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Title:
HIGH-FREQUENCY CONENCTOR
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/057376
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Disclosed is a high-frequency connector (1), the high-frequency connector (1) having a first interface structure for coupling with a first high-frequency assembly (3) and a second interface structure for coupling with a second high-frequency assembly (2). The high-frequency connector (1) includes an inner contact member (12) and an outer contact member (11). The inner contact member (12) and the outer contact member (11) extend along a longitudinal axis A. The high-frequency connector (1) further includes a resilient insulation member (13). The resilient insulation member (13) is radially arranged between the inner contact member (12) and the outer contact member (11).

Inventors:
STEMPLINGER, Florian (Rothhausstrasse 13, 8280 Kreuzlingen, 8280, CH)
Application Number:
EP2018/070662
Publication Date:
March 28, 2019
Filing Date:
July 31, 2018
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
HUBER+SUHNER AG (Degersheimerstrasse 14, 9100 Herisau, 9100, CH)
International Classes:
H01R12/52; H01R12/91; H01R24/54; H01R103/00
Foreign References:
JP2011108445A2011-06-02
Other References:
None
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
RENTSCH PARTNER AG (Bellerivestrasse 203, Postfach, 8034 Zürich, 8034, CH)
Download PDF:
Claims:
High-frequency connector (1 ), the high-frequency connector (1 ) having a first interface structure for coupling with a first high-frequency assembly (3) and a second interface structure for coupling with a second high-frequency assembly (2), the high-frequency connector ( 1 ) including an inner contact member (12) and an outer contact member (11), the inner contact member (12) and the outer contact member ( 11 ) extending along a longitudinal axis A, the high-frequency connector ( 1 ) further including a resilient insulation member (13), the resilient insulation member (13) being radially arranged between the inner contact member ( 12) and the outer contact member (11).

High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to claim 1 , wherein a distance between the first interface structure and the second interface structure along the longitudinal axis A is variable.

High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to either of the preceding claims, wherein the resilient insulation member (13) axially biases the first interface structure and the second interface structure of the high-frequency connector away from each other.

High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to either of the preceding claims, wherein the outer contact member (11) includes a first outer contact element (11a) and a second outer contact element ( 11 b) in telescopic arrangement.

High-frequency connector (1 ) according to claim 4, wherein the outer contact member ( 11 ) includes a circumferential outer contact spring element (11c), the circumferential outer contact spring element (11c) being radially arranged between the first outer contact element (11a) and the second outer contact element (11b).

6. High-frequency-connector (1) according to either of claims 1 to 3, wherein, the outer contact member (11) includes a first outer contact element ( 11 a), a second outer contact element (11b) and an intermediate outer contact element ( 11d), wherein the first outer contact element (11a) and the second outer contact element (11b) are arranged at opposite axial ends of the intermediate outer contact element ( 11 d) in telescopic arrangement with the intermediate outer contact element ( 11 d).

7. High-frequency connector (1 ) according to claim 6, wherein at least one axial end portion of the intermediate outer contact element ( 11 d) is designed as first respectively second integral outer contact spring element (11e) and/or wherein at least one of the first and second outer contact element (11a, 11b) is designed as first respectively integral outer contact spring element ( 11 e).

8. High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to either of the preceding claims, wherein the inner contact member (12) includes a first inner contact element ( 12a) and a second inner contact element ( 12b) in telescopic arrangement.

9. High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to claim 8, wherein the inner contact member (12) includes a circumferential inner contact spring element (12c), the circumferential inner contact spring element ( 12c) being radially arranged between the first inner contact element ( 12a) and second inner contact element ( 12b).

10. High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to either of claim 8 or claim 9, wherein one of the first inner contact element (21 b) and the second inner contact element ( 12b) isa pin elementand the other of the first inner contact element (12a) and the second inner contact element ( 12b) is a sleeve element, wherein the sleeve element receives a portion of the pin element in a longitudinal bore or recess.

11. High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to either of claims 1 to 7, wherein the inner contact member (12) includes a first inner contact element (12a), a second inner contact element ( 12b) and an intermediate inner contact element ( 12d), wherein the first inner contact element ( 12a) and the second inner contact element (12b) are arranged at opposite axial ends of the intermediate inner contact element (12d) in a telescopic arrangement with the intermediate inner contact element ( 12d). 12. High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to claim 11 , wherein at least one axial end portion of the intermediate outer contact element ( 12d) is designed as first respectively second integral outer contact spring element ( 12e).

13. High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to either of the preceding claims, wherein the high-frequency connector (1 ) is designed for rigid coupling with the first high- frequency assembly and for floating coupling with the second high-frequency assembly (2).

14. High-frequency connector (1) according to claim 13, wherein the first interface structure includes an inner contact soldering surface ( 121 a) for soldering the inner contact member ( 12) to the first high-frequency assembly (3). 15. High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to either of claim 13 or claim 14, wherein the first interface structure includes an outer contact soldering surface (111a) for soldering the outer contact to the first high-frequency assembly (3).

16. High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to either of claim 13 or claim 14, wherein the first interface structure includes an outer contact pressing surface (116a) for press-fitting the outer contact member ( 11 ) in a bore or recess of the first high-frequency assembly (3).

17. High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to either of the preceding claims, wherein the inner contact member (12) axially projects beyond the outer contact member ( 11 ) at the first interface structure and /or the second interface structure.

18. High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to either of the preceding claims, wherein a portion of the inner contact member (12) is arranged in a central aperture (131) of the resilient insulation member (13).

19. High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to either of the preceding claims, wherein at least one end portion of the resilient insulation member has an inner contact engagement structure (133, 135) and an outer contact engagement structure (132, 134), the inner contact engagement structure (133, 135) and the outer contact engagement structure (132, 134) being radially spaced apart from each other, the inner contact engagement structure (133, 135) axially engaging the inner contact member (12) and the outer contact engagement structure (132, 134) axially engaging the outer contact member (11).

20. High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to either of the preceding claims, wherein, the resilient insulation member (13) is axially split in a first insulation element (13a) and a second insulation element (13b).

21. High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to either of the preceding claims, wherein the high-frequency connector includes a carrier member ( 14), the carrier member ( 14) being radially arranged between the inner contact member (12) and the outer contact member (11), the carrier member ( 14) axially supporting the resilient insulation member (13).

22. High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to either of the preceding claims, wherein the high frequency connector (1 ) is provided with positioning members for radially positioning and locking the high-frequency connector relative to a shielding cover (4).

23. High-frequency connector ( 1 ) according to either of the preceding claims, wherein the high-frequency connector (1) is provided with elastic shielding cover contact springs (118) for electrically contacting a shielding cover (18).

Description:
HIGH-FREQUENCY CONENCTOR

Technical field

The present invention lies in the field of high-frequency technology and the coupling of high-frequency assemblies. It is particularly related to high-freq uency connectors, such as board-to-board connectors.

Background, prior art

In high-frequency technology, board-to board connectors are widely used for connecting different high-frequency assemblies, such as Printed Circuit Boards ( PCBs) that carry high- frequency circuitry. In a typical arrangement, PCBs are arranged in a parallel manner with a distance in a typical range of 5 mm to 20 mm to each other, with a number of high- frequency galvanic connections being present between them.

Summary of invention

With increasing technical performance the required number of high-frequency connections increases in devices such as remote radio heads, for example to 64 or 1 28 connec- tions per PCB which is eight times more compared to 3G and 4G solutions. At the same time, increasing miniaturization demands are given, which require a large number of connectors to be arranged in a limited space respectively on a limited surface. Due to both the increasing number of connectors and the space constraints, tolerances and alignment deviations between the high-frequency assemblies become more and more critical. A plurality of desig ns is known for high-frequency connectors that may be used, for example, for board-to-board coupling. Such connectors, however, are too bulky to allow an arrangement of large number of for example 64 or 1 28 connectors under the typical space constraints, and /or are critical in manufacture. Furthermore such connections consist of at least two to three individual connector-elements, which have to be assembled by the customer, resulting in comparatively high costs. Further, they are difficult to plug on PCBs especially in case of a large amount of connections.

It is an overall objective of the present invention to improve the state of the art regarding the coupling of high-frequency assemblies. Favourably, the drawbacks of the state of the art are avoided fully or partly.

In a general way, the overall objective is achieved by the subject of the independent claims. Exemplary and favourable embodiments are further defined by the independent claims and the disclosure of the present document as a hole.

In an aspect, the overall objective is achieved by a high-frequency connector. The high- frequency connector has a first interface structure for coupling with a first high-frequency assembly and a second interface structure for coupling with a second high-frequency assembly. The high-frequency connector includes an inner contact member and an outer contact member. The inner contact member and the outer contact member extend along a longitudinal axis. The high-frequency connector further includes a resilient insulation member. The resilient insulation member is radially arranged between the inner contact member and the outer contact member. It is noted that the role of the first and second interface structure is generally exchangeable. In a typical application, the first and /or second high-frequency assembly are, at least in an area of the hig h-frequency connector, coplanar, and may, for example, include panels and/or Printed Circuit Board (s) . The longitudinal axis of the high-frequency connector may be traverse, e. g. perpendicular to the first and second high-frequency assembly and may bridge the distance between them.

The first interface structure includes a first outer contact interface and a first inner contact interface. The second interface structure includes a second outer contact interface and a second inner contact interface. The first outer contact interface and the second outer contact interface form part of the outer contact member, while the first inner contact interface and the second inner contact interface form part of the inner contact member. The first interface structure and the second interface structure are located at longitudinal opposite sides of the high-frequency connector. The first contact member and the second contact member respectively the individual elements thereof may be efficiently manufactured for example by deep drawing, stamp & bending or/and machining. The coupling of the high-frequency connector with the first high-frequency assembly and the second high-frequency assembly is a galvanic coupling. Via the outer contact member with the first outer contact interface and the second outer contact interface, galvanic coupling is established between a first outer counter contact interface of the first high-frequency assembly and a second outer counter contact interface of the second high-fre- quency assembly. Similarly, via the inner contact member with the first inner contact interface and the second inner contact interface, separate galvanic coupling is established between a first inner counter contact interface of the first high-frequency assembly and a second inner counter contact interface of the second high-frequency assembly. Typically, the outer contact member serves for establishing a ground ( GN D) contact. The resilient insulation member is radially arranged between the inner contact member and the outer contact member. Generally, the inner contact member and the outer contact member extend along the longitud inal axis in a parallel and coaxial manner. Generally, the high-frequency connector is a coaxial connector. Typically, both the inner contact member and the outer contact member have a generally rotationally symmetrical body around the longitudinal axis. In particular the shape of the outer conductor may be generally fully or partly cylindrical respectively tubular.

The resilient insulation member bridges a radial distance or gap between the inner contact member and the outer contact member and is in mechanical contact with both the inner contact member and the outer contact member, thereby positioning the inner contact member and the outer contact member relative to each other. The resilient insulation member has dielectric properties. By way of example, the resilient insulation member may be made from silicone rubber. The resilient insulation member may be integrally formed from a single piece of material, e. g. via injection moulding. Alternatively, however, it may be radially and/or axially split. For example, it may be radially split and be realized by an inner insulation member that directly contacts the inner contact member only and a coaxial outer insulation member that directly contacts the outer contact member only.

In some embodiments, the resilient insulation member is axially split in a first insulation element and a second insulation element. The first and second insulation elements are fa- vourably tubular and axially arranged after each other. The insulation member elements may have front surfaces that face and abut each other. In further embodiments, the resilient insulation member is axially split into more than two insulation member elements.

In accordance with the present invention , the resilient insulation member serves a multiple purpose. Besides positioning the inner contact member and the outer contact member in an electrically insulating manner, the resilient insulation member allows, due to its resilient proprieties, a compensation of positional and /or alignment tolerances between the counter contact interfaces of the first and second high-frequency assembly, while ensuring the galvanic coupling, as explained further below in more detail. The resilient insulation member does not necessarily extend over the whole length or axial extension of the high-frequency connector. In portions of the high-frequency connector along its longitudinal extension where the resilient insulation member is not present, the outer contact member and the inner contact member may be separated by other insulating elements, e. g. an insulating carrier member, and/or an air gap. Further, the resilient insu- lation member may in some embod iments radially overlap with either or both of the inner contact member and the outer contact member, respectively components thereof.

In some embodiments, a distance between the first interface structure and the second interface structure along the longitudinal axis is variable. Via a variable distance between the first interface structure and the second interface structure, a distance tolerance between the first and second high-frequency assembly may be compensated, while ensuring the galvanic coupling. In a typical design, the difference between the longest and shortest length of the high-frequency connector may be in an exemplary range of 0.5mm to 1 mm.

In some embodiments, the resilient insulation member axially biases the first interface structure and the second interface structure of the hig h-frequency connector away from each other. For such embodiment, the length of the high-frequency connector respectively its extension along the long itudinal axis is maximum in a non-assembled state where it is not exerted to external forces. In an assembled state, it is slightly compressed respectively shortened in longitudinal direction via the first and second high-frequency assembly in a spring-like manner. Such axial biasing is in particular favourable with respect to a floating coupling as explained further below. Additionally or alternatively to exerting an axial biasing force, the resilient insulation member may, in some embodiments, exert a radial biasing force between the inner contact member and the outer contact member.

In some particular embodiments, the biasing is separate for the inner contact member and the outer contact member. An outer axial biasing force may bias the first outer contact interface and the second outer contact interface away from each other. Similarly, a generally different inner biasing force may bias the first inner contact interface and the second inner contact interface away from each other. As explained further below, the biasing forces may serve as contact forces for establishing the galvanic coupling. In some embodiments, the outer contact member includes a first outer contact element and a second outer contact element in telescopic arrangement. Similarly in some embodiments, the inner contact member includes a first inner contact element and a second inner contact element in telescopic arrangement. Telescopic arrangements are a favourable way for realizing a variable distance between the first interface structure and the second inter- face structure along the longitudinal axis. In a an embodiment where the outer contact member is designed as telescopic arrangement and the inner contact member is designed as telescopic arrangement, the high-frequency connector accordingly comprises two coaxial telescopic arrangements. The first outer contact interface may be part of or arranged at an axial end portion of the first outer contact element and the second outer contact in- terface may be formed by or arranged at the opposite axial end portion of the second outer contact element. Similarly, the first inner contact interface may be part of or arranged at an axial end portion of the first inner contact element and the second inner contact interface may be part of or arranged at the opposite axial end portion of the second inner contact element. In further embodiments, the outer contact member includes a first outer contact element, a second outer contact element and an intermediate outer contact element. The intermediate outer contact element is favourably tubular. The first outer contact element and the second outer contact element are arranged at opposite axial ends of the intermediate outer contact element in telescopic arrangement with the intermediate outer contact element. The first and second outer contact element telescopically project beyond the intermediate outer contact element in axial direction. In some of these embodiments, the first and second outer contact elements are partly inserted into the intermediate outer contact element. Alternatively, axial end portions of the intermed iate outer contact elements are inserted into the first respectively second outer contact element. In further embodiments, one of first or second outer contact element is partly inserted into the intermediate outer contact element while the opposite axial end portion of the intermediate axial contact element is inserted into the other of the first and second outer contact element.

While a variety of manufacturing technologies may be used, the first and second outer contact element as well as the intermediate outer contact element may be favourably produced from sheet metal by way of punching and bending in an efficient way

Similarly, the inner contact member includes in some further embodiments a first inner contact element, a second inner contact element and an intermediate inner contact element. The intermediate inner contact element is favourably tubular. The first inner contact element and the second inner contact element are arranged at opposite axial ends of the intermediate inner contact in telescopic arrangement with the intermediate inner contact element. The first and second inner contact element telescopically project beyond the intermediate inner contact element in axial direction. Typically but not necessarily, the first and second inner contact element are partly inserted into the intermediate inner contact element. The first and second inner contact elements may be realized as pin elements and may comprise a stop, e. g. in form of a shoulder that limits the axial insertion into the intermediate inner contact element.

In some embodiments with a first outer contact element and a second outer contact ele- ment as explained before, the outer contact member includes a circumferential outer contact spring element. The circumferential outer contact spring element is radially arranged between the first outer contact element and the second outer contact element and exerts a radial force between the first outer contact element and the second outer contact element. Similarly in some embodiments with a first inner contact element and a second inner contact element, the inner contact member includes a circumferential inner contact spring element. The circumferential inner contact spring element is radially arranged between the first inner contact element and second inner contact element and exerts a radial force between the first inner contact element and the second inner contact element.

A circumferential outer contact spring element respectively a circumferential inner contact spring element are conductive and may be formed as dedicated elements form a material of favourable electric and mechanical properties, such as, e. g. , a copper-beryllium alloy or phosphorus bronze. I n alternative embod iments, a circumferential inner contact spring element and/or a circumferential outer contact spring element may be integrally formed with the inner and /or outer contact, in particular its first or second contact element as ex- plained before. In a telescopic arrangement, a spring element serves for ensuring good galvanic coupling between the first and second outer contact element respectively first and second inner contact element.

In some embodiments with an intermediate outer contact element, at least one axial end portion of the intermediate outer contact element is designed as first respectively second integral outer contact spring element. Typically in such embodiment, one axial end portion of the intermediate outer contact element is realized as first integral outer contact spring element and the opposite axial end portion of the intermediate outer contact element is designed as second integral outer contact spring element. The integral outer contact spring elements may for example be realized by providing axial slits in the axial end portions of the intermediate outer contact element and favourably narrowing the cross section in end portions of the of the intermediate contact element e. g. in a constriction-like manner, thereby providing radially elastic tongues. Alternatively, the first and /or second outer contact element are designed as first and/or second integral outer contact spring elements. This may be realized by providing axial slits in the first and second outer contact elements and favourably widening the cross section of the first and second outer contact element e. g. in a bulge-like manner, thereby providing radially elastic tongues. In further variants, an integral first or second outer contact spring element is provided as part of the intermediate outer contact element at one end , while an integral first or second outer contact spring element is provided as part of the first respectively second outer contact element at the opposite axial end. In further variants, an integral outer spring element is provided at one end while a separate outer contact spring element is provided at the other end. In a further variant first respectively second integral outer contact spring elements may be provided as radially elastic tongues on the circumferential surface of the of the generally tubular inter- mediate outer contact element.

In further variants with a first outer contact element, a second outer contact element and an intermediate outer contact element, first respectively second integral outer contact spring elements are provided as part of the first respectively second outer contact element by way of radial spring elements that radially project from a generally tubular surface of a contact element and are arranged around the generally cylindrical circumferential surface of the contact element. The spring elements may be realized for example by tongues. Such design is particularly favourable if the first respectively contact element is formed from punched and bent sheet metal where the spring elements may be favourably formed in an integral way.

In some embodiments with and an intermediate inner contact element, at least one axial end portion of the intermediate inner contact element is designed as first respectively second integral inner contact spring element. Typically in such embodiment, one axial end portion of the intermediate inner contact element is realized as first integral inner contact spring element and the opposite axial end portion of the intermediate inner contact element is designed as second integral inner contact spring element. In some embodiments with an intermediate inner contact element, the intermediate inner contact element is axially fixed in the resilient insulation member. A positioning member, e. g. a circumferential ridge, may be provided at the intermediate inner contact element, thereby locally enlarging its diameter. The circumferential ridge may engage a corresponding circumferential notch on the inside of the resilient insulation member as positioning counter member. In embodiments with an axially split resilient insulation member, the notch may be arranged in an interface reg ion of the sections. In other embodiments, however, the intermediate inner contact element is not directly fixed in the resilient insulation member but only connected to and held at is axial ends by the first and second inner contact element. In some embodiments with a first inner contact element and a second inner contact element, one of the first inner contact element and the second inner contact element is a pin element. The other of the first inner contact element and the second inner contact element is a sleeve element. The sleeve element receives a portion of the pin element in a longitudinal bore or recess. Between the sleeve element and the pin element, a circumferential inner contact spring element may be arranged as explained before.

A stop may be present at the pin element that engages the circumferential inner spring- element in a configuration of maximum length of the high-frequency connector, thereby limiting the axial displacement between the pin element and the sleeve element. The stop may for example be realized by a circumferential shoulder or rim that radially extends from a body portion of the pin element. Similarly for a first and second outer contact element in telescopic arrangement, a stop may be present at one of the first and second outer contact element that engages the circumferential outer spring element in a configuration of maximum length. The stop may for example be realized by a circumferential shoulder or rim that radially extends from a body portion of the first or second outer contact element and projects towards the other of the first and second outer contact element. That is, for the rim or shoulder projecting from the outer of the first and second outer contact element, the rim or shoulder may be inward-directed. For the rim or shoulder projecting from the inner of the first and second outer contact element, the rim or shoulder may be outwards- directed.

In some embod iments, the high-frequency connector is designed for rigid coupling with the first high-frequency assembly and for floating coupling with the second high-fre- quency assembly. Both the rig id coupling and the floating coupling are galvanic couplings.

Via a floating coupling with second high-frequency assembly, a lateral displacement (traverse to the longitudinal axis of the high-frequency connector) between the counter contact interfaces of the first and second high-frequency assembly may be compensated. For a floating coupling, the inner contact member and the outer contact member, respectively the second inner contact interface and the second outer contact interface are axially pressed against the second high-frequency assembly respectively the associated counter contact interfaces, but are displaceable traverse to the longitudinal axis.

In an embodiment with an outer axial biasing force and an inner axial biasing force as ex- plained before, the outer axial biasing force and the inner axial biasing force serve as contact forces. The outer axial biasing force presses the outer contact member with the second outer contact interface against the second high-frequency assembly respectively the second outer counter contact interface, and the inner axial biasing force presses the inner contact member with the second inner contact interface against the second high-fre- quency assembly respectively the second inner counter contact interface. Thereby galvanic coupling with the counter contact interfaces of the second high-frequency assembly is established. The biasing forces should be sufficiently large to ensure a reliable electrical contact, but should otherwise be small in order to limit the force that acts onto the first and second high-frequency assembly. This aspect is particularly critical in arrangements with a plurality of hig h-frequency connectors in a small area. The biasing forces may be in an exemplary range of 0.2 N to 2 N or a sub-range thereof, for example 0.3 N to 1 N.

For establishing the floating coupling, the outer contact member may have a circumferential floating contact edge that serves as second outer contact interface.

In the context of a floating arrangement, the inner contact member may have second f loat- ing contact surface that serves as second inner contact interface, thereby enabling the compensation of positional tolerances between the first and second high-frequency component and /or their counter contact interfaces. In some embodiments, the first interface structure includes an inner contact soldering surface for soldering the inner contact member to the first high-frequency assembly. In an assembled configuration, the inner contact soldering surface is soldered to the corresponding first counter contact interface, such as a soldering pad, of the first high-frequency as- sembly. Via the soldering, both a galvanic contact and a rigid mechanical coupling are established. For this type of embodiment, the inner contact soldering surface forms the first inner contact interface and the counter contact interface forms the first inner counter contact interface.

In some embodiments, the first interface structure includes a first outer contact soldering surface for soldering the outer contact member to the first high-frequency assembly. Similarly to a soldering of the inner contact, a soldering of the outer contact member provides for a both galvanic contact and rigid mechanical coupling. For this type of embodiment, the first outer contact soldering surface forms the first outer contact interface.

In some embodiments that involve soldering, both the inner contact member and the outer contact member are coupled to the first high-frequency assembly by way of soldering . Alternatively, however, only one of the first inner contact member and the outer contact member may be coupled to the first hig h-frequency assembly by way of soldering, while the other is pressed against the associated counter contact interface of the first high-frequency assembly. In some embodiments, the first interface structure includes an outer contact pressing surface for press-fitting the outer contact in a bore or recess of the first high-frequency assembly. The outer contact pressing surface may be structured, for example knurled . For this type of embodiment, the outer contact pressing surface forms the first outer contact interface. Press-fitting the outer contact is an alternative to soldering for establishing a rigid coupling . Press-fitting is in particular suited if the first high-frequency assembly is a panel, while soldering is particularly suited for a PCB.

In further embodiments, the high-frequency connector is designed for floating coupling with both the first high-frequency assembly and the second high-frequency assembly. In such embodiment, the high-frequency connector may for example be positioned and hold in place via a further element that is arranged between the first high-frequency assembly and the second high-frequency assembly. By way of example, such further element may be a plate or panel that is arranged between the first high frequency-component and the second high-frequency assembly or panel that receives the high-frequency connector in a through-hole via press-fit.

In some embodiments, the high frequency connector is designed to positioned and hold by a shielding cover as further element between the first and second high frequency assembly. The shielding cover is a metallic or metallized element that has one dimension that substantially corresponds to the axial extension of the high-frequency connector and has a through-hole for receiving the high-freq uency connector. The through hole may be generally cylindrical, correspond ing to the outer shape if the high frequency connector with one or more axial notches (channels). The high frequency connector may be provided with positioning members, e.g. radially projecting tabs, splines or tongues that are arranged on the circumferential surface of the high-frequency connector and engage the correspond- ing axial notches, thereby radially positioning and locking the high-frequency connector relative to the shielding cover. Further, the high-frequency connector may have radially elastic shielding cover contact springs for electrically contacting the shielding cover. Shielding cover contact springs may be arranged on the circumferential surface of the high-frequency connector and electrically contact the inner surface of the receiving throug h-hole when inserting the high-frequency connector into the receiving through-hole. Positioning members and shielding cover contact springs may be arranged and favourably be an integral part of the outer member, e. g. an intermediate outer contact element.

A shielding cover may be designed to be clamped together with the high-frequency connector between the first and second high-frequency component. For this purpose, the shielding cover may include threaded or non-threaded fixing holes, for example through- holes or blind holes around and parallel to the through-hole for the high-frequency connector.

In some embod iments, the inner contact member axially projects beyond the outer contact member at the first interface structure and /or the second interface structure. Such type of embodiment is particularly favourable if the outer contact member is designed for press- fitting as explained before. The portion of the inner contact member that axially projects beyond the outer contact member is typically electrically contacted by way of soldering.

In some embod iments, a portion of the inner contact member is arranged in a central aperture of the resilient insulation member. Via the central aperture, the inner contact mem- ber is positioned and hold. The central aperture typically extends coaxial with the longitudinal axis.

In some embodiments, at least one an end portion of the resilient insulation member has an inner contact engagement structure and an outer contact engagement structure. The inner contact engagement structure and the outer contact engagement structure may be radially spaced apart from each other. The inner contact engagement structure axially engages the inner contact member and the outer contact engagement structure axially engages the outer contact member. Further, the inner contact engagement structure and the outer contact engagement structure may be axially spaced apart from each other. In particular, the inner contact engagement structure may axially project beyond the outer contact engagement structure.

The inner contact engagement structure and the outer contact engagement structure may each be realized by a generally ring-shaped circumferential surface that may be coaxial around the longitudinal axis. The inner contact engagement structure may be arranged concentrically around a central aperture as explained before. Between the inner contact engagement structure and the outer contact engagement structure may optionally be separated from each other by a circumferential groove or recess, or a number of recesses. The axial engagement of the inner contact engagement structure with the inner contact member and of the outer contact member engagement structure with the outer contact member is in particular a pushing engagement and a pushing force is exerted by each of the engagement structures onto the associated contact member. The pushing force is a biasing force that tends to lengthen the high-frequency connector respectively bias the first interface structure and the second interface structure away from each other as explained before. For engaging the inner contact member engagement structure, the inner contact member may have an inner contact engagement counter structure and the outer contact member may have an outer contact member engagement counter structure. The inner contact engagement counter structure may for example be realized by a circumferential outer rim or shoulder. Similarly, the outer contact engagement counter structure may for example be realized by a circumferential inner rim or shoulder.

Generally, the resilient insulation member has two end portions that are axially spaced apart from each other and at the axially opposite ends of the resilient insulation member. In an embodiment, each of the end portions has an inner contact engagement structure and an outer contact engagement structure as explained before. For an embodiment where the inner contact member comprises a first inner contact element and a second inner contact element in telescopic arrangement, one of the inner contact engagement structures axially engages the first inner contact element and the other inner contact en- gagement structure axially engages the second inner contact element. In this way, the inner contact member is axially biased towards its maximum length.

Similarly, for an embodiment where the outer contact member comprises a first outer contact element and a second outer contact element in telescopic arrangement, one of the outer contact engagement structures axially engages the first outer contact element and the other outer contact engagement structure axially engages the second outer contact element. In this way, the outer contact member is axially biased towards its maximum length.

In some embodiments, the resilient insulation member has a dedicated inner contact engagement structure and an outer contact engagement structure at both of axial end por- tions, with the engagement structures pointing away from each other respectively outwards, towards the first and second interface structure, respectively.

In alternative embodiments, the resilient insulation member has a dedicated inner contact engagement structure and outer contact engagement structure at one if its end only, while the other end may have a flat bottom, traverse to the axial direction. With the flat bottom surface, the resilient insulation member may abut and be supported by a carrier member as explained in the following . In some embodiments, the hig h-frequency connector includes a carrier member. The carrier member is radially arranged between the inner contact and the outer contact. The carrier member axially supports the resilient insulation member. The carrier member may, e. g. , be disk-shaped and is made of insulating material. In contrast to the resilient insulation member, the carrier member is rigid. In a peripheral portion, the carrier member may abut and be supported by an inwards-directed shoulder or rim of the outer contact member. In a telescopic arrangement with a first outer contact element and a second outer contact element as explained before, the carrier member may rest on an inwards-directed shoulder or rim of the outer of the first and second outer contact element. In an embodiment, the carrier member has a central trough-bore through which the inner contact member passes. The inner contact member may especially have an outer rim or shoulder which rests on the carrier member. The inner contact member respectively a first or second inner contact element thereof may be secured in the central bore of the carrier member via a press-fit.

In some embod iments with a first and second outer contact element, the first and second outer contact element are of identical design. Similarly in some embodiments with a first and second inner contact element, the first and second inner contact element are of identical desig n.

According to a further aspect, the overall objective is achieved by a high-frequency assembly. The hig h-frequency assembly includes a first high-freq uency assembly, a second high- frequency assembly. The high-frequency assembly further includes at least one high frequency connector according to any embodiment in accordance with the present disclosure. The at least one high-freq uency connector extends between and couples the first high- frequency assembly and the second high-frequency assembly. In a typical embodiment, a plurality of high-frequency connectors is present. Brief description of figures

Fig. 1 shows an embod iment of a high-frequency connector and related elements in a perspective partial sectional view;

Fig. 2 shows the embodiment of Fig. 1 in a sectional view;

Fig. 3 shows the embodiment of Fig. 1 in an exploded view;

Fig. 4 shows a further embodiment of a high-frequency connector and related elements in a sectional view;

Fig. 5 shows a further embodiment of a high-frequency connector and related elements in a sectional view;

Fig. 6 shows a further embodiment of a high-frequency connector and related elements in a sectional view;

Fig. 7 shows a further embodiment of a high-frequency connector in a perspective view;

Fig. 8 shows the high-frequency-connector of Fig. 7 in a front view;

Fig. 9 shows the high-frequency-connector of Fig. 7 in a sectional view;

Fig. 1 0 shows a further embodiment of a high-frequency connector in a perspective view;

Fig. 1 1 shows the high-frequency-connector of Fig. 1 0 in a front view;

Fig. 1 2 shows the high-frequency-connector of Fig. 1 0 in a sectional view; Fig. 1 3 shows a further embodiment of a high-frequency connector in a perspective and partly disassembled view;

Fig. 1 4 shows the high-frequency-connector of Fig. 1 3 in a front view;

Fig. Ί 5 shows the high-frequency-connector of Fig. 1 3 in a sectional view;

Fig. 1 6 shows a further embodiment of a high-frequency connector in a perspective view;

Fig. 1 7 shows the high-frequency-connector of Fig. 1 6 in a front view;

Fig. 1 8 shows the high-frequency-connector of Fig. 1 6 in a sectional view;

Fig. 1 9 shows a further embodiment of a high-frequency connector in a perspective view;

Fig. 20 shows the high-frequency-connector of Fig. 1 9 in a front view;

Fig. 21 shows the high-frequency-connector of Fig. 1 9 in a sectional view;

Fig. 22 shows the high-frequency connector of Fig. 1 9 and related elements in a perspec ¬ tive and partly sectional view during assembly;

Fig. 23 shows a view of a shielding cover;

Fig. 24 shows the high-frequency connector of Fig. 1 9 and related elements in a a sec ¬ tional view during assembly;

Fig. 25 shows the high-freq uency connector of Fig. 1 9 and related elements in a sectional view in an assembled state. Fig. 26 shows a further embodiment of a high-frequency connector in a perspective view; Fig. 27 shows the high-frequency-connector of Fig. 26 in a front view; Fig. 28 shows the high-frequency-connector of Fig. 26 in a sectional view;

Exemplary embodiments In the following description of exemplary embodiments, directional terms such as "top", "bottom", "left", "right", are referred to with respect to the viewing directions according to the drawings and are only given to improve the reader's understanding. They do not refer to any particular directions or orientations in use. Further for illustrative purposes, the longitudinal axis A of the high-frequency connector extends between top and bottom. A di- rection traverse to the longitudinal axis is referred to as "lateral". Further for illustrative purposes, the first high-frequency assembly is assumed to be arranged at the bottom of the high-frequency connector, and the second high-frequency assembly is assumed to be arranged at the top of the high-frequency connector, "inwards" and "outwards" refer to radial directions towards respectively away from the longitudinal axis. In the following, reference is first made to Fig. 1 - 3 , showing an exemplary embodiment of a high-frequency connector 1 in a perspective partial sectional view ( Fig. 1 ) , in a longitudinal sectional view ( Fig. 2 ), and in an exploded sectional view ( Fig. 3 ) . Along with the high-frequency connector 1 , a first hig h-frequency assembly 3 and a second high-frequency assembly 2 are shown in some of the Figures. In this example, the first high-fre- quency assembly 3 includes a PCB 3 1 and the second high-frequency assembly 2 includes a PCB 2 1 . The outer contact member 1 1 comprises a first outer contact element 1 1 a and a second outer contact element 1 1 b in telescopic arrangement. Both the first outer contact element 1 1 a and the second outer contact element 1 1 b are generally tubular.

Similarly, the inner contact member 1 2 comprises a first inner contact element 1 2a and a second inner contact element 1 2b in telescopic arrangement. The first inner contact element 1 2a is exemplarily realized as a cylindrical sleeve element that is open at the top side (towards the second high-frequency assembly 2 ) and has an exemplarily frustum conical base at the down side (towards the first high-frequency assembly 3 ), resulting in an overall upside-down mushroom shape of the first inner contact element 1 2a. The second inner contact element 1 2b is exemplarily realized as pin-element. The second inner contact element 1 2 b has body 1 22b with a generally cylindrical top portion and a generally cylindrical bottom portion of smaller diameter, with a transition chamfer in between. At its top (towards the second high-frequency assembly 2 ), the second inner contact element 1 2b carries a frustum conical head of enlarged diameter, resulting in an overall mushroom-shaped design of the second inner contact element 1 2b. Further at its opposing bottom end, the second inner contact element 1 2b has a thickening that serves as stop, as explained below.

At its bottom side (towards the first high-freq uency assembly 3 ), the first outer contact element 1 1 a has a flat outer soldering surface 1 1 1 a traverse to the longitudinal axis A, the outer soldering surface 1 1 1 a forming the first outer contact interface. Similarly, the first inner contact element 1 2a has a flat inner soldering surface 1 21 a traverse to the longitudinal axis A, the inner soldering surface 1 21 a forming the first inner contact interface. In combination, the soldering surfaces 1 1 1 a, 1 2 1 a form the first interface structure for rigid coupling with the first high-frequency assembly 3. The soldering surfaces 1 1 1 a, 1 21 a are soldered to the PCB 3 1 via solder elements 35, 36. The metal surfaces respectively contact pads ( not referenced ) on the PCB 3 1 to which the outer contact member 1 2 is connected via the solder elements 35, 35 form a first outer counter contact interface and a first inner counter contact interface, respectively.

At the top side (towards the second high-frequency assembly 2 ) , the second outer contact element 1 1 b has a circumferential floating contact edge 1 1 1 b traverse to the longitudinal axis A, forming the second outer contact interface. Similarly, the head portion of the second inner contact element 1 2b has a floating contact surface 1 21 b as second inner contact interface. I n combination, the circumferential floating contact edge 1 1 1 b and the floating contact surface 1 2 1 b form the second interface structure for floating coupling with the second high-frequency assembly 2. The PCB 21 comprises a metal surface 25 as second outer counter contact interface and a metal surface or pad 26 as second inner counter contact interface. The circumferential floating contact edge 1 1 1 galvanic contacts the metal surface respectively contact pad 25 in a floating manner by way of an outer contact force respectively outer axial biasing force as explained further below. Similarly, the floating contact surface 1 21 b galvanic contacts the metal surface respectively contact pad 26 by way of a an inner force respectively inner axial biasing force.

Radially between the first outer contact element 1 1 a and the second outer contact element 1 1 b, a circumferential outer spring element 1 1 c is arranged. The circumferential outer spring element 1 1 c is somewhat conical and has a number of axial slots that are arranged around its circumference. At its top portion, the circumferential outer spring element 1 1 c is hold and fixed inside the first outer contact element 1 1 a by way of a press fit. Radially inwards, the circumferential outer spring element 1 1 c circumferentially contacts the second outer contact element 1 1 b in an elastic manner. The contact between the circumferential outer spring element 1 1 c and the second outer contact element 1 1 b allows an axial relative displacement, while maintaining the galvanic coupling. Radially between the first inner contact element 1 2a and the second inner contact element 1 2b a circumferential inner spring element 1 2c is arranged. The circumferential inner- spring element 1 2c is conical and has a number of axial slots that are arranged around its circumference. At its top portion, the circumferential inner spring element 1 2c is hold and fixed inside the first inner contact element 1 2a by way of a press fit. Rad ially inwards, the circumferential inner spring element 1 2c circumferentially contacts the second inner contact element 1 2 b in an elastic manner. The contact between the circumferential inner spring element 1 2c and the second inner contact element 1 2b allows an axial relative displacement, while maintaining the galvanic coupling . At its bottom end, the second outer contact element 1 1 b has a outwards-directed circumferential rim 1 1 3 b. Similarly, the transition between the body 1 22b and the thickening at the bottom end of the second inner contact element 1 2b forms an outwards-directed shoulder 1 24b. The circumferential rim 1 1 3 b serves as stop that abuts, in a most extended position of the telescopic outer contact member 1 1 , the bottom front of the circumferential outer spring element 1 1 c. Similarly, the shoulder 1 24b serves as stop that abuts, in a most extended position of the telescopic inner contact member 1 2 , the bottom front of the circumferential inner spring element 1 2c. Via the arrangement of stops, an axial separation between the first outer contact element 1 1 a and the second outer contact element 1 1 b, and an axial separation between first inner contact element 1 2a and the second inner con- tact element 1 2b is prevented.

Radially between the outer contact member 1 1 and the inner contact member 1 2, resilient insulation member 1 3 is arranged in coaxial alignment with the outer contact member 1 1 and the inner contact member 1 2. In this example, the resilient insulation member has an overall tubular shape with a throug h-going central bore or aperture 1 3 1 for the inner con- tact member. At both of its end portions, the resilient insulation member 1 3 carries an inner contact engagement structure and an outer contact engagement structure. At the top side (directed towards the second high-frequency assembly 2 ) , the inner contact engagement structure is formed by a ring-shaped circumferential surface 1 33. Further at the top side, the outer contact engagement structure is formed by a ring-shaped circumferential surface 1 32. The ring-shaped circumferential surfaces 1 32, 1 33 are concentrically and axially spaced apart. At the bottom side, (directed towards the first high-frequency assembly 3 ), an inner contact engagement structure is formed by a ring-shaped circumferential surface 1 35 and an outer contact engagement structure is formed by a ring-shaped circumferential surface 1 34.

At the top side, the ring-shaped circumferential surface 1 32 contacts and abuts an inwards directed shoulder 1 1 2b of the second outer contact element 1 1 b, the inwards-directed shoulder 1 1 2b forming an outer contact engagement counter structure. Further at the top side, the ring-shaped circumferential surface 1 33 contacts and abuts an outwards-di- rected shoulder 1 23 b of the second inner contact element 1 2b, the outwards-directed shoulder 1 1 2b forming an inner contact engagement counter structure.

In an generally analogue way at the bottom side, the ring-shaped circumferential surface 1 34 contacts and abuts an inwards directed shoulder 1 1 4a of the first outer contact element 1 1 a, the inwards-directed shoulder 1 1 4a forming an outer contact engagement counter structure. Further at the bottom side, the ring-shaped circumferential surface 1 35 contacts and abuts an outwards-directed shoulder 1 25a of the first inner contact element 1 2a, the outwards-directed shoulder 1 25a forming an inner contact engagement counter structure. The dimensioning is such that the resilient insulation member 1 3 is axially somewhat compressed. An outer axial biasing force tends to lengthen the outer telescopic arrangement respectively push the first outer contact element 1 1 a (with the outer circumferential spring element 1 1 c) and the second outer contact element 1 1 b away from each other. An inner axial biasing force tends to lengthen the inner telescopic arrangement respectively push the first inner contact element 1 2a (with the inner circumferential spring element 1 2c) and the second inner contact element 1 2b away from each other. Both telescopic arrangements are accordingly biased towards their maximum length and are shortened via the coupling with the first high-freq uency assembly 3 and the second high-frequency assem- bly 2 against the biasing forces. The outer axial biasing force serves as contact force that presses the circumferential floating contact edge 1 1 2 b against the metal surface respectively contact pad 25. Similarly, the inner axial biasing force serves as contact force that independently presses the floating contact surface 1 21 b against the metal surface respectively contact pad 26. Favourably, the biasing of the two telescopic arrangements is f unc- tionally substantially independent from each other. Both telescopic arrangements can accordingly be lengthened and shortened separately from each other.

In a design variant, the resilient insulation member 1 3 may be radially split in an inner insulation member and an outer insulation member, with the inner insulation member carrying the ring-shaped circumferential surface 1 33 and the ring-shaped circumferential sur- face 1 35 of the inner contact engagement structure, while the insulation member carries the ring-shaped circumferential surface 1 32 and the ring shaped circumferential surface 1 34 of the outer contact engagement structure.

In the following, reference is additionally made to Fig. 4, showing a further embodiment in a cross-sectional view. Since, like in further following embodiments, the design of this embodiment is in a number of aspects similar to the before-discussed embodiment of Fig.

I - Fig. - 3 , only the differences are discussed.

In the embodiment of Fig. 4, the high-frequency connector 1 comprises an additional carrier member 1 4 in form of an insulating circular disc. The carrier member 1 4 rest on an inwards-directed shoulder or rim 1 1 5a of the bottom end of the first outer contact element

I I a. Further, the resilient insulation member 1 3 has a flat bottom surface 1 36 instead of the ring-shaped circumferential surfaces 1 34, 1 35. The flat bottom surface 1 36 rests on a top surface ( not referenced ) of the carrier member 1 4. Via the carrier member 1 4, the biasing forces are accordingly transferred to the first outer contact member 1 1 a. Further in this embod iment, the first inner carrier contact element 1 2a is hold and axially supported in a central through-bore of the carrier member 1 4 via an outwards directed shoulder of the first inner contact element 1 2a and a press-fit.

In the exemplary scenario as described with reference to Fig. 1 - 4, the high-frequency connector is soldered to the one of the high-frequency assembly, exemplarily high-fre- quency assembly 3. Alternatively however, the high-frequency connector 1 may be positioned and hold by a separate holding element. Such holding element may be a shielding cover as explained above and further below in the context of further embodiments. However, the holding element may also be designed generally similar to a shielding cover as explained, but may be non-conductive. In the following, reference is additionally made to Fig. 5, showing a further embodiment in a cross sectional view. The embodiment shown in Fig. 5 is different from the before- discussed embodiments in so far as the rig id mechanical coupling and the galvanic coupling of the outer contact member 1 1 respectively the first outer contact element 1 1 a with the first high-frequency assembly 3 is not achieved via soldering. In this embodiment, the first high-frequency assembly 3 comprises a panel 32, e.g. a die casted panel. The first outer contact element 1 1 a comprises at its bottom end a circumferential outer contact pressing surface 1 1 6a that is hold in a bore or recess of the panel 32 by way of a press-fit. Favourably, the circumferential outer contact pressing surface 1 1 6 is structured, e. g. knurled. An outer shoulder 1 1 7a of the first outer contact element 1 1 a serves as axial stop. Further, the inner contact member 1 2 respectively, the first inner contact element 1 2a projects in downwards direction axially beyond the outer contact member 1 1 respectively the first outer contact element 1 1 a for a soldering connection.

In the following, reference is additionally made to Fig. 6, showing a further embodiment in a cross-sectional view. The design of the high-frequency connector 1 in Fig. 6 generally corresponds to the design in Fig. 4. Also like in the embodiment in Fig. 4, the coupling with the first high-frequency assembly 3 is via soldering. The second high-frequency assembly 2 of this embodiment, however includes a panel 23. In a recess of the panel 23 , an insulation disc 22 is received and a metallic pin 24 is received in a through-bore of the insulation disc 22 via press fit, generally in axial alignment with the longitudinal axis A. The floating contact surface 1 21 b is axially pressed against a bottom surface of the metallic pin 24.

In the following, reference is additionally made to Fig. 7-9 , showing a further embodiment of a high-frequency connector. Fig. 7 shows a perspective, view. Fig. 8 a front view and Fig. 9 a sectional view as indicated in Fig. 8. Like in other embodiments that are described further below, the outer contact member 1 1 comprises a first outer contact element 1 1 a, a second outer contact element 1 1 b and an intermediate outer contact element 1 1 d. Similarly, the inner contact member 1 2 comprises a first inner contact member 1 2a, a second inner contact member 1 2b, and an intermediate inner contact member 1 2d as explained in the general description above. Also like in some embodiments that are described further below, the resilient insulation member 1 3 is axially split into a first insulation element 1 3a and a second insulation element 1 3 b that are of identical design and abut each other.

Like in other embodiments that are described further below, the first and second outer contact elements 1 1 a, 1 1 b are of identical design. Similarly, the first and second inner contact elements 1 2a, 1 2b, are of identical design.

The first and second inner contact elements 1 2a, 1 2b are realized as pin elements, with their circumferential surface contacting the first and second insulation element 1 3a, 1 3 b respectively the intermediate inner contact element 1 2d. The first and second inner contact elements 1 2a, 1 2b have a circumferential shoulder 1 26a, 1 26b that limits the axial insertion into the tubular intermediate inner contact element 1 2d. The shoulders 1 26a, 1 26 favourably project radially from the body of the first and second inner contact elements 1 2a, 1 2b in a right angle in the cross sectional view ( Fig . 9 ), i. e. without undercut. Thereby, the manufacture by way of machining is simplified. The mechanical and electrical contact between the first and second outer contact elements 1 1 a, 1 1 b with the intermediate outer contact element 1 1 d is realized by way of integral outer contact spring elements 1 1 e that are arranged at and formed integrally with the intermediate outer contact element 1 1 d. The integral outer contact spring elements 1 1 e are realized by exemplarily triangular tongues that are radially bent inwards. Similarly, integral inner contact spring elements 1 2e are provided at the axial ends of and integral with the intermediate inner contact element 1 2d, thereby electrically and mechanically contacting the cylindrical body of the first and second inner contact element 1 2a, 1 2b, respectively. Like in other embodiments that are described further below, high-frequency connector of this embodiment is designed to be arranged in a through-hole of a shielding cover as explained above in the general description as well as in the context of other embodiments further below, electrically contacting the shielding cover, the intermediate outer contact element 1 1 d is provided with integral shielding cover contact springs 1 1 8 that are formed outwards-projecting tongues at the circumferential surface of the intermediate outer contact element 1 1 d. Further, the intermediate outer contact element 1 1 d comprises one or more positioning members 1 1 9 that project radially outwards for radial positioning and locking the high-frequency connector. In the following, reference is additionally made to Fig. 1 0- 1 2, showing a further embodiment of a high-frequency connector. Fig. 1 0 shows a perspective, view. Fig. 1 1 a front view and Fig. 1 2 a sectional view as indicated in Fig. 1 1 .

Like in the embodiment of Fig. 7-9 , the resilient insulation member 1 3 of this embodiment has is axially split with a first insulation elementl 3a and a second insulation element 1 3 b of exemplarily identical design. In this embodiment, the intermediate inner contact element 1 2d comprises a circumferential ridge 1 27. The first and second insulation elements 1 3a, 1 3 b each comprise a circumferential recess at the abutting front surface. I n combination, these recesses for a notch 1 37 that serves as positioning counter member for the ridge 1 27 as positioning member. Thereby, the intermediate inner contact element 1 2d is axially fixed.

First and second integral outer contact spring elements 1 1 e are realized in this embodiment by providing a plurality of axial slits ( not individually referenced ) around the circumference of the intermediate outer contact element 1 1 d in the axial end sections of the intermediate outer contact element l i d and inwards-bending, thereby providing a constriction-like narrowing of the cross section in this areas.

In a similar way, a shielding cover contact spring 1 1 8 is realized in this embodiment by way of providing a plurality of axial slits ( not individ ually referenced ) around the circumference of the intermed iate outer contact element 1 1 d in an axial middle area and outwards-bending, thereby provid ing a bulge-like widening of the cross section in this area.

Generally, realizing contact springs in the here-described way via a plurality of axial slits and bending shows particularly favourable high-frequency properties.

In the following, reference is additionally made to Fig. 1 3 - 1 5, showing a further embodi- ment of a high-frequency connector. Fig. 1 3 shows a perspective, view. Fig. 1 4 a front view and Fig. 1 5 a sectional view as indicated in Fig. 1 4. In the perspective view of Fig. 1 3 , the high-frequency connector 1 is shown in a partly disassembled state with the second outer contact element 1 1 b being axially displaced.

In this embodiment, integral outer contact spring elements 1 1 e are provided as part of the first respectively second outer contact element 1 1 a, 1 1 b, by way of radial spring elements in the form of tongues ( not individually referenced ) that radially project from the generally tubular circumferential surface of the first respectively second outer contact element 1 1 a, 1 1 b. and are arranged around the circumference of the first respectively second outer contact element 1 1 a, 1 1 b. Further in the interest of good high-frequency properties, both ax- ial ends of the intermediate outer contact element l i d are headed inwards, thereby providing a local diameter reduction at the axial ends and ensuring a reliable circumferential contact with the circumferential surface of the first respectively second outer contact element 1 1 a, 1 1 b. In the following, reference is additionally made to Fig. 1 6- 1 8, showing a further embodiment of a high-frequency connector. Fig. 1 6 shows a perspective, view. Fig. 1 7 a front view and Fig. 1 8 a sectional view as indicated in Fig. 1 7.

The embodiment of Fig. 1 6 - 1 8 is in a number of aspects similar to the embodiment of Fig. 1 0- 1 2 as discussed before. However, the integral outer contact spring elements 1 1 e are realized in a different and complementary way. Rather than providing a plurality of axial slits around the circumference of the intermediate outer contact element 1 1 d and inwards- bending, first and second outer contact element 1 1 a, 1 1 b are designed with integral as first and second integral outer contact spring elements 1 1 e. A plurality of axial slits ( not individually referenced ) is for this purpose provided in the first and second outer contact element 1 1 a, 1 1 b and the cross section of the first and second outer contact element 1 1 a, 1 1 b, is widened in a bulge-like manner, thereby providing radially elastic tongues.

In the following, reference is additionally made to Fig. 1 9-21 , showing a further embodiment of a high-frequency connector. Fig. 1 9 shows a perspective, view. Fig. 20 a front view and Fig. 2 1 a sectional view as indicated in Fig. 21 .

The embodiment of Fig. 1 9 -21 is in a number of aspects similar to the embodiment of Fig. 1 3 - 1 5. However, the first and second outer contact spring elements 1 1 e are realized according to the design as shown in Fig. 7 -9. Similarly, shielding cover contact springs 1 1 8 and positioning members 1 1 9 are provided as in Fig 7-9. In the following, reference is additionally made to Fig. 22 -25, illustrating the assembly of a high frequency connector 1 according to the embod iment of Fig. 1 9-2 1 with a shielding cover. Fig. 22 shows a partly cut sectional view in an intermediate state during assembly. Fig. 23 shows a bottom view of the shielding cover 4. Fig. 24 shows the configuration of Fig. 22 in a sectional view and Fig. 25 shows the assembled state in a sectional view.

The shielding cover 4 has a central through-hole 41 that is dimensioned to receive the high- frequency connector 1 . Favourably symmetrically around the through-hole 41 , the shield- ing cover 4 has bores 42 for clamping the shielding cover 4 with the inserted high-frequency connector 1 between the first high-frequency assembly 3 and the second high- frequency assembly 2 with screws 5. The first high frequency assembly 3 and the second high-frequency assembly are in this example PCBs.

From the through-hole 41 a number of exemplary two axial notches 43 extend that en- gage corresponding positioning members 1 1 9 (e. g. Fig. 7 ) of the high-frequency connector 1 . Thereby, the high-frequency connector 1 1 is radially positioned and locked. The shielding cover 4 is further electrically connected with the outer contact member 1 1 respectively the intermediate outer contact element 1 1 d via shielding cover contact springs 1 1 8 (e. g. Fig . 7 ) . In the shown design, the first high-frequency assembly comprises a signal-carrying microstrip line 3a that is terminated by a central contact pad 3 b. I n an assembled state, the first inner contact element 1 2a contacts the central contact pad 3 bFurther in an assembled state, the first outer contact element 1 1 a contacts the ground pad 3c. I n order to prevent an undesired contact of the outer contact member 1 1 , in particular the first outer contact element 1 1 a, with the microstrip line 3 b, the shielding cover 4 has a passage in form of a recess 44 that allows traversing of the microstrip line 3a without contact. For the same purpose, the first outer contact member 1 1 has a first outer contact member recess 1 1 f. Via the radial positioning and locking of the high-frequency connector 1 relative to the shielding cover 4, correct alignment can be ensured such that the microstrip line 3a passes in the area of the recess 44 in the shielding cover 4 and the recess 1 1 f in the first outer contact element 1 1 a. The same desig n applies to the connection with the second high- frequency assembly 2.

In the following, reference is additionally made to Fig. 26-28, showing a further embodi- ment of a high-frequency connector. Fig. 26 shows a perspective, view. Fig. 27 a front view and Fig. 28 a sectional view as indicated in Fig. 27.

In the embodiment of Fig . 26 -28, the axial end portions of the intermed iate outer contact element 1 1 d are inserted into the first and second outer contact element 1 1 a, 1 1 b. The first respectively second outer contact element 1 1 a, 1 1 b each accordingly surround one of the axial end portions of the intermediate outer contact element 1 1 d. The intermediate outer contact element 1 1 d is accordingly radially arranged between the first respectively second outer contact element 1 1 a, 1 1 b on the one hand and the resilient insulation member 1 3 on the other hand.

It is noted that the exemplarily described embodiment of a high-frequency connector 1 in accordance with the present discloser show different designs for the first and second outer contact elements 1 1 a, 1 1 b as well as the first and second inner contact elements 1 2 a, 1 2b. It is noted that generally different designs may be independently used for the first outer contact element 1 1 a and first inner contact inner element 1 2b on the one hand, and the second outer contact element 1 1 b and second inner contact element 1 2b on the other hand. That is, the design of the contact elements and corresponding interface structure may be designed substantially independently in dependence of the specific application scenario. Reference signs high-frequency connector

1 outer contact member

1 a first outer contact element

1 b second outer contact element

I c circumferential outer spring element

I I a outer soldering surface (first outer contact interface)

1 d intermediate outer contact element

1 e first/second integral outer contact spring element

I f first/second outer contact member recess

I I b circumferential second floating contact edge (second outer contact interface)

1 2 b shoulder

1 3 b circumferential rim (stop)

1 4a shoulder (outer contact engagement counter structure)

1 5a shoulder

1 6a circumferential outer contact pressing surface

1 7a shoulder

1 8 shielding cover contact spring

1 9 positioning member

2 I nner contact member

2a first inner contact element

2b second inner contact element.

2c circumferential inner spring element

2d intermediate inner contact element

2e first/second integral inner contact spring element

21 a inner soldering surface (second inner contact interface)

21 b floating contact surface (second inner contact interface)

22 b body of second inner contact element

23 b shoulder ( inner contact member engagement counter structure)

24b shoulder (stop)

25a shoulder ( inner contact engagement counter structure)

26a shoulder

26 b shoulder

27 ridge ( positioning member) 1 3 resilient insulation member

1 3a first insulation element

1 3 b second insulation element

1 3 1 central aperture

1 32 ring-shaped circumferential surface (outer contact engagement structure)

1 33 ring-shaped circumferential surface ( inner contact engagement structure)

1 34 ring-shaped circumferential surface (outer contact engagement structure)

1 35 ring-shaped circumferential surface ( inner contact engagement structure)

1 36 bottom surface of resilient insulation member

1 37 positioning counter member

1 4 carrier member

2 second high-frequency assembly

21 PCB

22 insulation disk

23 panel

24 metallic pin

22 insulation disc

25 metal surface/ contact pad (second outer counter contact interface)

26 metal surface/ contact pad (second inner counter contact interface)

3 first high-frequency assembly

3a microstrip line

3 b central contact pad

3c ground pad

3 1 PCB

32 Panel

35 solder element

36 solder element

4 shielding cover

41 through-hole for high frequency connector

42 bore

43 notch

44 passage/recess

5 screw

A longitudinal axis