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Title:
HOOK MEMBER FOR MODULAR FURNITURE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/197990
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A hook member (7) for modular furniture has a vertical section (70) with a front side (72) provided with fastening means to fasten the hook member to a panel (3), and an inclined section (71) connected to the vertical section (70) according to an acute angle by a joining part (76) on the opposite side to the panel (3). An upwardly tapered space (77) is delimited by the vertical section (70) and the inclined section (71). A slit (82) is in the joining part (76), and the inclined section (71) is lightened in a lightening portion (83) thereof facing the vertical section (70), and has an abutment base (84). An elastic counteracting element constituted by a blade (81) has an upper end (85) trapped in the slit (82) and a lower end (86) resting on the abutment base (84).

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Inventors:
MORETTI GISFREDO
Application Number:
IB2019/052917
Publication Date:
October 17, 2019
Filing Date:
April 09, 2019
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
MORETTI & C 2 S R L (IT)
International Classes:
A47B77/02; F16B45/00; A47B57/16; E04B2/74; F16B12/02
Domestic Patent References:
WO2018041910A12018-03-08
WO2004049882A12004-06-17
WO2018041910A12018-03-08
WO2004049882A12004-06-17
Foreign References:
US2187441A1940-01-16
FR2664950A11992-01-24
DE19503814A11995-10-26
US2187441A1940-01-16
FR2664950A11992-01-24
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
CIPRIANI, Guido (IT)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

1. A hook member (7) for modular furniture, having

- a vertical section (70) with a front side (72) provided with fastening means to fasten the hook member to a panel (3) or similar component of a modular piece of furniture, and

- an inclined section (71) connected to the vertical section (70) according to an acute angle by a joining part (76) on the opposite side to the panel (3) or similar,

- an upwardly tapered space (77) delimited by the vertical section (70) and the inclined section (71), and

- an elastic counteracting element provided in the upwardly tapered space (77), characterized in that:

a slit (82) is in said joining part (76) between the vertical section (70) and the inclined section (71), and the inclined section (71) is lightened in a lightening portion (83) thereof facing the vertical section (70) and has an abutment base (84); and

the elastic counteracting element is constituted by a blade (81), having an upper end (85) trapped in the slit (82) and a lower end (86) resting on the abutment base (84) of the inclined section (71), the blade (81) facing the lightening portion (83) of the inclined section (71).

2. The hook member (7) according to claim 1, wherein the blade (81) is made of spring steel.

3. The hook member (7) according to claim 1, wherein the inclined section (71) has a nearly horizontal portion (78) terminating with a free end (79).

4. The hook member (7) according to claim 1, wherein said upwardly tapered space (77) has the shape of a wedge with a rounded upper vertex (80).

5. The hook member (7) according to claim 1, wherein the free end (79) of the nearly horizontal portion (78) is narrow and facing the vertical section (70).

6. The hook member (7) according to claim 1, wherein said fastening means comprises two transverse holes (74) made in the vertical section (70) for inserting screws (8).

7. The hook member (7) according to claim 1, wherein said fastening means further comprises at least one pair of ridges (75) projecting from the front side (72) of the vertical section (70), to be inserted into the panel (3).

Description:
DESCRIPTION

TITLE OF THE INVENTION: HOOK MEMBER FOR MODULAR FURNITURE Technical Field

The present invention relates to a hook member for modular furniture, in particular for free-standing kitchens, paneled walls, especially for living rooms.

Background Art

The patent application WO 2018/041910 describes a free-standing modular kitchen unit. The kitchen supports itself on the floor without the need for fixing either to the back wall, to the ceiling or to the floor. The kitchen unit includes a base and a multiplicity of uprights and panels. The uprights are in the form of sections having at least one front wing provided with slots, and the panels have hook members to be inserted into the slots for the assembly of the panels on the uprights.

By way of reference, the aforementioned prior art is shown in more detail in Figure 1 which is a rear axonometric view of the free-standing modular kitchen unit in an assembly step.

The assembly of the kitchen unit is performed starting from the base 1 and the multiplicity of uprights 2 which are fixed to the base 1. Above the base 1 a pair of panels 3 is mounted on the multiplicity of uprights 2 by means of hook members 4.

In Figure 2, which is an axonometric view showing an enlarged detail in Figure 1, the panel 3 is approached to the upright 2, which, like the hook member 4, is shown in greater detail.

The upright 2 has an angular shape with a front wing 20 facing the panel 3 and a side wing 21, orthogonal to the wing 20, and therefore also to the panel 3. In the wing 20 there are slots 22 for the engagement with the hook member 4.

The hook member 4 has a vertical section 40, intended to be fixed to the panel 3, and a section 41, substantially parallel to the vertical section 40, from which it is spaced with an inner bevel 42 and a slit 43. The inner bevel 42 is shaped as an invitation for insertion of the section 41 of the hook member 4 in the slot 22 of the upright 2. The insertion is completed when the slit 43 between the vertical section 40 and the parallel section 41 of the hook member 4 is inserted on the lower edge of the slot 22 of the upright 2. Given the plurality of the hook members 4 and the large dimensions of the panel 3, the assembly of the panel 3 on the uprights 2 can cause some difficulties for the installers. They must provide for the simultaneous insertion of the parallel section 41 of all the hook members 4 in the respective slots 22 and achieve that all the parallel sections 41 lower identically in the corresponding slots 22, in order to avoid a horizontal misalignment of the panels 3. This simultaneous insertion may cause the installer's fingers to fit between an upright 2 and a hook member 4, and may cause misalignment between the panels with consequent aesthetic defects in the kitchen once assembled.

US 2,187,441 discloses a hook member having a vertical section with a front side provided with fastening means to fasten the hook member to a panel, and an inclined section connected to the vertical section according to an acute angle in a joining part on the opposite side to the panel, so that an upwardly tapered space is delimited by the vertical section and by the inclined section and forms a mouth of the hook member. The inclined section has a nearly horizontal portion terminating with a free end. A spring tongue normally closes the mouth of the hook member. A similar hook member is described in FR 3 664 950 and WO 2004/049882 Al.

Summary of the Invention

An object of the present invention is to provide a hook member that can be used in a free-standing modular kitchen such as the one partially described above, but also in other modular furniture, such as paneled walls, especially for living rooms to improve the installation procedure and to improve the result.

In particular, an object of the invention is to facilitate the simultaneous insertion of the hook members in the uprights, also reducing the risk of physical damage to the installers.

Another object of the invention is to allow a regulated and adaptable assembly of the panels or of other members on which the hook members are engaged with respect to the uprights.

The aforementioned objects are achieved by a hook member for modular furniture, having - a vertical section with a front side provided with fastening means to fasten the hook member to a panel or similar component of a modular piece of furniture, and

- an inclined section connected to the vertical section according to an acute angle in a joining part on the opposite side to the panel or similar,

- an upwardly tapered space delimited by the vertical section and the inclined section, and

- an elastic counteracting element provided in the upwardly tapered space.

A slit is in said joining part between the vertical section and the inclined section, and the inclined section is lightened in a lightening portion thereof facing the vertical section and has an abutment base; and

the elastic counteracting element is constituted by a blade, having an upper end trapped in the slit and a lower end resting on the abutment base of the inclined section, the blade facing the lightening portion of the inclined section.

The elastic deformation of the blade creates a contrasting force on the panel to keep it perfectly upright and aligned with the other panels or components of the same modular furniture.

Brief Description of Drawings

Further characteristics and advantages of the present invention will become most clear from the indicative, and therefore non-limiting, description of preferred but not exclusive embodiments of a hook member, as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

- Figure 1 is a rear axonometric view of a free-standing modular kitchen unit of the prior art in an assembly phase;

- Figure 2 is an axonometric view showing an enlarged detail in Figure 1 ;

- Figure 3 is an axonometric view of a first embodiment of a hook member according to the present invention;

- Figures 4 and 5 are a side view and a rear view, respectively, of the hook member in Figure 3;

- Figure 6 is an axonometric view of a second embodiment of a hook member according to the present invention;

- Figures 7 and 8 are a side view and a rear view on a slightly reduced scale, respectively, of the hook member in Figure 6;

- Figure 9 is an exploded side view on a slightly reduced scale of the hook member in Figure 6;

- Figures 10 to 12 are partial axonometric views of successive mounting steps of mounting a panel to the uprights by means of the hook member in its second embodiment; and

- Figures 13 to 15 are partial cross-section views of successive mounting steps for mounting a panel to the uprights by means of the hook member in its second embodiment.

Description of Embodiments of the Invention

First reference is made to Figures 3 to 5 which are an axonometric view, a side view and a rear view, respectively, of a first embodiment of a hook member for modular furniture according to the present invention. The hook member, indicated as 5, has a vertical section 50 and an inclined section 51 so as to form an acute angle between the two sections. The vertical section 50, which is shaped like a square-shaped parallelepiped, has a front side 52 intended to be facing the panel or similar component of a modular piece of furniture, as shown in the following figures, and a rear side 53. The vertical section 50 is equipped with fixing means to fix the hook member to the panel or similar; this fixing means comprises two transverse holes 54 made in the vertical section 50 and a pair of ridges, generally indicated as 55, projecting from the front side 52 of the vertical section 50. The ridges 55 are of a parallelepiped shape with a rounded free end. However, the ridges could also be cylindrical pins.

The inclined section 51, having a cross-section similar to that of the vertical section 50, is connected to the vertical section 50 in a joining part 56 so as to form together an upwardly tapered space 57, which is delimited by the vertical section 50 and the inclined section 51. The inclined section 51 has a portion 58 slightly inclined downwardly with respect to the inclined section 51, i.e. substantially horizontal, which ends with a free end 59, substantially vertical.

It is understood that the upwardly tapered space 57 has the shape of a wedge with a rounded top vertex 60. The free end 59 of the nearly horizontal portion 58, which is in the form of a comma, is narrow and facing parallel to the vertical section 50.

Reference is made now to Figures 6 to 9 which are an axonometric view, a side view, a rear view and an exploded side view of a second embodiment of a hook member according to the present invention.

The hook member, indicated as 7, has a vertical section 70 and an inclined section 71 so as to form an acute angle between the two sections. Like in the first embodiment, the vertical section 70 is provided with two transverse holes 74 and a pair of ridges, generally indicated as 75, projecting from the front side 72 of the vertical section 70. The inclined section 71 is connected to the vertical section 70 in a joining part 76 so as to form an upwardly tapered space 77 which is delimited by the vertical section 70 and the inclined section 71. The inclined section 71 has an almost horizontal portion 78, i.e. substantially slightly inclined downward, terminating with a free end 79.

Analogously to the first embodiment, the upwardly tapered space 77 is shaped like a wedge with a rounded top vertex 80.

The free end 79 of the nearly horizontal portion 78, which is in the form of a comma, is narrow and facing parallel to the vertical section 70.

According to the second embodiment, an elastic counteracting element is provided in the upwardly tapered space 77. In fact, referring in particular to Figure 9, a slit 82 is made in the joining part 76 between the vertical section 70 and the inclined section 71. The inclined section 71 is lightened in a lightening portion 83 thereof facing the vertical section 70. Next to the lightening portion 83 there is provided an abutment base 84 for the elastic counteracting element.

The elastic counteracting element is preferably a blade 81 made of spring steel. It has an upper end 85 imprisoned in the slit 82, and a lower end 86 resting on the abutment plate 84. The blade 81 is situated, therefore, facing the lightening portion 83 of the inclined section 71. The upper end 85 is trapped in the joining part 76 by plastic deformation of the latter.

Reference is made now to Figures 10 to 12, which are partial axonometric views of successive mounting steps for mounting a panel to the uprights by the hook member 7 in its second embodiment.

Figure 10 shows a panel 3 and two hook members 7 according to the second embodiment of the invention. The hook members 7 are shown distant from the panel 3, and screws 8 are ready to be inserted into the holes 74, shown in the previous figures, for fixing the hook members 7 on the panel 3. Holes 9 are made in the panel 3 in correspondence of pins not shown, acting as centering means, like the ridges 75 of the hook members 7.

In Figure 11 the panel 3 with the hook members 7 is shown approaching the upright 2. The upright 2 has a core 10 and an L-shaped wing 11. The L-shaped wing 11 has a first side 110 orthogonal to the core 10 and a second side 111 parallel to the core 10. The first side 110 of the wing 11 has slots 12 sized so that the hook elements 7 can be inserted therein, as shown in Figure 12. The blade 81 rests on the lower edge 13 of the slots 12. The size of the wing 11, in particular of its first side 110, is such that, when the hook elements 7 are completely inserted into the slots 12, the blade 81, being deformed towards the inclined section 71 of the hook member 7, keeps the panel 3 against the free end of the second side 111 of the wing 11.

For better understanding reference is now made to Figures 13 to 15 which are partial cross-section views of successive mounting steps for mounting a panel to the uprights by means of the hook member in its second embodiment.

The same numbers are used in these figures to indicate parts similar to those of Figures 10 to 12. Figure 13 shows the panel 3 equipped with hook members 7 in horizontal approach to the upright 2, as indicated by the arrows O. In Figure 14 the nearly horizontal portion 78 is shown resting on the lower edge 13 of the slot 12. Obviously, also the other hook members of the panel 3 are positioned, even if not shown, on the lower edge 13 of their slots 12. The further approach of the panel 3 to the upright 2 causes the portion 78 to slide and lower itself according to the arrows V of the panel 3.

As shown in particular in Figure 15, the hook member 7 rests with the blade 81 on the lower edge 13 of the slot 12. The elastic deformation of the blade 81 creates a counteracting force on the panel 3 to keep it perfectly abutted to the second side 111 of the wing 11 and aligned with the other panels or components of the same modular furniture.