Login| Sign Up| Help| Contact|

Patent Searching and Data


Title:
HAMMER
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/116300
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
I-Iammer comprising a hammerhead which is connected to a shaft, wherein the hammerhead has a main body manufactured from a first material, and wherein the hammerhead has at least one striking side where a finishing layer is provided against the main body, wherein the finishing layer is manufactured from a second material, wherein the main body has a weight of a minimum of 2 kg, and wherein the finishing layer has a minimum thickness of 2 cm, wherein the second material has a hardness which is at least six times lower than the hardness of the first material.

Inventors:
WIJNHOVEN, Anthony Jacobus (Kluizerdijk 160, Hamont-Achel 3930, Hamont-Achel, BE)
Application Number:
IB2018/060011
Publication Date:
June 20, 2019
Filing Date:
December 13, 2018
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
WIJNHOVEN, Anthony Jacobus (Kluizerdijk 160, Hamont-Achel 3930, Hamont-Achel, BE)
International Classes:
B25D1/12; A63B15/00; A63B21/08
Foreign References:
JP2002200578A2002-07-16
FR2129625A51972-10-27
DE29817031U11998-11-26
US4302008A1981-11-24
US20140051554A12014-02-20
US20140309081A12014-10-16
US20120149539A12012-06-14
Other References:
None
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PHILIPPAERTS, Yannick (Bezuidenhoutseweg 57, 2594 AC Den Haag, 2594 AC, NL)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Claims

1. Hammer comprising a hammerhead which is connected to a shaft, wherein the hammerhead has a main body manufactured from a first material, and wherein the hammerhead has at least one striking side where a finishing layer is provided against the main body, wherein the finishing layer is manufactured from a second material, wherein the main body has a weight of a minimum of 2 kg, and wherein the finishing layer has a minimum thickness of 2 cm, wherein the second material has a hardness which is at least six times lower than the hardness of the first material.

2. Hammer as claimed in claim 1 , wherein the hammer comprises two opposite striking sides, and wherein each of the opposite striking sides is provided with a finishing layer of the second material, wherein the finishing layer has a minimum thickness of 2 cm.

3. Hammer as claimed in claim 1 or 2, wherein the hammerhead further comprises a sleeve which encases the main body and the finishing layer.

4. Hammer as claimed in any of the foregoing claims, wherein the finishing layer is connected removably to the main body so that the finishing layer is replaceable.

5. Hammer as claimed in any of the foregoing claims, wherein the hammerhead is further provided with a sensor.

6. Hammer as claimed in claim 5, wherein the sensor is provided in the finishing layer.

7. Hammer as claimed in claim 5 or 6, wherein the sensor comprises a plurality of sensors for measuring two or more of the following characteristics: speed, acceleration, position, pressure, force, temperature, vibration and impact.

8. Hammer as claimed in claim 5, 6 or 7, wherein the sensor is connected operatively to a clock in order to correlate different sensor measurements with time.

9. Set comprising a hammer as claimed in any of the foregoing claims and a strike pad comprising a core of a damping material and a pad sleeve which encases the core.

10. Set as claimed in claim 9, wherein the strike pad comprises a further sensor.

1 1. Set as claimed in claim 10, wherein the further sensor comprises a plurality of sensors for measuring two or more of the following characteristics: speed, acceleration, position, pressure, force, temperature, vibration and impact.

12. Set as claimed in claim 10 or 1 1, wherein the set further comprises a wireless communication system provided in order to connect the sensors operatively to a user interface, wherein the user interface comprises a screen for displaying characteristics of a stroke of the hammer on the strike pad.

Description:
Hammer

The invention relates to a hammer with a hammerhead connected to a shaft.

A hammer is a beating or striking tool. A hammer has a shaft wherein the proximal end typically has a handgrip, or at least a handling surface, and wherein the distal end is provided with a hammerhead. The shape, size and the material of the hammerhead, as well as the length of the shaft, depend on the type of hammer and the intended use. Hammers are used for many purposes. Small and light hammers can be used for precision work or as percussion instrument, medium sized hammers can be used to position components and elements, to fix elements, to drive in nails and plugs and so on. Large hammers are also known as sledgehammers and can be used to break stone or other hard materials.

There is a trend toward also using hammers for training, sport and fitness purposes. The aim here is to build up strength, increase motor precision and train stamina. Sports centres are equipped for this purpose with hammers, typically of the medium-sized and large types. Sports centres are also provided with objects for striking which may be struck with the hammers. In practice these objects for striking are typically truck or tractor tyres. These tyres are strong, have a sufficiently large surface for striking with a hammer, and are sufficiently well capable of damping the stroke on the ground surface.

The use of such a hammer with striking element in a sporting context has several drawbacks. Tests have shown that prolonged participation in a sporting activity wherein elements for striking are struck with hammers can cause injuries to hands, wrists, arms, shoulders and back. These injuries are particularly the result of the rebound which is transferred to arms, shoulders and back when the hammer hits the element for striking. In the case of beginners or inexperienced athletes a further drawback is that the hammer can cause damage in or to the surrounding area when the hammer comes down wide of the element for striking.

It is an object of the invention to provide a hammer adapted for athletes.

The hammer according to the invention comprises for this purpose a hammerhead which is connected to a shaft, wherein the hammerhead has a main body manufactured from a first material, and wherein the hammerhead has at least one striking side where a finishing layer is provided against the main body, wherein the finishing layer is manufactured from a second material, wherein the main body has a weight of a minimum of 2 kg, and wherein the finishing layer has a minimum thickness of 2 cm, wherein the second material has a hardness which is at least six times lower than the hardness of the first material.

In the hammer according to the invention the striking side of the hammerhead is provided with a layer, i.e. the finishing layer, with stroke-damping properties. Because a finishing layer is provided with a hardness which is at least six times lower than the hardness of the main body of the hammer, and because the finishing layer has a minimum thickness of 2 cm, a considerable damping of the stroke is achieved. A further advantage is that the finishing layer protects the surrounding area when the hammer comes down wide of the element for striking with its striking side. For instance when the hammer comes down wide of the element for striking on the floor, the finishing layer will damp the stroke of the hammer on the floor so that the floor is not damaged, or less so. Tests have further shown that providing a finishing layer also has the result that hands, wrists, arms, shoulders and back of an athlete are subjected to less load, while the physical exertion and the experience remain the same. This all makes sporting activity with the hammer according to the invention technically possible and attractive.

The hammer preferably has two opposite striking sides, and each of the opposite striking sides is provided with a finishing layer of the second material, wherein the finishing layer has a minimum thickness of 2 cm. Because it is provided with two opposite striking sides, the hammer has a symmetrical construction. This reduces the chance of incorrect use of the hammer and increases the lifespan of the hammer. This is because the hammer can be used with two striking sides, whereby wear is distributed over the two opposite striking sides. Because each of the striking sides is provided with a finishing layer with a minimal thickness of 2 cm, each striking side will be suitable for reducing the impact of the stroke.

The hammerhead preferably further has a sleeve which encases the main body and the finishing layer. The sleeve forms a visual finish to the hammer, more specifically to the hammerhead, this being appreciated in a sporting environment. The sleeve allows the hammer to be given a designation, for instance a colour, logo or text, indicating properties of the hammer. The weight of the hammer, the damping of the finishing layer, the length of the shaft, the intended purpose of the hammer etc. can thus be indicated. The sleeve has the further advantage that it holds together the different components in the hammerhead, more specifically the main body and the one or more finishing layers, by encasing them. The sleeve further has the advantage that the sleeve makes physical contact with the elements for striking, whereby the sleeve will undergo the most friction and wear. The sleeve is preferably replaceable. The sleeve can be provided with the logo of the sports club, or with the logo or the name of the competition in which the hammer is being used.

The finishing layer is preferably removable with the main body so that the finishing layer is replaceable. The finishing layer is at least 2 cm thick and has a hardness which is at least six times lower than the hardness of the main body, and is thereby intended to damp the stroke. When the finishing layer damps strokes frequently, the finishing layer will typically deteriorate, whereby it can fulfil its function less than optimally. Providing a removable and replaceable finishing layer allows it to be replaced so that the main body with the shaft can continue to be used. This considerably increases the durability of the hammer in a sporting environment.

The hammerhead is preferably further provided with a sensor. It is of interest in the context of sport to measure characteristics of the stroke in building up strength, increasing motor precision and training stamina. To this end a sensor can be provided in the hammerhead. Through measurement of properties of the stroke the athlete can be corrected so as to perform the stroke with a predetermined force, a higher precision or a more regular repetition.

The sensor is preferably provided in the finishing layer. The finishing layer is formed against a striking side of the main body and is therefore suitable for positioning the sensor. The force, impact and timing of a stroke can be properly measured at the location of the finishing layer. A further advantage of providing a sensor in the finishing layer is that the finishing layer is preferably removable. The sensor is hereby also removable. This allows a finishing layer to be provided with inexpensive sensors, or without sensors, in a small-scale training context so that frequent training is possible without an expensive hammer. In a competitive context or advanced training context a finishing layer can be provided with accurate sensors, multiple sensors or calibrated sensors such that a more accurate measurement of the stroke can be made. Replacement and/or repair of sensors is also simple when the sensors are provided in the finishing layer.

The sensor preferably comprises a plurality of sensors for measuring two or more of the following characteristics: position, speed, acceleration, pressure, force, temperature, vibration and impact. Properties of the stroke can be measured accurately by measuring two or more of these characteristics. The skilled person will appreciate that combinations of such characteristics can be measured and correlated in order to increase the precision of the measurement.

The sensor or the sensors is/are connected operatively to a clock in order to correlate different sensor measurements with time. The number of strokes, for instance the number of strokes per unit time, can hereby also be measured with the sensor or sensors. An evolution and difference in successive strokes can also be detected by further providing a clock and correlating the sensor measurements with the clock. The repetition speed of successive strokes can also be measured, plotted over time and visualized. This allows a user to be given feedback on the strokes with the hammer such that the user can optimize the stroke on the basis of the feedback. The hammer hereby allows the creation of more than just amusement value and the hammer can also be used in training environments in order to refine skills.

The invention further relates to a set with a hammer according to the invention and with a strike pad comprising a core of a damping material and a pad sleeve which encases the core.

Because a strike pad is provided sports clubs no longer have to provide the large and heavy truck and tractor tyres as element for striking. In the context of a strike pad a damping material is a mechanically damping material and/or a material able to at least partially absorb an impact through elastic and/or plastic deformation. The strike pad is typically considerably more compact, lighter, and so more easily manageable and easier to store. The strike pad can be further optimized so as to realize a predetermined damping of the stroke. Wear can be minimized by providing a pad sleeve around the strike pad and selecting a suitable pad sleeve material. An imprint can also be provided which indicates properties of the pad, such as described above with reference to the sleeve of the hammer. The pad sleeve is preferably also replaceable such that the lifespan and durability of the strike pad is considerably increased.

The strike pad preferably comprises a further sensor. The further sensor more preferably comprises a plurality of sensors for measuring two or more of the following characteristics: speed, acceleration, position, pressure, force, temperature, vibration and impact. Through use of sensors in the strike pad properties of the stroke with the hammer can be measured without the hammer having to be provided with sensors. When the hammer also comprises sensors, the stroke can be measured more accurately by combining the measurements of the sensors of the hammer and the further sensors of the strike pad.

The set preferably further comprises a wireless communication system provided in order to connect the sensors operatively to a user interface, wherein the user interface comprises a screen for displaying characteristics of a stroke of the hammer on the strike pad. The user interface provides a direct feedback to the user in respect of the stroke so that a user can immediately see characteristics of the stroke on the screen. This allows a user to modify his/her subsequent stroke so that after a pair of successive strokes the user arrives at a more optimal stroke. It will be apparent here that providing a user interface primarily goes beyond mere entertainment, but provides a mechanism for training the user in the optimal use of a hammer, this being previously impossible with existing systems. In addition, the feedback via the user interface will typically also motivate the user whereby exercise performance typically improves. Finally, the display of strike properties on a screen allows bystanders and other athletes to evaluate and compare the performance of the user to other users. This creates a sporting context, or even a competitive context.

The invention will now be further described with reference to an exemplary embodiment shown in the drawing.

In the drawing:

figure 1 shows a hammer according to a first embodiment of the invention;

figure 2 shows a hammer according to a further embodiment of the invention; and figure 3 shows a set according to an embodiment of the invention.

The same or similar elements are designated in the drawing with the same reference numeral.

Figure 1 shows a hammer 1 according to an embodiment of the invention. Hammer 1 comprises a shaft 3 with a hammerhead 2. Hammerhead 2 is connected fixedly to one end of shaft 3. The other end of shaft 3 can be provided with a handgrip or with a grip-enhancing layer in order to facilitate grasping and handling of hammer 1. Shaft 3 has in any case a proximal end provided so as to be gripped. The side of shaft 3 at the position of the handgrip is referred to as the proximal side. The end of shaft 3 to which hammerhead 2 is attached is referred to as the distal end of shaft 3.

Hammerhead 2 is attached at the distal end of shaft 3. Hammerhead 2 has a main body 4. Main body 4 is typically the hard part of the hammer, which part also forms the greater part of the weight of hammerhead 2. Main body 4 has a weight dependent on the size of the hammer. A small hammer can have a shaft of about 30 to 40 cm, and has a hammerhead with a weight of 1 kg to 2 kg, preferably more than 2 kg. The hammer according to the invention is particularly optimized so as to form a variant of the sledgehammer. A sledgehammer has a shaft of about 1 m ± 30 cm. The hammerhead of such a hammer has a weight of a minimum of 2 kg, preferably a minimum of 3 kg, more preferably a minimum of 4 kg.

Main body 4 can be manufactured from different materials. Hammerhead 4 can for instance be manufactured from a hard rubber. Hammerhead 4 is alternatively manufactured from a metal. Main body 4 is connected in known manner to the shaft. Typically provided for this purpose in main body 4 is an opening through which the shaft extends with a distal end. The diameter of the opening and the size of the shaft are typically adapted to each other such that the shaft can be clamped in the opening of main body 4.

Hammerhead 2 has at least one striking side 5. In the embodiment of figure 1 hammerhead 2 has two opposite striking sides 5. A striking side is defined as a side of hammerhead 2 which has the primary purpose of hitting the struck object during a stroke. On each striking side 5 hammerhead 2 is provided with a finishing layer 6. Finishing layer 6 has a thickness of a minimum of 2 cm, preferably a minimum of 3 cm, more preferably a minimum of 4 cm. The finishing layer is formed from material with damping properties. The finishing layer can for instance be manufactured from a foam rubber. The hardness of finishing layer 6 is preferably at least six times lower than the hardness of main body 4, more preferably at least ten times lower, most preferably at least fifteen times lower. The material from which the finishing layer is manufactured preferably has a foam structure. An example of material is polyurethane foam or ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA).

Finishing layer 6 is preferably connected removably to main body 4 at the position of striking sides 5. Complementary connecting elements can thus be provided on finishing layer and main body in order to realize the connection. A known example for realizing such a releasable connection is known under the commercial name of Velcro.

The purpose of providing a finishing layer of a material softer than the main body is to damp the stroke. A hammer is intended for the purpose of striking objects. The stroke occurs when hammerhead 2 collides at speed with an object for striking. An impact is hereby realized on the object for striking. The magnitude of the deceleration of the hammer, in combination with the weight of the hammer, determines the force transmitted. This force is also referred to as the impact or the shock. The object for striking is protected by damping of the impact, and more specifically the force exerted on the object for striking by the hammer is considerably reduced. Force equals mass times acceleration. Because of the finishing layer the magnitude of the deceleration of the hammer on the object for striking is reduced in that the finishing layer will be compressed.

Because the magnitude of the deceleration decreases, the force exerted on the struck object also decreases. When the hammer strikes an object, this object will therefore have to absorb less great a force. When the hammer strikes against the floor, because the person handling the hammer misses the object for striking, the floor will typically not be damaged. This has a safety advantage. A further advantage relates to the rebound and the associated load on the user of the hammer. Tests have shown that, by providing the finishing layer which damps the stroke, injuries to hands, wrist and shoulder joint are considerably reduced. It has also been found that the head of the hammer displays less wear when the stroke is damped.

Hammerhead 2 preferably further comprises a sleeve 7 which encases main body 4 and finishing layer 6 and/or finishing layers 6. Sleeve 7 is preferably formed as a rubber cover or plastic cover. As stated above, sleeve 7 can be provided with an imprint. Sleeve 7 is preferably also replaceable.

Figure 2 shows a front view of a striking side 5 of a hammerhead 2. The figure further shows shaft 3. Figure 2 shows how a plurality of sensors 8 can be provided in hammerhead 2 for the purpose of measuring characteristics and/or properties of the stroke. The sensors have been defined above. The sensors can be provided in openings in main body 4. Blind bores can be provided for this purpose in the striking side of main body 4, wherein sensors 8 are mounted in the blind bores. Sensors 8 are alternatively and preferably provided in finishing layer 6. When sensors 8 are provided in finishing layer 6, sensors 8 are replaceable together with finishing layer 6. This further provides the possibility of optionally equipping hammerhead 2 with sensors depending on which finishing layer 6 is mounted.

Figure 3 shows an overview of the set according to a preferred embodiment of the invention. Figure 3 shows a hammer 1 here with a shaft 3 and a hammerhead 2. Hammer 1 of figure 3 differs from the hammer of figure 1 in that the hammer of figure 3 has only one striking side 5. Figure 3 shows main body 4 and finishing layer 6 of hammerhead 2. Several sensors 8 are shown schematically in finishing layer 6. Figure 3 further shows a strike pad 9.

Strike pad 9 is preferably constructed from a pad filling with a pad sleeve. The pad filling can be a foam or other material. The pad filling is preferably also damping, similarly to the finishing layer of the hammer. The pad sleeve is preferably a rubber sleeve or plastic sleeve. At least one handgrip 11 is preferably provided on a side of the pad to enable easy handling of the pad. Pad 9 is preferably further provided with further sensors 10. Further sensors 10 are provided for the purpose of measuring properties and/or characteristics of a stroke on pad 9. A force, a location, a speed or a combination of these properties can preferably be measured here. Sensors 8 and further sensors 10 are preferably connected wirelessly to a communication module 12. This communication module 12 receives the data from sensors 8 and further sensors 10 for further processing. Communication module 12 preferably comprises a clock for placing the data from sensors 8 in time. The clock can alternatively be provided in or close to sensors 8 and/or 10.

Communication module 12 is further provided or connected operatively to a user interface which is preferably coupled to a screen 13. Via screen 13 a user can obtain feedback on his/her stroke. Different training options, sporting options or skill options are hereby created.

The skilled person will appreciate on the basis of the above description that the invention can be embodied in different ways and on the basis of different principles. The invention is not limited here to the above described embodiments. The above described embodiments and the figures are purely illustrative and serve only to increase understanding of the invention. The invention will not therefore be limited to the embodiments described herein, but is defined in the claims.