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Title:
HIGH EFFICIENCY LIGHT FOCUSING ARRANGEMENT
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/001999
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A surface graze lighting arrangement focuses light with a high efficiency. The lighting arrangement includes a curved reflector including a first reflective surface facing a target area. The lighting arrangement includes a light source generating a first light, the first light incident on the first reflective surface being redirected to the target area. The lighting arrangement includes a reflective baffle including a second reflective surface facing the first reflective surface and an opaque surface facing the target area, the first light incident on the second reflective surface being redirected to the first reflective surface, the opaque surface of the reflective baffle configured to prevent an illumination spot outside the target area from being created by the lighting arrangement.

Inventors:
MAN, Kwong, Hung (5656 AE Eindhoven, 5656 AE, NL)
Application Number:
EP2018/066084
Publication Date:
January 03, 2019
Filing Date:
June 18, 2018
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
PHILIPS LIGHTING HOLDING B.V. (High Tech Campus 45, 5656 AE Eindhoven, 5656 AE, NL)
International Classes:
F21V7/00; F21S4/28; F21V7/06; F21V13/10; F21Y103/10; F21Y115/10
Foreign References:
US20090316414A12009-12-24
CN101566310A2009-10-28
CN2898560Y2007-05-09
EP2071227A12009-06-17
Other References:
None
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
VAN EEUWIJK, Alexander, Henricus, Walterus et al. (Philips Lighting B.V. - Intellectual Property, High Tech Campus 45, 5656 AE Eindhoven, 5656 AE, NL)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS:

1. A surface graze lighting arrangement, comprising:- a curved reflector including a first reflective surface facing a target area of a surface plane, wherein the graze lighting arrangement to be positioned near the surface plane to provide a graze lighting effect on the target area;

a coupling component extending from a first end coupled to the first reflective surface, and a second end;

a light source generating a first light, the light source coupled to the coupling component and located within an interior space of the curved reflector, the first light incident on the first reflective surface being redirected to the target area, wherein the first light incident on the first reflective surface illuminates the target area with first intensity light; and a reflective baffle coupled to the second end of the coupling component such that the light source is between the first end of the coupling component and the refiective baffle, the reflective baffle including a second reflective surface facing the first reflective surface and an opaque surface facing the target area, the first light incident on the second refiective surface being redirected to the first reflective surface wherein the first light incident from the second reflective surface illuminates the target area with second intensity light and the second intensity light reinforces the first intensity light on the target area, and wherein the opaque surface of the reflective baffle configured to prevent an illumination spot outside the target area from being created by the lighting arrangement.

2. The lighting arrangement of claim 1, wherein the refiective baffle is coupled to the coupling component at a zero or substantially zero distance to the light source to enable peaks of luminous intensity associated with direct light and the first and second intensity light to coincide with one another .

3. The lighting arrangement of claim 2, wherein the reflective baffle is coupled to the coupling component at a predetermined angle, and said angle is selected such that the first light incident on the second reflective surface is redirected to the first reflective surface.

4. The lighting arrangement of claim 1, wherein the reflective baffle has a substantially bent shape.

5. The lighting arrangement of claim 1, wherein the curved reflector has a curvature having parabolic characteristics.

6. The lighting arrangement of claim 5, wherein the curved reflector has a circular paraboloid shape. 7. The lighting arrangement of claim 5, wherein the curved reflector has a partial cylindrical shape.

8. The lighting arrangement of claim 7, wherein a cross-sectional shape of the partial cylindrical shape is one of a semicircle or a quarter circle.

9. The lighting arrangement of claim 1, wherein the light source is adjacent the reflective baffle.

10. The lighting arrangement of claim 1, wherein the light source is at least one light emitting diode.

Description:
HIGH EFFICIENCY LIGHT FOCUSING ARRANGEMENT

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

There are many different ways that a lighting arrangement may provide illumination to an area. Those skilled in the art will understand that the positioning of a lighting node (e.g., a light bulb, a light emitting diode, etc.) and components used in the lighting arrangement may affect the manner and efficiency in which an intended lighting solution may be provided. For example, the lighting node may be entirely exposed to radiate light in all directions. In another example, when placed adjacent to one or more opaque surfaces that prevent light penetration, the light may radiate in an intended direction. In a particular scenario, a lighting node may be placed in a ceiling panel such that light radiating downward away from the panel illuminates a target area while light radiating upward toward the panel is stopped by the opaque surface. In another example, a lighting node may be partially or fully covered with a covering (e.g., a shade) in which light may radiate from the lighting node and through the covering at a decreased intensity. When the covering includes open areas, the light may radiate at a full intensity. When the covering includes opaque areas, the light may be prevented from being radiated.

In a particular manner of illumination, the lighting arrangement may be configured to illuminate a flat wall (or surface) or a textured wall (or surface) with radiated light being focused onto a target area of the wall or surface. In particular, illuminating a wall can be done in a wallwashing or wall grazing. An important distinction between these two core lighting details is the fixture's distance from the wall surface. In a wallwash detail, the luminaire is typically a minimum of 12 inches away from the wall/surface plane, allowing for an even application of light that gives the wall texture a flat appearance. In a wall grazing detail, the fixture is positioned very close to the wall/surface plane (no further away than 12 inches) in order to highlight and bring out the wall texture. The overall height of the wall informs the luminaire's distance from the wall. As herein described in relation to graze lighting arrangements, "near" is defined as no further away than 12 inches to the wall or surface of the target illumination area.

For example, the wall washing technique provides a wash lighting effect, and utilizes a wash luminaire lighting arrangement in which uniform lighting is provided on a wall from top to bottom using a smooth graded wash to hide any imperfections by eliminating any potential shadow (e.g., with a flat white wall). The lighting nodes of the wash luminaire lighting arrangement may be positioned at or above the ceiling toward a vertical wall and at a sufficient distance from the wall.

In another example, the wall grazing technique provides a graze lighting effect, and utilizes a graze luminaire lighting arrangement which is substantially similar to the wall washing lighting arrangement. Thus, the lighting nodes of the graze luminaire lighting arrangement may be positioned at or above the ceiling toward the vertical wall. However, the lighting nodes of the graze luminaire lighting arrangement may be positioned closer to the wall than the lighting nodes of the luminaire lighting arrangement. Accordingly, shadows may be emphasized (e.g., with a rock face wall).

The wash and graze luminaire lighting arrangements may utilize a set of components to provide the appropriate lighting conditions to achieve the above noted features. Specifically, the luminaire lighting arrangements may utilize a light focusing configuration to take advantage of light being generated by one or more lighting nodes in the luminaire lighting arrangement. As noted above, opaque components or surfaces that prevent light from passing therethrough may be an inefficient manner of utilizing the available light. Accordingly, the luminaire lighting arrangements may utilize direct light that is radiated from the lighting node as well as reflected light off a parabolic reflector. In this manner, the luminaire lighting arrangement may utilize light that would otherwise be unused (e.g., light radiating toward an opaque surface of the lighting arrangement). The luminaire lighting arrangement may also be capable of generating a higher intensity illumination since the reflected light reinforces the direct light. The luminaire lighting arrangements may also utilize a baffle to refine the manner in which the light is focused onto a target area.

Fig. 1 shows a lighting arrangement 100 with no baffle. Specifically, the lighting arrangement 100 may be a luminaire lighting arrangement. As noted above, the luminaire lighting arrangement may be used for wall washing or wall grazing as well as any other type of illumination purpose. A parabolic reflector 105 is used to focus the light radiating from a light emitting diode (LED) 115 positioned on a LED board 110 onto a target area. The LED 115 may represent any lighting node that may be used with the lighting arrangement 100. By placing the LED 115 within an interior of the parabolic reflector 105, the light of the LED 115 radiating away from the parabolic reflector 105 is aimed at the target area. The light of the LED 115 radiating toward the parabolic reflector 105 is also aimed at the target area as light reflects off the parabolic reflector 105 at an appropriate angle to reach the target area.

Although the lighting arrangement 100 may be capable of utilizing a significant amount of the light being generated by the LED 115, those skilled in the art will understand that the lighting arrangement 100 may have drawbacks. Specifically, the parabolic reflector 105 is configured to reflect all light that is incident upon the interior reflective surface of the parabolic reflector 105. However, light not incident on the parabolic reflector 105 may create a hot spot at an unintended area. When the unintended area is outside the target area, the hot spot may be visible to a user viewing a wall that the lighting arrangement 100 is configured to illuminate. With increased light not incident on the parabolic reflector 105, a plurality of hot spots may be created in a plurality of unintended areas outside the target area. When this occurs, a desired illumination effect may be lost entirely.

To prevent hot spots from being created at unintended areas outside a target area that the lighting arrangement is to illuminate, a baffle may be introduced to the lighting arrangement. Fig. 2 shows a lighting arrangement 200 with a black baffle 205. The lighting arrangement 200 may be substantially similar to the lighting arrangement 100. That is, the lighting arrangement 200 may also include the parabolic reflector 105, the LED board 110, and the LED 115. In addition, the black baffle 205 may be included in the lighting arrangement 200 to prevent unintended light from being reflected off the parabolic reflector 105 and create hot spots outside the target area. The black baffle 205 may be an opaque surface strategically positioned within the interior of the parabolic reflector 105. Through the positioning, the black baffle 205 may intercept unintended light that is not incident on the parabolic reflector 105 to eliminate hot spots.

Although the lighting arrangement 200 may be capable of utilizing a significant amount of the light being generated by the LED 115 and prevent unintended hot spots from being created, those skilled in the art will understand that the lighting arrangement 200 may also have drawbacks. Specifically, the introduction of the black baffle 205 also creates a less efficient use of the available light. With the black baffle 205 being opaque, the black baffle 205 essentially discards any light incident on the surface of the black baffle 205. By discarding this light, the addition of the black baffle 205 comes at the cost of efficacy. That is, the intensity and reinforcement of the direct light by the reflected light is decreased. When this occurs, a desired illumination effect (e.g., a desired intensity) may not be achieved. SUMMARY

The exemplary embodiments are directed to a lighting arrangement, comprising: a curved reflector including a first reflective surface facing a target area; a coupling component, for example an LED board or luminaire frame, extending from a first end coupled to the reflective surface and a second end; a light source generating a first light, the light source coupled to the coupling component and located within an interior space of the curved reflector, the first light incident on the first reflective surface being redirected to the target area; and a reflective baffle coupled to the coupling component such that the light source is between the first end of the coupling component and the reflective baffle, the reflective baffle including a second reflective surface facing the first reflective surface and an opaque surface facing the target area, the first light incident on the second reflective surface being redirected to the first reflective surface, the opaque surface of the reflective baffle configured to prevent an illumination spot outside the target area from being created by the lighting arrangement.

The exemplary embodiments are directed to a reflective baffle, comprising: a first reflective surface facing toward a second reflective surface of a curved reflector, the first reflective surface configured to redirect light incident thereon to the second reflective surface; and an opaque surface facing a target area, the opaque surface configured to prevent an illumination spot outside the target area from being created, wherein the reflective baffle is positioned at a predetermined distance away from the second reflective surface at a predetermined angle relative to the second reflective surface with a light source being between the reflective baffle and the curved reflector. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Fig. 1 shows a lighting arrangement with no baffle.

Fig. 2 shows a lighting arrangement with a black baffle.

Fig. 3 shows a lighting arrangement with a reflective baffle according to the exemplary embodiments.

Fig. 4 shows a first perspective view of a lighting arrangement with a reflective baffle according to the exemplary embodiments.

Fig. 5 shows a second perspective view of a lighting arrangement with a reflective baffle according to the exemplary embodiments. Fig. 6 shows a photometry polar plot from using a lighting arrangement with no baffle according to the exemplary embodiments.

Fig. 7 shows a photometry polar plot from using a lighting arrangement with a black baffle according to the exemplary embodiments.

Fig. 8 shows a photometry polar plot from using a lighting arrangement with a reflective baffle according to the exemplary embodiments.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The exemplary embodiments may be further understood with reference to the following description and the related appended drawings, wherein like elements are provided with the same reference numerals. The exemplary embodiments are related to a high efficiency light focusing arrangement. The exemplary embodiments may provide a lighting arrangement in which light is focused onto a target area by using direct light from a lighting node of the lighting arrangement and reflected light from the lighting node of the lighting arrangement that reinforces the direct light in a more efficient manner. Specifically, the lighting arrangement according to the exemplary embodiments also utilize a reflective baffle that improves efficacy by reinforcing the direct light with a greater amount of the reflected light from the lighting node. Accordingly, the lighting arrangement of the exemplary embodiments may provide the benefit associated with an illumination intensity of a lighting arrangement with no baffle as well as the benefit associated with a hot spot prevention of a lighting arrangement with a black baffle.

The exemplary embodiments are described with regard to a luminaire lighting arrangement such as used with wall washing or wall grazing. However, it is noted that the use of the luminaire lighting arrangement is only exemplary. For example, a relative positioning of the lighting arrangement according to the exemplary embodiments is not required to be at above a ceiling or strategically placed on or below a floor. The lighting arrangement according to the exemplary embodiments may be placed at any position relative to a target area that is to be illuminated. In this manner, the exemplary embodiments may be utilized or modified to be used with any lighting arrangement in which direct light is reinforced with reflected light. Furthermore, the description herein in which a parabolic reflector is used with a lighting node may represent any manner of generating a first reflected light that reinforces direct light from the lighting node.

It is also noted that the exemplary embodiments are described with direct light and reflected light. The direct light may be unobstructed light traveling from the light source of the lighting arrangement toward a target area within an intended main beam of the lighting arrangement. The reflected light may be light that does not travel directly toward the target area but is instead redirected through a reflection toward the intended main beam by a component of the lighting arrangement. This light that is reflected may originate from the light source of the lighting arrangement or from other sources not associated with the lighting arrangement. That is, the exemplary embodiments may be configured to reflect unwanted light to be reinforced into the main beam. However, the use of direct light and reflected light is only exemplary. Based on the configuration of the components of the lighting arrangement as described below, the lighting arrangement may substantially utilize reflected light. For example, a component may block any direct light that may be created but instead reflect all created light into the main beam. In this regard, the light originating from the light source of the lighting arrangement may correspond to the direct light noted above which forms the main beam while light originating from another light source unassociated with the lighting arrangement may correspond to the reflected light noted above which reinforces the main beam. Therefore, the direct light as described herein may represent any first light that is directed toward a target area while the reflected light as described herein may represent any second light that reinforces the first light in the target area.

Fig. 3 shows a lighting arrangement 300 with a reflective baffle 305 according to the exemplary embodiments. The lighting arrangement 300 may be a luminaire lighting arrangement including a parabolic reflector 105, a coupling component, shown as a light emitting diode (LED) board 110, and at least one LED 115. In improving an efficiency in which the lighting arrangement 300 operates, the reflective baffle 305 may also be incorporated. The components of the lighting arrangement 300 may be oriented such that light is emitted from the lighting arrangement 300 through focusing into a main beam.

Specifically, direct light may be emitted from the lighting arrangement 300 onto a target area and the direct light may be reinforced by reflected light where the reflected light may be created using the parabolic reflector 105, the reflective baffle 305, or a combination thereof. In particular, the reflective baffle 305 may recycle unwanted light into the main beam of the luminaire lighting arrangement 300.

The parabolic reflector 105 may be a curved component having an interior surface with a reflective surface. The reflective surface may be provided using a variety of different materials. For example, the parabolic reflector 105 may be made of an opaque material (e.g., plastic) with the interior lined with the reflective surface. In another example, the parabolic reflector 105 may be made of the reflective surface. The reflective surface may be a mirror or a metal-based compound.

The parabolic reflector 105 may be shaped in a variety of different manners with varying shapes. In a first example, the parabolic reflector 105 may be substantially cylindrical. That is, the parabolic reflector 105 may have a semicircular shape, a quarter circle shape, etc. Thus, the parabolic reflector 105 may extend from a first end to a second end where a cross-section has a parabolic shape or exhibits parabolic characteristics (e.g., only one half of a parabola). In a particular manner, the parabolic reflector 105 may extend from the first end to the second end with a uniform parabolic shape. In a second example, the parabolic reflector 105 may be substantially a circular paraboloid. Thus, the parabolic reflector 105 may be designed such that a parabolic shape is rotated about an axis of symmetry.

The parabolic reflector 105 may also be shaped with different parabolic characteristics. The parabolic characteristics may be selected to achieve a desired

illumination to a target area located at a distance from the lighting arrangement 300. The parabolic characteristics may also be selected to achieve a desired shape for the main beam of light. For example, the parabolic reflector 105 may utilize a parabolic shape having a first amplitude to achieve an illumination shape that is wide. In another example, the parabolic reflector 105 may utilize a parabolic shape having a second amplitude to achieve an illumination shape that is narrow. Thus, the first amplitude may be greater than the second amplitude.

It is noted that the parabolic reflector 105 shown in the lighting arrangement 300 is only exemplary. As noted above, the parabolic characteristics may be different than those illustrated. That is, the parabolic characteristics of the parabolic reflector 105 are not shown to scale in Fig. 3. Furthermore, the use of the reflector 105 being parabolic is also only exemplary. As those skilled in the art will understand based on the description herein, the exemplary embodiments may be used with any shape exhibited by the reflector 105 that allows for light to be focused onto a target area using direct light and reflected light.

The LED board 110 may be any component that enables the LED 115 to be positioned thereon and provide the necessary connections to power the LED 115. The LED board 110 may extend from a first end to a second end where the first end is coupled to the parabolic reflector 105. The LED board 110 may exhibit any shape. For example, the LED board 110 may have a substantially cylindrical shape where the circular faces are the first and second ends. In another example, the LED board 110 may have a substantially polygonal solid shape (e.g., triangular, rectangular, pentagonal, hexagonal, etc.) where the polygon faces are the first and second ends. As illustrated, the first end of the LED board 110 may be coupled, via a coupling connection, to a vertex of the parabolic reflector 105. However, it is noted that the central disposition of the LED board 110 relative to the parabolic reflector 105 is only exemplary and the LED board 110 may be coupled to the parabolic reflector 105 at any interior position. Thus, the parabolic reflector 105 may extend away from the coupling connection with the LED board 110 in a symmetric or asymmetric manner. As further shown in Figs. 4 and 5 below, the coupling connection may include the LED board 110 and/or portions of the luminaire frame 120 or assembly.

It is noted that the LED board 110 extending in a longitudinal manner from the first end to the second end as shown in the lighting arrangement 300 illustrated in Fig. 3 is only exemplary. According to another exemplary embodiment, the LED board 110 may extend in a lateral manner. For example, when the parabolic reflector 105 is a circular paraboloid, the LED board 110 may extend in the longitudinal manner. When the parabolic reflector 105 is a hemi- cylinder, the LED board 110 may extend in the lateral manner. The LED board 110 may also extend in different directions and does not necessarily have to be shaped in a board. However, as noted above, the LED board 110 may allow for the LED 115 to be placed at strategic positions relative to the parabolic characteristics of the parabolic reflector 105.

The LED 115 may represent any lighting node that may be used with the lighting arrangement 100. For example, the lighting node may be a LED, a light bulb, etc. However, for illustrative purposes, the lighting node is described as a LED. The LED 115 may be positioned at or adjacent the second end of the LED board 110. For example, the LED 115 may be placed near an end of a side of the LED board 110 that is perpendicular to a side of the second end. The LED 115 may be positioned such that light radiating from the LED 115 is not obstructed by the LED board 110. For example, the LED 115 may be placed on a surface of the LED board 110. In another example, the LED 115 may be placed within the LED board 110 but with a window or cutout in the LED board 110 for the light to radiate out from the LED 115 unblocked.

In one manner of positioning the LED 115 on the LED board 110, the placement of the LED 115 may be based on the parabolic characteristics of the parabolic reflector 105. For example, as one skilled in the art will understand, the parabola is a locus of points that is equidistant from a focus and a perpendicular distance to a directrix. Thus, by placing the LED 115 at or near the focus which is located in the interior of the parabolic reflector 105, an intended and known illumination may be achieved based on the reflection properties and angular incidents of the light. However, it is noted that the location of the LED 115 at the focus of the parabola associated with the parabolic reflector 105 is only exemplary and the LED 115 may be positioned at any point along the LED board 110 independent of a consideration related to the focus.

It is noted that the lighting arrangement 300 shown in Fig. 3 shows a single LED 115. However, the use of a single LED 115 is only exemplary. As shown in another implementation and as described below, the lighting arrangement 300 may include any number of LEDs 115. Based on the shape of the components of the lighting arrangement 300 including the parabolic reflector 105 and the LED board 110, the plurality of LEDs 115 may be placed in different manners. In a first example, when the LED board 110 extends in a longitudinal manner, the LEDs 115 may be around the LED board 110 (e.g., with a circular cross-sectional shaped LED board 110) or placed on one or more of the surfaces of the LED board 110 (e.g., with a polygonal cross-sectional shaped LED board 110). In a second example (and as shown in detail with regard to Fig. 5), when the LED board 110 extends in a lateral manner, the LEDs 115 may be placed along an exposed surface of the LED board 110. In a third example, the LEDs may be placed in a grid or with a pattern in a longitudinal direction, a lateral direction, or both directions.

According to the exemplary embodiments, the reflective baffle 305 may also be included in the lighting arrangement 300. The reflective baffle 305 may have a first side facing toward the parabolic reflector 105 and a second side facing away from the parabolic reflector 105. The first side of the reflective baffle 305 may have a reflective surface in a substantially similar manner as the interior surface of the parabolic reflector 105. The second side of the reflective baffle 305 may have an opaque surface in a substantially similar manner as the black baffle 205. For example, the reflective baffle 305 may be made of an opaque material and has a reflective surface coupled to the first side. In another example, the reflective baffle 305 may be made of a reflective material and has an opaque surface coupled to the second side. Thus, the opaque quality of the second side may provide a feature substantially similar to light incident on a corresponding side of the black baffle 205 where unintended hot spots outside the target area are prevented.

The reflective baffle 305 may be coupled to the second end of the LED board 110 such that the LED 115 is positioned between the coupling connection of the LED board 110 to the parabolic reflector 105 and the coupling connection of the LED board 110 to the reflective baffle 305. Although the reflective baffle 305 is shown at the second end of the LED board 110 in the lighting arrangement 300 illustrated in Fig. 3, the refiective baffie 305 may be positioned adjacent the second end of the LED board 110 in a substantially similar manner as the LED 115. However, the reflective baffle 305 may be positioned closer to the second end of the LED board 110 than the LED 115.

The refiective baffie 305 may be strategically positioned on the LED board

110 to achieve a desired illumination result. In a first example, the reflective baffie 305 may be positioned adjacent to the LED 115 with a zero or near zero distance therebetween (near zero distance being as substantially close as possible. As will be described in detail below, this zero-type positioning of the reflective baffle 305 relative to the LED 115 may enable peaks associated with the direct light and the reflected light to coincide with one another, thereby improving the reinforcement of the reflected light into the main beam. In a second example, the reflective baffle 305 may be positioned at away from the LED 1 15 with a nonzero distance therebeteween. This non-zero-type positioning of the reflective baffie 305 relative to the LED 115 may separate the peaks associated with the direct light and the refiected light. If the desired illumination effect is to utilize a less reinforced main beam in which the reflected light reinforces the direct light in a lesser degree, the non-zero-type positioning may be used.

The refiective baffle 305 may also be strategically angled on the LED board 110 relative to the LED 115. That is, the refiective baffle 305 may be coupled to the LED board 110 such that there is a first angle established therebetween. The first angle may be selected such that unwanted or unintended light is properly reflected toward the reflective surface of the parabolic reflector 105. Accordingly, the reflective baffle 305 may provide an improved efficiency for the reflected light to reinforce the direct light of the main beam, [[can you please provide a sample angle?]] It is also noted that the reflective baffle 305 being shown as a substantially straight component in the lighting arrangement 300 illustrated in

Fig. 3 is only exemplary. The reflective baffle 305 may also exhibit an angular or bent shape. That is, the reflective baffle 305 may have a second angle. The second angle may be selected to further contribute to the manner that unintended light is properly refiected toward the reflective surface of the parabolic reflector 105. For example, the second angle may enable the refiective baffle 305 to be coupled to the LED board 110 so that a desired first angle between the LED board 110 and the reflective baffle 305 is created.

The lighting arrangement 300 may include further components that may improve or refine the manner in which the illumination is created in a desired manner. In a first example, the lighting arrangement 300 may include a cover or shade to create the correct intensity of the illumination or decrease the intensity of a user looking at the lighting arrangement 300. In a second example, the lighting arrangement 300 may include a light optical diffuser that aids with blending any color separation. Those skilled in the art will understand that light may be reflected, refracted, bent, or otherwise directed in a way that an intended color or shade of the light may become present. For example, an intended white light may refract and create a rainbow pattern since white light includes all other colors of light. The light optical diffuser may also blend the main peak and secondary peak together. As noted above, the positioning and angle of the reflective baffle 305 may enable the peak of the reflected light to coincide with the peak of the direct light. The light optical diffuser may further aid in blending the peaks.

Fig. 4 shows a first perspective view 400 of the lighting arrangement 300 with the reflective baffle 305 according to the exemplary embodiments while Fig. 5 shows a second perspective view 500 of the lighting arrangement 300 with the reflective baffle 305 according to the exemplary embodiments. The perspective views 400, 500 of Figs. 4, 5, respectively, show an exemplary implementation of the lighting arrangement 300 described above with regard to Fig. 3. Specifically, the parabolic reflector 105 may extend in a cylindrical manner having a substantially quarter circle cross-sectional shape. A first end of the LED board 110 may be coupled to a center of the parabola over which the cross-sectional shape extends. Thus, the LED board 110 may extend from this coupling point or component to an interior of the parabola. The perspective view 500 shows when the lighting arrangement 300 may include a plurality of LEDs 115 positioned on the LED board 110 and aligned parallel to a length of the parabolic reflector 105. A second end of the LED board 110 may be coupled to the reflective baffle 305. As noted above, the reflective baffle 305 may include a first angle A defining an angular relation between the LED board 110 and the reflective baffle 305 and may also include a second angle B defining an angular shape of the reflective baffle 305. The reflective baffle 305 may be positioned at a distance D from the coupling connection of the LED board 110 on the parabolic reflector 105.

In view of the manner in which the components of the lighting arrangement 300 are positioned, shaped, and oriented, particularly the positioning and angling of the reflective baffle 305, the lighting arrangement 300 according to the exemplary embodiments provide a higher efficacy manner of reinforcing the main beam of direct light with reflected light. As shown in the perspective views 400, 500 of Figs. 4, 5, the LEDs 115 may radiate light outward toward the parabolic reflector 105. The light incident on the parabolic reflector 105 may be reflected toward a target area as a main beam of direct light. The reflective baffle 305 may also reflect light from the LEDs 115 toward the parabolic reflector 105. In this manner, the reflected light under this exemplary embodiment is reflected a first time off the reflective surface of the reflective baffle 305 and then off the reflective surface of the parabolic reflector 105. The reflected light is redirected into the main beam of direct light for reinforcement thereto. The reflective baffle 305 may also be configured to redirected unintended or unwanted light. If light from another source is traveling in a direction toward the parabolic reflector 105 or the reflective baffle 305, the position and angle of the reflective baffle 305 may be configured to also redirect this light toward the parabolic reflector 105 in a way that the main beam of direct light is further reinforced with reflected light. The parabolic reflector 105 may additionally be used to prevent hot spots of light from forming outside the intended target area that the lighting arrangement 300 is configured to illuminate.

Fig. 6 shows a photometry polar plot 600 based on using the lighting arrangement 100 with no baffle according to the exemplary embodiments. As described above, the lighting arrangement 100 including the parabolic reflector 105 but having no baffle reflects all light incident on the reflective surface of the parabolic reflector 105. Thus, the reflected light is uncontrolled and unintended/unwanted light being reflected may create a hot spot of light outside a target area which may be an undesirable byproduct. As illustrated in the photometry polar plot 600, there may be a first curve 605 of luminous intensity in a given direction and angle. The first curve 605 may represent the direct light. Since the parabolic reflector 105 is also used, there may be reflected light. Thus, the photometry polar plot 600 may include a second curve 610 of luminous intensity at a given direction and angle for the reflected light. The second curve 610 may illustrate how the reflected light may reinforce the direct light shown in the first curve 605. However, in view of the uncontrolled manner in which the reflected light is created, there may be uncontrolled portions of light or hot spots that are created. The photometry polar plot 600 includes an example of this type of hot spot as a curve 615. The curve 615 shows an unintended illumination which has a luminous intensity in a direction and angle that does not coincide with the target area (which the first curve 605 and the second curve 610 both exhibit).

Fig. 7 shows a photometry polar plot 700 based on using the lighting arrangement 200 with the black baffle 205 according to the exemplary embodiments. As described above, the lighting arrangement 200 including the parabolic reflector 105 but having the black baffle 205 reflects light incident on the reflective surface of the parabolic reflector 105 in a more controlled manner. Thus, unintended light is prevented from being reflected by the black baffle 205 to create hot spots of light outside the target area of the main beam. However, this feature comes at the price of efficacy as uncontrolled light is discarded to keep a candela distribution tight. As illustrated in the photometry polar plot 700, there may be a first curve 705 of luminous intensity in a given direction and angle. The first curve 705 may represent the direct light. In contrast to the first curve 605 of direct light for the lighting arrangement 100, those skilled in the art will clearly recognize the lower efficacy as the luminous intensity is lessened due to the use of the black baffle 205. Since the parabolic reflector 105 is also used, there may be reflected light. Thus, the photometry polar plot 700 may include a second curve 710 of luminous intensity at a given direction and angle for the reflected light. The second curve 710 may illustrate how the reflected light may reinforce the direct light shown in the first curve 605. In a similar manner as the first curve 705 relative to the first curve 605, in contrast to the second curve 705 of reflected light for the lighting arrangement 100, those skilled in the art will also clearly recognize the lower efficacy as the luminous intensity is lessened due to the use of the black baffle 205. However, the photometry polar plot 700 also illustrates the advantage of incorporating the black baffle 205 as no uncontrolled curves of luminous intensity is present. Nevertheless, the luminous intensity is decreased with a tighter distribution of light.

Fig. 8 shows a photometry polar plot 800 based on using the lighting arrangement 300 with the reflective baffle 305 according to the exemplary embodiments. As described above, the lighting arrangement 300 including the parabolic reflector 105 and having the reflective baffle 305 reflects light incident on the reflective surface of the parabolic reflector 105 in a more controlled manner while also preventing hot spots of light outside the target area from being created. The reflective surface of the reflective baffle 305 also improves the efficacy at which the LED 115 is used in illuminating the target area. As illustrated in the photometry polar plot 800, there may be a first curve 805 of luminous intensity in a given direction and angle. The first curve 805 may represent the direct light and is similar to the luminous intensity of the first curve 605 for the lighting arrangement 100 which is greater than the first curve 705 for the lighting arrangement 200. Those skilled in the art will recognize the increased efficacy as the luminous intensity using the reflective baffle 305 is substantially similar as if no baffle was included. Also, since the parabolic reflector 105 and the reflective baffle 305 are used, there may be reflected light. The reflected light will include first intensity light, which is light reflected by the parabolic reflector 105, and second intensity light, which is light reflected by the reflective baffle 305. Thus, the photometry polar plot 800 may include a second curve 810 of luminous intensity at a given direction and angle for the reflected light. The second curve 810 may illustrate how the reflected light may reinforce the direct light shown in the first curve 805. Much like the first curve 805 and similar to the luminous intensity of the second curve 610 for the lighting arrangement 100 which is greater than the second curve 710 for the lighting arrangement 200, those skilled in the art will recognize the increased efficacy as the luminous intensity is substantially similar as if no baffle was included. The photometry polar plot 800 also illustrates the advantage of incorporating the reflective baffle 305 as no uncontrolled curves of luminous intensity is present. Accordingly, the advantages of efficacy associated with using no baffle and the advantages of preventing unwanted hot spots from forming through use of a baffle are both realized with the reflective baffle according to the exemplary embodiments.

The exemplary embodiments provide a high efficient light focusing arrangement. The lighting arrangement includes a light source that radiates light. In a first manner, the light may be direct light that reaches a target area intended to be illuminated by the lighting arrangement. The lighting arrangement may also include a parabolic reflector in which any light incident on the reflective surface of the parabolic reflector is redirected toward the target area. The lighting arrangement may further include a reflective baffle in which any light incident on the reflective surface of the reflective baffle is redirected toward the parabolic reflector. The reflective baffle may be positioned and angled to provide this feature as well as preventing unwanted hot spots of light from forming outside the target area. Accordingly, the lighting arrangement according to the exemplary embodiments provide a high efficacy solution similar to a lighting arrangement with no baffle while still preventing unwanted hot spots similar to a lighting arrangement with a black baffle.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications may be made in the present disclosure, without departing from the spirit or the scope of the disclosure. Thus, it is intended that the present disclosure cover modifications and variations of this disclosure provided they come within the scope of the appended claims and their equivalent.