape could be folded over the upper side of the bag after the upper sides of the front panel S 1 A and the back panel S IB are brought together. This provides an easy method to close the bag. The length of the tape could be longer than the width of the bag. Then the outer edges of the tape could be put together to attach each other. This provides a better closing of the bag. In Fig. 51b the closure element 5170b is provided by a clamp. The clamp 5170b could, for example, press the upper parts of the front panel S I A and the back panel S IB together. This pressing together could for example be caused by the form and the stiffness of the clamp 5170b. The clamp 5170b can have a width which is longer than the upper width of the bag. The form of the clamp 5170b can be different from what is shown in Fig. 51b. Although shown without a handle, it would be no problem to provide a handle in Fig. 51a and Fig. 51b, for example a handle as in Fig. 48a or in Fig. 46.

What is said in relation to Fig. 51a and Fig. 51b can also be combined with other examples of the disclosure. A tape 5170a or a closure element 5170b could, for example, be combined with a folded closing as described in relation to Fig. 43 and Fig. 44. In that case it might in one example be advantageous to provide one or several clamps with shorter widths than the upper width of the front panel S 1 A and/or the back panel S IB. This is due to the fact that such a clamp might be enough to keep a closing as indicated in Fig. 44 at its place so that it will not unfold automatically. Yet another possibility is described in Fig. 51c. The front panel S1A and/or the back panel SIB could have a protrusion 5110c extending to its upper side. This protrusion 5110c could be substantially rectangular. The protrusion could have an opening 5120c. The opening 5120c could be such that it provides a handle. How openings can provide handles has been described before. At a part of the protrusion 5110c which is between the opening 5120c and the front panel S1A and/or back panel SIB a closure element 5170c could be provided. This closure element 5170c could have any of the properties of the closure element 4910 which has been described before. Especially the closure element 5170c could provide adhesive force. The closure element 5170c could also be thus that a closure could be provided with the help of an external element which has been described before.

The method 3300 can end after step 3310.

In Fig. 39 a method of providing a bag with a closure is illustrated. The closure which is provided there can, for example, be the closure as illustrated in Fig. 48a. This closure can be with or without the runner/slider 4880. A plurality of produced bags 3910a, 3910b, 3910c, ... can be provided. In the shown example the plurality of produced bags 3910a,

3910b, 3910c, ... is in an extended state. It should be understood that plurality of produced bags 3910a, 3910b, 3910c, ... equally well could be in a flat state. A long stripe 3920 of what should be the elongated closure element 4870a is provided. This long stripe 3920 could comprise to stripes, one for the front panel SI A and one for the back panel SIB. One or several cutting elements 3930 can be provided to cut the long stripe 3920 in between the plurality of plurality of produced bags 3910a, 3910b, 3910c, ... , for example along the dotted lines as indicated in Fig. 39. Said one or more cutting element 3930 is only schematically drawn in Fig. 39. Said one or more cutting element 3930 are in one example at a substantially fixed position, at least in one or two dimension, and the plurality of produced bags 3910a, 3910b, 3910c, ... can be transported in relation to said one or more cutting element 3930. The described way of providing a bag with a closure can facilitate mass production.

In the following additional ways of providing a handle and/or a closure are described. Some of the steps can be part of any of the methods 1300, 1302, 1305, 3200, and/or 3300. It should also be stressed that what is described here can be well combined with what have been described before. This combining might then provide additional embodiments of the present invention. Figure 43 shows an example of a section of a transport carrier-to-be. This section can, for example be a section of the sheet which is cut in step 1320 of method 1305. The section is for example an enlargement of the upper left corner of Fig. 41. Parts of what is present of this section in Fig. 41, but which will not be discussed in the following, have been removed from Fig. 43 for not overloading the figure. Fig. 43 shows thus a protrusion 4320 at a front panel S I A. As has been described before, that protrusion can also be attached at a later state. It does thus not need to be part of the pre-determined pattern which is cut in step 1320. It should also be stressed that the protrusion does not need to be rectangular. The protrusion 4320 could also have the shape of a rectangular with an attached triangle as shown in Fig. 40, or any other shape.

An edge part 4330 of the protrusion 4320 could be attached to a corresponding part of another protrusion of the base pattern. When looking at Fig. 41, this other protrusion can for example be protrusion 4120b or protrusion 4120c. This attaching can be done by gluing or bonding. For making the attaching possible the protrusion could be folded or bent, for example along a folding line/bending start line F 10. This allows providing a handle. When attaching the edge pattern 4330 to the protrusion 4120b a handle on the side panel S2A can be provided. When attaching the edge pattern 4330 to the protrusion 4120c a handle on the front panel will be provided. The edge part 4330 could be much larger than indicated in Fig. 43. The edge part is in one example basically the whole protrusion. This might provide an especially strong handle.

In an alternative example no protrusion 4120b and/or 4120c is provided. The edge part 4330 can then be attached to a corresponding area on another element of the bag. This corresponding area can, for example be an area at the side panel S2A or at the front panel S I A close to where the protrusion 4120b and/or 4120c could have been attached.

At least one additional folding edge F l 1 can be provided at the protrusion 4320. The at least one additional folding edge F l 1 comprises in one example four additional folding edges Fl 1.1, F 1 1.2, F l 1.3, F 1 1.4. This at least one additional folding edge can continue through the front panel S I A and/or one or both of the side panels S2A, S2B as well. There might also be at least one additional folding edge F 12 on the front panel S I A and/or one or both of the side panels S2A, S2B. The at least one additional folding edge F 12 comprises in one example three additional folding edges F 12.1, F12.2, F 12.3. The additional folding edges F 12 comprise preferably between one and ten folding edges. The additional folding edges F l 1 comprise preferably between one and ten folding edges. Corresponding folding edges can be provided at the back panel SIB and/or at protrusions thereof. In the following it will only be described how the protrusion 4320 and the front panel SI A can be folded. The same applies to other protrusions or to any other panel SIB, S2A, S2B as well. The folding edges Fl 1, F12 are in one example substantially parallel and at a distance to the upper side of the front panel SI A and/or the protrusion 4320.

In one example the protrusion 4320 and or the front panel SI A is folded along the folding edges Fl 1, F12 in the same direction. The folding is thus in one example always in the direction of the first sheet surface of the front panel SI A/the protrusion 4320. In another example, the folding is always in the direction of the second sheet surface of the front panel SI A/the protrusion 4320.

In one example, before starting the now described folding scheme, the back panel SIB is put into contact with the front panel SI A. This could be done by putting the upper side of the back panel SIB in contact with the upper side of the front panel. In one example there are enclosed areas FS1, FS2, FS3, ... between two adjacent folding edges Fl 1/F12 and/or between a folding edge F 11/F 12 and the upper side of the front panel S 1 A/ the upper side of the protrusion 4320. Preferably, the contact between the back panel SIB and the front panel S1A is along the enclosed areas FS1, FS2, FS3. What is said regarding bringing the back panel SIB in contact with the front panel S1A applies in one example also to the protrusion 4320, which could be brought into contact with a corresponding protrusion at the back panel SIB, for example the protrusion 4120b of Fig. 41.

The folding is in one example done in the way that the enclosed area FS1 between the upper side of the protrusion 4320/the upper side of the front panel SI A and the uppermost folding edge, in the shown example Fl 1.1, faces the enclosed area FS2 between the uppermost folding edge Fl 1/F12, in the shown example Fl 1.1, and the second most upper folding edge F 11/F 12, in the shown example F 11.2. When folding edges corresponding to

Fl 1/F12 exist at the back panel SIB/at protrusions from the back panel SIB, and when a folding along these corresponding folding edges is performed in the same direction as a folding at the front panel SI A/the protrusion 4320, a closure of the transport container is provided. The term same direction thus implies that the folding at the back panel SIB has to be towards the second sheet surface of the back panel SIB when the folding at the front panel SI A is towards the first sheet surface of the front panel SI A, and vice versa. The contact between the front panel S1A and the back panel SIB and/or the corresponding protrusions is preferable kept throughout the folding procedure, so that the first sheet surface of the front panel SI A and the back panel SIB and/or the corresponding protrusions always touch each other.

In a next folding step, an enclosed area FS2 between the uppermost folding edge Fl 1.1 and the second uppermost folding edge Fl 1.2 is folded towards the enclosed area FS3 between the second uppermost folding edge F 11.2 and the third uppermost folding edge F 11.3. The enclosed area FS1, and preferably its counterpart on the back panel SIB, will thus be situated between the areas FS2 and FS3.

The folding can be continued along several or all of the folding edges Fl 1/F 12. Fig. 44 shows a schematic example of how the result of thus a folding can look like. Fig. 44 can be obtained when looking into the direction of the arrow D in Fig. 43. In Fig. 44 it is shown how the enclosed areas FS1, FS2, ... can be arranged after the folding procedure. The horizontal lines in Fig. 44 are only sketched for clarity reason to provide an intermediate space between the enclosed areas FS1, FS2, ... The horizontal lines are in reality preferably not there, or at least much more narrow in relation to the vertical lines. In one example there is basically no space between the enclosed areas FS1, FS2, ... The lines in Fig. 44 present preferably the front panel SI A and the back panel SIB together, i.e. every line represents both the front panel S1A and the back panel SIB, where the front panel S1A is on one side of the line and the back panel SIB on the other side of the panel. As can be seen, such a folding provides a closure of the bag. This has the advantage that no additional closing element is needed. It is, however, possible to combine such a folding with a closure element as well. As an example, a closure element 4910 as described in relation to Fig. 49 can be provided at the enclosed area FS7 for attaching the enclosed area FS5 to it. This additionally increases the closing capacity of the fore mentioned folding method.

In Fig. 43 the folding edges FS1 1/FS12 are sketched at equal distance. This is, however, not a prerequisite. On the contrary, it might be preferably to slightly increase the distance between the folding edges. The reason can be seen in Fig. 44. A folded area has a certain thickness and the next folded area needs to compensate for this thickness when folded around the previous area, as is indicated by the horizontal lines in Fig. 44. As the number of folding increases more and more areas, each having a certain thickness, have to be compensated for. For the same reason it can be preferably to have slight differences between the distances between the folding edges Fl 1/F 12 on the front panel SI A compared to the corresponding folding edges on the back panel SIB. An example of how the folding described in relation to Fig. 43 and Fig. 44 can be applied to a bag made out of the base pattern in Fig. 40 is shown in Fig. 52a-52c. A starting point could be a bag in an opened position as shown in Fig. 40j . This bag could be closed by bringing the upper portions of the front side panel S1A and the back side panel SIB together as shown in Fig. 52a. Then, the bag in Fig. 52a can be folded along folding edges F12.1-F12.4 as described in relation to Fig. 43 and Fig. 44. A bag as shown in Fig. 52b will be achieved. If the combined length L5210 of the protrusion in a folded state 5210 is larger than thrice the length of the upper side of the front panel SI A and/or back panel SIB, the protrusion in a folded state 5210 could be turned to from a handle 5210c as shown in Fig. 52c. Preferably, the combined length L5210 of the protrusion in a folded state 5210 is at least four times larger than the length of the upper side of the front panel SI A and/or back panel SIB. This has the advantage that no additional elements except the sheet providing the pre-determined base pattern have to be provided for forming the handle and/or closure of the bag. For forming the handle 5210c the outer ends of the protrusion in a folded state 5210 can be attached to each other.

A bag with the triangles not attached to each other, as shown in Fig. 44n, could be folded in the same way.

A bag starting with a base-pattern as shown in Fig. 41 could provide handle and/or closure in an analogous way as shown in Fig. 52a-c. In one example, the combined length L5210 of the protrusion in a folded state 5210 is only slightly larger than the length of the upper side of the front panel SI A and/or back panel SIB. Then a handle 5210c of the kind shown in Fig. 52c will not be provided. In one example, the parts of the protrusions in the folded state 5210 are folded towards the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB.

When referring to the upper length of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB in relation to Fig. 52b and Fig. 52c it should be understood that this is the upper length in the state shown in Fig. 52b and Fig. 52c. This length could differ from the upper length of the front panel SI A and/or the back panel SIB in Fig. 52a, since the upper length there now has been folded away.

It should also be stated that Fig. 40a-n and Fig. 52a-c only are schematically. The relation of the area of the front panel S 1 A and/or the back panel SIB and the bottom plane BP could be much different from what is shown in the figures. As an example, the remaining part of the front panel SI A in Fig. 52c could be several times, for example five or ten times, the area of the bottom plane. Fig. 53a-c shows yet another example, where Fig. 53a corresponds to Fig. 52a, and so on. In this example, only an outer part of the protrusions 4020a, 4020b, 4020c, 4020d; 4120a, 4120b, 4120c, 4120d is attached to each other. The other parts of the protrusions 4020a, 4020b, 4020c, 4020d; 4120a, 4120b, 4120c, 4120d are preferably not attached to each other, thus allowing the protrusions to form at least one opening 5305. The folding between Fig. 53a and Fig. 53b is done analogous to the folding from Fig. 52a to Fig. 52b. A protrusion in a folded state 5310 looks then similar to what is shown in Fig. 52b, except that the protrusion in a folded state 5310 has said at least one opening. When turning said protrusion in a folded state 5310, this at least one opening 5305 can be used as a handle for the bag. This is indicated in Fig. 53c. What is said in relation to Fig. 52a-c regarding size of areas applies here as well. Providing handles as shown in Fig. 53c has the advantage that no additional elements are needed for the handle.

A Method of Grocery Delivery

According to an embodiment, the carrier bag 20 may advantageously be used by on-line shops, for delivery of frozen or chilled groceries which have been ordered e.g. via the Internet. The advantageous ability of the bag 20 to preserve the frozen or cold state of groceries for an extended length of time may enable a reduction in the cost for delivery of frozen or chilled groceries.

Figure 21 shows a schematic block diagram of an embodiment of a system for delivering groceries according to an embodiment of the invention. Reference numeral 500 relates to a client location with a computer 510 having a user interface 520 for enabling a client, such as e.g. a person wanting to buy goods, to access the Internet. The computer 510 has a communications port 520 for bi-directional data exchange. The communication port 520 is connectable to a communications network 530, e.g. via a data interfaced. The

communications network 530 may be the world wide internet, also known as the Internet. The communications network 530 may also comprise a public switched telephone network. A server computer 540 is also connected to the communications network 530. The server computer 540 may comprise a database 560, user input/output interfaces 570 and data processing hardware 580, and a communications port 590. The server computer 540 is located on a server location 592, which is geographically separate from the client location 500. The server location 592 may be in a first city, such as the Swedish capital Stockholm, and the client location may be in another city, such as Berlin, Germany. Alternatively, the server location 592 may be in a first part of a town and the client location may be in another part of the same town. The server location 592 may also be referred to as supplier part 592, or supplier part location 592. The server computer may be part of an on-line business entity 595 for the sales and delivery of goods that needs to be kept chilled, cold or frozen.

The on-line business also includes a storage facility 600 for goods 40. A storage computer 610 is connected to the communications network 530. The storage computer 610 may comprise user input/output interfaces 620 and data processing hardware 630, and a communications port 640.

The storage facility 600 also comprises one or several storage rooms 650. According to an embodiment of the invention, the storage room 650 has a controlled environment, in that the temperature and the relative humidity of the air in the storage room 650 is controlled so that it is kept within certain predetermined ranges.

The goods may comprise a plurality of different types of goods, and the goods may be sorted into different temperature ranges TI, Til, Till, and TIV, each type of gods being stored in a corresponding storage room 650 TI , 650 TII , 650 TIII , and 650 TIV having a temperature in accordance with the corresponding goods temperature range TI, Til, Till, or TIV (See Figure 22). According to an embodiment the temperature in each storage room is set 650 TI , 650 TII , 650 TIII , and 650 TIV in accordance with a lowest acceptable goods temperature range for the corresponding goods. According to an embodiment the temperature in each storage room 650 TI , 650 TII , 650 TIII , and 650 TIV is set in accordance with a lowest acceptable goods temperature range for the corresponding goods, and the relative humidity of the air is also set to a lowest acceptable value dependent on the type of goods in that storage room. According to an embodiment, the relative humidity of the air is set to a value equal to or lower than lower than 40% RH in a room storing chilled or frozen goods so as to reduce or minimize the rate of condensation.

Figure 22 is a schematic block diagram of an embodiment of a storage facility 600 comprising plural storage rooms 650 TI , 650 TII , 650 TIII , and 650 TIV . With reference to Figure 22, the facility 600 may also comprise a goods loading room 660. The goods loading room 660 may be arranged so that a storage room 650 is accessible directly from the goods loading room 660. According to an embodiment, the ambient air temperature in goods loading room 660 is kept lower than +18 degrees Centigrade. The air humidity is advantageously kept low in the environment where chilled or frozen goods is to be packed into containers 20 so as to eliminate or minimize the occurrence of condensation or frosting on chilled or frozen goods. According to an embodiment the relative air humidity is kept lower than 40% RH. According to another embodiment the relative air humidity is kept lower than 20% RH.

In this connection it may be noted that the occurrence of condensation can cause significant heating of chilled, non-frozen, goods. If air humidity causes condensation on the surface of a piece of chilled, non-frozen, goods the increase of the mean temperature of a piece of chilled, non-frozen, goods is:

For frozen goods the impact of frosting is even more severe. When air humidity causes water droplets to be formed on frozen goods the condensed water may also freeze. The formation of condensed water from air humidity, the condensed water subsequently also freezing to form ice, or frost, is herein also referred to as "frosting". If air humidity causes frosting on the surface of a piece of frozen goods the increase of the mean temperature of a piece of frozen goods is:

W FRG = mean heat capacity of the frozen goods

m FRG = the mass of the frozen goods, measured in kilograms

Accordingly, an object and an advantageous feature of the invention is to eliminate or minimize warming of chilled or frozen goods during packing into a container 20 by eliminating or minimizing the occurrence of frosting and/or condensation on chilled or frozen goods. According to an embodiment, the ambient air temperature in goods loading room 660 is therefore kept lower than +10 degrees Centigrade, and the air humidity is also kept low in the environment where chilled or frozen goods is to be packed into containers 20 so as to eliminate or minimize the occurrence of condensation or frosting on chilled or frozen goods. According to an embodiment the relative air humidity is kept lower than 30% RH. According to another embodiment the relative air humidity is kept lower than 20% RH. In fact, the energy released by 1 gram of water vapour being turned into a layer of ice on a package containing one kilogram of frozen water is actually sufficient to warm that whole kilogram of frozen water by 1,18 degrees. Thus, if e.g. 12 grams of water vapour is allowed to turn into a frost layer of ice on a package of frozen grocery, that energy (just over 31 kJ) may suffice to warm that grocery by several degrees. The exact temperature change depends on the specific heat capacity W FRG of that particular piece of grocery, as illustrated by the equations listed above. Pure fresh water ice has a specific heat capacity of 2200 J/(kg *K), and thus 12 grams of frost being formed would suffice to warm that one kilogram of fresh water ice by about 14 degrees Centigrade.

In this connection the maximum amount of water vapour at various air temperatures may be relevant. The right hand column in Table 1 below provides an overview of the water mass per unit volume of vapour saturated air. The left hand side column indicates corresponding temperature and the middle column indicates the pressure of saturated vapour.

The storage facility 600 also comprises storage of containers 20 for the transport of chilled or frozen goods. The containers 20 may be carrier bags 20 for the transport of chilled or frozen goods. The containers 20 may be provided in plural predetermined sizes, such as e.g. five different sizes. The interior storage space volume of the containers 20 sizes may comprise e.g. 10 litres, 20 litres, 30 litres, 40 litres and 50 litres.

With reference to Figure 22, the facility 600 may comprise plural storage rooms 650 TI , 650χπ, 650 TIII , and 650 ΤΓ ν, as mentioned above. The Goods storage facility # may keep a stock of goods 40i at a first cool temperature within the first temperature range Ti. The first temperature range may be 15-18 degrees Centigrade. Such goods 40i may comprise grocery such as fresh produce, such as fruit or mushroom, which may be provided in separate portion sized packages or containers 40A. Thus, some goods may be provided at a first, cool, temperature range TI of about 15-18 degrees Centigrade.

Some goods may be provided at a second, cold non-freezing, temperature range T II . The second cold non-freezing temperature range may be a range of about +6 to +8 degrees Centigrade. Alternatively, the cold non-freezing temperature range may be a range of about +1 to +4 degrees Centigrade. Some goods may be provided at a third temperature range T ra . The third temperature range TIll may be a freezing temperature range of e.g. between -18 degrees to - 22 Centigrade.

Moreover, some goods may be provided at a fourth freezing temperature range T IV which is colder than the third range. The fourth range may be e.g. of between -25 to -40 degrees Centigrade. Providing frozen goods within such a low temperature range advantageously extends the time required for the frozen goods to warm towards a minimum freezing temperature T frMin The minimum freezing temperature T frMin may be e.g. -10 or -4 degrees Centigrade. The value of the minimum freezing temperature T frMin depends on the type of goods.

According to an embodiment, the fourth freezing temperature range T IV is a settable range, such that the fourth freezing temperature range T IV can be set to a value T IV = T f4 +/- T ra , wherein the value T IV is a temperature between -25 to -40 degrees Centigrade, and T ra = is inaccuracy range. The inaccuracy range T ra may be a narrow span of a few degrees. The inaccuracy range T ra may be a narrow span of e.g. less than two degrees.

When transporting chilled or frozen goods in an embodiment of a chill conserving container 20, the duration from the packing of the chilled or frozen product into the chill conserving container 20 until the goods has reached a certain higher temperature T Ch2 depends on the initial temperature T Ch1 of the chilled or frozen goods. Thus, a lower initial goods temperature T Ch2 will increase the duration TCOO L during which the goods is kept below a certain limit value T Chlimit - Thus a lower initial goods temperature T Ch2 will enable a longer acceptable transport time of the chilled or frozen goods. However, the inventors concluded that a lowering of the initial temperature T Ch1 does not lead to a proportionally longer duration TCOOL during which the goods is kept below a certain limit value T Chlimit - Figures 23A and 23B show a schematic block diagram of an embodiment of a method of delivering chilled or frozen goods according to an embodiment of the invention.

With reference to figure 23 A, the left flow chart F10 illustrates actions performed by means of a client location computer 510. In a step S200 a client, such as e.g. a person wanting to buy goods, places an order for chilled and/or frozen goods by causing the client location computer 510 to communicate with the server computer 540 located at the server location 592. The client may thus place an order for a certain amount A of chilled and/or frozen goods to be delivered to a delivery destination DD.

The server computer 540 may thus be adapted to receive an order, as indicated by step S300 in the right hand side flow chart F20 in Fig 23 A. The server computer 540 may also include functionality for debiting, and for confirming receipt of the order.

When the order includes a request for goods that should be kept within mutually different temperature ranges, the server computer 540 may be adapted to sort the order information according to the goods temperature ranges (step S310).

With reference to Figure 23 A and Figure 21, the server computer 540 may, in a step S320, transfer a delivery instruction DI to the storage computer 610 at the storage facility 600. The delivery instruction DI may comprise information about the amount of each piece of goods ordered and information indicative of the delivery destination DD. The delivery instruction DI may also be indicative one or plural goods temperature ranges associated with the ordered goods.

In a step S330 the delivery instruction DI may be received by the storage computer 610 at the storage facility 600. In a step S340 the storage computer 610 may be adapted to create a packing instruction PI. The packing instruction may include information about the amount of each piece of goods ordered. It is noted that the step S310 may be performed by the storage computer 610, as an alternative to being performed by the server computer.

When the order includes a request for goods that should be kept within mutually different temperature ranges, the storage computer 610 may be adapted include structured information in the packing instruction PI so that an approximate volume and/or an approximate mass of the goods within an individual temperature range TI, Til, Till, or TIV is indicated by the packing instruction PL In dependence on the information in the packing instruction PI the storage computer 610 may generate an indication of a suitable type and/or suitable size of transport container for the ordered goods. As mentioned above, the containers 20 may be provided in plural predetermined sizes, such as e.g. five different sizes. The interior storage space volume of the containers 20 sizes may include plural container volume sizes VI, V2, V3, V4, V5. The container volumes may include VI, V2, V3, V4, V5 being mutually different sizes such as e.g. 10 litres, 20 litres, 30 litres, 40 litres and 50 litres.

With reference to figure 21 in conjunction with figure 22, and step S340 in Fig. 23 A, the storage computer 610 may deliver the packing instruction PI to a relevant user input/output interface 620 I , 620 II , 620 III , or 620 IV dependent on the volume and/or mass indicated for goods within an individual temperature range TI, Til, Till, or TIV is indicated by the packing instruction PI. Thus, for example, when the packing instruction PI includes an indication that X kg of goods within the fourth temperature range TIV is to be packed, the instruction may be sent to the corresponding user input/output interface 620rv (See Figure 22). A user input/output interface 620 I , 620 II , 620 III , and/or 620 IV may include a display. The display 620 I , 620 II , 620 III , and/or 620 IV may be adapted to be read by a person whose task it is to move the indicated amount of goods from the indicated storage room 650 TI , 650 TII , 650 TIII , and/or 650 TIV into a container 20 having an indicated size VI, V2, V3, V4, or V5. It has been found that there is an optimum filling degree of a chill container 20.

Moreover, it has been found that if X kg of a certain chilled or frozen goods is to be transported, it is better to include the X kg in one chill container 20 than to split the X kg into smaller plural smaller amounts in different containers. Thus, all goods within a certain temperature range should preferably be collectively packed in as few containers as possible, while not exceeding the optimum filling degree of a chill container 20. The optimum filling degree allows for an air gap to form between the inner surface of the container 20 and the outer surface of the cold or frozen goods. Preferably the container is filled to a filling degree such that the chilled goods avoids physical contact with any side wall and with the inside of the closed upper surface, i.e. the sealed opening portion of the container 20. Thus, packing instruction PI may include information indicative of a recommended number container(s) 20 and recommended container size VI, V2, V3, V4, or V5 for goods within each temperature range (see step S350 in Figure 23 A) so as to allow for packing a minimum number of uniform goods temperature containers being filled to the optimum filling degree.

The filling degree is determined so as to balance between conflicting requirements. If the filling degree is too small, the bag has too little content of chilled or frozen goods, the amount of stored negative energy is small rendering an undesiredly fast warming of the goods due the small amount of "cold energy". The terms "negative energy" or"cold energy" are used since a piece of chilled goods having a certain temperature absorbs energy , i.e. absorbs positive energy, in the process of increasing its temperature. The absorbed energy is the energy that may seep in via the walls of the closed and sealed container, by way of heat conduction through the walls. Advantageously, according to embodiments of the disclosure, heating by condensation and/or frosting within the container 20 or bag 20 is eliminated or reduced, since entry of air is prevented or reduced as described elsewhere in this document, thereby basically rendering heat conduction through the walls the only remaining manner by which energy can seep into the interior of the container 20 or bag 20. On the other hand, if the filling degree is too large, the goods may fill the interior storage space to such an extent that the chilled or frozen goods may rest close to the side walls, or even touch the side walls, thereby reducing or eliminating an insulating effect gained by a gap between the side walls and the chilled or frozen goods placed at a centre position of the bottom panel of the bag.

As mentioned above, it was found that a good filling degree of a bag 20 is between 25% and 75%, according to an embodiment of the disclosure, so as to gain an insulating effect by a gap between the side walls and the chilled or frozen goods placed in the interior storage space. It has been found that it is preferable to have at least 2 kg of chilled or frozen goods in order to provide an amount of stored cold energy within the container 20, when the container 20 has a volume between 10 litres and 50 litres. More preferably, a container 20 having a volume between 10 litres and 50 litres, should be filled with at least 2,5 kg of chilled or frozen goods and the filling degree should preferably be less than 90%.

It has been found by experiments that a good filling degree appears to be between 30% and 70%) of the bag volume.

An optimum filling degree appears to be between 40% and 60%> of the bag volume.

According to a preferred embodiment the filling degree is between 45% and 55% of the bag volume.

In a step S360 one or plural containers 20 are packed.

According to a preferred embodiment, a container 20, having a bottom panel and side panels, is packed in a manner that allows an air gap to be formed between the side panels of the container 20 and chilled or frozen goods placed at a centre position of the bottom panel. According to a preferred embodiment, a certain container 20 is filled with goods having mutually uniform temperature. This advantageously contributes to a substantially uniform temperature throughout the goods in that container 20, and it minimizes any temperature re- distribution between mutually different pieces of goods. Thus, in step S360 one or plural containers 20 may be packed such that a minimum number of uniform goods temperature containers are filled to the optimum filling degree. With reference to figure 22, the actual packing of containers 20 may be performed manually by a person receiving instructions from the user interface 620 in goods loading room 660.

When the container(s) 20 have been filled, as described above, each container 20 may be closed and sealed, as indicated in step S370 (Fig 23B). This may also be done manually. As described elsewhere in this document, there are many alternative manner by which closing and/or sealing of the container 20 may be performed. This may include heat welding, gluing, sealing by use of a tape, or by clamping. Closing and/or sealing of the container 20 may be also be performed by folding a rim portion of a bag 20. According to yet an embodiment, with reference to figure 24, the container 20 may include a neck portion 662 of flexible material at the rim portion of the container wall(s), the flexible material being shaped and sized to allow a string 664 being placed around the neck portion so as to strangle the neck portion such that the container becomes substantially sealed.

According to an embodiment, the storage computer 610 may deliver the packing instruction PI to a packing robot 670 (See figure 21 in conjunction with step S340 in Fig. 23 A).

Although Figure 21 only shows one storage room 650, it is to be understood that there may be plural storage rooms 650 TI , 650 TII , 650 TIII , 650 TIV and one, several or all the storage rooms 650χι, 650 TII , 650 TIII , 650 TIV may be provided with a packing robot 670, thereby enabling complete packing to be to performed in a cold and dry environment.

When packing is performed by a robot the whole packing procedure may be performed within the respective storage room 650 TI , 650 TII , 650 TIII , 650 TIV having a controlled air temperature and a controlled air humidity. For optimum cold retention properties of the container 20 during the-transport-to-come, the container 20 should preferably be packed and sealed such that the air trapped within the container 20 has a relative humidity of less than 70% at an air temperature equal to the surface temperature of the goods during packing. The purpose of this feature is to minimize or eliminate the risk of condensation occurring within the container 20. Since the relative air humidity decreases in response to increased temperature, such relatively dry air being initially trapped in the container may not only avid causing condensation, but it may also advantageously be able to absorb and dilute some humidity that may originate from the chilled goods or from a minor entry of ambient air during transport.

With reference to step 380 in Figure 23B, and Figure 21, the sealed container(s) 20 may be placed in or on a transport vehicle 680 for distribution to the delivery destination DD. The delivery destination may be the client location 500, or a geographically different place.

As illustrated by step S390 in Fig. 23C, the sealed container(s) is/are transported to the delivery destination DD in accordance with the information in the delivery instruction DI. The sealed container(s) 20 may have the ability to retain an initial low goods temperature for a long time due to the interaction of a number of cleverly combined features, as described elsewhere in this document, even when used in an air atmosphere environment having an ambient air temperature of more than +10 degrees Centigrade. The sealed container(s) 20 may have the ability to retain an initial low goods temperature for a long time also when the air atmosphere environment has an ambient air temperature of more than +20 degrees Centigrade or more.

With reference to step S400 in Figure 23B, and Figure 21, the sealed container(s) 20 may be delivered at the delivery destination DD in accordance with the information in the delivery instruction DI.

In fact, a test has been made where the air atmosphere environment had an ambient air temperature of +60 degrees Centigrade, and kraft paper carrier bag 20, according to an embodiment of the invention, was loaded with a mass of 5 kg frozen chicken meat. This test, here referred to as the first test, was performed in a room which was dark, except for short moments when a lamp was turned on. Hence, there was substantially no heat radiated onto the bags by lamps or sunlight. The kraft paper bag according to the embodiment used in the test had:

kraft paper Basis weight = 136.3 g/m2

kraft paper layer Thickness = 161 μm

kraft paper Density 848 kg/m3

Air permeance of the water vapour impermeable PE layer: less than 0.35 μm/Pa s, i.e. sufficiently low not to be measurable according to ISO 5636-3 : 2013

Thermal conductivity of the bag wall having a kraft paper layer and a water vapour impermeable PE layer as defined above: 0.098 W/(mK) ( It is noted that the thermal conductivity was established separately at 22°C and 50% RH).

A temperature probe was placed in between plural 1 kg packages of frozen chicken, the total weight of the frozen chicken being 5 kg. Test results are indicated in Figure 25. The horizontal axis in fig 25 indicates time, and the vertical axis indicates temperature. The initial temperature of the frozen chicken, as indicated by the measurement probe, was -30,9 degrees Centigrade, at 15:03, i.e. at 3 PM local time. Ambient air had a constant temperature of 60 degrees Centigrade, and the measurement continued until 07:43 the next morning. As illustrated in Figure 25 it took four hours before the meat, at 19: 13 reached -10 degrees Centigrade.

Thus, the above described method of packing a container with chilled and/or frozen goods advantageously enables a very cost effective delivery of chilled and/or frozen goods. In particular it is noted that the above described method of packing a container with chilled and/or frozen goods advantageously enables transporting the chilled and/or frozen goods for an extended amount of time without requiring the use of a vehicle having active cooling or freezing devices. In a second test, the air atmosphere environment had an ambient air temperature of

+20degrees Centigrade and a relative humidity of 70% RH. A kraft paper carrier bag 20, according to an embodiment of the invention, was loaded with a mass of 4,7 kg frozen fresh water. It is to be noted that fresh water ice has a specific heat capacity of 2200 J/(kg *K). The test was performed in a room which was dark, except for short moments when a lamp was turned on for the purpose of inspecting the test objects. Hence, there was substantially no heat radiated onto the bags by lamps or sunlight. Since the kraft paper bag 20 was closed so as to minimize or prevent entry of air into the interior of the bag, the goods placed in the kraft paper bag 20 was prevented from being heated by frosting or condensation heating. The kraft paper bag 20 according to the embodiment used in the frozen fresh water test had: kraft paper Basis weight = 136.3 g/m2

kraft paper layer Thickness = 161 μm

kraft paper Density 848 kg/m3

Air permeability of the water vapour impermeable PE layer: less than 0.35 μm/Pa s, i.e. sufficiently low not to be measurable according to ISO 5636-3 : 2013

Thermal conductivity of the bag wall having a kraft paper layer and a water vapour impermeable PE layer as defined above: 0.098 W/(mK) ( It is noted that the thermal conductivity was established separately at 22°C and 50% RH).

Figure 26 illustrates graphs of the temporal progression of temperature in two positions in a block of ice which was placed in a bag 20 according to the above described embodiment.

As a comparison Figure 26 also illustrates graphs of the temporal progression of

temperature in two positions in a block of ice which was placed in a bag according the prior art. Tables 5 and 3 (below in this document) provide measured values. Regarding the kraft paper carrier bag 20 as an energy storage system, it is to be understood that gradual warming of the chilled or frozen goods within the container 20 is the result of a flow of energy from the warmer ambient air. In order to cause the frozen goods in the bag to increase its mean temperature by a certain number of degrees centigrade a certain amount of energy is required. When no phase change takes place in the frozen goods during that warming, that energy may be referred to as sensible energy Es.

When the frozen goods is 4,7 kg fresh water ice, which has a specific heat capacity of 2200 J/(kg *K), the specific sensible energy Ess which is required to heat the frozen goods by one degrees is :

Since warming up of frozen goods is caused by a flow of energy into the bag, it is concluded that the pace at which different types of goods are warmed up depends on the specific sensible energy Ess of the frozen goods stored in the internal storage space of the bag.

Figure 26 and table 5 indicate that it took 2 hours and 6 minutes for the outer edge of the block of ice to increase its temperature by 20 degrees Kelvin, from -30 C to - IOC, and it took 2 hours and 30 minutes for the centre of the same block of ice to increase its temperature by 20 degrees Kelvin, from -30 C to -IOC.

Hence, the test indicates that when the specific sensible energy Ess of the frozen goods is at least 10340 J, then it takes more than 2 hours to warm the frozen goods from -30 C to - IOC when the ambient air temperature is constant at +20C.

In other words it can be concluded that, when the product of the mass m of the frozen goods and the specific heat capacity of the frozen goods exceeds 10340 J then

it takes more than 2 hours to increase the mean temperature of the frozen goods by 20 K when the initial temperature difference between the warmer ambient air and frozen goods is 50K and the final temperature difference is 30K. In this context it is to be noted that degrees Kelvin (K) and degrees Centigrade ( C ) have the same division so that a temperature deviation of 30 C is equal to a temperature deviation of 30K.

Since the test conditions were such that substantially no heat was radiated onto the bag 20 by lamps or sunlight, and the goods placed in the kraft paper bag 20 was prevented from being heated by frosting or condensation heating, it is concluded that the energy that flowed into the bag 20 causing an increase in the mean temperature of the frozen goods was transferred mainly by heat conduction from the ambient air of the environment via the bag bottom panel and via the wall panels of bag 20 and via the air inside the bag to the frozen goods. Accordingly, it was concluded that the kraft paper chill bag 20 is adapted to provide a thermal conductance, from the air atmosphere environment to the frozen goods in the interior storage space, such that when the product of the mass m of the frozen goods and the specific heat capacity of the frozen goods exceeds 10 000 Joule then it takes more than 2 hours to increase the mean temperature of the frozen goods by 20 K when the initial temperature difference between the warmer ambient air and frozen goods is 50K and the final temperature difference is 3 OK. Since the flow of energy depends on the temperature difference between the warmer ambient air and the frozen goods, and the time required for causing an increase of the mean temperature of the frozen goods depends on the product of the mass m of the frozen goods and the specific heat capacity of the frozen goods, it was concluded that when the product of the mass m of the frozen goods and the specific heat capacity of the frozen goods exceeds 20 000 Joule then it takes more than 4 hours to increase the mean temperature of the frozen goods by 20 K when the initial temperature difference between the warmer ambient air and frozen goods is 50K and the final temperature difference is 30K. Additional tests that have been performed on grocery items, appear to indicate that frozen meat has a significantly higher specific heat capacity than fresh water ice. Hence, the tests appear to indicate that the same amount of frozen meat, i.e. 4,7kg of frozen meat, would require significantly longer time than 2 hours to warm up by 20 K from -30 C to - IOC when the initial temperature difference between the warmer ambient air and frozen goods is 50K and the final temperature difference is 30K.

In fact, the tests measurements performed appear to indicate that frozen meat has a specific heat capacity of more than 4500 J/(kg *K). Thus it may be expected that 5kg of frozen meat may require more than 4 hours to increase its mean temperature by 20 K from -30 C to - IOC when the frozen meat is placed in a chill bag 20 and the initial temperature difference between the warmer ambient air and frozen goods is 50K and the final temperature difference is 30K. The test first test described above appears to support this conclusion.

In a third test, the air atmosphere environment had an ambient air temperature of

+20degrees Centigrade and a relative humidity of 70% RH. A kraft paper carrier bag 20, according to an embodiment of the invention, was loaded with a mass of 4,7 kg non-frozen fresh water. It is to be noted that non-frozen fresh water, in the temperature range from about +1C to about +10C, has a specific heat capacity of 4180 J/(kg *K). The third test was performed in a room which was dark, except for short moments when a lamp was turned on for the purpose of inspecting the test objects. Hence, there was substantially no heat radiated onto the bags by lamps or sunlight. Since the kraft paper bag 20 was closed so as to minimize or prevent entry of air into the interior of the bag, the goods placed in the kraft paper bag 20 was prevented from being heated by condensation heating. The kraft paper bag 20 according to the embodiment used in the chilled, non-frozen, fresh water test had: kraft paper Basis weight = 136.3 g/m2

kraft paper layer Thickness = 161 μιη

kraft paper Density 848 kg/m3

Air permeability of the water vapour impermeable PE layer: less than 0.35 μm/Pa s, i.e. sufficiently low not to be measurable according to ISO 5636-3 : 2013

Thermal conductivity of the bag wall having a kraft paper layer and a water vapour impermeable PE layer as defined above: 0.098 W/(mK) ( It is noted that the thermal conductivity was established separately at 22°C and 50% RH).

Figure 27 illustrates graphs of the temporal progression of temperature in two positions in a 4,7 litre canister of chilled non-frozen fresh water which was placed in a bag 20 according to the above described embodiment according to the third test. As a comparison Figure 27 also illustrates graphs of the temporal progression of temperature in two positions in a 4,7 litre canister of chilled non-frozen fresh water which was placed in a bag according the prior art. Tables 4 and 2 (below in this document) provide measured values.

Table 3

Table

A Bottom Cover

Some of the transport container embodiments described above comprise a sheet material which has been folded to form a carrier bag; the carrier bag having a collapsed state 20A for enabling transportation of the carrier bag in a substantially flat state, and an expanded state such that the carrier bag, in its expanded state, provides an interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages, the carrier bag comprising: a first material layer being shaped and folded so as to form a front wall panel SI A, a back wall panel SIB, two side wall panels S2A, S2B; and a bottom panel; wherein the wall panels and the bottom panel cooperate to form said interior storage space to a volume larger than 10 litres in the expanded state of the carrier bag; and wherein a rim portion of the wall panels facing away from the bag bottom panel provides a bag opening. In some embodiments of such a carrier bag the bottom panel comprises folded portions wherein one sheet edge meets and overlaps another sheet edge. Thus, one sheet surface overlaps another sheet surface and the two overlapping sheet surfaces may be attached to one another, e.g. by gluing or melt-bonding, so as to form the bottom panel. Unfortunately, a bottom panel including sheet edges (See e.g. 721-725 in Fig. 54e.) that are attached to each other does not always become airtight. Dependent on the nature of the attachment, such as the nature of the glue bond or the nature of the melt-bond, the bottom panel formed by folded sheet portions sometimes fails to prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space. This may be due e.g. to the folded portions forming fissures or slits through which a fluid, such as air, may pass between the environment and the interior storage space of the bag.

As mentioned elsewhere in this document, the entry of air having a certain air humidity may cause liquid water to be formed on a cold surface, such as on a surface of chilled goods in the interior storage space of the carrier bag. Since heat is released by the formation of liquid water or ice, the inventor realized that it is important to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space in order to prevent chilled goods from getting heated by the formation of liquid water or ice within the interior storage space. However, another hurdle is that in order to allow for inexpensive mass production of such a carrier bag, the method of manufacture of the bag has to be rational. Preferably, the method of manufacture of the bag should be in conformance with the manufacturing methods applied by standard bag production machines, such as e.g. machines used for the manufacture of carrier paper bags of the type commonly found in grocery stores. An example of such a carrier bag is disclosed in DE 89 04 678, the content of which is hereby incorporated by reference.

The inventor realized that the heating of chilled goods placed in the interior storage space of the bag may be reduced by attaching a cover sheet 700.

According to an embodiment, the cover sheet 700 is sized and adapted to fit snugly on the interior surface of the bag bottom panel BP so that it covers any paper edges from the bag bottom panel BP on the interior surface. The edges can give cause to small openings through which air and thus heat can pass. Although being generally small, these openings might contribute greatly to the total amount of heat transferred from the outside of the cag to the interior of the bag. By providing a cover sheet 700, heat transfer from the outside of the transport container/carrier bag through the bottom portion BP to the inside of the bag, or vice versa, is reduced. As an example, if the bottom portion BP of the transport

container/carrier bag comprises edges forming openings through which heat can transfer, the cover sheet, by covering the edges, can reduce this heat transfer. The edges in the bottom portion BP are in general at a distance from the perimeter, or from the outer lines, of the bottom portion BP. Thus, by covering the bottom portion BP, the edges are generally well covered as well.

Placing the cover sheet 700 in the interior storage space of the bag may, however, require that the bag is available in an expanded position in order to make it possible to reach the bottom panel at the inside of the bag. Depending on how the bag is manufactured, this might require an extra step and/or might cause problems to reach the inner bottom panel BP from the inside due to the design of the bag. According to an embodiment, the cover sheet 700 is sized and adapted to fit on the outer surface of the bag bottom panel BP so that it covers any paper edges from the bag bottom panel BP on the outer surface of the bag. The outer surface of the bottom panel BP is usually easier to reach than the interior surface. The outer surface of the bottom panel BP can usually be reached both when the bag is in its collapsed state and when it is in its expanded state. An example of a bag where the outer surface of the bottom panel can be easily reached in the collapsed state of the bag is shown in Fig. 4, Fig. 40M, or Fig. 46a. Thus providing the cover sheet 700 on the outside usually does not require an extra step for putting the bag into the expanded or collapsed state.

Examples of edges which can be covered by the cover sheet 700 are the edges 721-725 in Fig. 54e.

According to an embodiment the cover sheet 700 is a sheet of a membrane which is water vapour impermeable, or substantially water vapour impermeable.

According to an embodiment the membrane of the cover sheet 700 comprises a polymer, such as PE or polyethylene. Any other material described in relation to the water impermeable membrane 190 of the wall can be used as well. According to an embodiment the cover sheet 700 is of the same material as the bottom panel BP and/or the side panels SI A, SIB, S2A, S2B of the bag. This can reduce production costs since the number of different materials for producing the bag is produced.

According to an embodiment the cover sheet 700 comprises a layer of kraft paper and a layer of the water vapour impermeable membrane. According to an embodiment the layer of kraft paper is oriented against the side of the bottom panel. This might facilitate gluing since kraft paper often is simpler to glue than a water impermeable membrane. This is especially advantageous if the side of the bottom panel BP which is oriented to the cover sheet 700 comprises predominantly kraft paper as well. According to an embodiment the layer of water impermeable membrane is oriented against the side of the bottom panel. This might facilitate attaching via melting since a water impermeable membrane might comprise a material which can attach to another material through melting, such as said polymers. This is especially advantageous if the side of the bottom panel BP which is oriented to the cover sheet 700 comprises predominantly a water impermeable membrane as well.

According to an embodiment the cover sheet 700 comprises a layer of the water vapour impermeable membrane, a layer of kraft paper, and another layer of the water vapour impermeable membrane. This might especially be advantageous if it can be expected that the bag can be placed on wet grounds.

In relation to Fig. 28, a method 3400 for providing an improved transport container, or an improved carrier bag, is described. The method comprises the step 3410 of providing a transport container/carrier bag as described in relation to the method 1300, 1302, or 1305. The method 3400 can comprise the step of providing a handle according to method 3200 and/or providing closure means according to method 3300. Thus the method 3400 can be combined with what is described in relation to Fig. 30a-Fig. 53c. The method further comprises the step 3420 of providing a cover sheet 700 for said provided transport container/carrier bag. By providing said cover sheet 700 an improved transport

container/carrier bag is achieved. Especially heat transfer and/or transfer of water vapour can be further reduced.

Said cover sheet 700 is in one embodiment made of the same material as the panels of the transport container/carrier bag. In one example the material of the cover sheet 700 is kraft paper. In one example, the material of the cover sheet 700 comprises a water vapour impermeable membrane. In one example, the cover sheet 700 comprises at least one layer for preventing, or at least reducing transfer of liquid and/or vapour through the cover sheet 700. The step 3420 of providing said cover sheet 700 can comprise the step 3422 of cutting the cover sheet 700 from a piece of material for the cover sheet. Such cutting can comprise cutting a basically rectangular pattern out of said material for the cover sheet 700. Cutting basically rectangular patterns can be advantageous for saving material. This is due to the fact that basically rectangular patterns in general can be distributed tightly on a sheet of material.

The step 3420 of providing said cover sheet can comprise the step 3424 of folding said cover sheet. The cover sheet which is folded can be the cut cover sheet. In one example, the cover sheet is folded along two lines 701, 702, see for example Fig. 29c. Said two lines 701, 702 are in one example oriented basically in parallel. In one example, said cover sheet has a basically rectangular shape and said two lines 701, 702 are in parallel to two opposite outer lines of said basically rectangular shape. Said folding is preferably done in such a way that the folded portions are situated at the same side of the bottom portion, i.e. either the two folded portions are both folded backwards, or both or folded forwards. Preferably the folded sections are limited in size so that two folded sections do not cover each other. This is in one example achieved by making the folded area less in size than the unfolded area, for example as shown in Fig. 29c. This has the advantage that the folded cover sheet is at maximum two layers thick. A thicker cover sheet could prevent folding the improved transport container/carrier bag in a space-saving manner. This is due to the fact that each extra layer will usually add to the thickness of the bag in its collapsed state. In one example, the folded section is less than twenty percent, less than ten percent, or less than five percent of the size of the cover sheet in the unfolded state. In Fig. 29c, for example, the folded section along line 701 and the folded section along line 702 are less than fifteen percent of the cover sheet 700 in its unfolded state. In one example, the cover sheet is only folded along one line 703. An example is depicted in Fig. 29d. There, the cover sheet 700 is shown in its folded state, whereas the cover sheet 700 in Fig. 29c is shown in its unfolded state. Said one line 703 can be parallel to an outer line of the cover sheet. In one example, no folding of the cover sheet is performed. The step of providing said cover sheet can comprise the step 3426 of attaching said cover sheet 700 to a bottom portion BP of the transport container/carrier bag. Said attaching can comprise gluing the cover sheet 700 to the bottom portion BP. According to an

embodiment, the cover sheet 700 is glued along the outer contours of the cover sheet 700, the glue being deposited in a such a manner as to achieve an air impermeable, or substantially air impermeable, seal. Thus a continuous string of glue may advantageously be arranged along the outer contours of the cover sheet 700 so as to achieve an air impermeable, or substantially air impermeable seal.

According to another embodiment said attaching can comprise heating the cover sheet 700. In one example, when heating the cover sheet, a layer of the cover sheet 700 can, at least partly, melt and thereby attach to the bottom portion BP. According to an embodiment hot- melt-attachment method, a continuous air impermeable, or substantially air impermeable, seal is created along the outer contours of the cover sheet 700.

An example of a part of the cover sheet 700 which can melt is a polymer-layer in the cover sheet 700. Preferably, the area and/or the shape of the cover sheet 700 is basically the same as the area and/or the shape of the bottom portion BP. By this the cover sheet 700 can cover basically the whole bottom portion BP and fit tightly to it.

Another advantage of the cover sheet 700 is that vaporous transfer and/or transfer of liquids through the bottom side of the transport container/carrier bag may be reduced. This is due to the fact that the bottom of the transport container/carrier bag will contain at least one additional layer due to the cover sheet 700. Each additional layer will prolong the time before liquid/vapour will be able to pass through the bottom side of the transport container/carrier bag. This will prolong the time before the material of the bottom portion BP and/or the cover sheet 700 will lose its bearing strength due to absorbed liquid/vapour. Other advantages of different layer configurations for the cover sheet 700 have been described elsewhere in this document.

Said cover sheet 700 can be attached to the inside and/or the outside of the transport container/carrier bag. Attaching the cover sheet 700 to the outside can be easier when providing the improved transport container since the outside often is available when the transport container/carrier bag is provided, see for example, Fig. 40M. Attaching the cover sheet to the inside of the transport container/carrier bag is advantageous if edges of the bottom portion BP are folded to the inside of the transport container/carrier bag. This situation is illustrated in Fig. 29a and Fig. 29b. There, for not overloading the figure, only the bottom portion BP of a transport container/carrier bag is depicted. A cover sheet 700i from the inside and/or a cover sheet from the outside 700i can be attached to the bottom portion BP. In this example the bottom portion BP and the cover sheet 700i/700o/700 have basically the same shape and size. After attaching, the cover sheet 700, which can be either the cover sheet from the outside 700o, the cover sheet from the inside 700i, or both of them, basically covers the bottom portion, see Fig. 29b. Fig. 29d shows an example of a folded cover sheet 700 where a folded area 704 of the cover sheet 700 is illustrated. The folded area 704 is in one example folded in the direction of the bottom portion BP, and thus lies behind the front side of the cover sheet 700 when seen in Fig. 29d. The folded area 704 is in one example folded away from the direction of the bottom portion BP, and thus lies before the front side of the cover sheet 700 when seen in Fig. 29d.

It is advantageous to put the cover sheet 700 on the inside/outside of the transport container/carrier bag if it is expected that the liquid/vapour will preferably transmit from the inside to the outside of the transport container/carrier bag, or vice versa, respectively. This is especially the case if the cover sheet 700 comprises said at least one layer for preventing, or at least reducing transfer of liquid and/or vapour through the cover sheet 700. A preferred transfer of liquid/vapour from the inside to the outside might be the case if it is expected that condensation or liquid leakage from articles inside the transport

container/carrier bag might be the predominant effect. A preferred transfer of liquid/vapour from the outside to the inside might be the case if it is expected that the transport container/carrier bag might be put on wet ground or might be used in an environment with considerable precipitation or at least with high air humidity might cause a predominant transfer from the outside to the inside. According to one embodiment the cover layer 700 is stiffer than the bottom panel BP and/or any of the side panels SI A, S2A, SIB, S2B. This has the advantage that the bottom of the transport container/carrier bag will remain basically flat even when the transport container/carrier bag is loaded with relatively heavy goods. Examples of such relatively heave goods can be milk cartons, bottles with liquids in it, or the like. These relatively heavy goods might otherwise cause the bottom of the transport container/carrier bag to fold along the outer contours of the relatively heavy goods due to their weight. As a result, the interior surfaces of the transport container/carrier bag can touch the goods. Such a touching can cause a heat bridge to be established between the goods and the transport container/carrier bag . By providing a stiff cover layer 700, such a folding of the bottom, and thus a degrading of the heat insulating properties, can be prevented.

Embodiment Fl . A method for providing an improved transport container or an improved carrier bag, the method comprising the steps: providing a transport container according to any of the D embodiments (see below) or providing a carrier bag according to embodiment C40, C41, or C42 (see below); and providing a cover sheet for said provided transport container or said provided carrier bag.

Fig. 63-66 show the measurement results of temperature measurements in three mutually different bags. The dashed line 5400 corresponds to the temporal progression of a temperature measured in initially frozen goods placed in a commercially available thermally insulated plastic bag intended for transporting frozen food. This plastic bag is a bag according to the state of the art, and it was bought in the year 2015 from a grocery store in Stockholm, Sweden. The grocery store selling the state of the art plastic bag for transporting frozen food belongs to an international company specialised on selling frozen foods. In the following description of Fig. 63-66, 67a, 67b, and 67c this state of the art plastic bag will be denoted "plastic bag". The plastic bag carries the descriptive text "Sac Isotherme reutilisable" and it also carries text informing a reader that the plastic bag has a volume of 20 litres. The text on the exterior of the plastic bag also states that it is a 20 litre freeze bag causing products to maintain quality and frozen temperature: Ice cream lh, other food 1,5 h at room temperature 20 degrees C. It should be noted that the text on the plastic bag does not have any more specific statement about initial temperature of the "Ice cream" or "other food" for attaining the stated durations of lh, and 1,5 h, respectively.

With reference to Figure 65, the continuous line 5420 corresponds to the temporal progression of a temperature measured in initially frozen goods placed in a kraft paper grocery bag according to the present disclosure, wherein the kraft paper layer has a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane 190 bonded to one side of the kraft paper layer 180. In the following description of Fig. 63-66, 67a, 67b, and 67c this bag will be denoted "membrane bag". The membrane bag had a kraft paper basis weight of about 135 g/m 2 and a density of about 850 kg/m 3 . The air permeance of the substantially vapour impermeable membrane was less than 0,35 um/(Pa*s).

With reference to Figure 63 and 65, the dotted line 5410 corresponds to the temporal progression of a temperature measured in initially frozen goods placed in a kraft paper grocery bag, as described in this document, wherein the kraft paper layer does not have any water impermeable membrane. In the following description of Fig. 63-66, 67a, 67b, and 67c this bag will be denoted "non-membrane bag". The kraft paper layer of the non- membrane bag had a kraft paper basis weight of between 100 to 120 g/m 2 and a density between 800 and 900 kg/m 3 .

Fig. 63-66 illustrate the temporal progression of the measured temperatures for ten hours. Thus, Fig. 63-66 show the measured temperature inside the respective bag as a function of time. The time is denoted in hours and the temperature in degrees Celsius. The

measurements were performed with an ambient air temperature outside the bags of +20° Celsius. This temperature was allowed to vary one degree Celsius up or down. The measurements were performed at a relative humidity of the ambient air of 80%. No active cooling in any of the bags was provided during the measurements. The measurement of temperatures in the goods in the different bags was started with some minutes after each other. The zero point of time of the plotted measurement results corresponds to the respective starting point of the measurement of the respective bag.

All bags were equipped with the same mixture of frozen groceries. The mixture of frozen groceries consisted of a 0.72 kg package containing beef, a 0.36 kg package containing duck meat, a 1 kg package containing peas, a 1 kg package containing mushrooms, a 1 kg package containing raspberries, a 1 kg package containing fish and two 0.37 kg packages containing meat. As a result, the total amount of frozen groceries was 5.82 kg. The mixture of frozen groceries corresponds to a filling of the respective bag of around 80% of the volume. The temperature in each bag during the measurement was measured with a temperature sensor placed in between the two packages containing meat.

The following starting temperatures at time zero were measured: -29.41° Celsius for the dashed line 5400, -29.61° Celsius for the dotted line 5410, and -28.90° Celsius for the continuous line 5420. As can be seen from the figures, after more than seven hours the temperature measured inside the membrane bag as well as the temperature measured inside the non-membrane bag were still below zero degrees Celsius, whereas the temperature measured inside the plastic bag was above zero degrees Celsius. More specifically, the measurement inside the plastic bag reaches zero degrees after 7:00 hours. Table Tl shows how long time it takes for the measured goods temperature in the respective bag to increase its temperature by 5° Celsius, 10° Celsius, etc. Table T2 shows how long time it takes for the measured goods temperature in the respective bag to reach certain temperatures.

As can be seen from the tables and the figures, after 10 hours both the closed and sealed membrane bag and the closed and sealed non-membrane bag still have an inside temperature below zero degrees Celsius, whereas the plastic bag has an inside temperature above zero.

Fig. 63 compares the temperature behaviour inside the plastic bag with the temperature behaviour inside the non-membrane bag. As can be seen, the measured temperature inside the non-membrane bag stays below zero degrees Celsius during the whole plotted period of ten hours. The measured temperature inside the plastic bag reaches zero degrees Celsius after seven hours. Thus, the non-membrane bag is able to keep the goods inside the bag in a frozen state for several additional hours compared to the plastic bag. Partly, the measured temperature inside the plastic bag is more than five degrees higher than the measured temperature inside the non-membrane bag. This happens, for example, after one hour and ten minutes. Fig. 64 compares the temperature behaviour inside the plastic bag with the temperature behaviour inside the membrane bag. As can be seen, the measured temperature inside the membrane bag stays below zero degrees Celsius during the whole plotted period of ten hours. The measured temperature inside the plastic bag reaches zero degrees Celsius after seven hours. Thus, the membrane bag is able to keep the goods inside the bag in a frozen state for several additional hours compared to the plastic bag. Partly, the measured temperature inside the plastic bag is more than ten degrees higher than the measured temperature inside the non-membrane bag. This is, for example, immediately noticeable for the time of two hours after starting of the measurements.

Fig. 65 compares the temperature behaviour inside the non-membrane bag with the temperature behaviour inside the membrane bag. As can be seen, the measured temperature inside both the non-membrane bag and the membrane bag stays below zero degrees Celsius during the whole plotted period of ten hours. Apart from a starting period in which the non- membrane bag has a lower starting temperature, the membrane bag is able to keep the goods inside the bag at a cooler temperature compared to the non-membrane bag. Partly, the measured temperature inside the non-membrane bag is more than five degrees higher than the measured temperature inside the membrane bag. This is, for example, immediately noticeable for the time of two and/or three hours after starting of the measurements.

Fig. 66 compares the temperature behaviour inside the non-membrane bag with the temperature behaviour inside the membrane bag and the temperature behaviour inside the plastic bag. What has been said about the measurements in relation to Fig. 63-64 applies to

Fig. 66 as well.

Fig. 67a-c is a sketch of the different bags which were used for the measurements which are described in relation to Fig. 63-66. In Fig. 67a a schematic cut through the plastic bag is shown. The plastic bag consists of three layers 5801, 5802, 5803. In between the three layers 5801, 5802, 5803 air can be present. The plastic bag comprises a first outer layer

5801. The first outer layer 5801 is a thin plastic layer. The thin plastic layer has a thickness of roughly around a tenth of a millimetre. The plastic bag further comprises a second middle layer 5802. The second middle layer 5802 is a foamed or woven polymeric insulation material. The second middle layer 5802 has a thickness of around a millimetre.

The plastic bag further comprises a third inner layer 5803. The third inner layer 5803 is a thin plastic layer. The third inner layer 5803 has a thickness of roughly around a tenth of a millimetre.

The three layers 5801, 5802, 5803 are present at the side walls and at the bottom of the plastic bag. At the top of the plastic bag the side walls touch each other in a closed state of the plastic bag. At the handle of the plastic bag a fastening means is provided to prevent the plastic bag from opening. Although the upper sides of the side walls are touching each other in a closed state of the plastic bag, the design of the plastic bag allows a relatively small circulation of air through small holes 5804 on the outer edges of the upper side of the plastic bag. These small holes are provided there since the upper side walls do not touch each other completely until the very outer edges of the upper sides of the side walls in a closed state of the plastic bag. In other words, the plastic bag is not sealed in a closed state.

In Fig. 67b a schematic cut through the non-membrane bag is shown. The non-membrane bag consists of one layer 5811. Said one layer 5811 comprises kraft paper. The thickness of said one layer 5811 is roughly around a tenth of a millimetre. The non-membrane bag is sealed on the top of the bag. In Fig. 67c a schematic cut through the membrane bag is shown. The membrane bag consists of two layers 5821, 5822. The membrane bag comprises a first outer layer 5821. The first outer layer comprises kraft paper. The thickness of said first outer layer 5821 is roughly around a tenth of a millimetre. The membrane bag comprises a second inner layer 5822. The second inner layer 5822 comprises a membrane material as described in the present disclosure. The membrane bag is sealed on the top of the bag.

Further embodiments are described below:

Embodiment Al. A container for use in an air atmosphere environment, the container having a wall adapted to enclose an interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods, the wall being shaped and adapted to form said interior storage space to a volume of at least ten metric litres; said wall comprising:

a) a layer of a material having a thermal conductivity of less than 0,2 W/(K*m ); and b) a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of said material layer; and

c) a closable opening such that the container in its closed state substantially seals the interior storage space from the environment so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space.

Embodiment A2. The container as defined in Embodiment Al, wherein the wall is shaped and adapted to form said interior storage space to a volume of at least 20 metric litres; and wherein

said material layer has a tensile strength exceeding 0,267 Newton/ square millimeter.

Embodiment A3. The container as defined in Embodiment Al, wherein the wall is shaped and adapted to form said interior storage space to a volume of at least 30 metric litres; and wherein

said material layer has a tensile strength exceeding 0,4 Newton/ square millimeter.

Embodiment A4. The container as defined in Embodiment Al, wherein the wall is shaped and adapted to form said interior storage space to a volume of at least 40 metric litres; and wherein

said material layer has a tensile strength exceeding 0,533 Newton/ square millimeter.

Embodiment A5. The container as defined in Embodiment Al, wherein the wall is shaped and adapted to form said interior storage space to a volume of at least 50 metric litres; and wherein

said material layer has a tensile strength exceeding 0,667Newton/ square millimeter.

Embodiment A6. The container as defined in Embodiment Al, wherein

the container is adapted to be collapsible so as to have

a collapsed state for enabling transportation of the container in a substantially flat state, and

an expanded state such that the container, in its expanded state, provides an interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods. Embodiment A7. The container as defined in Embodiment Al, wherein the container is shaped in such a manner that plural containers 20 can be stacked so as to enable transporting a plurality of stacked containers within a certain volume in three dimensional space; said certain volume being smaller than the sum of the individual container volumes.

Embodiment A8. The container as defined in Embodiment A7, wherein an individual container has, at least partly, a cone shape such that two at least partly cone shaped containers can be placed one partly within the other. Embodiment A9. The container as defined in Embodiment Al, wherein

said material layer is a biodegradable material.

Embodiment A10. The container as defined in Embodiment Al, wherein

said substantially water vapour impermeable membrane is a biodegradable material. Embodiment All. The container as defined in Embodiment Al, wherein

said material layer is a biodegradable material; and wherein

said substantially water vapour impermeable membrane is a biodegradable material.

Embodiment A12. The container as defined in Embodiment Al, wherein

the container, when in use for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods, is shaped and adapted to enable a human to carry the container such that the centre of gravity of the loaded container is less than 10 cm from at least one container wall.

This advantageously allows for an ergonomically friendly carrying of the container. Embodiment A13. The container as defined in Embodiment Al, wherein

said wall is shaped and adapted to form said interior storage space to a volume of less than 100 metric litres.

Embodiment A14. The container as defined in Embodiment Al, wherein

said wall comprises Kraft paper.

Embodiment A15. The container as defined in Embodiment Al, wherein

said wall comprises a Non- woven material - Conventional textiles

- Film of foamed/porous thermoplastic.

Embodiment A16. The container as defined in Embodiment Al, wherein

said material layer has a tensile strength exceeding 0, 133 Newton/ square millimeter.

Embodiment A17. The container as defined in Embodiment Al, wherein

said wall material is selected from a list comprising:

- Film of foamed/porous thermoplastic. The thermoplastic may be a conventional oil-based plastic such as polyethylene, polypropylene or polyurethane. It is also possible to use a bio- based plastic, polylactic acid (PLA)

- Film of foamed/porous rubber (rubber can be of many types, but neoprene (chloroprene rubber) are preferred. Embodiment A18. The container as defined in Embodiment A16, wherein

Said non-woven materials and conventional textiles have a tensile index value exceeding 50 kNm/kg and a thermal conductivity of λ < 0,2 W/(m K).

Embodiment Bl. A grocery transport system comprising

a storage facility (600) for goods; The storage facility comprising one or several storage rooms having a controlled environment, in that the temperature and the relative humidity of the air in the storage room is controlled so that it is kept within certain predetermined ranges; wherein

the goods comprises a plurality of different types of goods, at least one type of goods being chilled or frozen.

Further embodiments are disclosed below:

Embodiment CI . A collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag (20) for use in an air atmosphere environment (10), the carrier bag (20) having

a collapsed state (20A) for enabling transportation of the carrier bag in a substantially flat state, and an expanded state (20B, 20C) such that the carrier bag, in its expanded state, provides an interior storage space (100) for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages (40), the carrier bag (20) comprising:

a paper layer (180) being shaped and folded so as to form

a front wall panel (110, SI A),

a back wall panel (120, SIB),

two mutually opposing side wall panels (130A,S2A; 130B, S2B); and a substantially rectangular bottom panel (140); wherein the wall panels and the bottom panel cooperate to form said interior storage space (100) to a volume of between 10 litres and 50 litres in the expanded state of the carrier bag; and

wherein a rim portion (150) of the wall panels facing away from the bag bottom panel (140) provides a bag opening (160); the carrier bag (20) further comprising

a first handle (170 A) adapted to allow gripping by a human hand for enabling carrying of the grocery carrier bag, the first handle comprising a paper strip formed in a U- shape and having two paper strip end portions (200 A; 21 OA); the paper strip end portions (200A; 210A) of the first handle (170A) being attached to said rim portion (150) of said front wall panel (110, SI A); and wherein

said paper layer is a kraft paper layer (180) having a surface weight of at least 100 grams per square meter; said kraft paper layer (180) having a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane (190) bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer (180); and wherein

the carrier bag (20) has

a mechanical interlock (240) attached to said rim portion(150); said mechanical interlock (240) being arranged and positioned to provide

an open expanded state (20B) of the carrier bag (20) for loading and/or unloading grocery packages (40) to be transported, and

a closed expanded state (20C) of the carrier bag (20) such that the carrier bag, in its closed expanded state (20C), provides a substantially closed interior storage space (100) for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages; wherein

the mechanical interlock (240) is closable such that, in the closed expanded state (20C) of the carrier bag, the mechanical interlock (240) cooperates with said wall panels and bottom panel so as to close and substantially seal the interior storage space (100) from the environment (10) so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space (100) such that when a grocery package comprising frozen food is transported in said interior storage space the grocery bag is adapted to minimize or prevent the occurrence of condensation within the interior storage space (100). This solution advantageously provides a collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag enabling the transport of frozen or chilled groceries while maintaining the frozen or chilled state of the groceries for a dramatically extended duration of time, while preserving the integrity of the carrier bag during transport, even when the bag is transported in tropical environments, e.g. at temperatures of 25 degrees Centigrade or more.

In this context it is to be noted that the air in the atmosphere of the earth inherently has a certain humidity. In other words, the air contains a certain amount of water in vapour form. In this context, it deserves mentioning that the absolute humidity is the mass of water vapour per unit volume of total air and water vapour mixture. Absolute humidity in the atmosphere reaches roughly 30 grams per cubic meter when the air is saturated at 30 °C.

The absolute humidity in southern Sweden in the month of Juli (average value for the years 1996 to 2012) ranged from 9 grams/cubic metre to 12 grams/cubic metre, according to the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI). A relative air humidity of around 50% is common, and during summertime or in

subtropical or tropical climate zones the outdoor air humidity may be higher than that. Thus a relative air humidity of around 80% is not unusual. The relative humidity of an air-water mixture is defined as the ratio of the partial pressure of water vapour (H20) in the mixture to the saturated vapour pressure of water at a given temperature. Thus the relative humidity of air is a function of both water content and temperature. As a rule of thumb, the relative air humidity may be estimated to increase by about 5% when the temperature drops by 1 degree. Accordingly, when the air of the environment has a temperature of + 18 degrees C and a relative air humidity of e.g. 60% and that air meets a cold surface, vapour may condense into liquid water on the surface when the air temperature reaches the dew point, i.e. a relative air humidity of about 100% .

In this context, it also to be noted that heat is released when vapour condenses into liquid water. In fact, one (1) gram of liquid water being formed from vapour releases 2260 J (joule) of energy. When that one gram of liquid water freezes to ice form it releases another 334 J. Thus, the energy released by 1 gram of water vapour being turned into a layer of ice is 2594 J. By comparison, it is to be noted that only 2,2 J is required in order to increase the temperature of 1 gram of ice (frozen water) by one degree. In other words, the energy released by 1 gram of water vapour being turned into a layer of ice on a package containing one kilogram of frozen water is actually sufficient to warm that whole kilogram of frozen water by 1, 18 degrees. Thus, if 12 grams of water vapour is allowed to turn into a frost layer of ice on a package of frozen grocery, that energy (just over 31 kJ) suffices to warm that grocery by several degrees. The exact temperature change depends on the specific heat capacity of that particular piece of grocery. Ice has a specific heat capacity of 2200 J/(kg *K), and thus 12 grams of frost being formed would suffices to warm that one kilogram of fresh water ice by about 14 degrees Centigrade.

Thus, whereas a collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according the state of the art, as disclosed by the German Utility Model Application DE 89 04 678 provides handles for conveniently carrying the groceries, any frozen grocery packages would appear to inherently cause vapour to condense into liquid water when the open carrier bag is transported in a warm air atmosphere environment having air humidity allowing such air to reach the dew point on a frozen grocery package surface. Such a condensation process may actually cause a rapid warming of the frozen grocery. Moreover, if the state of the art carrier bag according to DE 89 04 678 is carried by a walking person in a warm air environment, the movement would appear to inherently cause an exchange of air between the bag interior, which is chilled by the frozen groceries, and the warmer air surrounding the carrier bag, and this air exchange process will further drive the process of condensing vapour into liquid water by supplying new warm air to surfaces of the frozen groceries. Not only does this process cause thawing of initially frozen groceries and warming of initially chilled groceries, but it may also produce liquid water by condensation inside the carrier bag, which may jeopardize the integrity of the bag bottom or side wall, since it is made solely of paper, according to DE 89 04 678. Thus, the strength of carrier bag made solely of paper may decrease, and the risk of breaking increases when the paper-only-carrier bag becomes wet. By contrast, the collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag according to the above defined solution comprises a mechanical interlock which is closable such that, in the closed expanded state of the carrier bag, the mechanical interlock cooperates with said wall panels and said bottom panel so as to close and substantially seal the interior storage space from the environment so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space such that when a grocery package comprising frozen food is transported in said interior storage space the grocery bag is adapted to minimize or prevent the occurrence of condensation within the interior storage space.

Thus, for example, if a carrier bag, having a volume of 50 litres in the expanded state of the carrier bag, is filled by 75% with frozen groceries, there will remain about 25% of the total volume which can be filled by air in connection with the loading of the bag. Thus, as an example, about 12,5 liters of air having an initial temperature of about 18 degrees

Centigrade and, about 10 grams of water per cubic metre (example relating to approximate average absolute outdoor humidity in southern Sweden in the month of Juli) may be enclosed in the bag when it is sealed after packing. In this connection it is noted that the term "litre" means "metric litre" i.e. one litre equals one cubic decimetre. Accordingly, the 12,5 liters of contained air may include about 0, 125 grams of water in vapour form. Air contained within the bag together with frozen groceries may be caused to cool, and during this decreasing of the air temperature the water vapour in that air may first condense into water, releasing 0,2825 kJ of energy, and then it may freeze releasing 0,04175 kJ of energy. Thus, the two phase changes during the transformation of 0, 125 grams of water from vapour form into ice may deliver 0,324 kJ. The energy released may suffice to increase the temperature of 10 kg of frozen water by less than half a degree Centigrade. According to an estimate it would be about 0,008 degrees Centigrade. The energy released by cooling the 0, 125 grams of water by 19 degrees Centigrade is comparatively small and may actually be regarded as negligible is comparison. In effect, the grocery bag being adapted to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space advantageously contributes to maintaining the frozen or chilled state of the groceries for a significantly extended duration of time, while also preserving the integrity of the carrier bag by minimizing or preventing the formation of liquid water within the interior storage space, and by the kraft paper layer having a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer, thereby reducing or preventing paper disintegration due to paper wetness.

According to another aspect of the invention, a problem to be addressed is how to achieve an improved, yet cost-efficient, transportation of grocery items.

This problem is addressed by Embodiment C2. A collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag (20) for use in an air atmosphere environment, the carrier bag having

a collapsed state (20A) for enabling transportation of the carrier bag in a substantially flat state, and

an expanded state such that the carrier bag, in its expanded state, provides an interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages, the carrier bag comprising:

a paper layer being shaped and folded so as to form

a front wall panel (S 1 A),

a back wall panel (SIB),

two side wall panels (S2A, S2B); and

a bottom panel; wherein the wall panels and the bottom panel cooperate to form said interior storage space to a volume larger than 10 litres in the expanded state of the carrier bag; and

wherein a rim portion of the wall panels facing away from the bag bottom panel provides a bag opening; the carrier bag further comprising

a first handle being associated with said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A) so as to allow gripping by a human hand such as to enable carrying of the grocery carrier bag; and wherein

said paper layer is a kraft paper layer; said kraft paper layer having a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer; and wherein

the carrier bag has

an open expanded state for loading and/or unloading grocery packages to be transported, and a closed expanded state such that the carrier bag, in its closed expanded state, provides a substantially closed interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages; wherein

the bag opening is a closable opening which, in the closed expanded state of the carrier bag cooperates with said wall panels and said bottom panel so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space.

Embodiment C3. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according to

Embodiment CI or C2, wherein

the substantially water vapour impermeable membrane is bonded to the side of the kraft paper layer facing the interior storage space of the bag.

Embodiment C4. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according to

Embodiment CI or C2,

wherein

the substantially water vapour impermeable membrane is bonded to the side of the kraft paper layer facing the outside of the bag.

This solution advantageously allows user to place bag on ground even when its rainy and wet without causing deteriorated strength of the bag, since the water vapour impermeable membrane may prevent or minimize the absorption, by the kraft paper, of any water deposited on the exterior surface of the bag.

Embodiment C5. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C, wherein

said substantially water vapour impermeable membrane comprises a polymer layer.

Embodiment C6. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C, wherein

said polymer layer is a PE layer.

Embodiment C7. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C, wherein said polymer layer is a layer of Polyethylene.

Embodiment C8. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according to Embodiment C 2 or any preceding Embodiment C when dependent on Embodiment C 2, wherein

the carrier bag has a closure means attached to said rim portion; said closure means being arranged and positioned to allow

the open expanded state of the carrier bag for loading and/or unloading grocery packages to be transported, and

the closed expanded state of the carrier bag such that the carrier bag, in its closed expanded state, provides a substantially sealed interior storage space suitable for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages; wherein

the closure means is closable such that, in the closed expanded state of the carrier bag, the closure means cooperates with said wall panels and bottom panel so as to close and substantially seal the interior storage space from the environment so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space.

Embodiment C9. The grocery carrier bag according to according to Embodiment C 2 or any preceding Embodiment C when dependent on Embodiment C 2, wherein

the carrier bag has a closure means attached to said rim portion; said closure means, in the closed expanded state of the carrier bag, cooperating with said wall panels and said bottom panel such that, when a grocery package comprising frozen food is transported in said interior storage space, the grocery bag is adapted to minimize or prevent the occurrence of condensation within the interior storage space.

Embodiment CIO. The grocery carrier bag according to according to Embodiment C 8 or C9, wherein

Said closure means includes

a first elongated closure element, and

a second elongated closure element.

Embodiment CI 1. The grocery carrier bag according to according to any preceding Embodiment C when dependent on Embodiment C 1, wherein said mechanical interlock includes

a first elongated closure element, and

a second elongated closure element. Embodiment C12. The grocery carrier bag according to according to Embodiment C 10 or 11, wherein

the first elongated closure element is attached to an interior surface of the rim portion of the front panel and to a part of an interior surface of the rim portion of a side panel; and wherein

the first and second elongated closure elements are positioned and adapted for mating with each other so as to achieve closing of the opening.

Embodiment C13. The grocery carrier bag according to Embodiment C 12 when dependent on Embodiment C 2; wherein

the first handle comprises a paper strip formed in a U-shape and having two paper strip end portions; the paper strip end portions of the first handle being attached to said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A).

Embodiment C14. The grocery carrier bag according to Embodiment C 13 or any preceding Embodiment C when dependent on Embodiment C 1, further comprising

a first substantially planar reinforcement sheet having a certain size; the first substantially planar reinforcement sheet having a a first sheet surface () and a second sheet surface () on opposite sides of the substantially planar reinforcement sheet; wherein the first reinforcement sheet is attached to the paper strip end portions of the first handle and to said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A) such that said paper strip end portions of the first handle are located between the front wall panel (SI A) and the reinforcement sheet.

This first reinforcement sheet advantageously operates to distribute the lifting force from the first handle paper strip end portions to a larger surface area of the front wall panel (SI A).

Embodiment CI 5. The grocery carrier bag according to Embodiment C 14, wherein The first surface of the first reinforcement sheet faces the paper strip end portions of the first handle and said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A); said first surface of the first reinforcement sheet being bonded to the paper strip end portions of the first handle and said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A) so as to distribute lifting force from said paper strip end portions to said front wall panel via said first reinforcement sheet.

Embodiment C16. The grocery carrier bag according to Embodiment C 14 or 15 when dependent on Embodiment C 12, or any preceding Embodiment C, wherein

the first elongated closure element is integrated with a second substantially planar reinforcement sheet, the second reinforcement sheet having a predetermined area extension which is larger than the certain size of the first substantially planar reinforcement sheet; wherein

the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet is attached to the first reinforcement sheet and to said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A) such that the first reinforcement sheet is located between the front wall panel (SI A) and the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet.

Embodiment CI 7. The grocery carrier bag according to Embodiment C 16, wherein

the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet is bonded to the second sheet surface of the first substantially planar reinforcement sheet so as to distribute lifting force from said first substantially planar reinforcement sheet to said front wall panel via said second reinforcement sheet. Embodiment CI 8. The grocery carrier bag according to Embodiment C 16 or 17, wherein the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet comprises polymer material.

Embodiment CI 9. The grocery carrier bag according to Embodiment C 16, 17, or 18, wherein

the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet comprises paper.

Embodiment C20. The grocery carrier bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 16-19, wherein a second substantially planar reinforcement sheet is attached to an interior surface of the rim portion of the front panel and to a part of an interior surface of the rim portion of a side panel.

Embodiment C21. The grocery carrier bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 14-20, wherein

the paper strip end portions of the first handle and said first reinforcement sheet are sized and dimensioned so as to withstand a force exceeding 100 Newton.

Embodiment C22. The grocery carrier bag according to Embodiment C 12 when dependent on Embodiment C 2; wherein

said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A) comprises at least one die cut opening so as to form the first handle; and wherein

the first elongated closure element is attached to an interior surface of the rim portion of the front panel between said at least one die cut opening and said bag bottom panel. This location of the closure element advantageously enables the provision of a handle formed by a die cut opening in the wall panels above the closure elements while also enabling the closing and sealing of the interior storage space.

Embodiment C23. The grocery carrier bag according to Embodiment C 12 when dependent on Embodiment C 2; wherein

said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A) comprises at least one die cut opening so as to form the first handle; and wherein

the first elongated closure element is attached to an interior surface of the rim portion of the front panel between said at least one die cut opening and said bag bottom panel such that said at least one die cut opening does not interfere with said closable interior storage space.

Embodiment C24. The grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C when dependent on Embodiment C 2, wherein

said paper layer is a kraft paper layer having a surface weight of at least 100 grams per square meter. Embodiment C25. The grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C, wherein

said kraft paper layer comprises a certain amount of air being trapped within the kraft paper layer.

Embodiment C26. The grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C, wherein

said kraft paper layer comprises a plurality of Kraft Pulp Fibres which are arranged one above the other so as to form plural air gaps within the kraft paper layer.

Embodiment C27. The grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C, wherein

said kraft paper layer comprises a plurality of Kraft Pulp Fibres which are arranged one above the other so as to form plural air gaps within the kraft paper layer; wherein at least some of the Kraft Pulp Fibres have a length in the range between 1 and 3 mm and/or a width in the range between 10 and 50 micrometer; and wherein

at least some of said plural air gaps have a volume exceeding 200 000 cubic micrometers. Embodiment C28. The grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C, wherein

said paper layer being shaped and folded so as to form

the front wall panel (SI A),

the back wall panel (SIB), and

the side wall panels (S2A, S2B) consists of said kraft paper layer a single substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer.

This solution enables an advantageously cost-efficient production of the grocery carrier bag in that few production method steps are required when only a single layer of water vapour impermeable material need be bonded to the kraft paper layer. Embodiment C29. The grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C, wherein

said paper layer is a kraft paper layer having a surface weight of less than 140 grams per square meter.

Embodiment C30. The grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C, wherein

said paper layer is a kraft paper layer having a surface weight of less than 140 grams per square meter.

Embodiment C31. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C, wherein

the bottom panel is substantially rectangular.

Embodiment C32. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C, wherein

the paper layer is shaped and folded so as to form

the front wall panel (SI A) such that it exhibits a first certain width at a folding edge where the front wall panel (SI A) meets the bottom panel, and wherein

the paper layer is shaped and folded such that the front wall panel (SI A) exhibits a second certain width at the rim portion facing away from the bag bottom panel;

said second certain width being longer than said first certain width.

Embodiment C33. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according to Embodiment C 32, wherein

the paper layer is shaped and folded so as to form

the back wall panel (SIB) such that it exhibits substantially said first certain width at a folding edge where the back wall panel (SIB) meets the bottom panel, and wherein

the paper layer is shaped and folded such that the back wall panel (SIB) exhibits substantially said second certain width at the rim portion facing away from the bag bottom panel. Embodiment C34. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C, wherein

said substantially water vapour impermeable membrane is bonded to the side of the kraft paper layer facing the interior storage space.

Embodiment C35. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C, further comprising:

a second handle adapted to allow gripping by a human hand for enabling carrying of the grocery carrier bag, the second handle comprising a paper strip formed in a U-shape and having two paper strip end portions; the paper strip end portions of the second handle being attached to said rim portion of said back wall panel (SI A).

Embodiment C36. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C, wherein

the interior storage space of the bag, in its expanded state, has a cross-sectional area substantially parallel to the plane of the bag bottom panel,

the cross-sectional area shrinking towards the closable opening such that grocery carrier bag , in its closed and expanded state, has a generally tapered shape, as seen in a line of view substantially parallel to

the plane of the front wall panel and

the plane of the bottom panel.

Embodiment C37 A kit of parts, comprising

a collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C; and

an insulator device for placement towards the front wall panel

Embodiment C38. A kit of parts, comprising

a collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according to any preceding Embodiment C; and

an insulator device for placement on the bottom panel in the interior storage space so as to reduce heat transfer through said bottom panel. Embodiment C39. A kit of parts, comprising

a collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according to any preceding

Embodiment C; and

an insulator device for placement towards the front wall panel (SI A) in the interior storage space so as to reduce heat transfer through said front wall panel (SI A).

Embodiment C40. A method for providing a collapsible carrier bag, the method comprising:

providing a substantially planar sheet of a multilayer material; the substantially planar sheet having a first sheet surface and a second sheet surface on opposite sides of the substantially planar sheet; the multilayer material comprising a layer of kraft paper having a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer;

cutting the planar sheet according to a pre-determined pattern so that a resulting planar sheet has at least two edges;

forming or folding the multilayer sheet into a substantially tubular shape such that the at least two edges overlap so as to allow a first overlap area of the first sheet surface to meet a second overlap area of the second sheet surface and

so that the first sheet surface forms an interior surface of the-bag-to-be;

attaching the first overlap area to the second overlap area, e.g. by gluing or melt- bonding;

forming or folding the multilayer sheet so as to form a front panel (S1A), a back panel (SIB), and two mutually opposing side panels (S2A, S2B) of the-bag-to-be;

forming or folding the multilayer sheet so as to create a bottom portion of the-bag-to- be so that the bottom portion connects the panels (SI A, SIB, S2A, S2B), thereby obtaining a semi-manufactured bag which in an expanded state exhibits four wall panels, a bag bottom panel and a bag opening formed by an opening rim of the four wall panels facing away from the bag bottom;

collapsing the semi-manufactured bag by folding along a folding edge where the front panel (SI A) connects with the bottom panel and providing a mid-fold in each of the side panels (S2A, S2B), the mid-fold of a side panel running in a direction substantially parallel to a fold where that side panel (S2A, S2B) connects with the front panel; wherein the collapsing step is performed such that a side panel mid-fold is bent outwardly so as to cause a front most interior surface portion of that side panel to face a back most secondary interior surface portion of that side panel;

providing a first elongated closure element, and providing a second elongated closure element; the first and second elongated closure elements being adapted for mating with each other;

attaching the first elongated closure element to the interior surface of the front panel and to the interior surface of the front most portion of a side panel substantially in the vicinity of the opening rim; and

attaching the second elongated closure element to the interior surface of the back panel and to the interior surface of the back most portion of a side panel substantially in the vicinity of the opening rim such that the first elongated closure element and the second elongated closure element are aligned with each other so as to form a mechanical interlock which, in a closed state, is adapted to provide a substantially water vapour impermeable seal;

providing a handle for allowing a user to carry the carrier bag; the handle being associated with the front panel (S1A) and the back panel (SIB).

Embodiment C41. A method for providing a carrier bag; the method comprising:

providing a carrier bag having a carrier bag enclosure formed by

a front wall panel (S 1 A),

a back wall panel (S IB),

two mutually opposing side wall panels (S2A, S2B);

a substantially square bottom portion; wherein the wall panels and the bottom portion cooperate to form said enclosure; and wherein a portion of the wall panels facing away from the bag bottom comprises a closable enclosure opening.

Embodiment C42. A method for providing a carrier bag, the method comprising:

providing a collapsible carrier bag having

a collapsed state for enabling transportation of the carrier bag in a substantially flat state, and

an expanded state for transporting food items in a carrier bag enclosure which, in the expanded state of the carrier bag, has a volume larger than 10 litres; the carrier bag further having

a front wall panel (S I A), a back wall panel (SIB),

two mutually opposing side wall panels (S2A, S2B);

a substantially square bottom portion; wherein the wall panels and the bottom portion cooperate to form said enclosure; and wherein a portion of the wall panels facing away from the bag bottom comprises a closable enclosure opening.

Embodiment C43. A method of delivering chilled groceries, the method comprising: providing a collapsible grocery carrier bag, e.g. according to any of Embodiment Cs 1-35, in a collapsed state;

expanding the collapsible grocery carrier bag in an environment having a certain relative air humidity;

loading chilled or frozen groceries into the interior storage space; and

transporting the loaded grocery carrier bag to a destination.

Embodiment C44. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 1-36, further comprising

an insulator device for placement on the bottom panel in the interior storage space so as to reduce heat transfer through said bottom panel.

Embodiment C45. The chill bag according to Embodiment C 44, wherein

the insulator device is arranged and positioned on at least a portion of the bottom panel in the interior storage space so as to reduce heat transfer through said bottom panel.

Embodiment C46. The chill bag according to Embodiment C 44 or 45, wherein

the insulator device comprises a piece of material; said piece of material being shaped and adapted to provide cellular air cushions so as to reduce heat transfer through said bottom panel.

Embodiment C47. The chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 44-46, wherein

said piece of material comprises paper.

Embodiment C48. The chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 44-47, wherein

said piece of material comprises a substantially water vapour impermeable material. This solution advantageously enables the insulator device to withstand a damp or wet environment without absorbing water.

Embodiment C49. The chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 46 - 48, wherein said piece of material comprises at least one layer of a polymer material.

Embodiment C50. The chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 46 - 48, wherein said piece of material comprises at least one layer of a plastic material.

This solution advantageously enables the insulator device to withstand a damp or wet environment without absorbing water.

Embodiment C51. The chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 46 - 50, wherein said piece of material comprises BubbleWrap®. Embodiment C52. The chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 47 - 49, wherein said piece of paper material has a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the paper material.

This solution advantageously enables the insulator device to withstand a damp or wet environment without absorbing water.

Embodiment C53. The chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 44 - 49 or 52, wherein

the insulator device comprises a piece of card board paper material; said piece of card board paper material being shaped and adapted to reduce heat transfer through said bottom panel.

Embodiment C54. A kit of parts, comprising

a collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 1-36; and

an insulator device for placement on the bottom panel in the interior storage space so as to reduce heat transfer through said bottom panel.

Embodiment C55. The kit of parts according to Embodiment C 54, wherein the insulator device is adapted for positioning on at least a portion of the bottom panel in the interior storage space so as to reduce heat transfer through said bottom panel.

Embodiment C56. The kit of parts according to Embodiment C 54 or 55, wherein

the insulator device comprises a piece of material; said piece of material being shaped and adapted to provide cellular air cushions so as to reduce heat transfer through said bottom panel.

Embodiment C57. The kit of parts according to any of Embodiment Cs 54 -56, wherein said piece of material comprises at least one layer of a plastic material.

This solution advantageously enables the insulator device to withstand a damp or wet environment without absorbing water.

Embodiment C58. The kit of parts according to any of Embodiment Cs 54 -56, wherein said piece of material comprises a paper layer; said paper layer having a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the paper layer.

This solution advantageously enables the insulator device to withstand a damp or wet environment without absorbing water. Embodiment C59. The kit of parts according to any of Embodiment Cs 54 -58, wherein said piece of material comprises a piece of BubbleWrap®.

Embodiment C60. A collapsible grocery inner chill bag ();

the inner chill bag having

a collapsed state (20A) for enabling transportation of the inner chill bag in a substantially flat state, and

an expanded state such that the inner chill bag, in its expanded state, provides a second interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages, the inner chill bag comprising:

a inner wall panels (S 1 A); and

an inner bottom panel; wherein the inner wall panels and the inner bottom panel cooperate to form said second interior storage space; and

wherein a second rim portion of the inner wall panels facing away from the inner bottom panel provides an inner bag opening; and wherein the inner chill bag has

an open expanded state for loading and/or unloading grocery packages to be transported, and

a closed expanded state such that the inner chill bag, in its closed expanded state, provides a substantially closed second interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages; wherein

the inner bag opening is a closable opening which, in the closed expanded state of the inner chill bag cooperates with said inner wall panels and said inner bottom panel so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the second interior storage space.

Embodiment C61. A collapsible grocery inner chill bag () for use inside of the carrier bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 1-36 and/or any of Embodiment Cs 44-53;

the inner chill bag having

a collapsed state (20A) for enabling transportation of the inner chill bag in a substantially flat state, and

an expanded state such that the inner chill bag, in its expanded state, provides a second interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages, the inner chill bag comprising:

inner walls and an inner bottom cooperating to form said second interior storage space; and

wherein a second rim portion of the inner walls facing away from the inner bottom provides an inner bag opening; and wherein

the inner chill bag has

an open expanded state for loading and/or unloading grocery packages to be transported, and

a closed expanded state such that the inner chill bag, in its closed expanded state, provides a substantially closed second interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages; wherein

the inner bag opening is a closable opening which, in the closed expanded state of the inner chill bag cooperates with said inner walls and said inner bottom so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the second interior storage space. Embodiment C62. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 60 or 61; wherein

the inner chill bag, in its expanded state, is shaped and dimensioned to fit inside of the carrier bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 1-36 and/or any of Embodiment Cs 44- 53.

Embodiment C63. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 60 - 62; wherein

the inner walls comprise

an inner front wall panel (SI A),

an inner back wall panel (SIB),

two inner side wall panels (S2A, S2B); and wherein

the inner bottom comprises an inner bottom panel; wherein the inner wall panels and the inner bottom panel cooperate to form said second interior storage space.

Embodiment C64. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment C 63; wherein

the carrier bag comprises a paper layer being shaped and folded so as to form

said inner front wall panel (SI A),

said inner back wall panel (SIB),

said inner two side wall panels (S2A, S2B); and

said inner bottom panel.

Embodiment C65. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 60 - 64; wherein

the wall panels and the bottom panel cooperate to form said interior storage space to a volume larger than 2 litres in the expanded state of the carrier bag;

Embodiment C66. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 60 - 65; wherein

a first handle is associated with said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A) so as to allow gripping by a human hand such as to enable carrying of the grocery carrier bag. Embodiment C67. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 64 or any of Embodiment Cs 65 or 66 when dependent on Embodiment C 64; wherein

said paper layer is a kraft paper layer; said kraft paper layer having a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer;

Embodiment C68. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 60 - 67; wherein

the substantially water vapour impermeable membrane is bonded to the side of the kraft paper layer facing the second interior storage space of the bag.

Embodiment C69. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 60 - 68; wherein

the substantially water vapour impermeable membrane is bonded to the side of the kraft paper layer facing the outside of the bag.

This solution advantageously prevents or minimizes absorption, by the kraft paper, of any water deposited on the exterior surface of the bag.

Embodiment C70. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 60 - 69; wherein

said substantially water vapour impermeable membrane comprises a polymer layer.

Embodiment C71. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 70; wherein

said polymer layer is a PE layer.

Embodiment C72. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 70; wherein

said polymer layer is a layer of Polyethylene.

Embodiment C73. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 60 - 72; wherein the inner chill bag has an inner closure means attached to said rim portion; said inner closure means being arranged and positioned to allow

a) the open expanded state of the inner chill bag for loading and/or unloading grocery packages to be transported, and

b) the closed expanded state of the inner chill bag such that the inner chill bag, in its closed expanded state, provides a substantially sealed second interior storage space suitable for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages; wherein

the inner closure means is closable such that, in the closed expanded state of the inner chill bag, the inner closure means cooperates with said inner wall panels and said inner bottom panel so as to close and substantially seal the second interior storage space from the environment so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space.

Embodiment C74. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 60 - 73; wherein

the chill bag has an inner closure means attached to said rim portion; said inner closure means, in the closed expanded state of the inner chill bag, cooperating with said inner wall panels and said inner bottom panel such that, when a grocery package comprising frozen food is transported in said interior storage space, the inner chill bag is adapted to minimize or prevent the occurrence of condensation within the second interior storage space.

Embodiment C 75. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 73 or 74; wherein

Said inner closure means includes

a first elongated inner bag closure element, and

a second elongated inner bag closure element.

Embodiment C 76. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to according to Embodiment C 75, wherein

the first elongated inner bag closure element is attached to an interior surface of the rim portion of the inner front wall panel and to a part of an interior surface of the rim portion of an inner side wall panel; and wherein the first and second elongated inner bag closure elements are positioned and adapted for mating with each other so as to achieve closure of the opening.

Embodiment C 77. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 66; wherein

the first inner bag handle comprises a paper strip formed in a U-shape and having two paper strip end portions; the paper strip end portions of the first inner bag handle being attached to said rim portion of said inner front wall panel (SI A).

Embodiment C78. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 77; further comprising:

a first substantially planar inner bag reinforcement sheet having a certain size; the first substantially planar inner bag reinforcement sheet having a first sheet surface () and a second sheet surface () on opposite sides of the substantially planar inner bag

reinforcement sheet; wherein

the first inner bag reinforcement sheet is attached to the paper strip end portions of the first handle and to said rim portion of said inner front wall panel (SI A) such that said paper strip end portions of the first handle are located between the inner front wall panel

(SI A) and the inner bag reinforcement sheet. This first inner bag reinforcement sheet advantageously operates to distribute the lifting force from the first handle paper strip end portions to a larger surface area of the front wall panel (SI A).

Embodiment C 79. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 78, wherein

the first surface of the first reinforcement sheet faces the paper strip end portions of the first handle and said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A); said first surface of the first reinforcement sheet being bonded to the paper strip end portions of the first handle and said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A) so as to distribute lifting force from said paper strip end portions to said front wall panel via said first reinforcement sheet. Embodiment C 80. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 14 or 15 when dependent on Embodiment C 12, or any preceding Embodiment C, wherein the first elongated closure element is integrated with a second substantially planar reinforcement sheet, the second reinforcement sheet having a predetermined area extension which is larger than the certain size of the first substantially planar reinforcement sheet; wherein

the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet is attached to the first reinforcement sheet and to said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A) such that the first reinforcement sheet is located between the front wall panel (SI A) and the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet.

Embodiment C81. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 80, wherein

the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet is bonded to the second sheet surface of the first substantially planar reinforcement sheet so as to distribute lifting force from said first substantially planar reinforcement sheet to said front wall panel via said second reinforcement sheet.

Embodiment C82. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 80 or 81, wherein

the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet comprises polymer material.

Embodiment C 83. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 80, 81, or 82, wherein

the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet comprises paper.

Embodiment C 84. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 80-83, wherein

the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet is attached to an interior surface of the rim portion of the front panel and to a part of an interior surface of the rim portion of a side panel. Embodiment C 85. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 78-84, wherein

the paper strip end portions of the first handle and said first reinforcement sheet are sized and dimensioned so as to withstand a force exceeding 100 Newton.

Embodiment C86. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 60-76; wherein

said rim portion of said inner front wall panel (SI A) comprises at least one first die cut opening, and said rim portion of said inner back wall panel (SI A) comprises at least one second die cut opening said first and second die cut openings being shaped and adapted to form the first handle.

This solution advantageously allows for a cost effective manufacturing process of the inner chill bag, since the handle may be produced by cutting openings in the rim portions of the inner front and back wall panels.

Embodiment C87. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 86 when dependent on Embodiment C 75 or 76; wherein

said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A) comprises at least one die cut opening so as to form the first handle; and wherein

the first elongated inner bag closure element is attached to an interior surface of the rim portion of the front panel between said at least one die cut opening and said bag bottom panel such that said at least one die cut opening does not interfere with said second interior storage space. According to an embodiment the first elongated closure element is attached to an interior surface of the rim portion of the front panel between said at least one die cut opening and said bag bottom panel.

This location of the closure element advantageously enables the provision of a handle formed by a die cut opening while also enabling the closing and sealing of the interior storage space. Embodiment C88. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 60-87; wherein

said paper layer is a kraft paper layer having a surface weight of at least 80 grams per square meter, or preferably a surface weight of at least 100 grams per square meter.

Embodiment C89. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag to any of Embodiment Cs 60- 88; wherein

said kraft paper layer comprises a certain amount of air being trapped within the kraft paper layer.

Embodiment C90. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 60-89; wherein

said kraft paper layer comprises a plurality of Kraft Pulp Fibres which are arranged one above the other so as to form plural air gaps within the kraft paper layer.

Embodiment C91. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 60-90; wherein

said kraft paper layer comprises a plurality of Kraft Pulp Fibres which are arranged one above the other so as to form plural air gaps within the kraft paper layer; wherein at least some of the Kraft Pulp Fibres have a length in the range between 1 and 3 mm and/or a width in the range between 10 and 50 micrometer; and wherein

at least some of said plural air gaps have a volume exceeding 200 000 cubic micrometers. Embodiment C92. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 64-91; wherein

said paper layer being shaped and folded so as to form

the inner front wall panel (SI A),

the inner back wall panel (SIB), and

the inner side wall panels (S2A, S2B)

consists of said kraft paper layer and a single substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer. This solution enables an advantageously cost-efficient production of the grocery chill bag in that few production method steps are required when only a single layer of water vapour impermeable material need be bonded to the kraft paper layer.

Embodiment C93. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 64-92; wherein

said paper layer is a kraft paper layer having a surface weight of less than 140 grams per square meter.

Embodiment C94. The collapsible grocery inner chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 60-93; wherein

the inner bottom panel is substantially rectangular.

Embodiment C95. The grocery inner chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 60-94; wherein

the paper layer is shaped and folded so as to form

the inner front wall panel (SI A) such that it exhibits a first certain width at a folding edge where the front wall panel (SI A) meets the bottom panel, and wherein

the paper layer is shaped and folded such that the inner front wall panel (SI A) exhibits a second certain width at the rim portion facing away from the inner bag bottom panel;

said second certain width being longer than said first certain width.

Embodiment C96. The grocery inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 95, wherein the paper layer is shaped and folded so as to form

the inner back wall panel (SIB) such that it exhibits substantially said first certain width at a folding edge where the inner back wall panel (SIB) meets the inner bag bottom panel, and wherein

the paper layer is shaped and folded such that the inner back wall panel (SIB) exhibits substantially said second certain width at the rim portion facing away from the inner bag bottom panel. Embodiment C97. The grocery inner chill bag according to any preceding Embodiment C when dependent on Embodiment C 77; further comprising:

a second handle adapted to allow gripping by a human hand for enabling carrying of the grocery inner chill bag, the second handle comprising a paper strip formed in a U-shape and having two paper strip end portions; the paper strip end portions of the second handle being attached to said rim portion of said inner back wall panel (SI A).

Embodiment C98. The inner chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 60-97; wherein the second interior storage space of the bag, in its expanded state, has a second cross- sectional area substantially parallel to the plane of the inner bag bottom panel,

the second cross-sectional area shrinking towards the closable opening such that grocery inner chill bag , in its closed and expanded state, has a generally tapered shape, as seen in a line of view substantially parallel to

the plane of the front wall panel and

the plane of the bottom panel.

Embodiment C99. The inner chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 60-98; further comprising

an inner bag insulator device for placement on the bottom panel in the second interior storage space so as to reduce heat transfer through said bottom panel.

Embodiment CI 00. The inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 99, wherein

the inner bag insulator device is arranged and positioned on at least a portion of the inner bottom panel in the second interior storage space so as to reduce heat transfer through said inner bottom panel.

Embodiment ClOl . The inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 99 or 100, wherein the inner bag insulator device comprises a piece of material; said piece of material being shaped and adapted to provide cellular air cushions so as to reduce heat transfer through said inner bag bottom panel.

Embodiment CI 02. The inner chill bag according to Embodiment C 101, wherein

said piece of material comprises paper. Embodiment CI 03. The inner chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 101-102, wherein

said piece of material comprises a substantially water vapour impermeable material. This solution advantageously enables the insulator device to withstand a damp or wet environment without absorbing water.

Embodiment C104. The inner chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 101- 103, wherein

said piece of material comprises at least one layer of a polymer material.

Embodiment CI 05. The inner chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 101- 104, wherein

said piece of material comprises at least one layer of a plastic material.

This solution advantageously enables the insulator device to withstand a damp or wet environment without absorbing water.

Embodiment C106. The inner chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 101 - 105, wherein

said piece of material comprises BubbleWrap®.

Embodiment C107. The inner chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 101 - 104, wherein

said piece of paper material has a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the paper material.

This solution advantageously enables the insulator device to withstand a damp or wet environment without absorbing water.

Embodiment CI 08. The inner chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 99 - 105 or 107, wherein

the inner bag insulator device comprises a piece of card board paper material; said piece of card board paper material being shaped and adapted to reduce heat transfer through said bottom panel. Embodiment C109. A kit of parts, comprising

an inner chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 60-98; and

an inner bag insulator device for placement on the inner bag bottom panel in the second interior storage space so as to reduce heat transfer through said inner bag bottom panel.

Embodiment CI 10. The kit of parts according to Embodiment C 109, wherein

the inner bag insulator device is adapted for positioning on at least a portion of the inner bag bottom panel in the second interior storage space so as to reduce heat transfer through said inner bag bottom panel.

Embodiment CI 1 1. The kit of parts according to Embodiment C 109 or 1 10, wherein

the inner bag insulator device comprises a piece of material; said piece of material being shaped and adapted to provide cellular air cushions so as to reduce heat transfer through said inner bag bottom panel.

Embodiment CI 12. The kit of parts according to Embodiment C 1 1 1, wherein

said piece of material comprises at least one layer of a plastic material.

This solution advantageously enables the insulator device to withstand a damp or wet environment without absorbing water.

Embodiment CI 13. The kit of parts according to any of Embodiment Cs 109 -1 1 1, wherein

said piece of material comprises a paper layer; said paper layer having a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the paper layer.

This solution advantageously enables the insulator device to withstand a damp or wet environment without absorbing water.

Embodiment CI 14. The kit of parts according to any of Embodiment Cs 109 -1 12, wherein

said piece of material comprises a piece of BubbleWrap®. Embodiment CI 15. A handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package comprising a collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag according to any of

Embodiment Cs 1-36 and/or any of Embodiment Cs 44-53; and

a collapsible grocery inner chill bag () according to any of Embodiment Cs 60-108; wherein,

the handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package, in use, includes

the collapsible grocery inner chill bag in its closed expanded state; and the collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag in its closed expanded state; and wherein

the collapsible grocery inner chill bag is placed in the interior storage space of the collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag.

This solution advantageously enables the packing of frozen grocery packages in the second interior storage space. This solution therefore enjoys a high thermal resistance from a frozen grocery package in the second interior storage space to the environment outside of the outer handle-carryable grocery carrier bag, since any air inside of the first interior storage space (100) functions as insulation between the second interior storage space and the environment outside of the outer handle-carryable grocery carrier bag. Additionally, there are double barriers for minimizing or preventing entry of air from the environment outside of the outer handle-carryable grocery carrier bag into the second interior storage space when both of the bags are in their closed expanded states, since the second interior storage space is sealed by the closed inner bag as well as by the closed outer bag.

Embodiment CI 16. The handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package according to Embodiment C 115, wherein,

the handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package, in use, further

comprises:

a means for cooling the interior (100) of the bag (20).

Embodiment CI 17. The handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package according to Embodiment C 116, wherein,

the means for cooling the interior of the bag comprises a cooling agent Embodiment CI 18. The handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package according to Embodiment C 116 or 117, wherein,

the means for cooling the interior of the bag comprises a piece of dry ice.

Embodiment CI 19. The handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package according to Embodiment C 116, 117, or 118; wherein

the means for cooling the interior of the bag comprises a container holding a pressurized gas; said container having a valve which is settable to a valve state in which the valve allows pressurized gas to flow out from the pressurized container so as to attain a cooling effect.

Embodiment C120. The handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package according to Embodiment C 119; wherein

the pressurized gas comprises pressurized carbon dioxide.

Embodiment C 121. The handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package according to Embodiment C 119; wherein

the pressurized gas comprises pressurized air.

Embodiment C122. The handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package according to any of Embodiment Cs 119-121; wherein

one of the walls of the collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag (20) comprises a valve adapted to allow passage of gas in the direction from the interior storage space (100) to the surrounding environment.

Embodiment C123. The handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package according any of Embodiment Cs 116-122; wherein

the means for cooling the interior of the bag comprises an ice pack.

Embodiment C124. The handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package according to Embodiment C 123; wherein

the ice pack comprises a sachet containing a gel that can be frozen and that, in use, retains a frozen temperature for an extended period of time. Embodiment C125. The handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package according any of Embodiment Cs 116-124; wherein

the means for cooling the interior of the bag, in use, is placed in the second interior storage space of the inner chill bag.

Embodiment C126. The handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag package according any of Embodiment Cs 116-125; wherein

the means for cooling the interior of the bag, in use, is placed in the interior storage space (100) of the collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag (20).

Embodiment C127. A kit of parts, comprising

a collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag (20) according to any of Embodiment Cs 1-36 and/or any of Embodiment Cs 44-53; and

a collapsible grocery inner chill bag () according to any of Embodiment Cs 60-108.

Embodiment C128. The kit of parts according to Embodiment C 127, further comprising means for cooling the interior of the bag. Embodiment C129. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 1-36 and/or any of Embodiment Cs 44-53;

wherein,

the collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag, in use in its closed expanded state, further includes means for cooling the interior of the bag.

Embodiment C130. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag according to Embodiment C 129; wherein

the means for cooling the interior of the bag comprises a cooling agent

Embodiment C131. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag according to Embodiment C 129 or 130, wherein,

the means for cooling the interior of the bag comprises a piece of dry ice. Embodiment CI 32. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag according to Embodiment C 129, 130, or 131; wherein

the means for cooling the interior of the bag comprises a container holding a pressurized gas; said container having a valve which is settable to a valve state in which the valve allows pressurized gas to flow out from the pressurized container so as to attain a cooling effect.

Embodiment C133. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag according to Embodiment C 132; wherein

the pressurized gas comprises pressurized carbon dioxide.

Embodiment CI 34. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag according to Embodiment C 132; wherein

the pressurized gas comprises pressurized air.

Embodiment C135. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 132-134; wherein

one of the walls of the collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag (20) comprises a valve adapted to allow passage of gas in the direction from the interior storage space (100) to the surrounding environment.

Embodiment C136. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag according any of Embodiment Cs 129-135; wherein

the means for cooling the interior of the bag comprises an ice pack.

Embodiment C137. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag according to Embodiment C 136; wherein

the ice pack comprises a sachet containing a gel that can be frozen and that, in use, retains a frozen temperature for an extended period of time.

Embodiment C138. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag according any of Embodiment Cs 129-137; wherein the means for cooling the interior of the bag, in use, is placed in the interior storage space (100) of the collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag (20).

Embodiment C139. A kit of parts, comprising

a collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag (20) according to any of

Embodiment Cs 1-36 and/or any of Embodiment Cs 44-53 and/or any of Embodiment Csl29-138; and

a means for cooling the interior of the bag. Embodiment C140. A kit of parts according to Embodiment C 139, further comprising a collapsible grocery inner chill bag () according to any of Embodiment Cs 60-108.

Embodiment C141. The collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag according to any of Embodiment Cs 1-36 and/or any of Embodiment Cs 44-53;

wherein,

the collapsible handle-carryable grocery carrier chill bag, in use in its closed expanded state, further includes

an insulator device as defined in any of Embodiment Cs 54-59. Embodiment Dl . A method for providing a collapsible transport container, wherein said collapsible carrier bag has a collapsed state for enabling transportation of the transport container in a substantially flat state, and an expanded state for transporting food items in a transport container enclosure which, the method comprising:

- providing a substantially planar sheet comprising kraft paper; the substantially planar sheet having a first sheet surface and a second sheet surface on opposite sides of the substantially planar sheet; the kraft paper having a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer;

- cutting the planar sheet according to a pre-determined pattern so that a

resulting planar sheet has at least two edges;

- forming or folding the substantially planar sheet such that the at least two edges overlap so as to allow a first overlap area of the first sheet surface to meet a second overlap area of the second sheet surface and so that the first sheet surface forms an interior surface of the-bag-to-be;

- attaching the first overlap area to the second overlap area, e.g. by gluing or melt-bonding;

- forming or folding the sheet so as to form outer surfaces of the transport container;

- providing closure means suitable for closing the transport container.

Embodiment D2. The method according to Embodiment D 1, further comprising providing a handle for allowing a user to carry the transport container. Embodiment D3. The method according to any of the previous Embodiment Ds, further comprising forming or folding the sheet so as to form a front panel (S I A), a back panel (SIB), and two mutually opposing side panels (S2A, S2B) of the transport container-to-be.

Embodiment D4. The method according to any of the previous Embodiment Ds, further comprising forming or folding the sheet so as to create a bottom portion (BP) of the transport container-to-be.

Embodiment D5.A method according to the previous Embodiment D, where the bottom portion is formed or folded in so that the bottom portion (BP) connects to the panels (SI A, S IB, S2A, S2B), thereby obtaining a semi-manufactured transport container which in an expanded state exhibits four wall panels, a bag bottom panel and a bag opening formed by an opening rim of the four wall panels facing away from the bag bottom.

Embodiment D6. The method according to any of the previous Embodiment Ds, further comprising the step of collapsing the semi-manufactured transport container.

Embodiment D7. The method according to the previous Embodiment D when used in combination with Embodiment D 3, wherein the collapsing is done by folding along a folding edge where the front panel (S I A) connects with the bottom panel (BP) and providing a mid-fold in each of the side panels (S2A, S2B), the mid-fold of a side panel running in a direction substantially parallel to a fold where that side panel (S2A, S2B) connects with the front panel.

Embodiment D8. The method according to the previous Embodiment D wherein the collapsing step is performed such that a side panel mid-fold is bent outwardly so as to cause a front most interior surface portion of that side panel to face a back most secondary interior surface portion of that side panel.

Embodiment Fl . A method for providing an improved transport container or an improved carrier bag, the method comprising the steps: providing a transport container according to any of the D embodiments or providing a carrier bag according to embodiment C40, C41, or C42; and providing a cover sheet for said provided transport container or said provided carrier bag. Embodiment F2. The method according to embodiment Fl, wherein the step of providing said cover sheet comprises the step of cutting the cover sheet from a piece of material for the cover sheet.

Embodiment F3. The method according to any other of the F embodiments, wherein the step of providing said cover sheet comprises the step of folding said cover sheet. Embodiment F4. The method according to any other of the F embodiments, wherein the step of providing said cover sheet comprises the step of attaching said cover sheet to a bottom portion of the transport container or the carrier bag.

Embodiment F5.The method according to embodiment F4 wherein said attaching comprises gluing. Embodiment F6.The method according to embodiment F4 or F5 wherein said attaching comprises heating of the cover sheet and/or the bottom portion.

Embodiment F7. The method according to any other of the F embodiments wherein the cover layer comprises a water vapour impermeable membrane.

Embodiment El . A method of delivering goods, the method comprising the steps of: providing a collapsible carrier bag, for example according to embodiment C40, C41, C42, or any of the F embodiments, or providing a collapsible transport container, for example according to any of the D embodiments or any of the F embodiments, wherein the carrier bag or the transport container is provided in a collapsed state; expanding the collapsible carrier bag or transport container in an environment having a pre-determined condition of the environment; loading chilled or frozen goods into an interior storage space of said transport container or carrier bag; and transporting said loaded transport container or carrier bag to a destination.

Embodiment E2. The method according to embodiment El, further comprising the step of closing said interior storage space of said transport container or carrier bag.

Embodiment E3. The method according to embodiment E2, wherein the closing is performed in an environment having a pre-determined condition of the environment. Embodiment E4.The method according to any of the previous E embodiments, wherein said goods comprise groceries.

Embodiment E5.The method according to any of the previous E embodiments, wherein said goods comprise drugs.

Embodiment E6. The method according to any of the previous E embodiments, wherein the loading is performed in an environment having a pre-determined condition of the environment.

Embodiment E7. The method according to any of the previous E embodiments, wherein said pre-determined condition of the environment relates to the surrounding air, such as a certain relative air humidity. Embodiment E8. The method according to embodiment E7, wherein said certain relative air humidity relates to a maximum certain relative air humidity, such as 50%.

Embodiment E9. The method according to any of the previous E embodiments, where said transporting is performed in a storage space having at least a pre-determined temperature, such as at least 10 degrees Celsius, at least 15 degrees Celsius, or at least 20 degrees Celsius.

Embodiment E10. The method according to embodiment E9, wherein said pre-determined temperature is kept for at least a pre-determined time, such as for at least 5 minutes, at least 10 minutes, at least 20 minutes, at least one hour, at least two hours, at least three hours, or at least five hours. Embodiment El 1. The method according to any of the previous E embodiments, wherein said transporting is performed by a vehicle, such as a motorised vehicle.

Embodiment E12. The method according to any of the previous E embodiments, wherein the delivered goods are chilled and/or frozen goods. Embodiment El 3. The method according to any of the previous E embodiments, further comprising putting at least one spacing layer inside said carrier bag.

Said spacing layer corresponds according to one embodiment to a cover layer, except that the spacing layer will not be attached to the bottom portion BP. A spacing layer can, for example, be inserted inside the carrier bag above one or several goods. The spacing layer is preferably inserted to a position substantially in parallel and at a distance to the bottom panel. The spacing layer may then advantageously achieve the retaining of the side panels S I A, S2A, SIB, S2B at a distance from each other at the position where the spacing layer is placed so as to maintain an air gap between goods-under-transportation and the side panels. Thus, this distance between mutually opposite side panels will correspond to the size of the spacing layer. This prevents the side panels S I A, S2A, S IB, S2B touching the goods in a manner similar to the stiff cover sheet preventing the side panels S I A, S2A, S IB, S2B from touching the goods. Thus a direct heat bridge between the goods and the side panels S I A, S2A, S IB, S2B can advantageously be prevented.

In the following, several embodiments of a carrier bag are illustrated. The illustrated carrier bags each have one or several of the advantages described in this disclosure. The illustrated carrier bags can be provided by any of the methods for providing a carrier bag or for providing a transport container which are described in this disclosure.

Fig. 54a-g shows one embodiment of a carrier bag according to the present invention. Fig. 54a shows an elevated view of this embodiment. Fig. 54b shows a front view of this embodiment. Fig. 54c shows a back view of this embodiment. Fig. 54d shows a top view of this embodiment. Fig. 54e shows a bottom view of this embodiment. Fig. 54f shows a side view of this embodiment. Fig. 54g shows a side view of this embodiment, taken from a side opposite the side which is illustrated in Fig. 54f. The arrows b-g in Fig. 54a illustrate from which direction the view in Fig. 54b-g is taken, where the latter in the figure number corresponds to the letter of the arrow. The embodiment of Fig. 54a-g has no handle. In one example, this embodiment is provided based on what is illustrated in Fig. 42 and described in relation to that figure. The carrier bag in Fig. 54a-g is shown in its expanded state. Some of its folding edges and/or outer edges are illustrated by dashed and/or continuous lines.

Fig. 55a-g shows another embodiment of a carrier bag according to the present invention. This embodiment differs from the previous embodiment in that a handle is provided at the carrier bag. The views in Fig. 55a-g correspond to the views which have been described in relation to Fig. 54a-g.

Fig. 56-61 illustrate elevated views of yet other embodiments. Fig. 56 illustrates an embodiment comprising a handle. Fig. 57 corresponds to the embodiment illustrated in Fig. 56 without a handle. Fig. 58 illustrates an embodiment comprising a handle. Fig. 59 corresponds to the embodiment illustrated in Fig. 58 without a handle. Fig. 60 corresponds to the embodiment illustrated in Fig. 59 with a substantially square shaped bottom portion. Fig. 61 corresponds to the embodiment illustrated in Fig. 59 with a lower height of the side panels.

The embodiments illustrated in Fig. 54-61 are intended to present a selection of possible embodiments of carrier bags/transport containers which can be provided within the scope of the present disclosure.

HI . A collapsible handle-carryable kraft paper grocery carrier bag for use in an air atmosphere environment, the kraft paper carrier bag having

a collapsed state for enabling transportation of the carrier bag in a substantially flat state, and

an expanded state such that the kraft paper carrier bag, in its expanded state, provides an interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages, the kraft paper carrier bag comprising:

a kraft paper layer being shaped and folded so as to form

a front wall panel (S I A),

a back wall panel (S IB),

two mutually opposing side wall panels (S2A, S2B); and

a substantially rectangular bottom panel; wherein the wall panels and the bottom panel cooperate to form said interior storage space to a volume of between 10 litres and 50 litres in the expanded state of the carrier bag; and wherein a rim portion of the wall panels facing away from the bag bottom panel provides a bag opening; the kraft paper carrier bag further comprising

a first handle adapted to allow gripping by a human hand for enabling carrying of the kraft paper carrier bag, the first handle comprising a paper strip formed in a U-shape and having two paper strip end portions; the paper strip end portions of the first handle being attached to said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A); and wherein

said kraft paper layer having a surface weight of at least 100 grams per square meter; said kraft paper layer having a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer; and wherein

the kraft paper carrier bag has a mechanical interlock attached to said rim portion; said mechanical interlock being arranged and positioned to provide

an open expanded state of the carrier bag for loading and/or unloading grocery packages to be transported, and

a closed expanded state of the carrier bag such that the carrier bag, in its closed expanded state, provides a substantially closed interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen grocery packages; wherein

the mechanical interlock is closable such that, in the closed expanded state of the kraft paper carrier bag, the mechanical interlock cooperates with said wall panels and bottom panel so as to close and substantially seal the interior storage space from the environment so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space such that when a grocery package comprising frozen food is transported in said interior storage space the kraft paper carrier bag is adapted to minimize or prevent the occurrence of condensation within the interior storage space. H2. The collapsible handle-carryable kraft paper grocery carrier bag according to embodiment HI, wherein

the substantially water vapour impermeable membrane is bonded to the side of the kraft paper layer facing the interior storage space of the bag. H3. The collapsible handle-carryable kraft paper grocery carrier bag according to embodiment HI or embodiment H2, wherein

said substantially water vapour impermeable membrane comprises a polymer layer. H4. The collapsible handle-carryable kraft paper grocery carrier bag according to any preceding embodiment, wherein

said mechanical interlock includes

a first elongated closure element, and

a second elongated closure element.

H5. The collapsible handle-carryable kraft paper grocery carrier bag according to according to embodiment H4, wherein

the first elongated closure element is attached to an interior surface of the rim portion of the front panel and to a part of an interior surface of the rim portion of a side panel; and wherein

the first and second elongated closure elements are positioned and adapted for mating with each other so as to achieve closing of the opening. H6. The collapsible handle-carryable kraft paper grocery carrier bag according to any preceding embodiment H, further comprising

a first substantially planar reinforcement sheet having a certain size; the first substantially planar reinforcement sheet having a first sheet surface and a second sheet surface on opposite sides of the substantially planar reinforcement sheet; wherein

the first reinforcement sheet is attached to the paper strip end portions of the first handle and to said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A) such that said paper strip end portions of the first handle are located between the front wall panel (SI A) and the reinforcement sheet. H7. The collapsible handle-carryable kraft paper grocery carrier bag according to embodiment H6, wherein

The first surface of the first reinforcement sheet faces the paper strip end portions of the first handle and said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A); said first surface of the first reinforcement sheet being bonded to the paper strip end portions of the first handle and said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A) so as to distribute lifting force from said paper strip end portions to said front wall panel via said first reinforcement sheet. H8. The collapsible handle-carryable kraft paper grocery carrier bag according to embodiment H6 or embodiment H7 when dependent on embodiment H5, or any of embodiments HI to H4, wherein

the first elongated closure element is integrated with a second substantially planar reinforcement sheet, the second reinforcement sheet having a predetermined area extension which is larger than the certain size of the first substantially planar reinforcement sheet; wherein

the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet is attached to the first

reinforcement sheet and to said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A) such that the first reinforcement sheet is located between the front wall panel (SI A) and the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet.

H9. The collapsible handle-carryable kraft paper grocery carrier bag according to embodiment H8, wherein

the second substantially planar reinforcement sheet is bonded to the second sheet surface of the first substantially planar reinforcement sheet so as to distribute lifting force from said first substantially planar reinforcement sheet to said front wall panel via said first reinforcement sheet. Jl. A grocery transport system comprising

a storage facility (600) for goods; the storage facility comprising one or several storage rooms having a controlled environment in that the temperature and the relative humidity of the air in the storage room is controlled so that it is kept within certain predetermined ranges; wherein

the goods comprises a plurality of different types of goods sorted into different temperature ranges (TI, Til, Till, TIV), each type of goods being stored in a corresponding storage room (650 TI , 650 TII , 650 TIII , 650 TIV ) having a temperature in accordance with the corresponding goods temperature range (TI, Til, Till, TIV);

a loading facility for enabling chilled or frozen goods is to be packed into closable and sealable containers (20); said loading facility comprising a plurality of said closable and sealable containers (20) for use in the distribution of said chilled or frozen goods in an air atmosphere environment; a delivery vehicle for transporting said closable and sealable containers (20), when loaded with a predetermined amount of chilled or frozen goods, to a delivery destination, wherein such a container comprises:

a wall adapted to enclose an interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods, the wall being shaped and adapted to form said interior storage space to a volume of at least ten metric litres; said wall comprising:

a) a layer of a material having a thermal conductivity of less than 0,2 W/(K*m ); and

b) a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of said material layer; and

c) a closable opening such that the container in its closed state substantially seals the interior storage space from the environment so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space; and wherein

said material layer has a tensile strength exceeding 0, 133 Newton/ square millimeter.

J2. The grocery transport system according to embodiment Jl comprising :

a server computer (540) having a communications port for communication via the Internet.

J3. A method of delivering chilled goods in a sealable container, comprising the steps of receiving an order for an amount of chilled goods; and packing an amount of chilled goods in a closable container for use in an air atmosphere environment, the container having

a wall adapted to enclose an interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods, the wall being shaped and adapted to form said interior storage space to a volume of at least ten metric litres; said wall comprising:

a) a layer of a material having a thermal conductivity of less than 0,2 W/(K*m ); and b) a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of said material layer; and

c) a closable opening such that the container in its closed state substantially seals the interior storage space from the environment so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space; said material layer has a tensile strength exceeding 0, 133 Newton/ square millimeter; and the method furter comprising the steps of

loading initially chilled or frozen goods into the container; and

transporting the loaded container to a delivery destination (DD).

Gl. A collapsible chill bag for use in an air atmosphere environment, the chill bag having a collapsed state for enabling transportation of the chill bag in a substantially flat state when empty, and

an expanded state such that the chill bag, in its expanded state, provides an interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods, the chill bag comprising:

a material layer being shaped and folded so as to form

a front wall panel (S I A),

a back wall panel (S IB),

two mutually opposing side wall panels (S2A, S2B); and

a bottom panel; wherein the wall panels and the bottom panel cooperate to form said interior storage space to a volume of between 10 litres and 50 litres in the expanded state of the chill bag; and

said material layer having a density less than 1000 kg/cubic metre;

said material layer having a membrane bonded to at least one side of the material layer, said material layer together with said membrane having a thermal conductivity of less than 0,2 W/(K*m ); wherein the membrane is adapted to reduce or prevent passage of air between the environment and the interior storage space, said membrane having an air permeability less than 0.35 μιη/Pa s; wherein

a rim portion of the wall panels facing away from the bag bottom panel provides a bag opening; and wherein

the chill bag has a mechanical interlock attached to said rim portion; said mechanical interlock being arranged and positioned to provide

an open expanded state of the chill bag for loading and/or unloading chilled and/or frozen goods to be transported, and

a closed expanded state of the chill bag such that the chill bag, in its closed expanded state, provides a substantially closed interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods; wherein the chill bag comprises chilled and/or frozen goods placed in the interior storage space; wherein

the mechanical interlock is an openable and reclosable interlock including

a first elongated closure element attached to said rim portion; the first elongated closure element being attached to the front wall panel (SI A) and to first parts () of both side wall panels (S2A, S2B) adjacent to the front wall panel (S I A), and

a second elongated closure element attached to said rim portion; the second elongated closure element being attached to the back wall panel (S IB) and to second parts () of both side wall panels (S2A, S2B) adjacent to the back wall panel (S IB);

the first elongated closure element having a cavity adapted to receive a protrusion of the second elongated closure element; and wherein

the mechanical interlock is closable such that the mechanical interlock, in its closed state, cooperates with said wall panels, said bottom panel, and said bottom panel cover sheet (700) so as to close and substantially seal the interior storage space from the environment so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space such that the chill bag is adapted to minimize or prevent the occurrence of condensation on the chilled and/or frozen goods within the interior storage space.

G2. The collapsible chill bag according to embodiment Gl ; wherein

the bottom panel comprises overlapping sheet edges of said folded material layer; and the collapsible chill bag further comprises:

a bottom panel cover sheet (700) attached to the bottom panel, the bottom panel cover sheet (700) including a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane adapted to reduce or prevent passage of air, water vapour and water between the environment and the interior storage space via the bottom panel.

G3. The collapsible chill bag according to embodiment Glor G2, wherein

said material layer comprises Kraft paper having a surface weight of at least 60 grams per square meter.

G4. The collapsible chill bag according to embodiment Gl or G2, wherein

said material layer comprises at least one of the materials selected from the list:

a non-woven material; a textile material;

a film of foamed and/or porous thermoplastic.

G5. The collapsible chill bag according to any of embodiments Gl to G4, wherein

said material layer has a tensile strength exceeding 0, 133 Newton/ square millimeter.

G6. The collapsible chill bag according to embodiment Gl or G2, wherein

said material layer is selected from a list comprising:

a film of thermoplastic;

a film foamed and/or porous rubber.

G7. The collapsible chill bag according to embodiment Gl or G2, wherein

Said material layer comprises a non-woven material and/or a textile material having a tensile index value exceeding 50 kNm/kg and a thermal conductivity of λ < 0,2 W/(m K).

Yet further embodiments are described below. In view of the state of the art, a problem to be addressed by an aspect of the invention, is how to achieve an improved, yet cost- efficient, transportation of goods using a transport container or a carrier bag.

This problem may be addressed by an embodiment Kl: A collapsible kraft paper chill bag for use in an air atmosphere environment, the kraft paper chill bag having

a collapsed state for enabling transportation of the kraft paper chill bag in a substantially flat state, and

an expanded state such that the kraft paper chill bag, in its expanded state, provides an interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods, the kraft paper chill bag comprising:

a kraft paper layer being shaped and folded so as to form

a front wall panel (SI A),

a back wall panel (SIB),

two mutually opposing side wall panels (S2A, S2B); and

a bottom panel comprising overlapping sheet edges of said folded kraft paper layer; wherein the wall panels and the bottom panel cooperate to form said interior storage space to a volume of between 10 litres and 50 litres in the expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag; and

said kraft paper layer having a surface weight of at least 60 grams per square meter and a density less than 1000 kg/cubic metre;

said kraft paper layer having a membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer, said kraft paper layer together with said membrane having a thermal conductivity of less than 0,2 W/(K*m ); wherein the membrane is adapted to reduce or prevent passage of air between the environment and the interior storage space, said membrane having an air permeability less than 0.35 μιη/Pa s; the kraft paper chill bag further comprising:

a bottom panel cover sheet (700) attached to the bottom panel, the bottom panel cover sheet (700) including a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane adapted to reduce or prevent passage of air, water vapour and water between the environment and the interior storage space via the bottom panel; wherein a rim portion of the wall panels facing away from the bag bottom panel provides a bag opening;

and wherein

the kraft paper chill bag has a mechanical interlock attached to said rim portion; said mechanical interlock being arranged and positioned to provide

an open expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag for loading and/or unloading chilled and/or frozen goods to be transported, and

a closed expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag such that the kraft paper chill bag, in its closed expanded state, provides a substantially closed interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods; wherein

the mechanical interlock is closable such that, in the closed expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag, the mechanical interlock cooperates with said wall panels, said bottom panel, and said bottom panel cover sheet (700) so as to close and substantially seal the interior storage space from the environment so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space such that the kraft paper chill bag is adapted to minimize or prevent the occurrence of condensation on the chilled and/or frozen goods within the interior storage space during transport of the chilled and/or frozen goods;

wherein

the mechanical interlock is a reclosable interlock including a first elongated closure element attached to said rim portion; the first elongated closure element being attached to the front wall panel (SI A) and to first parts () of both side wall panels (S2A, S2B) adjacent to the front wall panel (SI A), and

a second elongated closure element attached to said rim portion; the second elongated closure element being attached to the back wall panel (SIB) and to second parts () of both side wall panels (S2A, S2B) adjacent to the back wall panel (SIB);

the first elongated closure element having a cavity adapted to receive a protrusion of the second elongated closure element, and

a slider (280) slidably mounted to the elongated closure elements for movement between a closed position and an open position, and

at least one end stop () located at each end of the mechanical interlock so as to retain the slider (280) on the reclosable interlock.

Embodiment K2. A collapsible kraft paper chill bag for use in an air atmosphere environment, the kraft paper chill bag having

a collapsed state for enabling transportation of the kraft paper chill bag in a substantially flat state, and

an expanded state such that the kraft paper chill bag, in its expanded state, provides an interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods, the kraft paper chill bag comprising:

a kraft paper layer being shaped and folded so as to form

a front wall panel (SI A),

a back wall panel (SIB),

two mutually opposing side wall panels (S2A, S2B); and

a bottom panel comprising overlapping sheet edges of said folded kraft paper layer; wherein the wall panels and the bottom panel cooperate to form said interior storage space to a volume of between 10 litres and 50 litres in the expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag; and

said kraft paper layer having a surface weight of at least 60 grams per square meter and a density less than 1000 kg/cubic metre;

said kraft paper layer having a membrane bonded to at least one side of the kraft paper layer, said kraft paper layer together with said membrane having a thermal conductivity of less than 0,2 W/(K*m ); wherein the membrane is adapted to reduce or prevent passage of air between the environment and the interior storage space, said membrane having an air permeability less than 0.35 μm/Pa s; the kraft paper chill bag further comprising:

a bottom panel cover sheet (700) attached to the bottom panel, the bottom panel cover sheet (700) including a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane adapted to reduce or prevent passage of air, water vapour and water between the environment and the interior storage space via the bottom panel; wherein a rim portion of the wall panels facing away from the bag bottom panel provides a bag opening;

and wherein

the kraft paper chill bag has a mechanical interlock attached to said rim portion; said mechanical interlock being arranged and positioned to provide

an open expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag for loading and/or unloading chilled and/or frozen goods to be transported, and

a closed expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag such that the kraft paper chill bag, in its closed expanded state, provides a substantially closed interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods; wherein

the mechanical interlock is closable such that, in the closed expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag, the mechanical interlock cooperates with said wall panels, said bottom panel, and said bottom panel cover sheet (700) so as to close and substantially seal the interior storage space from the environment so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space such that the kraft paper chill bag is adapted to minimize or prevent the occurrence of condensation on the chilled and/or frozen goods within the interior storage space during transport of the chilled and/or frozen goods;

wherein

the mechanical interlock is a reclosable interlock including

a first elongated closure element attached to said rim portion; the first elongated closure element being attached to the front wall panel (SI A) and to first parts () of both side wall panels (S2A, S2B) adjacent to the front wall panel (SI A), and

a second elongated closure element attached to said rim portion; the second elongated closure element being attached to the back wall panel (SIB) and to second parts () of both side wall panels (S2A, S2B) adjacent to the back wall panel (SIB);

the first elongated closure element having a cavity adapted to receive a protrusion of the second elongated closure element. Embodiment K3. The collapsible kraft paper chill bag according to embodiment K2, further comprising:

a slider (280) slidably mounted to the elongated closure elements for movement between a closed position and an open position, and

at least one end stop () located at each end of the mechanical interlock so as to retain the slider (280) on the reclosable interlock.

Embodiment K4. The collapsible kraft paper chill bag according to embodiment Kl, 2 or 3 wherein

the kraft paper chill bag is adapted to minimize energy transfer, from the air atmosphere environment to the frozen goods in the interior storage space, such that when the air atmosphere environment has a constant temperature and the product of the mass m of the frozen goods and the specific heat capacity of the frozen goods exceeds 20 000 Joule then

it takes more than 4 hours to increase the mean temperature of the frozen goods by 20 K, while maintaining its frozen state, when the initial temperature difference between the warmer ambient air and frozen goods is 50K.

Embodiment K5. The kraft paper chill bag according to any preceding claim, further comprising

a first handle adapted to allow gripping by a human hand for enabling carrying the container, the first handle comprising a material layer strip formed in a U-shape and having two material layer strip end portions; the material layer strip end portions of the first handle being attached to said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A); and

a second handle adapted to allow gripping by a human hand for enabling carrying the container, the second handle comprising a second material layer strip formed in a U-shape and having two material layer strip end portions; the second material layer strip end portions of the second handle being attached to said rim portion of said back wall panel (SIB).

Embodiment K6. The kraft paper chill bag according to any of claims 1-4, wherein

said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A) comprises at least one die cut opening so as to form a first handle; and wherein the first elongated closure element is attached to the rim portion of the front panel between said at least one die cut opening and said bag bottom panel.

This location of the closure element advantageously enables the provision of a handle formed by a die cut opening in the wall panels above the closure elements while also enabling the closing and sealing of the interior storage space.

Embodiment K7. The kraft paper chill bag according to embodiment K6, wherein

said rim portion of said back wall panel (SIB) comprises at least one second die cut opening so as to form the first handle; and wherein

the second elongated closure element is attached to the rim portion of the back panel between said at least one second die cut opening and said bag bottom panel.

Embodiment K8. The kraft paper chill bag according to any preceding claim, wherein the kraft paper layer is shaped and folded such that

the front wall panel (SI A),

the back wall panel (SIB),

said two mutually opposing side wall panels (S2A, S2B); and

said bottom panel

co-operate to form said interior storage space such that, in the closed expanded state of the kraft paper chill bag, said bottom panel forms a flat plane or a substantially flat plane.

Embodiment K9. The kraft paper chill bag according to any preceding claim, wherein the bottom panel cover sheet (700) is adapted to provide stiffness to the bottom panel.

Embodiment K10. The kraft paper chill bag according to embodiment K9 when dependent on embodiment K8 and any of claims 5-7, wherein

the bottom panel cover sheet (700) is adapted to provide such an amount of stiffness to the bottom panel that when lifting the kraft paper chill bag by said handle or handles during transport of the chilled and/or frozen goods

said bottom panel maintains said flat plane shape or a substantially flat plane shape. Embodiment Kll. A goods temperature retaining container for use in an air atmosphere environment, the container having

a wall adapted to enclose an interior storage space so as to enable transporting more than 2 kg of chilled and/or frozen goods, the wall being shaped and adapted to form said interior storage space to a volume of at least ten metric litres; said wall comprising:

a) a layer of a material having a thermal conductivity of less than 0,2

W/(K*m ); and

b) a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of said material layer; and

c) a closable opening such that the container in its closed state substantially seals the interior storage space from the environment so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space.

Embodiment K12. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1, wherein said wall material layer is shaped so as to form

a front wall panel (SI A),

a back wall panel (SIB),

two mutually opposing side wall panels (S2A, S2B); and

a bottom panel; wherein the wall panels and the bottom panel cooperate to form said interior storage space to a volume of between 10 litres and 50 litres; and

wherein a rim portion of the wall panels facing away from the bag bottom panel provides a container opening; the container further comprising

a first handle adapted to allow gripping by a human hand for enabling carrying the container, the first handle comprising a material layer strip formed in a U-shape and having two material layer strip end portions; the material layer strip end portions of the first handle being attached to said rim portion of said front wall panel (SI A); and

a second handle adapted to allow gripping by a human hand for enabling carrying the container, the second handle comprising a second material layer strip formed in a U-shape and having two material layer strip end portions; the second material layer strip end portions of the second handle being attached to said rim portion of said back wall panel

(SIB);

and wherein d) said material layer has a tensile strength exceeding 0, 133 Newton/ square millimetre so as to enable transporting up to 5 kg of chilled and/or frozen goods.

Embodiment K13. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1 or 12, wherein the wall is shaped and adapted to form said interior storage space to a volume of at least 20 metric litres; and wherein

said material layer has a tensile strength exceeding 0,267 Newton/ square millimeter.

Embodiment K14. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1 or 12, wherein the wall is shaped and adapted to form said interior storage space to a volume of at least 30 metric litres; and wherein

said material layer has a tensile strength exceeding 0,4 Newton/ square millimeter.

Embodiment K15. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1 or 12, wherein the wall is shaped and adapted to form said interior storage space to a volume of at least 40 metric litres; and wherein

said material layer has a tensile strength exceeding 0,533 Newton/ square millimeter.

Embodiment K16. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1 or 12, wherein the wall is shaped and adapted to form said interior storage space to a volume of at least 50 metric litres; and wherein

said material layer has a tensile strength exceeding 0,667Newton/ square millimeter.

Embodiment K17. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1 or 12, wherein the container is adapted to be collapsible so as to have

a collapsed state for enabling transportation of the container in a substantially flat state, and

an expanded state such that the container, in its expanded state, provides an interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods.

Embodiment K18. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1 or 12, wherein the container is shaped in such a manner that plural containers (20) can be stacked so as to enable transporting a plurality of stacked containers within a certain volume in three dimensional space; said certain volume being smaller than the sum of the individual container volumes.

Embodiment K19. The container as defined in Embodiment K18, wherein an individual container has, at least partly, a cone shape such that two at least partly cone shaped containers can be placed one partly within the other.

Embodiment K20. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1 or 12, wherein said material layer is a biodegradable material.

Embodiment K21. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1 or 12, wherein said substantially water vapour impermeable membrane is a biodegradable material.

Embodiment K22. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1 or 12, wherein said material layer is a biodegradable material; and wherein

said substantially water vapour impermeable membrane is a biodegradable material.

Embodiment K23. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1 or 12, wherein the container, when in use for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods, is shaped and adapted to enable a human to carry the container such that the centre of gravity of the loaded container is less than 10 cm from at least one container wall.

This advantageously allows for an ergonomically friendly carrying of the container.

Embodiment K24. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1, wherein

said wall is shaped and adapted to form said interior storage space to a volume of less than 100 metric litres.

Embodiment K25. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1 or 12, wherein said wall comprises Kraft paper.

Embodiment K26. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1 or 12, wherein said wall comprises at least one of the materials selected from the list:

a non- woven material; a textile material;

a film of foamed/porous thermoplastic.

Embodiment K27. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1, wherein

said material layer has a tensile strength exceeding 0, 133 Newton/ square millimeter.

Embodiment K28. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1, wherein

said wall material is selected from a list comprising:

a film of thermoplastic;

a film foamed and/or porous rubber.

Embodiment K29. The container as defined in Embodiment Kl 1, wherein

Said material layer comprises a non-woven material and/or a textile material having a tensile index value exceeding 50 kNm/kg and a thermal conductivity of λ < 0,2 W/(m K).

Embodiment K30. Use of a kraft paper chill bag according to any of claims 1 to 10 for the transportation of chilled or frozen goods.

Embodiment K31. Use of a container according to any of claims 1 1 to 29 for transporting chilled or frozen goods.

Embodiment K32. A grocery transport system comprising

a storage facility (600) for goods; the storage facility comprising one or several storage rooms having a controlled environment in that the temperature and the relative humidity of the air in the storage room is controlled so that it is kept within certain predetermined ranges; wherein

the goods comprises a plurality of different types of goods sorted into different temperature ranges (TI, Til, Till, TIV), each type of goods being stored in a corresponding storage room (650 TI , 650 TII , 650-nn, 650-nv ) having a temperature in accordance with the corresponding goods temperature range (TI, Til, Till, TIV);

a loading facility for enabling chilled or frozen goods is to be packed into closable and sealable containers (20); said loading facility comprising a plurality of said closable and sealable containers (20) for use in the distribution of said chilled or frozen goods in an air atmosphere environment;

a delivery vehicle for transporting said closable and sealable containers (20), when loaded with a predetermined amount of chilled or frozen goods, to a delivery destination, wherein such a container comprises:

a wall adapted to enclose an interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods, the wall being shaped and adapted to form said interior storage space to a volume of at least ten metric litres; said wall comprising:

a) a layer of a material having a thermal conductivity of less than 0,2 W/(K*m ); and

b) a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of said material layer; and

c) a closable opening such that the container in its closed state substantially seals the interior storage space from the environment so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space; and wherein

said material layer has a tensile strength exceeding 0, 133 Newton/ square millimeter.

Embodiment K33. The grocery transport system according to embodiment 32 comprising :

a server computer (540) having a communications port for communication via the Internet.

Embodiment K34. A method of delivering chilled goods in a sealable container, comprising the steps of

receiving an order for an amount of chilled goods; and

packing said amount of chilled goods in a closable container adapted to be used in an air atmosphere environment, the container having

a wall adapted to enclose an interior storage space for transporting chilled and/or frozen goods, the wall being shaped and adapted to form said interior storage space to a volume of at least ten metric litres; said wall comprising:

a) a layer of a material having a thermal conductivity of less than 0,2 W/(K*m ); and b) a substantially water vapour impermeable membrane bonded to at least one side of said material layer; and c) a closable opening such that the container in its closed state seals, or substantially seals, the interior storage space from the environment so as to minimize or prevent entry of air from the environment into the interior storage space;

and wherein the method further comprises the steps of

closing said closable opening so as to seal said amount of chilled or frozen goods from said air atmosphere environment; and

transporting the loaded container to a delivery destination (DD).

Embodiment K35. The method according to embodiment K34 wherein said transporting step includes:

Using a vehicle without any actively refrigerated storage enclosure for the transportation of the loaded container.