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Title:
HELMET FASTENING DEVICE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/042213
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The invention is a helmet fastening device for fastening a helmet (10) on a seat of a motorcycle, the device comprising two lateral strap elements (2), an upper strap element (4), as well as a locking strap element (6) adapted for fastening to the seat. The device, furthermore, comprises a fixed-projection connection element (5, 7) connecting to each other strap elements (2, 4) having connection ends, the fixed-projection connection element (5, 7) has projections in a number corresponding to the number of the strap elements connected by means of connection ends, and the projections are in a fixed arrangement in relation to each other, fastening tabs being opposite each other are formed on the projection, and the connection end is connected to the fastening tabs by means of a fastening rod element extending through the fastening tabs and the connection end.

Inventors:
TORKOS, András (Kolozsvár tér 13/2, 2094 Nagykovácsi, HU)
Application Number:
HU2017/000019
Publication Date:
March 08, 2018
Filing Date:
March 13, 2017
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
TORKOS, András (Kolozsvár tér 13/2, 2094 Nagykovácsi, HU)
International Classes:
A42B3/04; B62J11/00
Domestic Patent References:
WO2011135143A12011-11-03
Foreign References:
FR2489775A11982-03-12
US3762191A1973-10-02
US5531364A1996-07-02
FR2547263A11984-12-14
DE29805594U11998-08-13
DE202014006062U12015-02-05
US3831407A1974-08-27
EP1031500A12000-08-30
FR2489775A11982-03-12
US3762191A1973-10-02
FR2376783A21978-08-04
US5531364A1996-07-02
FR2547263A11984-12-14
FR2369145A11978-05-26
DE202014006062U12015-02-05
DE29805594U11998-08-13
US8087270B12012-01-03
GB1564952A1980-04-16
US6116064A2000-09-12
US3817064A1974-06-18
US20140047871A12014-02-20
FR2376783A21978-08-04
FR2547263A11984-12-14
US8807270B22014-08-19
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
GÖDÖLLE, KÉKES, MÉSZÁROS & SZABÓ (Patent and Trademark Attorneys, Keleti Károly u. 13/b, 1024 Budapest, HU)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

1. A helmet fastening device for fastening a helmet (10, 130) on a seat (52, 54) of a motorcycle (50), the device comprising

- two lateral strap elements (2, 12, 22, 32, 42) being arrangeable along opposite lateral portions of the helmet (10, 130) and being interconnected at their ends,

- an upper strap element (4, 14, 24, 34, 44) being arrangeable along an upper portion of the helmet (10, 130) situated opposite a head introduction opening, and being connected to the lateral strap elements (2, 12, 22, 32, 42), and

- a locking strap element (6) being connected to at least one of the lateral strap elements (2, 12, 22, 32, 42), being adapted for releasable fastening to the seat (52, 54),

c h a r a c t e r i s e d in that

- the device further comprises a fixed-projection connection element (5, 80, 99, 100, 110, 140, 220) connecting to each other strap elements (2, 4, 12, 14, 22, 24, 32, 34, 42, 44) having connection ends (111 , 122, 211), the fixed-projection connection element (5, 80, 99, 100, 110, 140, 220) has projections (85, 105, 145a, 145b, 200) in a number corresponding to the number of the strap elements (2, 4, 12, 14, 22, 24, 32, 34, 42, 44) connected by means of connection ends (111 , 122, 211), and the projections (85, 105, 145a, 145b, 200) are in a fixed arrangement in relation to each other, and

- fastening tabs (82, 102, 142, 201) being opposite each other are formed on the projection (85, 105, 145a, 145b, 200), and the connection end (111 , 122, 211) is connected to the fastening tabs (102, 142, 201) by means of a fastening rod element (83, 97, 113, 143, 210) extending through the fastening tabs (82, 102, 142, 201) and the connection end (111 , 122, 211).

2. The device according to claim 1 , characterised in that - the upper strap element (14, 24, 34) comprises at least three upper strap element portions (14', 14", 14"', 24', 24", 34', 34", 134', 134", 134"'), and

- the upper strap element portions (14', 14", 14"', 24', 24", 34', 34", 134', 134", 134"') are connected to the lateral strap elements (12, 22, 32) by their first ends and to one another by their second ends.

3. The device according to claim 2, characterised in that

- the upper strap element (14) comprises four upper strap element portions (14', 14", 14"', 134', 134", 134"'), and

- two first upper strap element portions (14", 14"', 134", 134"') are connected to the lateral strap elements (12) at their interconnections, and two second upper strap element portions (14', 134') are connected to the lateral strap elements (12) at parts different from the connection locations of the first upper strap element portions (14", 14"', 134", 134"').

4. The device according to claim 3, characterised in that

- the lateral strap elements (12) are connected to each other at their first ends and at their second ends by means of respective fixed-projection connection elements (5, 100, 110, 220), the ends of the lateral strap elements (12) and a first upper strap element portion (14", 14"', 134", 134"') are connected to respective projections (105, 200) of the fixed- projection connection elements (5, 100, 110, 220), and

- the lateral strap elements (12) and the first upper strap element portions (14", 14'", 134", 134"') are formed by means of chains (81 , 121 , 208) comprising chain links (60, 88a, 88b, 89a, 89b), and from the chain links (60, 88a, 89a) intermediate chain links (60, 88a, 89a) of the chain (81 , 121 , 208) are connected to respective adjacent chain links (60, 88b, 89b) by means of a first chain rod element (76, 84, 213) and a second chain rod element (76, 84, 213) having axes parallel with each other, and the adjacent chain links (60, 88a, 88b, 89a, 89b) are configured to be rotatable relative to each other about the chain rod element (76, 84, 213) that connects them, and the fastening rod elements (83, 97, 113, 143, 210) extending through each of the connection ends (111 , 122, 211) of the chain (81 , 121 , 208) are parallel for each connection end (111 , 122, 211) with the chain rod element (76, 84, 213) of a chain link (60, 88a, 88b, 89a, 89b) connected to the respective connection end (111 , 122, 211).

5. The device according to claim 3 or claim 4, characterised in that

- each of the second upper strap element portions (134') is connected to a respective lateral strap element with a respective rotatable-projection connection element (90), the rotatable-projection connection element (90) comprises projections (92a, 92b, 92c) being connected to each other by means of a rivet element (94) and being rotatable relative to each other, and

- the second upper strap element portion (134') and the lateral strap element portions (132', 132") of the lateral strap element (12) are connected to respective projections (92a, 92b, 92c) of the rotatable- projection connection element (90).

6. The device according to claim 1 , characterised in that a plurality of upper strap elements (4, 44) are connected to the lateral strap elements (2, 42) at the same distances along the two lateral strap elements (2, 42) from the interconnections thereof.

7. The device according to claim 2, characterised in that the upper strap element (24) comprises three upper strap element portions (24', 24"), of which

- a first upper strap element portion (24") is connected to that interconnection of the lateral strap elements (22) which is arranged - when the device is placed on a helmet (10) such that the locking strap element (26', 26") is positioned in the plane of symmetry of the helmet (10) - at the rear side of the helmet (10) opposite the side where a visor (18) is arranged,

- a second upper strap element portion (24') and a third upper strap element portion (24') is connected to respective lateral strap elements (22) in the region between the interconnections of the lateral strap elements (22).

8. The device according to claim 2, characterised in that

- the upper strap element (34) comprises four upper strap element portions (34', 34"), and

- the four upper strap element portions (34', 34") are connected to the lateral strap elements (32) at positions being different from the interconnections of the lateral strap elements (32).

9. The device according to any of claims 1 to 8, characterised in that the lateral strap elements (2, 12, 22, 32, 42) and the first upper strap element portions (4, 14, 24, 34, 44) are formed by means of chains (81 , 121 , 208) comprising chain links (60, 88a, 88b, 89a, 89b), and from the chain links (60, 88a, 89a) intermediate chain links (60, 88a, 89a) of the chain (81 , 121 , 208) are connected to respective adjacent chain links (60, 88b, 89b) by means of a first chain rod element (76, 84, 213) and a second chain rod element (76, 84, 213) having an axis parallel with each other, and the adjacent chain links (60, 88a, 88b, 89a, 89b) are configured to be rotatable relative to each other about the chain rod element (76, 84, 213) that connects them.

10. The device according to any of claims 1 to 9, characterised in that the locking strap element (6) is formed such that it can be passed underneath the seat (52, 54) of the motorcycle (50).

11. The device according to any of claims 1 to 10, characterised in that the connection end (111 , 122, 211) is arranged between fastening tabs (102, 201) being opposite each other.

12. The device according to any of claims 1 to 11 , characterised in that the fixed-projection connection element (5, 80, 100, 110, 140, 220) is formed from sheet material, the fastening tabs (82, 102, 142, 201) on the projections (85, 105, 145a, 145b, 200) being bent from the sheet material to be arranged oppositely to each other.

13. The device according to any of claims 1 to 11 , characterised in that projections of the fixed-projection connection element (99) are formed with bent chain link elements (95a, 95b), and the strap elements connected to adjacent projections are connected to each other by means of at least one bent chain link element (95a, 95b).

14. The device according to any of claims 1 to 12, characterised in that

- it comprises a locking connection element (7, 110) arranged at one of the interconnections of the lateral strap elements (2, 12, 22, 32, 42), the locking connection element (7, 110) comprises a fixed-projection connection element (140), the lateral strap elements (2, 12, 22, 32, 42) are connected to respective projections (105, 200) of the fixed-projection connection element (140), and the locking connection element (7, 110) further comprises a locking arrangement having locking tabs (114, 164) and at least one locking pawl (118, 147) arranged between the locking tabs (114, 164),

- the locking strap element comprises a chain (81) having at least one hitch opening (87) adapted for receiving the at least one locking pawl (118, 147),

- two lock openings (116, 162) being adapted for receiving a locking element (182) of a locking device (180) are arranged opposite each other on the locking tabs (114, 164) such that when at least one locking pawl (118, 147) is introduced into the at least one hitch opening (87) of the chain the lock openings (116, 162) are left free by the chain.

15. The device according to claim 14, characterised in that the locking arrangement is a locking projection (119) formed integrally with the fixed- projection connection element of the locking connection element (7, 110).

16. The device according to claim 14, characterised in that the locking arrangement is a locking auxiliary element (151) rotatably connected to the fixed-projection connection element (140) of the locking connection element (7, 110).

17. The device according to claim 16, characterised in that at the other one of the interconnections of the lateral strap elements (2, 12, 22, 32, 42) the lateral strap elements (2, 12, 22, 32, 42) are interconnected by a fixed- projection connection element (140), and a supplementary projection (171) adapted for connecting the locking strap element being rotatably connected to this fixed-projection connection element (140).

18. The device according to any of claims 1 to 17, characterised in that fastening openings (106) are formed on the fastening tabs (82, 102, 142) being opposite each other, and the fastening rod element (83, 97, 113, 143) extends through the fastening openings (106) of the fastening tabs (82, 102, 142) being opposite each other.

19. The device according to any of claims 1 to 17, characterised in that fastening recesses (203, 205) are formed on the fastening tabs (201) being opposite each other, and the fastening rod element (210) extends through the fastening recesses (203, 205) of the fastening tabs (201) being opposite each other.

20. The device according to claim 19, characterised in that a plurality of pairs of corresponding fastening recesses (203, 205) are formed on the fastening tabs (201) being opposite each other.

21. The device according to claim 19 or claim 20, characterised by comprising a covering element (230) having covering projections (190) fitting between the fastening tabs (201), the covering element being secured to the connection element (220).

22. The device according to claim 21 , characterised in that on the side of the covering element (230) facing the connection element (220) at least one screw thread (196) is formed, and at least one screw introduction opening (206) adapted for receiving a screw engaged by the at least one thread (196) is formed on the connection element (220).

23. The device according to claim 21 or claim 22, characterised in that covering pins (192) extending into respective fastening recesses (203, 205) are connected to the covering projections (190).

Description:
HELMET FASTENING DEVICE

TECHNICAL FIELD

The invention relates to a helmet fastening device adapted for fastening a helmet (e.g. a crash helmet) to the seat of a motorcycle. BACKGROUND ART

In our age there is rapid growth in the splread and use of motorcycles. Due to the enormous amount of money that is available in the field, there are a huge number of engineers, designers and other professionals all over the world working on creating novel designs, models and technical solutions, and also on marketing and commercializing new products. In addition to motorcycle manufacturing that exists in itself as a huge industry sector, a number of service and complementary industries deal with the design, development, manufacturing and distribution of related products (safety, H&S - health and safety, e.g. crash helmets). There are an enormous number of large companies and professionals engaged in the crash helmet design, development and production industry who work constantly on developing the newest, safest and most developed product models and their accessories, and yet to this date the problem of helmet storage and of fastening it to the motorcycle in a safe manner has not been solved.

For a couple of decades a separate industrial field has been engaged with the design, development, manufacturing and distribution of the newest safety products that generally covers the most state-of-the-art safety devices, i.e. chains, padlocks, locks, and other safety accessories. Applying the best and most modern technologies, these professionals create exceptionally safe, clever, practical and strong tempered steel safety accessories for locking the motorcycle and optionally its accessories, apparatuses, which innovations see market success year after year.

So far the only established manner of storing the rider's helmet on the motorcycle has been the "top box", a box usually made of plastic that is mounted on the rear part of the motorcycle with the help of type specific accessories. With a number of motorcycle types this solution is either not practically feasible and/or is not desired. This solution is particularly unfeasible in the case of the most popular and best- looking types, i.e. the so-called custom, naked, sport and supersport motorcycles, although in these cases the above sketched problem presents itself even more manifestly because in these cases the motorcycle itself offers no storage space at all for accessories. Previously, motorcycles were considered as a hobby or were utilized strictly for work (couriers), and therefore there used to be way less motorcycles in use compared to the present situation. Today the number of people switching from using cars and public transport to riding motorcycles (and bicycles) is increasing constantly. The reason why single track vehicles are becoming more and more popular is that they provide comfortable and fast transport, which despite some unresolved problems such as the complete lack of storage space for accessories, is very appealing. Besides that, hobby and fashion also remain, which is also a major driving force behind the popularity of this means of transport. Manufacturers put a major emphasis on the design and aerodynamics of their newer and newer fashionable motorcycle models, which leaves no room for including built-in storage space or a subsequently mounted storage compartment. This trend as well as the manufacturing industry includes as an organic component the crash helmet as a primary and compulsory protection device, but the above presented problem has not yet been solved in spite of ongoing product development. Many motorcycle users (e.g. those who use so-called custom, naked, sport and supersport design motorcycles) value fashion, appearance of the vehicle, as well as aerodynamics and driving characteristics over comfort, and thus do not equip their motorcycle with any box adapted for storage (top box) or storage bag (so- called soft bag). This can be observed primarily in the case of narrow-build sport and supersport motorbikes where for the above reasons the provision of storage space also poses technical problems (fastening the various storage devices to the motorcycle is cumbersome). It is these motorcycle types that are affected most by technological progress and the revolution of design.

In addition to basic protective devices (particularly the helmet and gloves) riding a motorcycle does not require anything else, however, when the rider arrives at his/her destination (e.g. to a cinema, theatre, shopping mall, restaurant, beach, etc.) storing these devices (especially the helmet) presents a serious problem. With a little cleverness some helmet types can be chained to the motorcycle. As it will be demonstrated below, a number of prior art solutions are based on this approach (DE 29805594, DE 20 2014 006 062, US 3,831 ,407, EP 1031500 A1). Lacking a better option, in some cases riders apply this solution. However, none of these DIY- (do-it-yourself) solutions resolves the issue of storing the (sometimes very costly) helmet, and thus in most cases riders have to take their helmets with themselves (in the lack of other solutions), which in addition to be extraordinarily uncomfortable also exposes the helmet to potential damage. The helmet and the visor typically sustain damage (indentation, scratches, and other damage) in these situations. Sooner or later this necessitates the replacement of the helmet/visor.

Documents revealed in this field are presented below. None of the approaches disclosed in the documents have ever been put to production, serial production, have been made available commercially, or have become a part of general knowledge. From the aspect of end users these solutions might as well have been non-existent as they have not been available at all to them. The objects of these documents could not achieve commercial success - probably due to their shortcomings and faults described here - despite there being a long-standing need for solving the above described problems. These technical solutions are known only from these documents, and are presented only to the limited extent made possible by the documents.

Some motorcycle types possess a factory-mounted "helmet lock" mechanism (which is a tiny metal hook that can be operated by a built-in lock), which indicates the manufacturers urge to search for a solution to the problem. This mechanism is therefore a tiny metal hook mounted on the side of the motorcycle on which the helmet can be hanged by its chin strap, which does not provide a real solution at all and there is also no practical experience indicating otherwise.

In FR 2489775 a helmet fastening device is disclosed. The device has lateral strap elements extending along both sides of the helmet, and an upper strap that runs along the upper part of the helmet and interconnects the lateral strap elements at the middle. The lateral strap elements are configured such that by placing the device on the helmet situated on the seat they come together at the location where the longitudinal sides of the seat meet the helmet. The lateral strap elements are therefore interconnected at the sides of the seat, and such a construction starts from their interconnection points which can be introduced into and fastened to a respective lock mechanism fastened to both sides of the motorcycle.

This device has the great disadvantage that it necessitates the modification of the motorcycle (by mounting to it an additional structural component). Modern crash helmets which, instead of the essentially hemispherical shape shown in the figures of the document essentially have the shape of an egg lying on its side. For these helmets the configuration of the device is not suitable because the single upper strap can be forced to come off sideways towards the sides of the seat such that it becomes possible to remove the helmet from under the straps, so protection against theft is not provided.

Furthermore, according to FR 2489775 the "boxes" adapted for receiving the straps of the helmet fastening device are fixedly mounted on the motorcycle, and thus they are constantly disturbing. There is not always enough room on a motorcycle for this approach, and a suitable universal attachment point cannot always be found, and therefore it can be assumed that this solution can only be applied for certain motorbike types.

In US 3,762,191 a further helmet fastening device is disclosed. This helmet fastening device comprises a chain consisting of very robust oval chain links interconnected typically at a position rotated by 90°, which in top view extends in a cross shape on the helmet, with circular reinforcing chain segments, with the chain being wound around the seat (thus it also has a section extending between the helmet and the seat).

A great disadvantage of this approach is that if the helmet lock according to the document is made of a material appropriate from the aspect of protection against theft (the material of the chain links is sufficiently thick) then the helmet fastening device is very heavy. On top of that, the chain section extending between the seat and the helmet may damage the upper part of the seat and thus during prolonged use the helmet fastening device causes the seat to wear. The heavy material of the chains may damage the surface of the helmet. In FR 2376783 a helmet fastening device is disclosed that comprises two straps riveted to the surface supporting the helmet, with a spacer extending between the straps such that the straps are arranged about the rivet at a specific angle.

In US 5,531 ,364 a helmet fastening device is disclosed that comprises two straps which can be hooked to the sides of the seat (disadvantageously this is a very type-specific solution), with two further straps being connectable to connection elements attached to the seat. The connection elements are permanently joined to the seat (by screw joints), i.e. the solution requires the modification of the motorcycle and a special seat arrangement in order that the straps to be hooked under the seat can function correctly. In the document the operation of the device is illustrated for a helmet having an essentially hemispherical shape. If the device was applied for a contemporary, modern crash helmet, much longer straps would have to be applied. This solution therefore requires a modification involving boring and making screw joints; it is a rigid structure assembled from metal sheets, is fixedly attached to the motorcycle, and the connection elements must remain on the motorcycle even when the helmet fastening device is out of use (i.e. the motorcycle is used for travel).

In FR 2547263 a further helmet fastening device is disclosed, comprising a circular portion adapted to be pulled on a helmet, with straps leading from the circular portion to attachment points fixed to the sides of the seat, to which the helmet can be "tied" by the helmet fastening device. The downward-extending straps are connected to the circular lateral strap element at multiple places. This approach therefore has the drawback that a respective attachment point has to be provided on each side of the seat. After the straps have been engaged they have to be pulled tight applying a tightener mechanism, and thus this solution causes damage to the material and the outer shell of the seat, or in case it is adjusted sufficiently loose to not damage the seat the device can be removed easily. The mechanism may be removed from the helmet by a rotating movement; this reduces the safety of the device. In the documents there are disclosed a number of such helmet fastening device configurations which encompass the helmet like a net, mesh, or bag, and provide a storage option by being attached to multiple attachment points of the motorcycle. Such an approach is disclosed in WO 2011/135143 A1 wherein the helmet fastening device has a mesh-like configuration; the drawings of the document illustrate that the device can be applied for fastening the helmet to the fuel tank, to the seat or even to another location. If such a mesh-like device is made of a material that is sufficiently strong to provide anti-theft protection the weight of the device is exceedingly large, and it also has a complicated structure. According to the document the mesh made up of vertical and horizontal thin wires is connected to thicker steel wires which have their ends attached fixedly to the motorcycle. This approach does not provide a sufficient level of protection either. A similar approach is disclosed in FR 2369145 wherein the helmet can be stored essentially in a bag made of a closely woven net. Such an approach is disclosed also in the German utility model description DE 20 2014 006 062 U1 wherein the device capable of storing the helmet has a bag-like configuration, with a plurality of straps running alongside one another. DE 298 05 594 U1 discloses a device with the help of which the helmet can be fastened to or hung on a portion of a motorcycle. According to this solution the straps are placed on the helmet relatively close to one another, with the straps converging at the bottom of the helmet where they are interconnected.

A similarly complex helmet fastening device is disclosed in US 8,087,270 B1 , the device has a circular strap arranged around the top portion of the helmet, with a plurality of pairs of straps (in the drawing, five pieces) extending downwards as far as the bottom portion of the helmet where the pairs of straps are interconnected. With the help of the interconnected pairs of straps the helmet storage device can e.g. be hanged on the handlebar of the motorcycle. The mesh-like basket system of the document is made applying thin steel cables and slidable weak interconnections and thus the construction does not provide a sufficient level of safety. The helmet is hanged with the open portion facing upwards also in this case, which is disadvantageous.

A similar technical solution comprising rings and chains is disclosed in US 3,831 ,407. The structure according to the document is made of thin and weak material, and does not provide a sufficient level of safety because it can be removed applying even a small-sized hand tool. Because helmet can be hung by applying the device on a structural component of the motorcycle, by way of example on its handlebar, with its open portion facing upwards, the interior of the helmet is unprotected, is exposed to rain or other adverse conditions. GB 1564952 and US 6,116,064 disclose devices for storing helmets wherein the helmet/helmets are covered by an extensible cover, their application necessitating an excessive modification of the motorcycle.

In US 3,817,064 and US 2014/0047871 A1 locking devices for chains are disclosed. A common disadvantage of a number of the approaches disclosed in the documents (e.g. US 5,531 ,364, FR 2376783, FR 2489775, FR 2547263 and GB 564952) is that the motorcycle has to be modified for their application, or further accessories have to be mounted thereon, which is exceedingly disadvantageous. Another group of the approaches disclosed in the documents (US 3,831 ,407, US 8,807,270 B1 , DE 298 05 594 and DE 20 2014 006 062 U1) has the common drawback that according to them the helmet has to be hung on the handlebar or on the frame. This causes problems in actual practice, since it often happens that multiple motorcycles have to be parked simultaneously at a narrow parking space, and thus the sideways protruding helmet is more prone to damage, and the arrangement is not practical due to inefficient use of space.

The disadvantage of the approaches disclosed by the documents is that they are made specific by the helmet (can be applied with a helmet of one of more specific shapes), by the motorcycle type (can be applied with motorcycles having appropriate structural details) or by the modification that has to be made to the motorcycle to accommodate the approach. Known helmet fastening devices are in many cases heavy, cumbersome or complicated. In addition to that, there are disclosed in the documents such lightweight, flexible solutions which cannot fulfil contemporary requirements of functionality and safety. The helmet fastening devices disclosed in the above cited documents are not available commercially probably due to the above mentioned disadvantages; the devices do not fulfil user needs to a sufficient extent. The problem detailed above (i.e. what to do with the accessories used during the ride, especially the helmet and the gloves, and the mask worn under the helmet after arriving at the destination) has been in existence for a long time, and the approaches disclosed in the above cited documents also illustrate the need for solving the problem.

Therefore there is a need for such solutions with which the helmet/crash helmet can be fastened to the motorcycle, i.e. which can be applied for locking the helmet to the motorcycle in a safe and practical manner. Nowadays this need is even greater than it used to be previously. The constantly changing and modernizing design of motorcycles also requires that such solutions are provided which conform to these carefully designed shapes and do not deteriorate the visual impression of the motorcycle when a helmet fastening device is applied; this latter requirement is not fulfilled in the case of many prior art solutions.

It is supported by the approaches disclosed in the above documents that there is a long-standing need for such a helmet fastening device that can be realized as a lightweight, low-material device that is preferably better protected against forcing to come off compared to the approaches disclosed in the prior art, and thereby provides improved safety for storing and locking the helmet on the motorcycle seat compared to the approaches disclosed in the documents. DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The primary object of the invention is to provide a helmet fastening device which is free of disadvantages of prior art approaches to the greatest possible extent.

A further object of the invention is to provide such a helmet fastening device that can be realized as a lightweight, low-material device that is preferably better protected against forcing to come off compared to conventional solutions disclosed in the prior art, and thereby provides improved safety for storing and locking the helmet on the motorcycle seat compared to the technical solutions disclosed in the prior art If possible. The objects of the invention can be achieved by the helmet fastening device according to claim 1. Preferred embodiments of the invention are defined in the dependent claims.

The fundamental difference between the invention and the above mentioned approaches is the application of a fixed-projection connection element or a system thereof that - contrary to the various fixed solutions - provides connection to and secure retaining of any commercially available crash helmet type in a non- integrated manner. In the invention a single-degree-of-freedom strap element (typically a chain, a multiple-row machine chain) is applied that is arranged in a uniquely configured system and is kept oriented by fixed-projection connection elements. These features cannot be derived from any of the approaches disclosed in the above documents.

A long-standing need is filled by the helmet fastening device according to the invention, such a device had not been developed in a satisfying manner in spite of a large amount of development work and the money spent in the field. The documents consulted during a search spanning a period of more than 40 years (starting in 1973) provide a decisive proof for the existence and presence of this long-standing need to solve the problem. None of these experimental prior art devices has seen production, serial production, has been marketed commercially or had commercial success. These or an improved version of any of these devices has practically been nonexistent from a commercial or user aspect.

The perfectly firm (stable) positioning and secure attachment of the helmet fastening device according to the invention may be provided by placing the device on the helmet and passing the locking strap element underneath the seat (or the frame structure supporting the seat).

The helmet fastening device (helmet fastening construction (arrangement, mechanism), helmet locking device) according to the invention brings a significant improvement over the above described approaches. The great advantage of the helmet fastening device according to the invention is its universal nature; neither of the above described approaches can be considered universal to this extent. The device according to the invention provides significant improvement over the approaches disclosed in the above referenced documents as far as the quantity of the applied materials, the provided security level and its practicality are concerned, which makes the device according to the invention valuable from the aspects of usability and potential commercialization. The application of the solution according to the invention presented below is of course not excluded in such cases where the motorcycle is fitted with the above mentioned top-box. The present solution allows for utilizing additional storage space that has been hitherto unused.

The solution according to the invention approaches the problem from multiple ways. A solution is provided by stably and securely fastening the helmet to the motorcycle, i.e. to that part of the motorcycle which can be easily and comfortably accessed at even the narrowest parking place and can be found on every motorcycle, whereby the helmet and its interior is exposed to the weather to the least extent possible and due to its position provides storage space for additional accessories such as gloves, scarfs, and face masks. The device is preferably made commercially available as a package including a waterproof bag into which the helmet can be placed and which provides additional protection to the helmet, but such a bag is not a part of the invention.

The application of the helmet fastening device according to the invention does not require any modification of the motorcycle or any additional components to be mounted thereon. Due to its structural arrangement detailed below the helmet fastening device according to the invention can be applied for most motorcycle types (cruisers, sport and supersport bikes, naked bikes, custom bikes, etc.), the invention preferably having the objective of making use of the gap under the seat.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Preferred embodiments of the invention are described below by way of example with reference to the following drawings, where

Fig. 1A is a schematic side view drawing illustrating an exemplary motorcycle,

Fig. 1 B is a schematic illustration of an embodiment of the device according to the invention on the seat of a motorcycle, Fig. 1C is a side view drawing illustrating the arrangement of a helmet on the motorcycle of Fig. 1A applying the embodiment of the device according to the invention shown in Fig. 1 B, Fig. 1 D is a side view drawing illustrating the arrangement of helmets on the motorcycle of Fig. 1A in first and second positions,

Fig. 1 E is a side view drawing illustrating the arrangement of a helmet on the motorcycle of Fig. 1A in a second position,

Fig. 2A is a schematic side view drawing illustrating an embodiment of the helmet fastening device according to the invention on a helmet,

Fig. 2B is a drawing showing a schematic view illustrating the embodiment of Fig. 2A,

Fig. 2C is a drawing showing a further schematic view illustrating the embodiment of Fig. 2A,

Fig. 2D is a drawing showing a yet further schematic view illustrating the embodiment of Fig. 2A,

Fig. 3A is a schematic front view drawing illustrating a further embodiment of the helmet fastening device according to the invention,

Fig. 3B is a drawing showing a schematic view illustrating the embodiment of Fig. 3A,

Fig. 3C is a drawing showing a schematic rear view of the embodiment of Fig. 3A,

Fig. 4A is a schematic drawing illustrating a yet further embodiment of the helmet fastening device according to the invention,

Fig. 4B is a further schematic drawing illustrating the embodiment of

Fig. 4A,

Fig. 4C is a schematic front view drawing illustrating the embodiment of

Fig. 4A,

Fig. 4D is a schematic rear view of the embodiment of Fig. 4A,

Fig. 4E is a schematic drawing illustrating the forces arising in the strap elements of the helmet fastening device in the embodiment of Fig. 4A, Fig. 5A is a schematic front view drawing illustrating an embodiment of the helmet fastening device according to the invention,

Fig. 5B is a drawing showing a schematic view illustrating the embodiment of Fig. 5A,

Fig. 5C is a schematic side view drawing illustrating the embodiment of

Fig. 5A,

Fig. 5D is a drawing showing a schematic rear view illustrating the embodiment of Fig. 5A,

Fig. 5E is a schematic rear view drawing illustrating the embodiment of

Fig. 5A,

Figs. 5F and 5G are schematic drawings illustrating the forces arising in the strap elements of the helmet fastening device in the embodiment of Fig. 5A,

Fig. 6A is a top plan drawing showing a chain link of a chain that can be exemplary applied as a strap element in the helmet fastening device according to the invention,

Fig. 6B is a side elevation drawing depicting the chain link of Fig. 6A, Fig. 6C is a side elevation drawing depicting the chain links of Figs. 6A and 6B linked together,

Fig. 7A shows the upper connection element of an embodiment of the invention from inside,

Fig. 7B shows the upper connection element of Fig. 7A from outside, Fig. 8 is a side view drawing illustrating the connection element-strap element connection applied in an embodiment of the invention, Fig. 9 is a drawing showing a view of the rotatable-projection connection element applicable in an embodiment of the invention,

Fig. 10A is a schematic drawing illustrating placing of the embodiment of the invention comprising a rotatable-projection connection element,

Fig. 10B is a drawing illustrating the rotatable-projection connection element in a particular arrangement in an embodiment, Fig. 11A is a further schematic drawing illustrating placing of the embodiment of the invention comprising a rotatable-projection connection element,

Fig. 11 B is a drawing illustrating the rotatable-projection connection element in a further arrangement in a possible embodiment,

Fig. 12A is a drawing showing, from inside, an embodiment of a fixed- projection connection element forming a part of a locking connection element adapted for connecting the lateral and upper strap element portions,

Fig. 12B shows the fixed-projection connection element of Fig. 12A from outside,

Fig. 13A is a drawing illustrating the fixed-projection connection element shown in Figs. 12A and 12B complemented to a locking connection element,

Fig. 13B is a drawing illustrating the rotatability of the locking portion of the locking connection element obtained in the embodiment depicted in Fig. 13A,

Fig. 13C is a front view drawing illustrating a locking connection element together with a locking device in the embodiment according to Fig. 13A,

Figs. 14A and 14B illustrate the preform and finished form of the locking auxiliary element applied in the embodiment according to Fig. 13A and 13B,

Figs. 15A and 15B illustrate, in a separated and connected position, the connection element that in an embodiment of the device according to the invention may be arranged on the helmet opposite the element illustrated in Figs. 13A and 13B and strap element adapted to be connected thereto,

Figs. 15C and 15D are schematic drawings illustrating the rotatability of the strap element in the embodiment illustrated in Figs. 15A and

15B,

Fig. 16A is a drawing showing a view of a fixed-projection connection element according to an embodiment of the invention, Fig. 16B is a drawing illustrating the preform of a connection element portion of the embodiment depicted in Fig. 16A,

Fig. 17 is a top view drawing illustrating a preform of an embodiment of the fixed-projection connection element applicable in the helmet fastening device according to the invention,

Fig. 18 is a side view drawing illustrating the finished form of the connection element of Fig. 17,

Fig. 19 is a side view drawing illustrating a locking connection element applicable in an embodiment of the device according to the invention,

Fig. 20A is a side view drawing illustrating the locking projection of the locking connection element of Fig. 19,

Fig. 20B is a side view drawing illustrating a further locking projection, Fig. 21 is a side view drawing illustrating the manner of connection of a further implementation of the strap element to the connection element,

Fig. 22 shows a view of an exemplary applicable chain,

Fig. 23 shows a view of the chain end of the chain of Fig. 22,

Fig. 24A is a top view drawing illustrating the covering element applied in an embodiment of the helmet fastening device according to the invention,

Fig. 24B is a side view drawing illustrating the covering element of Fig.

24A,

Fig. 25 is a side view drawing illustrating the connection element projection adapted to be applied with the covering element illustrated in Figs. 24A and 24B,

Fig. 26A is a side view drawing illustrating the projection shown in Fig.

25 with a chain arranged in a first position,

Fig. 26B is a side view drawing illustrating the projection shown in Fig.

25 with a chain arranged in a second position,

Fig. 27 is a top view drawing illustrating the preform of an exemplary connection element comprising the projection shown in Fig. 25, Fig. 28 is a top view drawing illustrating the finished state of the connection element of Fig. 27,

Fig. 29 is a top view drawing illustrating a covering element adapted to fit against the connection element shown in Fig. 28, and

Fig. 30 is a top view drawing illustrating the connection element of Fig.

28 together with a chain adapted to be connected thereto.

MODES FOR CARRYING OUT THE INVENTION

The helmet fastening device according to the invention is adapted for fastening a helmet to a seat of a motorcycle. Fig. 1A is a schematic side view drawing illustrating an exemplary motorcycle 50. Fig. 1 B is a schematic drawing illustrating an embodiment of the invention on a motorcycle. In Figs. 1C-1 E the embodiment of the invention shown in Fig. 1 B is illustrated in a position on a motorcycle 50 and applied to a helmet 10. A front seat 52 and a rear seat 54 of a motorcycle 50 is shown in Fig. 1A. In Fig. 1C a helmet 10 is fastened to the front seat 52, in Fig. 1 D a respective helmet 10 is fastened to both seats 52, 54, while in Fig. 1 E a helmet 10 is fastened to the rear seat 54 applying the helmet fastening device of Fig. 1 B.

The helmet fastening device according to the invention comprises two lateral strap elements (in the embodiment illustrated in Figs. 1 B-1 E, lateral strap elements 2 comprising lateral strap element portions 2' and 2") being arrangeable (may be arranged, being enabled to arrange) along opposite lateral portions of the helmet and being interconnected at their ends. Therefore, arranging the device according to the invention on a helmet, the lateral strap elements run along the sides thereof. The part of the helmet which is used to put it on, i.e. the part where the cyclist can put his head in the helmet, is termed the bottom of the helmet. This portion abuts against the seat 52 or 54 of the motorcycle 50 when the helmet fastening device is in use (the parts surrounding the bottom portion are the lateral portions).

In many cases - such as in the cases illustrated in Figs. 1 B-1 E - the lateral strap elements have a substantially curved configuration or are made up of straight segments. The substantially curved shape may also be formed of straight segments (thus a single-degree-of-freedom chain can be applied for these segments); the line of the strap element is broken at the locations of the connection elements preferably applied at the connection points. In all cases the lateral strap elements is divided into more than one lateral strap element portions by one or more connection points (the connection point[s] of the upper strap element as introduced later on). Preferably, a respective connection element (to be introduced below) is arranged at each of these connection points (the strap elements are connected to each other by a connection element) but at certain connection points the strap elements may also be interconnected in another way.

The lateral strap elements are therefore connected to each other at both of their ends (e.g. their ends are gripped into corresponding connection elements). By interconnecting the lateral strap elements at their ends it is meant that they do not extend over each other to a significant extent (see such embodiments illustrated in the figures wherein the chains implementing the lateral strap elements are interconnected by the connection element at their very ends). Naturally, the strap elements have such a length that in the case when the helmet fastening device is arranged on a helmet they can provide connection between the connection elements, and that they are neither too short nor too loose. To cover differently sized helmets it may be sufficient to manufacture the helmet fastening device in only a few different sizes (typically 1-2 sizes, by way of example for children and for adults as there are no major size differences within each category). The strap elements may thus have a looser fit on smaller-sized helmets, however - as it is detailed in this document - protection against forcing to come off is preserved (the locking strap element can be locked sufficiently tight).

The helmet fastening device according to the invention further comprises an upper strap element being arrangeable along an upper portion of the helmet that is situated opposite a head introduction opening (referred to above as the bottom portion), and being connected to the lateral strap elements. The upper strap element is therefore passed at the upper portion (along the outside of the upper portion) of the helmet, extending to the lateral strap element. In the embodiment illustrated in Figs. 1 B-1 E the upper strap element 4 of the helmet fastening device comprises more upper strap element portions. In Fig. 1 B upper strap element portions 4', 4" are shown but this embodiment comprises a total of four upper strap element portions (see Figs. 2A-2D illustrating a helmet fastening device configured in an analogous manner to the present embodiment). There are embodiments wherein a larger number of upper strap elements are applied (see by way of example the embodiments depicted in Figs. 5A-5G).

The helmet is not a part of the invention. By the clause e.g. that "the lateral strap elements are arrangeable (can be arranged) along opposite lateral portions of the helmet" it is meant that the lateral straps are positioned and dimensioned in the helmet fastening device in such a manner that after placing the helmet fastening device on the helmet they can be slid downwards over the lateral portions of the helmets to essentially encompass the helmet. And, with appropriate dimensioning, the upper strap element is arranged along the upper part of the helmet such that the lateral strap elements and the upper strap element are all tight (see e.g. Figs. 10A, 11 A).

The helmet fastening device according to the invention further comprises a locking strap element (in the embodiment of Figs. 1 B-1 E, a front locking strap element 6) being connected to at least one of the lateral strap elements and being adapted for releasable (disengageable, openable) fastening to the seat. By the locking strap element adapted for releasable fastening to the seat it is meant that (of all components of the motorcycle) the helmet is fastened to the seat by the helmet fastening device, and that it is kept in place on the seat by means of the locking strap element. In the device according to the invention the locking strap element is preferably designed to fit into the gap underneath the seat of a motorcycle (see Figs. 1C-1 E); i.e. the locking strap element 6 is passed underneath the portion of the motorcycle supporting the seat (the seat support structure). Such a fastening solution utilizing more than one locking strap element portion can also be conceived by which - making use of special properties (frame structure, other structural components) of the motorcycle - the helmet can be fastened or clamped (locked) to the seat of the motorcycle. In that case such a (specially configured) locking element has to be applied to the ends of the two locking strap elements by means of which they can be fastened to the motorcycle.

In the embodiment of Figs. 1B-1 E the locking strap element 6 is connected to the lateral strap elements 2 preferably at their interconnection. Accordingly, the locking strap element is preferably arranged also in other embodiments such that it is connected to the lateral strap elements at one of their interconnections, preferably via a locking connection element to be described below. Furthermore, as illustrated in Figs. 1B-1E, during use it is passed underneath the portion of the motorcycle that comprises the seat, and is releasable connected to the lateral strap elements 2 at their other interconnection, at the other side of the seat (preferably via such a locking connection element - to be disclosed below - to which the end of the locking strap element can be connected).

Such a locking strap element adapted to be passed underneath the seat can of course also be conceived which consists of more than one, e.g. two pieces that can be connected to each other under the seat. In this case a locking means (locking mechanism) has to be applied only at the connection of the two locking strap elements, the locking means being adapted for connecting the strap elements together appropriately tightly underneath the seat. In this case the connection elements utilized at any other strap element connection point can also be applied at the connection of the locking strap element and the lateral strap element (i.e. it is not necessary to apply a specially configured locking connection element comprising a locking arrangement).

The term "strap element" is used to refer to any element that is capable of providing a system of straps, a strap mesh or a strapping arrangement. The strap elements are preferably made of such a material (e.g. metal) that cannot be stretched. Of course, the strap elements are meant to be resistant against such stretching forces which can be produced under normal circumstances by, for example, a thief. Accordingly, the strap elements are implemented as or comprise a machine chain (primarily, a duplex machine chain), the chain to be presented below (see Figs. 6A-6C), or even a strap element made of a metal (steel) material, for example a wire rope.

The strap element is therefore a single-degree-of-freedom strap element (see detailed below in relation to exemplary strap elements). The strap elements are arranged such that they can only be displaced in the direction of the centre of the helmet and in the opposite direction but not sideways with respect to that. The system of strap elements (the direction of strap elements, see Figs. 2A-5G) is preferably defined by the connection elements described in detail herebelow. The helmet fastening device according to the invention further comprises a fixed- projection connection element (in the embodiment of Figs. 1 B-1 E e.g. an upper connection element 5) connecting to each other strap elements having connection ends, the fixed-projection connection element has projections (protrusions) in a number corresponding to the number of the strap elements connected by means of connection ends, and the projections are in a fixed arrangement in relation to each other, and fastening tabs being opposite each other are formed on the projection, and the connection end is connected to the fastening tabs by means of a fastening rod element (bar element; such as a rivet element, rivet (pin), bolt pin, or other fastening rod element may be passed therethrough) extending (passed) through the fastening tabs and the connection end. The connection end is preferably arranged between the oppositely positioned fastening tabs, or such that it encompasses the fastening tabs.

The fastening rod elements are elements having a typically cylindrical shape that can be introduced into (and passed through) the fastening openings, and are preferably secured in the fastening openings by flattening the two ends of the fastening rod element (e.g. utilizing a suitable tool), which results in the ends having greater width than the diameter of the fastening opening (in other embodiments - see Figs. 24A-30 - completely different ways of interconnecting the fastening rod element and the fastening tab are possible). Thanks to this configuration the rivet element cannot move longitudinally (or can move only very slightly in that direction). The fastening rod elements are for example rivet elements but they can also be termed fastening rods (bars), fastening rod-shaped elements, or simply fastening elements. According to the above, the rod element applied as a fastening rod element is typically longer than the rod element (chain rod element) adapted for interconnecting the chain links. It can be seen that the lateral deflection of single-degree-of-freedom chains can be minimized by selecting appropriate tolerances. The axis of the fastening rod element is perpendicular, to a good approximation, to the surface of the corresponding fastening tab. This allows that the connection end connected thereto can be rotated with respect to the fastening tab (i.e. that the fastening tab does not block its rotation). The connection elements typically have dimensions in the range of a few centimetres, e.g. the width of the upper connection element (the distance between the end points of its oppositely positioned projections) is approximately 6 cm.

The fixed-projection connection element can simply be termed a "connection element" or e.g. "first connection element" but for the sake of differentiation the adjective "fixed-projection" has been included in the name. The adjective "fixed- projection" is taken to refer to a configuration wherein the projections cannot be rotated relative to one another, i.e. that they are fixed with respect to one another. The strap element can be connected to the projections by means of a connection end. The connection end can be preferably rotated about the fastening rod element adapted for connecting the connection end and the projection. The connection element can also be termed a strap element connection.

In Figs. 1 B-1 E the connection element 5 is illustrated only schematically; the exemplary realization of the projections of an applicable connection element, the connection ends of the strap elements, the fastening tabs and the provision of connections thereto can be observed in further figures (Figs. 7A, 12A, 19), showing some embodiments of the connection elements. In an example of the embodiment shown in Figs. 1 B-1 E the (locking, lateral, and upper) strap elements are implemented as the chains of Figs. 22-23. At the other side of the motorcycle the locking strap element 6 is connected to a connection element to which the rear ends of the lateral strap elements 2 are also connected. An additional upper strap element portion is arranged on the rear portion of the helmet (not visible in Figs. B- E) according to the strap element arrangement of Figs. 2A-2D.

At some connection of the strap elements, therefore, the above characterized fixed-projection connection element is arranged (but, as shown in Fig. 1 B, not at the interconnection of the lateral strap element portions forming the lateral strap elements). The strap elements terminating at the fixed-projection connection element are oriented with the help of (via) the connection element (and, when a single-degree-of-freedom strap element is applied, they cannot deviate from this direction) connected to each other. There are essentially three types of connection point in the helmet fastening device according to the invention: - the points where the lateral strap elements (of both sides) are interconnected - preferably the locking strap element is also connected at this point (front and rear connection elements; group 1);

- the connection points of the lateral strap elements and the one or more upper strap elements (lateral connection elements; group 2); and

- the connection points of strap element portions of the upper strap element (upper connection element; group 3).

Within a group preferably the same kind of strap element connections are applied. Any type of connection solution between the strap elements may be applied for any group independently of one another, i.e. the helmet fastening device may comprise the fixed-projection connection element presented in this description in any of the groups. As it will be shown below, there also exist such embodiments wherein the locations of strap element connection points where fixed-projection connection elements are applied are explicitly determined, with rotatable- projection connection elements being applied at some other connection points.

If e.g. in group 1 (i.e. at the strap element connections classified in group 1) fixed- projection connection elements are applied, then one of them (the lateral straps have two interconnection points) is typically such a locking connection element that is capable of receiving and locking the chain of the locking strap element (see Figs. 13A, 13B, 13C, 19, 20A, 20B). When the device is used, the locking connection element is preferably located in the front part (chin portion) of the helmet. When the device according to the invention is used (when the helmet locked) the strap elements are arranged in an almost loose or a very slightly tightened manner (such that the helmet pressed against the seat does not leave an imprint on the seat surface).

Fixed-projection connection elements can also be applied in group 2 (e.g. in the embodiments shown in Figs. 4A-4E or in Figs. 5A-5G); in which case the connection element typically has three branches (unlike the connection element shown in Fig. 17). In contrast to that, for example in the embodiment according to Fig. 1 B a rotatable-projection connection element is arranged in group 2. Fixed-projection connection elements can also be applied in group 3 (e.g. in the connection devices according to Figs. 7A-7B and Fig. 18), for that it is typically required that a connection element with an X, Y or + shape is applied. Instead of utilizing X- or +-shaped connection elements the strap elements may simply be passed above one another.

It is therefore not necessary to apply a fixed-projection connection element at all of the connection points of the strap elements of the helmet fastening device according to the invention (rotatable-projection connection elements can also be utilized or the connection can be provided by other means), but such a connection element is always applied at at least one of the connection points of the helmet fastening device according to the invention.

It is not shown in the schematic drawings of Figs 1 B-1 E (for more details see the descriptions of further figures) that the respective connection ends of the given strap elements are either introduced between the fastening tabs of the connection element or encompass them, and are connected thereto by fastening rod elements (e.g. rivet elements) extending (passed) through the fastening tabs. The connection ends of the strap elements are therefore such ends or assemblies (e.g. a chain link at a chain end having an opening adapted to receive the fastening rod element, or a connection end 122 shown in Fig. 21 ) through which the fastening rod element can be passed. The connection ends can for example be connected to the fastening tabs by a rivet element similar to those applied in machine chains (rivet elements longer than the rivet elements of machine chains may be applied as fastening rod elements, but other similar rivet elements or rod elements can also be applied). As it is illustrated e.g. also in Figs. 7A and Fig. 19, the connection end, for example the chain link/chain links functioning as a connection end, can be arranged between, or encompassing, the fastening tabs of the projections of the connection element.

As shown in Fig. 1 B, the strap element 2 comprises strap element portions 2' and 2" that are connected to each other by means of a rotatable-projection connection element 9. A locking connection element 7 is arranged at the interconnection point of the lateral strap elements 2 of both sides. As far as the projections connected to the lateral strap elements 2 are concerned, the locking strap element 7 has a configuration analogous to the connection element 5 (both are of fixed-projection type), i.e. the lateral connection straps 2 are connected to the fastening tabs of the corresponding projections of the locking connection element 7 by respective connection ends. A portion of the locking connection element 7 adapted for connecting the locking strap element 6 (a locking auxiliary element 3) is configured differently than these projections so as the locking strap element 6 can be releasable (and lockably) connected thereto (see also Figs. 13A, 13B). As it is illustrated in Figs. 1 B-1 E, a helmet can preferably be fastened to the seat applying the helmet fastening device according to the invention if the helmet is placed on the front or on the rear seating position. The helmet fastening device can of course be applied for any other type of seat (motorcycle seat), such those wherein a single (optionally elongated) seating position is provided. From the aspect of the invention the essential features are that the helmet can be placed on the seat, and the locking strap element can be passed through the gap between the frame portion supporting the seat and the rear wheel, or can otherwise be fastened to the seat portion.

The helmet is preferably arranged crosswise on the seat, i.e. such that the front portion of the helmet (visor) is at one side of the motorcycle (and thus of the seat), while the rear portion of the helmet (the portion at the back of the neck) is at the other side of the motorcycle. Such an arrangement is preferable also because the bottom portion of the helmets (which is thereby abutted against the seat) typically has a slightly curved configuration. This curve is fits the shape of the seat in a section perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the motorcycle, i.e. the helmet can be stably arranged in this position and can be connected to the motorcycle utilizing the helmet fastening device according to the invention. For dimensioning the helmet fastening device according to the invention it is of course preferred to take into account the future arrangement of the helmet since the lateral and upper straps should expediently be arranged over the helmet in a tight and taut manner when the helmet is locked. The helmet fastening device according to the invention is targeted at using the most basic free spatial region of the vehicle. After a travel the seat is freed up and the softly cushioned seat that has so far been left completely unused offers itself for storing the helmet. According to the above, the helmet is preferably placed on the seat crosswise with respect to the direction of travel, with the open portion facing downwards, this position corresponding perfectly to the currently applied design of both the seat and the helmet, and since the seat and the helmet have essentially complementary shape the helmet lies in a perfectly stable position. By way of this solution and by utilizing the above described space it becomes practically impossible for an unauthorised person to use the motorcycle. Since an unauthorised person is thereby incapable of sitting on the motorcycle, the motorcycle cannot be driven away and thus it is partially protected against theft. This space utilization solution provide another possibility for those who otherwise have storage solutions (top-box, soft-bag, etc.) installed on their vehicle because the helmet/helmets attached to the seat do not take up any usable space from the storage boxes. Also, this solution allows for the safe transport and storage of a helmet prepared for the passenger of the motorcycle (i.e. not the driver's helmet). In the case of two seating positions therefore two helmets may be arranged on a single motorcycle, i.e. both the driver's and the passenger's helmet. In Figs. 2A-2D a preferred arrangement of the strap elements of the helmet fastening device according to the invention is shown (this arrangement of the strap elements is analogous to the one shown in Figs. 1 B-1 E). In Fig. 2A a helmet and the strap elements of the helmet fastening device placed thereon are shown in a side view; Fig. 2B shows a front view, with the back of the helmet being rotated slightly to the left of the figure; Fig. 2C shows another front view, with the back of the helmet being rotated slightly to the right, and Fig. 2D shows a rear view with the front of the helmet being rotated slightly to the left. It is called a front view when the helmet is shown from the direction of its front part (of the visor), while in a rear view it is shown from the direction of its occipital portion. The strap element arrangement illustrated in Figs. 2A-2D can be preferably applied for the most widely used so-called full-face helmets that have a flip-up visor or flip-up chin section, but of course - thanks to its universal strap element arrangement - it may also be applied for any other helmet type. The strap element arrangement illustrated in Figs. 2A-2D makes it practically impossible to open the flip-up section (visor, chin section), and thus in case the helmet is fastened to the seat with the helmet fastening device having this strap element arrangement inside the helmet a protected region is provided for storing other accessories (e.g. gloves, scarfs, face masks).

As with the embodiments shown in Figs. 3A-3C and in Figs. 4A-4E, in the embodiment of the helmet fastening device illustrated in Figs. 2A-2D the upper strap element 14 comprises at least three upper strap element portions, in this particular embodiment two upper strap element portions 14' as well as upper strap element portions 14", 14"'. In such embodiments the first ends of the upper strap element portions are connected to the lateral strap elements, and the second ends thereof are connected to each other (forming, due to at least three strap element portions being included, an Y (T) or X-shaped connection in the helmet fastening device at the upper part of the helmet).

In the embodiment according to Figs. 2A-2D the upper strap element 14 comprises as many as four upper strap element portions 14', 14", 14"', and two first upper strap element portions (the upper strap element portions 14", 14"') are connected to lateral strap elements 12 at their interconnections, and two second upper strap element portions (the upper strap element portions 14') are connected to lateral strap elements 12 at parts different from the connection locations of the first upper strap element portions.

In the embodiment of Figs. 2A-2D the lateral strap element 12 preferably comprises lateral strap element portions 12' and 12", with the upper strap element portion 14' being connected at their interconnection (in case of lateral strap elements 12 extending along both sides of the helmet). Accordingly, when placed on the helmet the strap element portions 12', 12" turn towards the bottom portion of the helmet; at each side of the helmet an Y-shape is formed by the strap elements 12', 12" and 14' (with the individual strap elements lying at nearly equal angles relative to one another). When the helmet fastening device is placed on the helmet the upper strap element portions 14" and 14"' extend over the surface of the helmet essentially in the helmet's plane of symmetry (see, respectively Figs. 2B, 2C for the strap element portion 14" and Fig 2D the strap element portion 14"'). Due to the arrangement of the strap element portions 14', 14" and 14"' according to Figs. 2A-2D a + sign is formed at the top of the helmet by the connection of the strap element portions 14', 14" and 14"'.

In the embodiment of Figs. 2A-2D the helmet fastening device comprises locking strap element portions 16' and 16". The strap element portions 16', 16" are only schematically shown in Figs. 2A-2D (in reality the locking strap element portions are typically longer so that they span underneath the seat); the locking strap element can be configured as disclosed above. In this regard, the figures illustrate only the preferred manner of connecting the locking strap element to the system of lateral and upper strap element portions. Therefore such an arrangement can also be conceived that comprises a single locking strap element connected to the lateral strap elements at one side, and the end of the locking strap element is adapted to be releasable connected to an appropriate locking connection element at the other side. In this case the connection element arranged at the location where the front strap element portion 16' is connected to the upper and lateral strap elements is essentially a locking connection element (locking element), and a locking strap element, implemented preferably as a locking chain, extends here from the connection location of the rear strap element portion 16" to the upper and lateral strap elements. These criteria related to the schematic nature of the strap element portions 16', 16" are also valid for locking strap element portions 26', 26", 36', 36", 46' and 46". An alternative arrangement of the connection elements adapted for connecting the locking strap element is shown in Figs. 13A and 15B.

Accordingly, in the embodiment according to Figs. 2A-2D the locking strap element portion 16' and the strap element portion 16" are connected to the lateral strap elements 12 and to the upper strap elements 14 respectively at the interconnection of the lateral strap element portions 12' and the upper strap element portion 14" and at the interconnection of the lateral strap element portions 12" and the upper strap element portion 14"'. The configuration of the lateral straps (including in this case also the upper strap element) and their included angles makes the device to be universally applied for a wide range of helmet sizes and shapes. As it is demonstrated below, in this embodiment a rotatable-projection connection element - which provides universal applicability also by means of the freely adjustable locking angles of the connection element even when a single-degree-of-freedom chain is applied as a strap element (see Figs. 10A and 11 A) - can be applied at the connection points of the lateral strap element portions. In case of different sizes only the position of the connection location (relative to the helmet) of the locking strap elements 16', 16" to the lateral strap elements is changed. This is what happens also when e.g. a projecture is on the helmet (typically over the occipital region). The helmet is encompassed by the strap system from both sides in the form of a reversed letter Y (lateral strap elements 12 and upper strap elements 14'). When the device is placed on the helmet the connection of the lateral strap elements 12 and the upper strap elements 14' can be found essentially at the position of the ears of the helmet's user.

Fig. 3A-3C illustrate a further embodiment of the helmet fastening device according to the invention. In Fig. 3A the helmet and the strap elements are shown in front view, Fig. 3B also shows a front view, with the rear portion of the helmet being slightly rotated to the right, and Fig. 3C shows the helmet in rear view.

This embodiment can of course be utilized with any type of helmet, but is particularly preferably applied for so-called motocross helmets. In such helmets the rider's face is protected against sprayed mud by a shade arranged above the visor. As it is shown especially in the front view of Fig. 3A, sufficient space is provided for this shade by the Y-shaped front arrangement of the strap elements, but at the same time this strap element arrangement makes it impossible to open the visor in the case of most helmet types.

As shown in Figs. 3A-3C, in this embodiment a lateral strap element 22 comprises lateral strap element portions 22' and 22". When placed on the helmet, the strap element 22 (made up of a plurality of pieces) arcs towards the top of the helmet, with a respective upper strap element portion 24' being connected to it at both sides of the helmet at the topmost point (from the aspect of the helmet). The strap element portions 24' extend upwards from both sides of the helmet and connect together at the plane of symmetry of the helmet. An upper strap element portion 24" extending from the connection point of the strap element portions 24' to the interconnection point of the lateral strap element portions 22" is also connected in this interconnection point. Such an arrangement of the upper strap element portion 24" ensures that the strap element portions 24' cannot be forced to come off towards the front part of the helmet (it pulls them back). It is further provided by this arrangement that even if the strap element portions 24' are let to be moved towards the rear of the helmet, the strap element system is dimensioned such that the area between the strap element portions 22' and 24' (essentially having a diamond shape, see Fig. 3A) cannot be increased to such a degree that the helmet could be pulled through it (for that it is required that the strap elements are non-stretchable as mentioned above).

In the embodiment of Figs. 3A-3C therefore the upper strap element 24 comprises three upper strap element portions 24', 24", of which a first upper strap element portion 24" is connected to that interconnection of the lateral strap elements 22 which is arranged - when the device is placed on a helmet such that the locking strap element is positioned in the plane of symmetry of the helmet - at the rear side of the helmet opposite the side where a visor is arranged, of which furthermore a second and a third upper strap element portion 24' are connected to respective lateral strap elements 22 in the region between the interconnections of the lateral strap elements 22.

In the embodiment of Figs. 3A-3C the lateral straps 22 and the upper strap element portion 24' are connected to each other to form a Y shape, and this Y- shaped configuration renders the device universal with respect to size differences between individual helmets, as with the embodiment illustrated in Figs. 2A-2D. The Y-shaped connection is situated essentially about the middle height of the visor, with the lateral strap element portions 22" started from there. In the figures locking strap element portions 26' and 26" are shown. An embodiment similar to the one illustrated in Figs. 3A-3C is illustrated in Figs. 4A-4E. In Fig 4A the helmet is shown in a view when its side is visible, also providing a view of its top portion. In Fig. 4B the helmet is shown in side view slightly from below. In Fig. 4C a front view of the helmet is shown, while in Fig. 4D it is shown in rear view. The view provided in Fig. 4E is identical to the one of Fig. 4A.

In this embodiment the device comprises four upper strap element portions 34', 34" in contrast to the three upper strap element portions 24', 24" shown in Figs. 3A-3C. In addition to the slightly different strap paths there is another significant difference, namely that the upper strap element portion 24" (a rearward-extending straight strap element portion) is replaced by two upper strap element portions 34". Each upper strap element portion 34" is run along the extended path of a respective strap element portion 34', i.e. the strap element portions 34', 34" are arranged in the upper strap element 34 in a regular X shape. This renders the helmet fastening device in this embodiment even more capable of negotiating the size differences between different helmets. Another advantage of the embodiment of Figs. 4A-4E is that - as it is illustrated also in Fig. 4E - force distribution is more even in the strap system. The X-shaped connection point of the strap elements 34', 34" is essentially impossible to displace from its position because three more strap elements counteract any attempt at moving it.

It can clearly be seen in Figs. 4A-4C how visor 18 is situated under the upper strap element portions 34', 34" such that they prevent the opening of the visor 18. In the side view of Fig. 4B it is shown that the lateral strap element 32 comprises strap element portions 32, 32" and 32"' that are connected to the end of a respective locking strap element portion 36' and 36". The front lateral strap element portion 32' starts at the locking strap element 36' situated at the chin portion of the helmet and extends as far as the connection point of the upper strap element portion 34', ascending from the chin portion towards the visor. The strap element portion 32" of the strap element 32 extending between the connections of the strap element portions 34' and 34" runs essentially horizontally, with the remaining part of the strap element 32 being constituted by the strap element portion 32"', the configuration of which is shown in Fig. 4D. The locking strap elements 36', 36" are configured in similarly to the above discussed strap elements 16', 16" and 26', 26". ln this embodiment, therefore, the upper strap element 34 comprises four strap element portions 34', 34", and the four upper strap element portions 34', 34" are connected to the lateral strap elements 32 at positions being different from the interconnections of the lateral strap elements 32. Figs. 5A-5G illustrate a further embodiment of the strap element arrangement of the helmet fastening device according to the invention. In Fig. 5A and Fig. 5C the helmet bearing the helmet fastening device is shown, respectively, in front view and in side view. In Figs. 5B and 5D the helmet is illustrated in side view. In Fig. 5B the helmet is slightly rotated relative to the view of Fig. 5C; while in Fig. 5D the helmet is rotated such that the rear part of it is also visible. In Fig. 5E a rear view is illustrated. The view shown in Fig. 5F is identical to that of Fig. 5B, the view of Fig. 5G being identical to that of Fig. 5D.

In the embodiment of Figs. 5A-5G - in a manner different from the embodiments of Figs. 2A-4E - a plurality of upper strap elements 44 are connected to lateral strap elements 42 at the same distances along the two lateral strap elements 42 from the interconnections thereof. The strap elements 44 are preferably arranged such that the helmet cannot be pulled out from among them even if they are forced sideways, i.e. the opening thus produced is smaller than the largest dimension of the helmet. In addition to that, in this embodiment the lateral strap elements 42 have an essentially arched configuration (consist of a plurality of strap element portions) such that, when the device is placed on the helmet, the arched shape is convex as seen from the open side of the helmet. Multiple upper strap elements can be arranged - spaced apart at equal intervals - on the lateral strap elements also in case the lateral strap elements do not have an arched configuration but are nearly straight. In this case, however the upper strap elements situated in the middle have to be much longer than the ones situated on the sides. The upper strap elements situated in the middle are longer also in the embodiment of Figs. 5A-5G, but thanks to the arced configuration the length difference is not significant and - as illustrated in Figs. 5F and 5G - force distribution in the strap elements 42, 44 is also even. These forces act towards the lateral strap elements 42, concentrate the forces on the locking strap elements 46', 46". By providing an appropriate arrangement of the upper strap elements 44 sufficient space can be provided for the shade of motocross helmets and the visor can be prevented from opening. This embodiment can be applied with good results even for open-face helmets (where the chin is left uncovered). The "snow-chains-like" configuration of the transverse straps connected to the lateral strap elements extending along both sides of the helmet also allows for a high degree of flexibility and at the same time also provides perfect support. In this embodiment the arclike lateral configuration assumes the function of the above described Y-shape connection (illustrated in Figs. 2A-4E). The helmet fastening device is thus capable of bridging large size differences.

Thanks to the above presented structural arrangements (to strap element paths) the helmet fastening device according to the invention is manufactured using a minimal amount of material and provides for safe storage. Also, thanks to the characteristics of the materials currently applied in this field the device can be made lightweight (utilizing multiple-tempered safety and/or stainless steel products, chains, steel wire ropes). The path of the strap elements aligns well with the shape of full-face helmets, motocross helmets (fitted with a peak) and even with open face helmets. Although open face helmets are usually not worn by riders of the motorcycle types considered here (but rather by riders of scooters and maxi- scooters where in most cases the helmet can be stored in a storage rack under the seat), by the application of the device according to the invention space can be freed up also in these cases.

The above described structures comprising Y, T, and/or + shaped connections provide essentially perfect fit on the helmet even in the case of multiple types, shapes or sizes while keeping the mass of the device as low as possible. The device according to the invention provides perfect safety and excellent support in spite of its minimal material consumption. When the helmet fastening device according to the invention is in its locked state it is practically impossible to force it to come off, take it off, or slide it off from the helmet without causing permanent damage to the helmet (this applies especially for certain embodiments). Of course, the fixed-projection connection element is also applied in the device in the embodiments shown in Figs. 2A-5G but they are not shown in the schematic drawings of Figs. 2A-5G.

In an embodiment of the device according to the invention the lateral strap elements and the upper strap element are formed by means of chains comprising (or optionally, consisting entirely of) chain links, each chain link is connected to the respective adjacent chain links by a first chain rod element (adapted for connecting the chain links to each other, i.e. for extending through the chain links; the rod elements of some embodiments of the invention can e.g. be rivet elements; the chain rod elements could simply be termed "rod elements", the adjective "chain" being included for the sake of differentiation) and a second chain rod element, the axes of the chain rod elements being parallel with one another, the adjacent chain links being configured to be rotatable relative to each other about the chain rod element that interconnects them. These embodiments are called embodiments implemented by single-degree-of-freedom chain portions (chain sections) because - due to the connection by a rod element (e.g. a rivet) - the adjacent chain links of the chain can only be rotated relative to each other about the axis of the chain rod element (rivet element).

In the embodiments illustrated below the chain rod element is a rivet element. The single-degree-of freedom chain (capable of moving only in one direction) is preferably a single- or multiple-row roller machine chain. The rivet element has a rod-shaped body that is retained in the opening by its widened ends (during assembly the ends of the otherwise cylindrical rod element are made - e.g. pressing - wider than the opening itself). The rod element also has a rod-shaped body, but it may be secured in the opening receiving it in a different manner than the rivet element.

The chain links of a single-degree-of-freedom chain cannot be moved in directions other than that of the rotation about the chain rod elements (disregarding the movement resulting from tolerances). This is ensured by that the rod element openings (rivet openings) of adjacent chain links are connected (aligned) by the chain rod elements (providing a common axis to them). In some embodiments of the helmet fastening device according to the invention the chains are arranged by the connection elements in such a way that due to the rotations about the chain rod element the chain formed by the chain links can fit close on the helmet surface, that is, the chain rod elements of the chain are set in an essentially tangential direction with respect to said surface. This arrangement is also compatible with the connection elements applied in the device according to the invention because the chains utilized as strap elements are in themselves provided with such a connection end that can be clamped between (fastened to) the fastening tabs of a respective projection of the connection element. To achieve that, the fastening rod element has to be passed through the last rod element-opening (rivet opening) of the chain (the connection end is provided by the last chain link) in such a manner that it is also passed through the fastening tabs. It may become necessary that for connecting the chain to the fastening tabs a fastening rod element being longer than other rivet elements of the chain has to be applied. The manner of connection to the connection element is also presented in the description of the different strap element and chain types. When such a single-degree-of-freedom chain is connected to oppositely positioned fastening tabs it receives orientation due to the fastening and chain rod elements.

It is particularly preferable to utilize single-degree-of-freedom chains (e.g. machine chains, the chain illustrated in Figs. 6A-6C and the chains shown in Figs. 20A, 22, 23, 26A, 26B and 30) because in case the helmet fastening device according to the invention is implemented by applying such chains it is exceedingly difficult to force it to come off from a helmet fastened to the motorcycle for the following reasons. In accordance with their single degree of freedom, those segments of single-degree-of-freedom chains that are situated between the connection elements can fit close on the given helmet region, and being fit close they cannot be moved sideways due to the single degree of freedom.

As shown also in Figs. 2A-5G illustrating strap element arrangements, at the connection locations of the strap elements at least three strap elements are connected to each other (in the locking connection element optionally two strap elements and a locking strap element to be connected to the third projection (locking projection)). Particularly in the case where the strap elements are implemented by chains it is expedient to implement all (or a major part) of these interconnections by a fixed-projection connection element that is applied at at least one such interconnection in the device according to the invention, or in the position shown in Fig. 1 B by a rotatable-projection connection element, because due to their configuration comprising fastening tabs such connection elements guide and orient the strap elements connected thereto. The strap elements implemented by single-degree-of-freedom chains in the invention are therefore set by the fixed- projection connection element in a given direction, and due to their single-degree- of-freedom configuration they cannot be deflected therefrom, and thereby the device is protected against forcing to come off in a particularly preferable and efficient manner by the single-degree-of-freedom chains and the connection elements comprising fastening tabs and fixedly arranged projections (in case rotatable-projection connection elements are applied the device is protected against forcing to come off by the configuration of the strap element system and the fixed-projection connection element(s) arranged at other position(s) - by way of example, at the front, rear, and optionally at the top).

Applying single-degree-of-freedom chains as lateral and upper strap elements involves that the strap element portions extending between the connection elements are straight. Therefore, non-straight strap elements necessarily consist of multiple strap element portions. Strap elements having an essentially arched shape can also be implemented utilizing a plurality of strap element portions, see the embodiments according to Figs. 5A-5G.

In Figs. 6A-6C a chain link 60 of an exemplary single-degree-of-freedom chain is illustrated. In this embodiment according to Figs. 6A-6D each chain link 60 of the chain comprises a first chain link portion 66 and a second chain link portion 68. These chain link portions 66 and 68 are typically connected in a shifted (staggered) manner (see Fig. 6B), and thus, in a view where their rivet openings 62, 64 (their rod element openings adapted to connect a rod element) are vertical, the first chain link portion 66 is connected to the right side of the second chain link portion 68 from above. A first connection arc terminates in a neck recess 65, and thus it is typically longer than the other connection arcs of the chain link 60 shown in the figure. The rivet opening is typically a rod element opening having its ends widened as shown in the figure so that the ends of the rivet can be pressed in the widened portions. Instead of pressing, the rod element can be connected to the rod element opening by other means, provided that it does not fall out therefrom and performs its function of connecting the chain links (fixing of the rod element to the rod element opening can e.g. achieved by pegs or small rivets). The chain link 60 is preferably made of special tempered steel and is configured as a solid body. The chain link portions 66 and 68 can be oblong, as illustrated in Figs. 6A-6C, in which case their longitudinal axes are parallel. At its middle portion (where the first and second chain link portions 66 and 68 are interconnected) the thickness of the chain link 60 shown in Fig. 6B is preferably approximately 5-20 mm, particularly preferably 10-13 mm. With such a configuration it is provided that the chain formed by the chain links 60 is lightweight, while it can still provide a high level of security. The mass of currently available vehicle lock chains is typically 3-5 kg/m (the prior art contains approaches comprising such high-mass chains). With the solution according to the invention a chain having a significantly lower mass can be obtained which is still secure enough. The chain links 60 typically have a length of 10-50 mm, preferably a length of 20-30 mm, and a typically rectangular cross-section. In Fig 6C interconnected chain links 60 are shown in side view. As shown in the figure, rivet elements 76 are introduced (fastened) in aligned rivet openings 62, 64 (arranged to form a continuation of each other). The chain links 60 are connected to one another by rivet-in-hole connections in order to minimize attachment gaps (this can also be achieved not only by means of rivet elements but by applying other rod element types). The chain links 60 essentially have no weakened cross sections. Compared with chains comprising ring-like chain links the material usage can be reduced to 10-20% with the present chain links 60.

In the following figures the connection elements and other components (such as the duplex chain applied as a strap element) are illustrated that can also be utilized in the embodiment illustrated also in Figs. 1 B-1 E. The helmet fastening device illustrated in Figs. 1 B-1 E has four upper strap element portions that are connected to each other at the top part of the helmet. A fixed-projection connection element 80 illustrated in Figs. 7A and 7B can be preferably arranged at this connection point, which has four projections 85 accordingly. In Fig. 7A the connection element 80 is shown from the side that lies on the helmet, while in Fig. 7B it is shown from the outside. By comparing the figures it can be observed that the connections of chains 81 are covered (protected) from the outside.

In Fig. 7A fastening tabs 82 arranged on projections 85 are shown and are straddled by chain links 88a (the terminal chain links of the chain 81). The connection end of the corresponding strap element is formed by the chain links 88a (optionally together with chain links 89b situated between the fastening tabs 82). As shown in Fig. 7A, a fastening rod element 83 is passed through the connection end and the fastening tabs 82. The connection end is connected to the fastening tabs 82 by the fastening rod element 83. As shown in Fig. 7A, due to the duplex chain configuration of the chain 81 (chain segment) the fastening rod element 83 is passed through two chain links 89b. There are spacer elements 86 arranged in the chain 81 between the chain link row constituted by alternately arranged outside chain links 88a and 88b and the inside duplex chain link row constituted by chain links 89a adapted to encompass the inside duplex chain links 89b (the chain links 89a and 89b are disposed alternately here as well, see Fig. 7A) and also between this inside duplex chain link row and the other outside chain link row. Rod elements 84 (rivet elements) of the chain 81 are passed also through these spacer elements 86.

In Fig. 7B the connection element 80 is illustrated from the outside. When the helmet fastening device is placed on a helmet, the connection elements 80 are preferably oriented such that this side faces outside. This is advantageous for the following reasons. As shown in Fig. 7B, with such an arrangement the connections of the chains 81 , i.e. the region where the chains applied as strap elements are connected, are covered by the projections 85. Thereby the part of the helmet fastening device which is probably the most exposed to attacks is protected against being damaged. In Fig. 7B the configuration of the fastening tabs 82 is shown by dashed lines in the region of the projections 85 facing the chains 81. ln Fig. 8 the connection of the chain 81 to the projection 85 of the connection element 80 is shown in side view. The connection element 80 and also its projection 85 are preferably made of sheet metal, the fastening tabs 82 being bent to position, i.e. they are bent at a right angle such that they are arranged opposite each other. Fig. 8 illustrates that in this embodiment the fastening tabs 82 are encompassed by the last chain links 88a (adapted to function as a connection end) of the chain 81 applied as a strap element, i.e. the chain links 88a are arranged outside at both sides of the tabs 82. It is also shown in Fig. 8 that the fastening rod element 83 is passed through the rivet opening (and thus also through the fastening opening of the fastening tab 82) of the chain link 88a. In Fig. 8 also the chain 81 is shown from side view, i.e. the chain link 88a mentioned above and the chain link 88b connected from the inside to the next chain link are shown.

In Fig. 9 a rotatable-projection connection element 90 is shown in its disassembled state. Accordingly, it is shown in the figure that in this embodiment the connection element 90 comprises three projections 92a, 92b, 92c that each have an opening 93 adapted for providing connection to a rivet element at one of their ends. The chains 81 are connected to those ends of the projections 92a, 92b, 92c that are not to be interconnected in the same manner as they are connected to the connection element 80 in Figs. 7A-7B, i.e. fastening tabs are utilized also in this case (the chains connected to the projections 92a, 92b, 92c cannot be rotated relative to the projections).

The operating principle of the rotatable-projection connection element is illustrated in schematic Fig. 10A (see also Fig. 11 A), while in Fig. 10B the rotatable- projection connection element 90 is shown in its assembled state. The projections 92a, 92b, 92c are connected (interlinked) at a single point by a rivet that allows their mutual rotation. Each projection of the rotatable-projection connection element 90 can be rotated with respect to any other.

In Fig. 10A a helmet 130 is depicted schematically; in addition to that the path of the strap elements is also illustrated in the figure but the rotatable-projection connection element is not shown. In Fig. 10A the state wherein the helmet fastening device is placed on the helmet 130 and is brought to a locked state is illustrated. The strap element configuration according to Fig. 10A corresponds to the strap element arrangement shown in Figs. 1 B-1 E. In Fig. 1 B the rotatable- projection connection element 9 arranged on the side of the helmet is shown, a corresponding rotatable-projection connection element is arranged in the embodiment of Fig. 10A at the connection of the lateral strap element portions 132', 132" and the upper strap element portion 134'. In Fig. 10A it is illustrated that in the locked state these strap element portions 132', 132", 134' lie at obtuse angles relative to one another. In addition to that, in Fig. 0A the arrangement of upper strap element portions 134", 134"' is also illustrated. These extend along the circumference of the helmet 130 from the end of the upper strap element portion 134' not connected to the lateral strap element portions 132', 132" (along the front side of the helmet fitted with a visor and also along the oppositely situated rear side thereof) until the end of the lateral strap element portions 132', 132" situated opposite the end connected to the upper strap element portion 134'. In Fig. 10A at the level where the rotatable-projection connection element is situated (the level at which the strap element portions 132', 132", 134' are interconnected) there is shown a dashed line that indicates the largest diameter of the helmet, this largest diameter being a unit. The diameter corresponding to the other (lower) dashed line in the drawing is 0.8 times this largest diameter. This height is determined by the connection point of the strap element portions 132' and 134" and the strap element portions 132" and 134"' (in reality the strap element portions are not connected in a point-like manner but by means of a connection element, see e.g. Fig. B).

In Fig. 10B the rotatable-projection connection element 90 is shown in its assembled state. In this state a rivet element 94 adapted for keeping together the projections 92a, 92b, 92c is passed through the openings 93 of the projections 92a, 92b, 92c. In order that the projections 92a, 92b, 92c of the connection element 90 can be rotated relative to one another, this rivet element 94 is arranged loosely, i.e. it does not clamp together tightly the projections 92a, 92b, 92c.

In Figs. 11A and 11 B a placing/removing state of the helmet fastening device is illustrated schematically, and a view of the rotatable-projection connection element 90 in the same state, respectively. In Fig. 11A there is illustrated that when the device is placed on/is removed from the helmet, the strap element portions 132', 132" and 134' are rotated relative to one another (by the help of the rotatable- projection connection element) with respect to the locked state shown in Fig. 10A, thus allowing for/making easier the application/removing of the device. It is illustrated in Fig. 1 A that the strap element portions can be rotated relative to one another to such an extent that the strap element portions 132' and 132" of the lateral strap element lie at approximately 180° relative to each other (i.e. the lateral strap element becomes straight), while the strap element portion 134' is substantially (to a good approximation) perpendicular to the lateral strap element. Then the lateral strap elements can embrace the helmet at its largest-diameter (they are dimensioned so), i.e. the helmet fastening device can then be pulled through the largest diameter which allows for the application/removal. The configuration thus obtained can therefore be comfortably applied on/removed from practically any type of helmet, and provides perfect support also in its locked state.

In the locking state the helmet fastening device is kept fixed maintained by the device being fastened to the motorcycle seat. Therefore the angles between the straps 92a, 92b, 92c (determined by the size and shape of the helmet) cannot be modified after the helmet fastening device having been locked. To provide firm support, the front and rear connection elements are arranged approximately at the lower trisector line of the helmet (the lower dashed line in Figs. 10A, 11 A), where the circumference is shorter than at the other connection elements situated at the centreline of the helmet (at the largest diameter thereof). Such an arrangement is required because the shape of the helmet is essentially that of an egg on its side. The orientation of the fixed projections of the front and rear fixed-projection connection elements, i.e. the locking angle of the projections are chosen corresponding to this position, and according to this arrangement the lateral connection elements of both sides are flexibly formed with respect to each other.

Since the lateral strap elements become arranged on the helmet at a shape (ellipse, circle) following its shape (that varies from helmet to helmet), the Y- shaped arrangement on the side is highly preferable. By allowing the locking angles of this Y-shaped arrangement to adapt themselves to the shape of the helmet it is possible to bridge very considerable shape and size differences. Due to the openable Y-arrangement the diameter (helmet diameter) can vary within a very wide range determined by the length of the upper strap elements. Thereby the upper and lateral strap elements always have an optimal fit on the helmet surface. This does not pose a problem because the locking strap element can be connected to the locking connection element at an arbitrary location, thus adjusting the locking strap element to an optimal length and providing an optimal position for the device on the helmet. It is therefore possible to arrange the strap elements of the device in such a manner that the device fits close on the helmet surface in the case of various helmet types and sizes, and that it provides perfect support (from the aspect of fastening) even in case the locking strap element is not connected into the locking connection element in a fully tensioned state.

The fastening means to the seat is preferably connected to the helmet fastening device at the connection of the lateral strap elements and the upper strap element (in Figs. 10A, 1A at the connection of the strap element portions 132', 134" and of the strap element portions 132", 134"'). Accordingly, the fastening means that is attached to the seat keeps in position the lateral and upper strap elements, and thus in the locked state the projections of the rotatable-projection connection element cannot be rotated relative to one another. When, however, the fastening to the seat is released such a rotation is allowed and the embodiment of the helmet fastening device becomes possible to remove from the helmet (since the lateral strap elements can now be put through the largest diameter).

In Fig. 11A therefore such a state is illustrated wherein - due to the rotatable- projection connection element - the lateral strap element portions 32', 132" and the upper strap element portion 134' are mutually rotated compared to the locked state illustrated in Fig. 10A. Accordingly, the upper strap element portions 134", 134"' no longer extend immediately along the helmet surface, i.e. they are looser; and by grabbing them the helmet fastening device can be removed from or descended onto the helmet. As illustrated in Figs. 7A-11 B (and in other figures), the strap elements are implemented by a chain of which the shape can be changed only by exerting rotation about the rod elements connecting the chain links (i.e. the chain has restricted freedom of movement involving that it cannot be moved in the direction parallel with the rod elements or rivet elements, or it can be moved in that direction to an extent allowed by tolerances). As it is illustrated in Figs. 7A-11 B (and in other figures), the chains forming the strap elements are arranged such that the chain links (according to the drawing, duplex chain links) fit close on the helmet. In that case the axis of the rod elements (rivet elements) adapted to connect the chain links is set substantially tangentially or at a low angle with respect to the tangential direction. Accordingly, a given chain link is seated against the helmet such that the adjacent chain link can be moved in a direction nearly perpendicular to the helmet relative to the given chain link but it cannot be moved along the helmet (or only within assembly tolerances; such tolerances are present because it is not possible for the rod elements or rivet elements connecting the chain links to provide a tight connection between the chain links because in that case the chain links could not be rotated relative to one another).

In Figs. 10B and 11 B the rotatable-projection connection element 90 is illustrated, respectively, in a mounted (applied) state and in an application/removal state. It can be observed that in this latter state the projections 92a and 92b to a good approximation lie at an angle of 180°, the projection 92c being perpendicular thereto. The chains 81 corresponding to the respective projections 92a, 92b, 92c, i.e. the strap elements connected to the rotatable-projection connection element, are oriented in corresponding directions according to the manner of connection thereof.

In Figs. 12A and 12B a fixed-projection connection element 140 is shown (in front and rear view, respectively). This connection element 140 can be arranged at the interconnection of the lateral strap elements in such embodiments wherein an upper strap element portion is also connected at this point. Connection elements situated in this position therefore connect the lateral and optionally the upper strap elements (the latter only if an upper strap element extends in this direction) and orient them at given angles.

Such an embodiment is exemplified by the one illustrated in Figs. 1 B-1 E, of which the connection elements 80 and 90 to be arranged, respectively, at the top and the side of the helmet, were illustrated in the previous figures. In the following figures still further connection elements applied in this embodiment are described. As it is illustrated in the figures following Figs. 12A-12B (i.e. in Figs. 13A-15D) multiple variants of a connection element 140 shown in Figs. 12A and 12B are applied in this embodiment. These variants are obtained by connecting various further components to the connection element body shown in Figs. 12A and 12B (typically by means of an opening 146 also shown in Figs. 12A and 12B). Accordingly, therefore, in these variants the connection element body depicted in Figs. 12A- 12B is included (i.e. they comprise this connection element body). The application of such variants reduces manufacturing costs because a separate base portion need not be produced for each variant, only the supplementary components have to be manufactured for them.

In Fig. 12A therefore a fixed-projection connection element 140 is shown. In Figs. 12A that side of the connection element 140 is illustrated which faces the helmet when the device is being placed thereon, while in Fig. 12B the opposite, outward facing side is illustrated. It is shown in Fig. 12A that the connection of chains 81 (i.e. the appropriate strap elements) is implemented in the case of this connection element in the same manner as with the connection element 80 illustrated in Figs. 7A, 7B (here a fastening tab 142 and a fastening rod element 143 are applied).

When it is arranged in the helmet fastening device the connection element 140 shown in Fig. 12A is adapted for connecting two lateral strap elements and an upper strap element portion. In the arrangement shown in the figure the strap elements connected from the sides are the lateral strap elements while the one connected from above is the upper strap element portion (cf. Fig. 1 B). Accordingly, in the connection element 140 projections 145a adapted for connecting the lateral strap elements lie at an obtuse angle (approximately 150-170°) as measured at the side facing the upper strap element portion. This angle is halved by a projection 145b adapted for connecting the upper strap element portion, i.e. the connection element 140 is configured symmetrically with respect to the projection 145b. This angle can of course be chosen arbitrarily, it is expediently an obtuse angle. Such an obtuse-angle arrangement is advantageous because it fits the locked state exceptionally well, and is not disadvantageous in application/removal states either. ln Fig. 13A a variant of the connection element 140 is illustrated. A connection element 150 shown in Fig. 13A is obtained by connecting, through an opening 146, a locking auxiliary element 151 to the connection element 140 shown Figs. 12A-12B. The connection element 150 is therefore such a variant of the connection element 140 that functions as a locking connection element. Moreover, the connection element 150 is such a locking connection element that comprises a locking component that can be rotated with respect to projections 45a, 145b adapted for connecting the lateral strap elements and the upper strap element portion, i.e. the locking strap element to be connected to it will also be rotatable relative to the lateral and upper strap elements.

In Fig. 13C the locking connection element 150 of Fig. 13A is shown with a locking element 182 of a locking device 180 being passed through the locking auxiliary element 151 thereof. As shown in Fig. 13C, in a manner also illustrated in Fig. 20B the locking element 182 extends very close to locking pawls 147 (locking sticks), and is passed through the lock openings of the locking tabs 164. In Fig. 13C the chain 181 forming a part of the locking strap element is shown in dashed lines in order that other components of the locking arrangement can be seen as clearly as possible.

The locking auxiliary element 151 comprises locking pawls 147 (the manner of connecting the locking strap element to these pawls is illustrated in Fig. 13B), and an opening through which the locking auxiliary element 151 can be connected to the connection element 140 (i.e. into opening 146 thereof). As with the interconnection of the projections 92a, 92b, 92c the locking auxiliary element 151 is connected to the connection element 140 functioning as a base body by means of a loosely fit rivet element 148.

Figs. 14A and 14B show, respectively, a preform 160 corresponding to a locking auxiliary element 151 and the locking auxiliary element 151 itself. Observing the preform 160 depicted in Fig. 14A the portions of the locking auxiliary element 151 can be clearly differentiated. The preform 160 comprises an oblong, flat, rectangular base portion 163 on which there is arranged an opening 166 (this opening is typically disposed in the middle of the base portion). Preform portions corresponding to locking pawls 147 are connected to the longer sides of the base portion 163. In the bent-finished locking auxiliary element 151 these preform portions are bent appropriately (approximately at 90°) such that they form locking pawls 147. Preform portions corresponding to locking tabs 164 are connected to both ends of the base portion 163. In the finished locking auxiliary element 151 these preform portions are also bent at approximately 90°. After the bending operation, in the bent-finished state lock openings 162 of the locking tabs 164 are positioned opposite each other.

In Fig. 14B therefore the locking auxiliary element 151 is shown in a bent-finished state, with the dashed lines on the locking tabs 164 indicating the lock openings 162. As shown also in Fig. 13A the locking auxiliary element 151 - with its flat side fitted against the surface of the connection element 140 - is connected thereto. Accordingly, the locking connection element 150 is essentially a four-branch (four- projection) connection element comprising three fixed, i.e. non-rotatable branches, with the fourth projection being rotatable relative to them. This rotatability is illustrated also in Fig. 13B which in comparison with Fig. 13A also shows a chain 181 as connected. As with the chain 81 shown in the above referenced figures, the chain 181 is shown in order to illustrate the manner of connecting the given embodiment of the strap element to the connection element, so the length of these chains 81 , 181 is not relevant and therefore only a section of the strap element having an arbitrary length is shown. The locking auxiliary element 151 may of course be rotated to a different angle and in a different direction relative to the body of the connection element 140 functioning as a base.

As it is also shown in Figs. 13A-13B, the locking auxiliary element 151 is of course connected to the outside of the connection element 140. In other words, by connecting a locking auxiliary element 151 to a connection element 140 functioning as a base the outside face (and of course also the side facing the helmet) of the thus obtained connection element 150 is selected. As shown in Figs. 13A, 13B, the connection portions situated at the respective ends of the projections 145a, 145b are accordingly in a covered position. In Figs. 15A-15B a further variant of the connection element (a connection element 170) is shown that is based on the connection element 140. Figs. 15A and 15B illustrate this in its pre-assembly and assembled states. The connection element 170 can be arranged in an embodiment of the helmet fastening device in a pair formed with the connection element 150 shown in Figs. 13A-13B; preferably a single instance of both elements is required; because a releasable connection can be made to the locking strap element applying the connection element 50, the connection of the connection element 170 and the locking strap element can remain fixed. The connection element 170 has three fixed and one rotatable projections.

As it is illustrated by Fig. 15A, the connection element 170 can be obtained from the fixed-projection connection element 140 in the following way. As shown in Fig. 15A, a supplementary projection 171 is applied. On the connection element 140 there is formed the opening 146, and an opening 172 is formed on the supplementary projection 171. By passing a rivet element through these openings 146, 172 the connection element 140 and the supplementary projection 171 can be connected. As with certain connections illustrated above (see the rotatable- projection connection element 90 and the locking connection element 150) this connection is loose, i.e. the supplementary projection 171 is rotatable relative to the body of the connection element 140 functioning as a base element. In this embodiment therefore the lateral strap elements are interconnected by a fixed- projection connection element 140 at the interconnection where there is not arranged a locking connection element, and a supplementary projection 171 adapted for connecting the locking strap element is rotatably connected to this fixed-projection connection element 140. Within certain limits the locking chain can be oriented at an arbitrary angle with respect to other structural components. The optimal position of the locking chain is determined by the motorcycle itself. This position preferably cannot be changed after the device has been locked.

The rivet connection of the projection 171 is tightened only to an extent that the two components remain mutually rotatable. The locking auxiliary element 151 adapted for connecting the locking strap element is fastened to the rear connection element (situated at the occipital region) in the same manner (based on the same principle). This solution allows that the locking strap element can be passed underneath the seat frame independent of the position of the helmet. In practice the seat's size, shape, configuration and position relative to the motorcycle may greatly vary even within a given type. By that it is meant that the helmet and thus the device according to the invention is usually not provided by the seat with a horizontal, vertical and/or "perfectly aligned" position relative to the motorcycle. The strap element adapted for locking the device according to the invention should preferably conform to the position of the seat with respect to the seat frame structure that has to be embraced to an optimal extent by the locking strap element. If the seat position is not parallel with the frame structure supporting the seat, then in specific cases the locking strap element of the device according to the invention either cannot be aligned perpendicularly to the seat or such an alignment would result in a lateral tightening thereof. In a number of motorcycle types the frame structure adapted for supporting the seat also comprises (carries) other components that have to be avoided in order to provide perfect alignment and support. Since the locking strap element has the same characteristics as other strap elements, i.e. it is only capable of unidirectional motion and thus in order to avoid the above mentioned obstacles and to provide perfect fit the locking strap element is enabled to fit perfectly by this rotatable solution.

The mutual rotatability of the connection element 170 and its projection 171 is illustrated in a view shown in Fig. 15C. The flat, oblong, rounded-end projection 171 is seated against the flat body of the connection element 140 functioning as a base element, and due to the loose connection it can be rotated with respect to it.

Rotatability is also illustrated in Fig. 15D that (like Figs. 10A and 11 A) shows a schematic view of the locked state of helmet fastening device mounted on the helmet 130. In Fig. 5D the helmet 130 is illustrated in rear view (a schematic front view can be shown in an analogous manner). Accordingly, the lateral strap element portions 132" starting from the connection point indicated by a circle in Fig. 15D and the upper strap element portion 134"' extending between them are shown in the figure. As shown in Fig. 15D a respective upper strap element portion 134' running downwards at each side extends along the upper extremity of the helmet 130. The connection between the upper strap element portions 134' and the corresponding lateral strap element portion 132" is also shown. In the schematic view of Fig. 15D the connection elements are not shown. The plurality of lines starting downward also from the region designated with a circle illustrate that the locking strap element portion corresponding to the lines is rotatable with respect to the connection element (not shown), i.e. with respect to the lateral and upper strap elements connected to the connection element at a fixed angle.

According to the above referenced figures a connection element adapted for keeping the lateral strap elements and the upper strap element portions fixed relative to one another can be arranged on the front and rear portions of the helmet, with the projection belonging to the locking strap element being rotatable relative to them. Thereby the rotatability of the locking strap element is provided at the front and also at the rear, which is beneficial for placing the device on the helmet and also for helping strap self-alignment for locking.

In an exemplary realization the strap element path according to Figs. 1 B, 2A-2D is applied. The locking connection element 7 is configured in a manner analogous to the locking connection element 150 shown in Fig. 13A, and connection elements 90 according to Fig. 10B are arranged at the connections on the lateral strap element portions and also at the rear connection point of the lateral strap element portions (situated behind the helmet). In this example the lateral strap element, the upper strap element and the locking strap element are implemented by the chain illustrated in Figs. 22 and 23. In the example the upper strap element portions are connected to each other by a connection element 80 shown in Fig. 7A. The view shown in Fig. 16A illustrates a fixed-projection connection element 99. In this embodiment the fixed-projection connection element 99 comprises, i.e. is composed of, bent chain link elements (three outside chain link elements 95a and three inside chain link elements 95b). A chain link element preform 98 corresponding to such chain link elements is illustrated in Fig. 16B. In the preform state no bending of the chain link element has been performed yet (the bend line along which the preform is to be bent is shown by a dashed line). The bent chain link element is an oblong element that - like chain links - has at each end an opening adapted for receiving the rod element.

In a number of embodiments therefore the fixed-projection connection element is formed from sheet material (typically metal sheet), the fastening tabs on the projections being bent from the sheet material such that they are arranged opposite each other. In the embodiment according to Fig. 16A the projections of the fixed-projection connection element 99 are formed with bent chain link elements 95a, 95b, and the strap elements connected to adjacent projections are connected to each other by means of at least one bent chain link element 95a, 95b.

The fixed-projection connection element 99 is prepared as follows. The chain link elements 95a, 95b are essentially configured as bent and elongated chain links. In this embodiment the connection end to be connected to the connection element 99 is constituted by such terminal chain links of a chain 96 shown in Fig. 16A (the chain links located nearest to the connection element 99) through which a fastening rod element 97 applied in the present embodiment is passed. The chain link elements 95a, 95b are connected to these chain links; the outside chain link elements 95a being connected from outside, while the inside chain link elements 95b being connected between the inside chain links. Each projection is formed by the corresponding ends of as many as four chain link elements, the fastening tabs being constituted by those ends of the chain link elements 95a, 95b (or only of the outside chain link elements 95a) that have openings. The fastening tabs corresponding to the same projection are therefore arranged oppositely. Similarly, the strap element is connected to the fastening tabs by fastening rod elements. The chain link elements forming the connection element installed between the strap elements (although they are not fixed to one another) are kept in place by the strap elements and obviously form fixed-projection connection elements.

In Fig. 16A the connection element 99 is shown to have three projections lying at a given angle relative to each other. However, it can be understood that a fixed- projection connection element of this type (i.e. comprising bent chain link elements) may also be configured to have an arbitrary number - e.g. four - projection. In the latter case, the chain link elements are e.g. bent at 90°. In a similar manner it will also be understood that the angles between the projections can also be chosen freely to a certain extent. The chain link elements 95a, 95b illustrated in Fig. 16A are bent at approximately 120°.

In the embodiment of Fig. 16A two adjacent projections are interconnected from outside by the outside chain link elements 95a and by the inside chain link elements 95b at the inside chain links of the exemplary duplex chain 96 shown in the figure. It is shown in the figure that for each projection two inside chain link elements 95b are connected to each inside chain link forming a part of the connection end of the chain 96, with each inside chain link element 95b being connected to a respective adjacent projection. The other outside chain link element 95a is also connected to the other adjacent projection. Accordingly, in the illustrated embodiment the strap element of each projection is connected to a given adjacent projection also by means of respective chain link elements 95a and 95b. The chain link elements may have a different configuration from the one shown in the figure.

It is easily seen that a fixed-projection connection element of the type shown in Fig. 16A can be provided for a single-strand chain or also for a different type of strap element. For a single-strand chain or for example for the connection end 122 shown in Fig. 21 , by way of example such that each pair of adjacent projections are interconnected only by a single chain link element, and therefore in this case a fixed-projection connection element comprising three projections would consist of three chain link elements.

The angle between the projections is obviously determined by the angle between the chain link elements 95a, 95b, and the chain link elements 95a, 95b can be made sufficiently strong in order that this angle cannot be changed. The three chain link elements of a fixed-projection connection element of this type applied for single-strand chains can optionally also be connected to one another.

According to above described details, in an embodiment of the invention the upper strap element comprises four upper strap element portions, the upper strap element portions are connected to the lateral strap elements by their first ends and to one another by their second ends, and two first upper strap element portions are connected to the lateral strap element at their interconnection, and two second upper strap element portions are connected to the lateral strap elements at parts different from the connection locations of the first upper strap element portions. In addition to that, in a further embodiment the lateral strap elements are connected to each other at their first end and at their second end by means of respective fixed-projection connection elements, the ends of the lateral strap elements and a first upper strap element portion are connected to respective projections of the fixed-projection connection elements (the lateral straps are terminated here), and the lateral strap elements and the first upper strap element portions are formed by means chains comprising chain links, and from the chain links intermediate chain links (i.e. non-terminal chain links) are connected to respective adjacent chain links by a first chain rod element and second chain rod element having axes parallel with each other (in multiple-strand chains a given chain link may have a plurality of adjacent chain links that are all connected to the given chain link by the same chain rod element), and the adjacent chain links are configured to be rotatable relative to each other about the chain rod element that connects them, and the fastening rod elements extending through each of the connection ends of the chain (which in this type of chain are typically formed by the terminal chain links of the chain) are parallel for each connection end with the chain rod element of a chain link connected to the respective connection end (this is a single-degree-of-freedom chain wherein - as illustrated in the figures - the fastening rod element is parallel with the chain rod elements within the limits set by the tolerances of the chain).

The direction in which the strap element can be rotated relative to the connection element is determined by the fastening rod element. This fastening rod element is connected to oppositely arranged fastening tabs on the connection element (it is preferably connected into openings or recesses oppositely formed on the fastening tabs). Due to the meeting of the plurality of straps the body of the connection element fits close on the helmet, with the tabs preferably facing towards the helmet. Accordingly, the fastening rod element is oriented approximately tangentially with respect to the helmet (and due to the configuration comprising fastening tabs, slightly spaced apart from it). The single-degree-of-freedom chain is connected such that the chain rod elements thereof are parallel with the fastening rod element, i.e. that they are oriented approximately tangentially with respect to the helmet (and due to the configuration comprising fastening tabs, slightly spaced apart from it). In this embodiment, therefore, fixed-projection connection elements are applied at the interconnection point of the lateral strap elements, and the lateral strap elements and the upper strap element portions connecting the lateral strap elements (these are the upper strap element portions that interconnect the front and rear fixed-projection connection elements in a manner similar to the lateral strap element portions) are implemented by single-degree-of-freedom chains. A great advantage of this configuration is that - due to the application of the fixed- projection connection elements together with single-degree-of-freedom chains - the strap elements are resistant against forcing to come off, i.e. due to the synergistic effect of these features the strap elements connecting the forward and rear fixed-projection connection elements can preferably be prevented from moving nearer to each other to a significant extent (i.e. above the amount allowed by configuration tolerances).

In a still further embodiment the upper strap element also comprises four upper strap element portions, and the upper strap element portions are connected to the lateral strap elements and to one another respectively by their first and second ends, and two first upper strap element portions are connected to the lateral strap elements at their interconnections, respectively, and two second upper strap element portions are connected to the lateral strap elements at parts (locations) different from the connection locations of the first upper strap element portions.

Furthermore - and optionally in addition to the features of the above described further embodiment - in the still further embodiment each of the second upper strap element portions is connected to a respective lateral strap element with a respective rotatable-projection connection element, the rotatable-projection connection element comprising projections being connected to each other by means of a rivet element and are rotatable relative to each other, and the second upper strap element portion and the lateral strap element portions of the lateral strap element are connected to respective projections of the rotatable-projection connection element. Such rotatable-projection connection elements can be utilized together with any type of strap element and also without having the features of the previously described further embodiment (resulting in a helmet fastening device with highly flexible adjustability), however it is particularly preferable to apply such rotatable-projection connection elements in a helmet fastening device that also has the features of said further embodiment. In this latter embodiment, in addition to an improved protection against forcing to come off, a simple manner of installation/removal - particularly as illustrated in Figs. 10A and 11 A - can be preferably provided.

Therefore, independent of the manner of connection of the locking strap element (i.e. whether it is connected applying a locking auxiliary element 151 and a supplementary projection 171 - as it was mentioned above, the connection elements 150 and 170 comprising these components are also based on the fixed- projection connection element 140 - or otherwise) such an embodiment can be provided - as illustrated in Fig. 1 B - wherein

- the lateral strap elements are interconnected by fixed-projection connection elements both at the front and at the rear,

- the upper strap element consists of four strap element portions, of which two upper strap element portions are terminated at the fixed-projection connection element interconnecting the lateral strap elements,

- the other two upper strap element portions are connected to a respective projection of the rotatable-projection connection element adapted to divide the lateral strap elements into two parts. This embodiment is thus independent of the manner of connecting the locking strap element to the device. This embodiment possesses the above described advantages (protection against forcing to come off, simple installation/removal).

Fig. 17 shows a preform (connection element preform 101) of the fixed-projection connection element 100 adapted for interconnecting strap elements in an embodiment of the helmet fastening device according to the invention. The connection element 100 may function as an alternative to the connection element 80 according to Figs. 7A-7B, as it can also be utilized as an upper connection element. The preform represents the state before bending, when fastening tabs 102 still lie in the plane of a connection body 108. In Fig. 17 bend lines 104 are shown (in dashed lines). Being bent along these lines the fastening tabs 102 can assume their final shape in the connection element 100 (see Fig. 18). As shown in Fig. 17, on each fastening tab 102 there is arranged (formed) a respective fastening opening 106. A pair of fastening tabs 102 corresponds to each projection 105.

The connection element preform 101 is preferably produced as a one-piece element, preferably cut by sheet-metal pressing. The material of the connection element 100 is tempered or untempered (stainless) steel with a typical thickness of 2-5 mm, its thickness preferably being 3-4 mm, or a material identical with the material of the chain links 60 shown in Figs. 6A-6C. The above presented connection elements also have similar characteristics, and as with the above presented ones, this connection element is preferably also tempered (to obtain safety-grade steel) after the fastening tabs have been bent.

In Fig. 17 projections 05 situated at nearly 90° relative to each other are shown (it is provided by the connection body 108 that the projections 105 have a mutually fixed arrangement). Connection elements having an arbitrary number of projections can be formed in a manner analogous to forming the connection element 100 (see e.g. Fig. 28); by arranging the projections around a suitably shaped connection body a connection element suited to the application can be made. As in the case of the embodiments illustrated in Figs. 2A-4E, connection elements with a T, X, or Y shape may e.g. be required. The angles between the branches of the Y-shaped connection can be different also in this embodiment. The desired angles can be chosen by applying the appropriate connection body.

In Fig. 18 the connection element 100 bent to its finished shape is shown, i.e. the fastening tabs 102 are bent upwards (such that they preferably lie at 90° relative to the projection 105), fastening openings 106 on the corresponding fastening tabs 102 of the projections 105 are thus brought opposite each other (as with the above described embodiments illustrated with duplex chains). In Fig. 18 the oppositely positioned fastening openings 106 are shown by dashed lines on that projection 105 which in side view faces the viewer.

In Fig. 19 a special connection element is illustrated, a locking connection element 1 0 comprising such fastening tabs 102 at its sides shown in the left and in the right of the figure that are identical to the ones comprised by the connection element 100 shown in Fig. 18 (with a projection thereof comprising fastening tabs 102 being obstructed from view). Therefore - unlike the connection element 150 - the connection element 110 is formed as a one-piece element, and accordingly its locking projection is not rotatable. As shown in the figure, a connection end 111 of a respective chain link 112 is connected, by means of a fastening rod element 113 (e.g. rivet element) passed through the fastening opening 106 (a rivet-in-hole joint), to each of the pairs of fastening tabs 102. The connection end 111 is in this case the end of the chain, i.e. a chain link 12 illustrated in the figure.

The connection elements are made of stainless steel preferably by punching, pressing-bending (press-brake) or laser cutting. In the case of chains the connection end is implemented in a straightforward manner by the end of the chain, and thus chains are provided with connection ends by themselves.

In the embodiment according to Fig. 19 the helmet fastening device according to the invention comprises the locking connection element 110 arranged at one of the interconnections of the lateral strap elements, the locking connection element comprises a fixed-projection connection element (in this embodiment this is formed by those projections of the locking connection element 110 that do not have a locking pawl, in other above described embodiment it is formed by the connection element 140 functioning as a base body), the lateral strap elements are connected to a respective projection 105 of the fixed-projection connection element, and the locking connection element 110 further comprising a locking arrangement (in this embodiment, a locking projection 119) having locking tabs 114 and at least one (typically 2-4) locking pawl 118 arranged between the locking tabs 114, the locking strap element comprises a chain having at least one hitch opening adapted for receiving the at least one locking pawl 118 (or it comprises a chain portion, it is not required that the entire locking strap element is implemented by a chain, the remaining part can be of any configuration), and lock openings 116 adapted for receiving a locking element of a locking device are arranged opposite each other on the locking tabs 114 such that when at least one locking pawl 118 is introduced into the at least one hitch opening of the chain the lock openings 116 are left free by the chain. In this embodiment, therefore, the locking arrangement is a locking projection 119 formed integrally with the fixed-projection connection element of the locking connection element 110. The locking connection element 110 is a special fixed-projection connection element that comprises projections adapted to be connected to the strap elements having a connection end, and therefore it has all the features of a "basic" fixed- projection connection element. In addition to that it also has a special locking projection. It is therefore sufficient for the helmet fastening device according to the invention to comprise a single such fixed-projection locking connection element (while not having any "basic" fixed-projection connection elements) in order to obtain a solution falling in the scope of the invention.

In Fig. 19 locking tabs 114 that are bent upwards in a manner similar to the fastening tabs 102 are shown. As it is illustrated also in Fig. 19, the lock opening 116 is situated much higher than the fastening openings 106. In Fig. 19 a locking pawl 118 is also shown.

In Fig. 20A the manner of connecting a chain 121 to the locking projection 119 is also shown. As shown in Fig. 17 the chain links of the chain 121 are introduced between the locking tabs 114 and the locking pawls 118 (in the embodiment of Fig. 20A there are arranged two locking pawls 118) are introduced in hitch openings adapted for receiving the locking pawls 118 (such hitch openings are found on conventional machine chains - applied in the drivetrain of bicycles and motorcycles - with the drive sprockets of the bicycle and the motorcycle engaging the openings). As illustrated in Fig. 20A, also with a chain 121 introduced between the locking tabs 114 the lock opening 116 is situated above the chain 121 , and thus it is not obstructed by the chain 121 (the manner of passing the locking element through the lock opening is illustrated in Fig. 13C for the embodiment shown in Figs. 13A, 13B). The chain link in the left-side terminal position of the chain 121 shown in Fig. 20A is a so-called inside chain link; as shown e.g. in Figs. 22-23, the inside and outside chain links are typically arranged in an alternating fashion on a machine chain. As with the outside chain link a hitch opening is also formed at the inside chain link and so both locking pawls 118 shown in Fig. 17 are introduced into a corresponding hitch opening. The lock openings 116 of the oppositely positioned locking tabs 114 are adapted to receive the locking element of for example a padlock (a locking device) that can be passed through them (see the locking element 182 in Fig. 13C). When the locking element is passed through the lock openings 116 (the portion passed through the opening being straight) the chain 121 cannot be removed from its position on the locking pawls 118 (due to the geometric configuration the removal of the chain 121 is made physically impossible), i.e. the locking strap element - implemented e.g. by a machine chain - can be locked by means of the locking projection 119. In order to realize such a manner of locking a chain segment adapted to be engaged with a locking pawl 118 locking pawls has to be included.

If therefore the locking connection element 110 according to Fig. 17 is applied for locking the locking strap element, the locking strap element has to comprise a chain adapted to be connected to the locking pawls (i.e. having hitch openings). Applying such a chain the variable-sized structures (e.g. seats of different heights) present in the different types of motorcycle can be compensated for in a simple manner; thereby making the helmet fastening device universally applicable. The chain can be connected to the locking connection element at any point (not just at its end), and thus the length of the locking strap element to be applied - passed underneath the seat or connected in another manner - can be chosen as desired (essentially such that it corresponds to the space (approximately 5 mm) between the adjacent hitch openings).

Preferably, the entire locking strap element is implemented by a machine chain that - due to its configuration - comprises hitch openings capable of receiving the locking pawls (see Fig. 22-23). This machine chain is also a single-degree-of- freedom chain, and thus it cannot be forced to come off sideways when the locking connection element 110 is applied, with the locking tabs 114 providing suitable orientation for the locking strap element. Thereby a particularly preferable combination can be obtained by applying a single-degree-of-freedom chain.

In Fig. 20B a locking arrangement realized by the locking auxiliary element 151 is illustrated in section view (the section cuts through the locking auxiliary element 151 and thus the manner of introduction of the locking pawls 147 into the hitch openings of the chain can be seen), i.e. in this embodiment the locking arrangement is the locking auxiliary element 151 rotatably connected to the fixed- projection connection element of the locking connection element. The figure illustrates that the locking auxiliary element 151 can be connected through its opening 166 to the opening 146 of the connection element 140. The opening 166 widens towards the inside of the locking auxiliary element 151 (upwards in the drawing), while the opening 146 widens towards the opposite side of the connection element 140. These widened portions are formed for the rivet elements connecting the two elements.

It is illustrated in Fig. 20B that the chain comprising the chain links 88a, 88b is laid on the base portion 163 of the locking auxiliary element 151 , and the locking pawls 147 are introduced into the hitch openings of the chain (for the hitch openings 87 of the duplex chain see Fig. 23). As shown in the figure, the locking auxiliary element 151 is preferably dimensioned such that the locking pawls 147 thereof extend as far as approximately the centreline of the lock opening 162 or further than that. With such a dimensioning (generally described as the locking pawls being passed so close to the lock opening that the chain cannot pass between the pawls and the opening) by passing the locking element of the locking device through the lock opening 162 it is ensured that the chain cannot be removed from the locking auxiliary element 151. Thereby, by pushing in the locking element between the teeth (the locking pawls) and above the chain it provides the teeth and the entire locking element with extra support and brings them together into a single unit. When the device is stretched in any direction all the loads are placed on the locking element of the padlock by the teeth and by the components of the locking element. This solution allows that in this embodiment the device according to the invention can be locked as securely as possible by a very lightweight, simple, tiny component (made for example by sheet-pressing).

Fig. 21 illustrates a strap element configuration according to a further embodiment of the invention, as well as the manner of connecting the strap element to the fastening tabs 102 also shown in Figs. 18-19. In this embodiment the lateral strap elements and/or the upper strap element and/or the locking strap element comprise a - preferably metal - wire rope or are formed by a wire rope (preferably multiple-strand wire rope). As shown in Fig. 21 , for the connection to the fastening tab 102 of the connection element the end of the wire rope 124 is fitted with a connection end 122 that can be clamped between the fastening tabs 102 - with the help of a fastening rod element 113 - just like the strap elements implemented by chains.

Implementing the strap elements by wire ropes an extremely economical and low- cost embodiment of the helmet fastening device according to the invention can be obtained. A wire rope can be applied in the locking strap element such that by way of example the chain portion (chain) adapted to be connected to the locking arrangement is connected to it, or if the at least partially releasable connection of the locking strap element is implemented by other means (not by a chain portion and a connection end adapted for receiving it). By the connection element comprising fastening tabs according to the invention the strap elements implemented by wire ropes are provided with orientation and thus the device's resistance against forcing to come off remains also in this embodiment.

In Figs. 22 and 23 an exemplary chain (duplex or double-row machine chain) applicable as a strap element is illustrated. The illustrated chain comprises outside chain links 88a and 88b alternately arranged at the outer sides thereof as well as chain links 89a arranged along the centreline of the duplex chain, with each pair of chain links 89a encompassing a pair of chain links 89b. The row of the chain links 88a, 88b arranged at the sides of the chain is separated from the inside row of the chain links 89a, 89b by spacer elements 86 (rollers) at both sides of the duplex chain. There is a rod element 84 (e.g. a rivet element) passed through the corresponding chain links and through the spacer elements 86 arranged between them. In a manner shown in Fig. 23, in the illustrated embodiment the hitch openings 87 are formed between the spacer elements 86. A duplex chain can also be provided such that the chain links 89b are not doubled and the spacer elements are implemented by bushings.

In Fig. 23 there is shown a chain end functioning as a connection end. It is shown that at the end of the chain there is no spacer element 86 arranged between the outside chain links 88a and the chain links 89b situated between them, and that at this end a fastening rod element 83 is arranged instead of a rod element 84 (the fastening rod element may have the same configuration as the rod element 84). The thereby obtained connection end can be connected to the connection element for example in a manner illustrated in Fig. 7A. The fastening tabs of the connection element are preferably encompassed by the outside chain links, and, to make a connection, the fastening rod element 83 is passed through the fastening tabs and the chain links after such an arrangement has already been made.

It is not necessary in all cases to arrange spacer elements in the chain (machine chain); in certain machine chain types the hitch openings are provided by including sufficiently thick inside chain links (or inside chain links assembled from multiple pieces). In machine chains applied in the drivetrain of motorcycles or bicycles hitch openings are necessarily provided because also the teeth of the drive sprockets are adapted to engage them. In Fig. 23 an exemplary machine chain is shown, but of course machine chains or single-degree-of-freedom chains having different configurations than what is illustrated here can also be applied in the helmet fastening device according to the invention. The machine chain can be made of multiple tempered safety-grade steel or stainless steel. Of course, single-strand chains or chains with even more than two strands can also be applied as strap elements.

In addition to the above listed strap element types, chain types different from the ones described above and even plastic bands or bands made of other materials can be applied in the invention as strap elements; these have to be fitted with the connection end adapted to be connected to the connection element. A further embodiment of the connection element applicable in the helmet fastening device according to the invention is illustrated in Figs. 24A-30.

In Fig. 24A an end portion of a covering projection 190 is shown. As illustrated in Fig. 24B, an opening 194 leading into a screw thread 196 is arranged on the covering projection 190. Figs. 24A and 24B show that there are sideways- protruding covering rivets 192 arranged on the covering projection 190.

A projection 200 adapted to be connected to the covering projection 190 is illustrated in Fig. 25. The projection 200 comprises a fastening tab 201 that in this embodiment consists of two rectangular fastening tab portions 202 arranged inward from the end portion of the projection 200, and a fastening tab portion 204 that is arranged further inward and has a trapezoidal shape widening towards the endpoint of the projection 200. The fastening tab 201 is divided into fastening tab portions 202 and 204 by fastening recesses 203 and 205. In Fig. 25 the projection

200 is shown in side view; as illustrated in Fig. 28 there is another fastening tab

201 of an identical shape disposed behind the fastening tab 201 shown in Fig. 25 parallel therewith.

Between the fastening tabs 201 a screw introduction opening 206 is formed on the projection 200. In Fig. 24B the covering projection 190 is illustrated in side view. By comparing Figs. 24B and 25 it can be observed that the covering projection 190 can be pulled on the projection 200 by means of a screw introduced through the screw introduction opening 206, and that the projection 200 and the covering projection 190 can be fastened together by the screw.

When the covering projection 190 is fastened to the projection 200 the covering rivets 192 are introduced into the fastening recesses 203 and 205. The fastening recesses may also be called fastening indentions. The covering projection 190 is preferably connected to the projection 200 when there is a chain - as shown in Figs. 26A and 26B, a chain 208 - connected to the projection 200.

In Figs. 26A and 26B it is illustrated that the chain 208 (of which only the end, i.e. two adjacent chain links are shown in the figures) can be connected into the fastening tabs 201 in two different ways. The chain links of the chain 208 are secured together by rivet elements 213 (particularly, rod elements having pressed ends) as shown in Figs. 26A and 26B. At the end of the chain 208 a connection end 211 is formed by the terminal chain link, with a fastening rod element 210 being passed through the passage (opening) lying next to the end of the chain. The fastening rod element 210 is longer than the rivet elements 213. The rivet elements 213 are situated between the fastening tabs 201 , while the fastening rod element 210 extends into the fastening recess 205 (the state shown in Fig. 26A) or into the fastening recess 203 (the state shown in Fig. 26B). The relative lengths of the rivet element 213 and the fastening rod element 210 are illustrated also in Fig. 30. The fastening rod element 210 can therefore be introduced into the fastening recesses 203 or 205 of the oppositely positioned fastening tabs 201 (thereby the fastening rod elements 210 are connected to the fastening tabs 201), which involves that the strap element (that is, in this embodiment, a chain) is more or less pulled on the projection 200, i.e. the length of the chain extending from the projection can be reduced. After positioning the chain 208 the covering projection 190 is preferably fastened to the projection 200. In this embodiment fastening is performed by placing a screw in the screw introduction opening 206 and the thread 196 of the covering projection 190 at the end of the screw, the thread 196 (and the thread of the screw) being oriented such that by turning the screw inwards the covering projection 190 is pulled on the projection 200. As a result of that, when the screw is turned inward the thread (made integral with the cylindrical body) is pressed against the projection 200 (the bottom edge of the body of the screw thread comes into contact with the surface of the projection 200 facing towards the body).

Thereby the covering projection 190 is pulled between the fastening tabs 201 , thereby preventing the fastening rod element 210 from being removed from the fastening recess 203 or 205. Due to the configuration of the connection end of the chain 208 and the fastening rod element 210 to prevent such a removal it is sufficient to insert the covering projection 190, it is not necessarily required that it has covering pins 192 extending into the fastening recesses 203 and 205 (in case such a fastening rod element 210 is applied that is long enough relative to the height of the fastening tab 201 the chain end connected to the fastening rod element 210 cannot be slipped from under the covering projection 190).

In case, however a covering pin 192 is also applied it has the effect that the fastening rod element 210 is "clamped" inside the connection element at a greater width, i.e. the sway of the fastening rod element 210 and thus of the chain 208 can be reduced by means of the covering pin 192 compared to the solution wherein a covering projection without covering pins is applied. In an embodiment of the invention, therefore covering pins 192 extending into respective fastening recesses 203, 205 are connected to the covering projections 190 (the covering pins are preferably made integral with the corresponding covering projections). ln this embodiment therefore fastening recesses 203, 205 are formed fastening tabs 201 being opposite each other, the fastening rod element 210 being passed through the fastening recesses 203, 205 of the oppositely positioned fastening tabs 201. Optionally, a single fastening recess may be disposed on each one of the oppositely positioned fastening tabs providing only one possibility for arranging the fastening rod element. Of course there can be arranged more pairs of fastening recesses than the two pairs illustrated above, thereby allowing for more possibilities for passing through or "engaging" the fastening rod element, rendering the mechanism more adjustable. A number of solutions offer themselves for keeping the fastening rod element in the fastening recesses; it can be kept in place not only by means of the above illustrated covering element.

Therefore, as with the above described embodiment, in an embodiment of the invention a plurality of pairs of corresponding fastening recesses 203, 205 are formed on the fastening tabs 201 being opposite each other. These corresponding fastening recesses 203, 205 are preferably arranged symmetrically with respect to the longitudinal axis of the projection. That is, they are arranged such that they can receive the fastening rod element passing through the connection end. The function of the connection end (like in other embodiments) is to provide for securing the strap element in the connection element, while the connection ends preferably (and thus also in the illustrated embodiments) also have side walls that are parallel with the fastening tabs and face towards them. The connection element is preferably dimensioned such that it fits exactly between the fastening tabs, thereby providing orientation for the strap element connected thereto.

In Fig. 27 a connection element preform 221 of a connection element comprising three instances of the above described projection 200 is shown. The connection element preform 221 has to be machined (the fastening tabs 201 have to be bent upwards along bend lines 224) in order to obtain a connection element 220 illustrated in Fig. 28.

In Fig. 28 therefore the fastening tabs 201 are bent upwards in the connection element 220, that is, they have already assumed their final position compared to the connection element preform 221. The connection element 220 has three branches, i.e. it is capable of interconnecting three strap elements. In the illustrated embodiment there are two possibilities (fastening recesses 203, 205) on the fastening tabs 201 of each projection 200 for engaging the fastening rod elements 210. Accordingly, by the help of the connection element 220 it can be adjusted in all three directions the amount to which the strap element is pulled on the connection element 220, i.e. the length of the strap element portion extending from the connection element 220 can be adjusted.

Thereby the length of the various strap elements of the helmet fastening device can be adjusted to match different helmet types, of course depending on the connections at which such connection elements are arranged. The locking connection element 150 illustrated in Fig. 13A can also be modified so that fastening tabs comprising fastening recesses instead of fastening openings are arranged on the projections, thereby obtaining an adjustable locking connection element. An adjustable connection element (allowing for adjusting the length of the strap elements) similar to the connection element 220 can also be arranged at the connection of the lateral strap elements and the upper strap element(s), or optionally at the connection of the upper strap elements. An adjustable connection element similar to the connection element 220 can of course be configured to have more or less projections compared thereto.

It has to be noted, however, that such embodiments of the helmet fastening device according to the invention can also be preferably installed on differently-sized helmets wherein the connection elements do not allow for adjustability, since in practice the size differences between different helmets are very small, or these embodiments may be manufactured to conform to different helmet sizes. In case a non-adjustable helmet fastening device is installed on a helmet that is smaller than the optimal size it may happen that certain strap elements remain loose to a small extent, but in most cases this does not affect the functionality of the helmet fastening device (the strap elements can be forced sideways along the helmet only to a small extent, and the gaps between the strap elements - the size of the area encompassed by the strap elements - can be adjusted such that even the smallest helmet could not be pulled through it, even if the strap elements have been displaced by forcing to come off). The covering element 230 shown in Fig. 29 has three covering projections 190. The covering element 230 can be applied for the connection element 220 shown in Fig. 28; the projections of the covering element 230 fit between the fastening tabs 201 (i.e. they lie at an appropriate angle relative to each other and have an appropriate width). Applying the covering element 230 therefore the removal of the strap elements connected to the projections 200 can be prevented for each projection 200.

On the covering element 230 openings 194 corresponding to each covering projection 190 are formed. These openings 194 open into the screw thread 196 shown in Fig. 24B. In the figure the screw introduction openings 206 on the connection element 220 are shown; by passing screws through these openings the covering element 230 can be fastened to the connection element 220.

The screw introduction openings 206 are disposed at such locations of the connection element 220 (in the middle part of the connection element 220) that is typically not reached by the connection ends of the strap elements, and thus the connection ends do not block the introduction of the screw. Of course the connection element and the covering element can be fastened together applying a larger or smaller number of screws or even e.g. by a single screw that extends at the centre of the connection element and is connected to the centre portion of the covering element (in this case obviously only a single screw introduction opening and a single screw thread are required). Of course, in addition to an external- thread screw and an internal threading an internal-thread screw and an external threading can also be applied.

In this embodiment therefore the helmet fastening device - corresponding to the appropriately configured one or more connection elements - comprises a covering element 230 being secured to the connection element 220 and having covering projections 190 fitting between the fastening tabs 201. The covering element 230 is fastened to the connection element 220 only during use; it can of course be adjusted when adjusting the length of the strap elements. The screw introduction openings are disposed on the inside of the connection element, i.e. on the side facing the helmet, which involves that the screws are not accessible in the state where the helmet fastening device is placed on the helmet (adjustability does not reduce the safety of the helmet fastening device). A covering element may also be added to the locking connection elements, optionally configured such that it covers only the projections but not the locking projection.

In the embodiment comprising the covering element, therefore, on the side of the covering element facing the connection element at least one screw thread is formed, and at least one screw introduction opening adapted for receiving a screw engaged by the at least one thread is formed on the connection element. The covering element may also be fastened to the connection element in a different manner; however, this manner of fastening is particularly preferred because it is resistant against attacks by unauthorized persons (the screw cannot be accessed when the helmet fastening device is installed on the helmet).

Fig. 30 also illustrates, in top view, the connection element 220, also showing a section of the chain 208. As shown in the figure, the chain 208 essentially has the same width as the width of the space between the fastening tabs 201 (in the figure the chain 208 is shown schematically, of course the rivet elements 213 can also fit between the fastening tabs 201). It is also shown that the fastening rod element 210 is longer than the rivet elements 213; the fastening rod element 210 has such a length that it extends into one of the fastening recesses 203, 205, i.e. that it is passed through the fastening tab 201. Of course by an arrangement being "passed through" (extending through) it is also meant, in this case and also in the cases illustrated in Figs. 13-15 that the fastening rod element does not extend over the fastening tab (only extends into the opening thereof); what is important is that the fastening tab can hold the fastening rod element. According to the figure, therefore, the fastening rod element 210 is engaged with the oppositely positioned fastening recesses 205 or 203. After that the covering element 230 can be installed and fastened to the connection element.

Before applying the helmet fastening device according to the invention the helmet can preferably be put in a waterproof bag. The helmet fastening device according to the invention is placed on the helmet from above; thereby the individual strap elements can appropriately align themselves thereon. The device according to the invention is applied for fastening the helmet to the seat with its open part facing downwards and with the visor being closed. Thanks to that - unlike with other approaches - applying the solution according to the invention the helmet is not subjected to impacts (because the user does not carry it with him/herself) and its interior is not exposed to the weather and other factors as it remains laid down on the seat.

The invention is, of course, not limited to the preferred embodiments described in details above, but further variants, modifications and developments are possible within the scope of protection determined by the claims.