Login| Sign Up| Help| Contact|

Patent Searching and Data


Title:
INSTALLING AND REMOVING POWER SUPPLIES WITHIN LUGGAGE SYSTEMS
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/161283
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Luggage handle assemblies for installing, removing, and retaining removable power supplies from articles of luggage. The luggage handle assembly includes a luggage handle housing and a power supply housing connected to the luggage handle housing, the power supply housing capable of receiving a removable power supply. The luggage handle assembly includes an access door pivotably attached to the luggage handle housing, and a latch slideably attached to the luggage handle housing, wherein, in an engaged position, at least a portion of the latch engages with the access door to prevent the access door from opening, and wherein, in a disengaged position, the at least a portion of the latch is disengaged from the access door to permit the access door to open and the removable power supply to be inserted or removed.

Inventors:
RUBIO, Jennifer (Inc.82 Mercer Street, 3rd Floo, New York NY, 10012, US)
KOREY, Stephanie (Inc82 Mercer Street, 3rd Floo, New York NY, 10012, US)
NAPARSTEK, Sam (Inc82 Mercer Street, 3rd Floo, New York NY, 10012, US)
LEWIS, Celia (Inc82 Mercer Street, 3rd Floo, New York NY, 10012, US)
MADISON, Kyle (Inc82 Mercer Street, 3rd Floo, New York NY, 10012, US)
Application Number:
US2019/018326
Publication Date:
August 22, 2019
Filing Date:
February 15, 2019
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
JRSK, INC. (82 Mercer Street, 3rd FloorNew York, NY, 10012, US)
International Classes:
A45C5/06; A45C13/00
Foreign References:
US20180000215A12018-01-04
CN205831311U2016-12-28
CN206866806U2018-01-12
US201514935335A2015-11-06
US201715684077A2017-08-23
Other References:
"Smart Baggage with Integrated Lithium Batteries and Electronics", May 2017, INTERNATIONAL AIR TRANSPORT ASSOCIATION (IATA
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ANDERSON, James R. et al. (Proskauer Rose LLP, One International PlaceBoston, MA, 02110, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
WHAT IS CLAIMED:

1. A luggage handle assembly comprising:

a luggage handle housing;

a power supply housing connected to the luggage handle housing, the power supply housing capable of receiving a removable power supply;

an access door pivotably attached to the luggage handle housing; and

a latch slideably attached to the luggage handle housing, wherein, in an engaged position, at least a portion of the latch engages with the access door to prevent the access door from opening, and wherein, in a disengaged position, the at least a portion of the latch is disengaged from the access door to permit the access door to open and the removable power supply to be inserted or removed.

2. The luggage handle assembly of claim 1 wherein the luggage handle housing comprises a first chamber corresponding to the engaged position and a second chamber corresponding to the disengaged position, wherein the first and second chambers are configured to require a force to toggle the latch between the first chamber and the second chamber.

3. The luggage handle assembly of claim 1 wherein the latch comprises a thumb grip.

4. The luggage handle assembly of claim 3 wherein the thumb grip is substantially flush with a surface of the luggage handle housing.

5. The luggage handle assembly of claim 1 wherein a lateral side of the access door comprises a pocket configured to receive at least a portion of the latch when in the engaged position.

6. The luggage handle assembly of claim 1 wherein the luggage handle housing comprises a recess configured to receive at least a portion of the latch when in the disengaged position.

7. The luggage handle assembly of claim 1 wherein the latch comprises a chamfered upper surface.

8. A luggage handle assembly comprising:

a luggage handle housing;

a power supply housing connected to the luggage handle housing, the power supply housing capable of receiving a removable power supply;

an access door pivotably attached to the luggage handle housing;

a lip integrally formed on the access door; and

a depression formed in the luggage handle housing, wherein, in a closed state, the lip is configured to engage with the depression to prevent the access door from opening.

9. The luggage handle assembly of claim 8 wherein the lip is formed on a bottom surface of the access door and the depression is formed on an interior surface of the luggage handle housing.

10. The luggage handle assembly of claim 8 wherein the depression is formed on an exterior surface of the luggage handle housing.

11. The luggage handle assembly of claim 8 wherein at least a portion of the access door is configured to flex in response to an applied force.

12. The luggage handle assembly of claim 8 wherein the access door comprises a top surface and a front surface, and extends over a comer of the luggage handle housing.

13. The luggage handle assembly of claim 12 wherein the top surface of the access door and the front surface of the access door are configured to be substantially flush with an outer surface of the luggage handle housing when the access door is in the closed state.

14. The luggage handle assembly of claim 8 wherein a top surface of the access door is configured to be substantially flush with an outer surface of the luggage handle housing when the access door is in the closed state.

15. A luggage handle assembly comprising:

a luggage handle housing;

a power supply housing connected to the luggage handle housing, the power supply housing capable of receiving a removable power supply;

an access door pivotably attached to the luggage handle housing; and

a push-button disposed proximate an outer surface of the luggage handle housing, the push-button connected to a latch that, in an engaged position, extends over an upper surface of the removable power supply to retain the removable power supply within the power supply housing;

wherein the push-button is configured to toggle the latch to a disengaged position, such that the removable power supply can be removed from the power supply housing, in response to a depressive force.

16. The luggage handle assembly of claim 15 wherein the push-button and the latch are integrally formed.

17. The luggage handle assembly of claim 15 wherein the latch comprises a chamfered upper surface.

18. The luggage handle assembly of claim 15 wherein the access door further comprises a lip configured to engage with the luggage handle housing to retain the access door in a closed configuration.

19. The luggage handle assembly of claim 15 wherein the power supply housing includes a push-push spring mechanism.

20. The luggage handle assembly of claim 15 wherein the push-button is configured to remain in the engaged position in the absence of a depressive force, by a spring assembly.

Description:
INSTALLING AND REMOVING POWER SUPPLIES WITHIN LUGGAGE SYSTEMS

RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims the benefit of and priority to U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/710,400, filed February 16, 2018, the entire teachings of which are incorporated by reference herein.

TECHNICAL FIELD

[0002] The present invention relates generally to systems and methods for installing and removing power supplies to and from luggage systems, including systems and methods for securing power supplies within luggage systems.

BACKGROUND

[0003] With the evolution of luggage systems over the past 100 years, some luggage systems can include or accommodate a power supply (e.g., battery module) to provide a user with an electrical source during traveling for various uses. Such power supplies can include one or more power ports (e.g., ports configured to receive a USB or other connector) for providing electricity. In some cases, a user may plug in an electronic device, such as a cell phone, computer, tablet, etc., to charge or otherwise use the device during travel.

[0004] Due at least in part to regulations and user preferences, a user may desire to temporarily remove the power supply from the suitcase at different times. In particular, airline guidelines promulgated by the International Air Transport Association (IATA) (lst Edition, May 2017) “Smart Baggage with Integrated Lithium Batteries and Electronics” require all lithium batteries to be removable, and to be removed from their luggage pieces and carried into the cabin when traveling on an aircraft. Example removal times can include while checking a bag on an airplane or times at which security may be a concern and the user wants to avoid the power supply from being accidently removed and lost or stolen. To complicate things, the modem traveler is often forced to navigate through complex travel environments, often with one hand pulling the trolley handle of their luggage system, while one’s other hand is holding a mobile phone, purse, and/or briefcase. Additionally, in some areas, bags may be subject to inspection (e.g., security inspection), in which a power supply may be removed and inspected.

[0005] Consumer’ s expectations have evolved along with luggage to expect the flexibility of having a power supply available to plug in their electronic devices, but to also demand the convenience of removing the power supply when desired or necessary during travel. And, users want to ensure that their power supply is securely stored during travel to avoid it falling out of their luggage and becoming damaged or lost. At times, the expectations can be in tension, especially in view of luggage systems currently available on the market. Consequently, there is a great need for a better solution to meet consumer expectations with regard to, e.g., convenience, ease-of-use, and security.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0006] Accordingly, an object of the invention is to provide users with systems and methods to permit a user to securely install a power supply (e.g., battery) into an article of luggage for use and, at a desired time, remove the power supply from the luggage. It is an object of the invention to permit such power supplies to be securely retained within a luggage system during travel, such that the power supply will not inadvertently be removed or fall out of the luggage system. It is an object of the invention to facilitate ease-of-use for a user to install or insert a power supply into a luggage system (e.g., into a designated power supply holder) and to remove the power supply from that holder on the luggage system.

[0007] In some aspects, a luggage handle assembly is provided. A user can install or remove a removable power supply or battery from a power supply housing, which can store the removable power supply during transit or storage of the luggage. The luggage handle assembly includes a luggage handle housing and a power supply housing connected to the luggage handle housing. The power supply housing is capable of receiving and/or storing a removable power supply. The luggage handle assembly includes an access door pivotably attached to the luggage handle housing. A latch is slideably attached to the luggage handle housing. In an engaged position, at least a portion of the latch engages with the access door to prevent the access door from opening. In a disengaged position, the at least a portion of the latch is disengaged from the access door to permit the access door to open and the removable power supply to be inserted or removed.

[0008] In some embodiments, the luggage handle housing includes an opening. The opening can include a first chamber corresponding to the engaged position of the latch and a second chamber corresponding to the disengaged position of the latch. The first and second chambers can be configured to require a force to toggle the latch between the first chamber and the second chamber. In some embodiments, the latch can be spring-biased, such that it returns to the engaged position when not being held open by a user.

[0009] In some embodiments, the latch includes a thumb grip. In some embodiments, the thumb grip can be disposed on or proximate a surface of luggage handle housing that is remote from the latch. In some embodiments, the latch can include a chamfered upper surface. The chamfered upper surface can permit the latch to be deflected out of the way of either or both of the closing access door or a bottom surface of the removable power supply as it is being inserted into the power supply housing. The thumb grip can be substantially flush with a surface of the luggage handle housing. In some embodiments, the latch can include a protrusion on the top and/or side of the latch to provide a surface for a user’s finger to catch and push and/or pull on the latch to actuate the latch.

[0010] In some embodiments, a lateral side of the access door includes a pocket that is configured to receive at least a portion of the latch when the latch is in the engaged position. In some embodiments, the luggage handle housing includes a recess configured to receive at least a portion of the latch when the latch is in the disengaged position. In some embodiments, a portion of the latch and/or a connection between the latch and a thumb grip can be disposed beneath a surface of the housing.

[0011] In some aspects, a luggage handle assembly is provided. The luggage handle assembly includes a power supply housing connected to a luggage handle housing, the power supply housing being capable of receiving a removable power supply. The luggage handle assembly includes an access door pivotably attached to the luggage handle housing. The access door includes a lip, which can be integrally formed on the access door. The handle assembly includes a depression formed in the luggage handle housing. In a closed state, the lip is configured to engage with the depression to prevent the access door from opening. The lip can be disengaged from the depression to actuate or swing the door to an open state.

[0012] In some embodiments, the lip is formed on a bottom surface of the access door. In some embodiments, the depression is formed on an interior surface of the luggage handle housing.

The depression can be formed from a separate component that is attached to the interior or exterior of the luggage handle housing. In some embodiments, the depression is formed on an exterior surface of the luggage handle housing. In some embodiments, the depth of the lip and/or the depth of the depression can be varied, such that increased depth can provide increased engagement of the two components, making it more difficult to disengage the lip from the depression and consequently further ensuring that the access door is maintained in the closed position.

[0013] In some embodiments, the access door is configured to flex in response to an applied force. In some embodiments, one region of the access door can be configured to flex comparatively more than another region of the access door. A central region of the access door (e.g., a central region along the depth of the access door) can be configured to flex more than the edge regions (e.g., the regions near the front and rear edges of the access door). In some embodiments, the access door includes a top surface and a front surface, and can be configured to extend over a corner of the luggage handle housing. An access door having a top surface and a front surface can be configured such that the top surface and the front surface of the access door are substantially flush with an outer surface(s) of the luggage handle housing when the access door is in a closed state. The access door and luggage handle housing can be formed such that any outer surfaces of the access door are flush with any outer surfaces of the luggage handle housing. In some embodiments, the top surface of the access door is configured to be substantially flush with an outer surface of the luggage handle housing when the access door is in the closed state.

[0014] In some aspects, a luggage handle assembly is provided. The luggage handle assembly can include a luggage handle housing and a power supply housing connected to the luggage handle housing. The power supply housing can be capable of receiving a removable power supply. The luggage handle assembly can include an access door pivotably attached to the luggage handle housing. The luggage handle assembly can include a push-button disposed proximate an outer surface of the luggage handle housing. The push-button can be connected to a latch that, in an engaged position, extends over an upper surface of the removable power supply to retain the removable power supply within the power supply housing. The push-button is configured to toggle the latch to a disengaged position, such that the removable power supply can be removed from the power supply housing, in response to a depressive force.

[0015] In some embodiments, the push-button and the latch are integrally formed from the same piece of material. The push-button and the latch can be two separate components that are connected together. In some embodiments, the latch includes a chamfered upper surface. The chamfered upper surface can permit the latch (and a push-button, if attached or integral to the latch) to be deflected out of the way by a bottom surface of a removable power supply while it is being inserted or installed to be stored in the power supply housing.

[0016] The power supply housing can include a push-push spring mechanism. The power supply housing can include a standard spring mechanism. In some embodiments, the access door includes a lip that can engage with the luggage handle housing to retain the access door in a closed configuration. In some embodiments, the push-button is configured to remain in the engaged position in the absence of a depressive force, by a spring assembly.

[0017] In some aspects, the systems and methods for installing, removing, and retaining power supplies in luggage systems can be implemented in any of several known hard- or soft-side luggage systems. For example, the systems and methods described herein can be implemented with Applicant’s luggage systems as described in, e.g., U.S. Application Nos. 14/935,335 and 15/684,077, however, use of the systems and methods described herein are not limited to those luggage systems.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0018] The advantages of the invention described herein, together with further advantages, may be better understood by referring to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. The drawings are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead generally being placed upon illustrating the principles of the invention.

[0019] FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of an exemplary handle assembly including an exemplary latch embodiment according to an embodiment of the invention.

[0020] FIG. 2 is a front view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 1.

[0021] FIG. 3 is a rear view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 1.

[0022] FIG. 4 is a left side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 1.

[0023] FIG. 5 is a right side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 1.

[0024] FIG. 6 is a cutaway view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 1.

[0025] FIG. 7 is a bottom view the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 1.

[0026] FIG. 8 is a detail view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 1 depicting an embodiment of the latch.

[0027] FIGS. 9A-9C are cutaway detail views of features of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 1.

[0028] FIG. 10 is a top perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 1.

[0029] FIG. 11 is a bottom perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 1.

[0030] FIG. 12 is a rear perspective view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 1.

[0031] FIG. 13 is a front perspective view of an exemplary handle assembly including an exemplary latch embodiment according to an embodiment of the invention.

[0032] FIG. 14 is a front view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 13.

[0033] FIG. 15 is a rear view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 13.

[0034] FIG. 16 is a left side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 13.

[0035] FIG. 17 if a right side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 13.

[0036] FIG. 18 is a cutaway view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 13.

[0037] FIG. 19 is a bottom view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 13.

[0038] FIG. 20 is a cutaway detail view of features of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 13.

[0039] FIG. 21 is a top perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 13.

[0040] FIG. 22 is a bottom perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 13.

[0041] FIG. 23 is a rear perspective view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 13.

[0042] FIG. 24 is a front perspective view of an exemplary handle assembly including an exemplary latch and thumb grip embodiment according to an embodiment of the invention. [0043] FIG. 25 is a front view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 24.

[0044] FIG. 26 is a rear view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 24.

[0045] FIG. 27 is a left side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 24.

[0046] FIG. 28 is a right side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 24.

[0047] FIG. 29 is a cutaway view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 24.

[0048] FIG. 30 is a bottom view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 24.

[0049] FIG. 31 is a top perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 24.

[0050] FIG. 32 is a bottom perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 24.

[0051] FIG. 33 is a detail view of features of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 24.

[0052] FIG. 34 is a rear perspective view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 24.

[0053] FIG. 35 is a front perspective view of an exemplary handle assembly including an exemplary latch and thumb grip embodiment according to an embodiment of the invention.

[0054] FIG. 36 is a front view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 35.

[0055] FIG. 37 is a rear view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 35.

[0056] FIG. 38 is a left side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 35.

[0057] FIG. 39 is a right side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 35.

[0058] FIG. 40 is a cutaway view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 35.

[0059] FIG. 41 is a bottom view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 35.

[0060] FIG. 42 is a top perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 35.

[0061] FIG. 43 is a bottom perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 35.

[0062] FIG. 44 is a detail view of features of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 35.

[0063] FIG. 45 is a rear perspective view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 35.

[0064] FIG. 46 is a front perspective view of an exemplary handle assembly including an exemplary pivotable latch embodiment according to an embodiment of the invention.

[0065] FIG. 47 is a front view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 46.

[0066] FIG. 48 is a rear view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 46.

[0067] FIG. 49 is a left side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 46.

[0068] FIG. 50 is a right side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 46.

[0069] FIG. 51A is a cutaway view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 46 showing the pivotable latch in a closed configuration.

[0070] FIG. 5 IB is a cutaway view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 46 showing the pivotable latch in an open configuration.

[0071] FIG. 52 is a bottom view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 46.

[0072] FIG. 53 is a top perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 46.

[0073] FIG. 54 is a bottom perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 46.

[0074] FIG. 55 is a rear perspective view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 46.

[0075] FIG. 56 is a front perspective view of an exemplary handle assembly including an exemplary access door and luggage handle housing including lip and depression features, respectively, according to an embodiment of the invention.

[0076] FIG. 57 is a front view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 56.

[0077] FIG. 58 is a rear view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 56.

[0078] FIG. 59 is a left side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 56.

[0079] FIG. 60 is a right side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 56.

[0080] FIG. 61 is a cutaway view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 56.

[0081] FIG. 62 is a bottom view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 56.

[0082] FIG. 63A is a cutaway side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 56 showing the access door in the closed configuration.

[0083] FIG. 63B is a cutaway side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 56 showing the access door in the open configuration.

[0084] FIG. 64 is a top perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 56.

[0085] FIG. 65 is a bottom perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 56.

[0086] FIG. 66 is a rear perspective view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 56.

[0087] FIG. 67 is a front perspective view of an exemplary handle assembly including an exemplary access door and luggage handle housing including lip and depression features, respectively, according to an embodiment of the invention.

[0088] FIG. 68 is a front view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 67.

[0089] FIG. 69 is a rear view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 67.

[0090] FIG. 70 is a left side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 67.

[0091] FIG. 71 is a right side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 67.

[0092] FIG. 72 is a cutaway view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 67.

[0093] FIG. 73 is a bottom view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 67.

[0094] FIG. 74 is a cutaway side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 67. [0095] FIG. 75 is a top perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 67.

[0096] FIG. 76 is a bottom perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 67.

[0097] FIG. 77 is a rear perspective view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 67.

[0098] FIG. 78 is a front perspective view of an exemplary handle assembly including an access door capable of being toggled between locked-closed and openable states, according to an embodiment of the invention.

[0099] FIG. 79 is a front view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 78.

[0100] FIG. 80 is a rear view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 78.

[0101] FIG. 81 is a left side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 78.

[0102] FIG. 82 is a right side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 78.

[0103] FIG. 83 is a cutaway view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 78.

[0104] FIG. 84 is a bottom view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 78.

[0105] FIG. 85 is a top perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 78.

[0106] FIG. 86 is a bottom perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 78.

[0107] FIG. 87 is a detail view of features of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 78.

[0108] FIG. 88 is a rear perspective view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 78.

[0109] FIG. 89 is a front perspective view of an exemplary handle assembly including an exemplary push-button and latch system, according to an embodiment of the invention.

[0110] FIG. 90 is a front perspective view with handle and telescopically-extendible rods removed, of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 89.

[0111] FIG. 91 is a front view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 89.

[0112] FIG. 92 is a rear view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 89.

[0113] FIG. 93 is a left side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 89.

[0114] FIG. 94 is a right side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 89.

[0115] FIG. 95 is a top view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 89.

[0116] FIG. 96 is a cutaway view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 89.

[0117] FIG. 97 is a bottom view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 89.

[0118] FIG. 98 is a top perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 89.

[0119] FIG. 99 is a bottom perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 89. [0120] FIG. 100 is a top perspective view of another embodiment of an access door.

[0121] FIG. 101A cutaway side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 89.

[0122] FIG. 101B is an exploded cutaway side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 89.

[0123] FIG. 102 is a rear perspective view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 89.

[0124] FIG. 103 is a front perspective view of an exemplary handle assembly including a lift arm assembly according to an embodiment of the invention.

[0125] FIG. 104 is a front perspective view with handle and telescopically-extendible rods removed, of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 103.

[0126] FIG. 105 is a front view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 103.

[0127] FIG. 106 is a rear view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 103.

[0128] FIG. 107 is a left side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 103.

[0129] FIG. 108 is a right side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 103.

[0130] FIG. 109 is a top view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 103.

[0131] FIG. 110 is a bottom view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 103.

[0132] FIG. I l l is a front cutaway view showing the lift arm lifting a removable power supply upward out of the removable power supply housing of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 103.

[0133] FIG. 112 is a top perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 103.

[0134] FIG. 113 is a bottom perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 103.

[0135] FIG. 114 is a rear perspective view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 103.

[0136] FIG. 115 is a front perspective view of an exemplary handle assembly including a slideable access door according to an embodiment of the invention.

[0137] FIG. 116 is a front view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 115.

[0138] FIG. 117 is a rear view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 115.

[0139] FIG. 118 is a left side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 115.

[0140] FIG. 119 is a right side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 115.

[0141] FIG. 120 is a cutaway view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 115.

[0142] FIG. 121 is a bottom view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 115.

[0143] FIG. 122A is a cutaway side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 115 showing the access door in the closed position.

[0144] FIG. 122B is a cutaway side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 115 showing the access door in the open position. [0145] FIG. 123 is a top perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 115.

[0146] FIG. 124 is a bottom perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 115.

[0147] FIG. 125 is a rear perspective view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 115.

[0148] FIG. 126 is a front perspective view of an exemplary handle assembly including a living hinge door according to an embodiment of the invention.

[0149] FIG. 127 is a front view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 126.

[0150] FIG. 128 is a rear view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 126.

[0151] FIG. 129 is a left side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 126.

[0152] FIG. 130 is a right side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 126.

[0153] FIG. 131 is a cutaway view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 126.

[0154] FIG. 132 is a bottom view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 126.

[0155] FIG. 133A is a cutaway side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 126 showing the living hinge access door in the closed position.

[0156] FIG. 133B is a cutaway side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 126 showing the living hinge access door in the open position.

[0157] FIG. 134 is a top perspective view of a living hinge access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 126.

[0158] FIG. 135 is a bottom perspective view of a living hinge access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 126.

[0159] FIG. 136 is a rear perspective view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 126.

[0160] FIG. 137 is a front perspective view of an exemplary handle assembly including a flexible access door according to an embodiment of the invention.

[0161] FIG. 138 is a front view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 137.

[0162] FIG. 139 is a rear view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 137.

[0163] FIG. 140 is a left side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 137.

[0164] FIG. 141 is a right side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 137.

[0165] FIG. 142 is a cutaway view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 137.

[0166] FIG. 143 is a bottom view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 137.

[0167] FIG. 144A is a cutaway side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 137 showing the flexible access door in the closed position.

[0168] FIG. 144B is a cutaway side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 137 showing the flexible access door in the open position.

[0169] FIG. 145 is a top perspective view of a flexible access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 137.

[0170] FIG. 146 is a bottom perspective view of a flexible access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 137.

[0171] FIG. 147 is a rear perspective view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 137.

[0172] FIG. 148 is a front perspective view of an exemplary handle assembly including an access door with a lip feature according to an embodiment of the invention.

[0173] FIG. 149 is a front view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 148.

[0174] FIG. 150 is a rear view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 148.

[0175] FIG. 151 is a left side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 148.

[0176] FIG. 152 is a right side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 148.

[0177] FIG. 153 is a cutaway view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 148.

[0178] FIG. 154 is a bottom view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 148.

[0179] FIG. 155 is a top perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 148.

[0180] FIG. 156 is a bottom perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 148.

[0181] FIG. 157 is a rear perspective view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 148.

[0182] FIG. 158 is a front perspective view of an exemplary handle assembly including an access door and luggage handle housing with lip and protrusion features, respectively, according to an embodiment of the invention.

[0183] FIG. 159 is a front view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 158.

[0184] FIG. 160 is a rear view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 158.

[0185] FIG. 161 is a left side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 158.

[0186] FIG. 162 is a right side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 158.

[0187] FIG. 163 is a top view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 158.

[0188] FIG. 164 is a bottom view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 158.

[0189] FIG 165 is a cutaway side view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 158.

[0190] FIG. 166 is a top perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 158.

[0191] FIG. 167 is a bottom perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 158.

[0192] FIG. 167A is another bottom perspective view of an access door of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 158

[0193] FIG. 168 is a rear perspective view of the exemplary handle assembly shown in FIG. 158. DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0194] In some aspects, the systems and methods described herein can include one or more mechanisms or methods for installing, removing, and/or retaining a power supply within a luggage system. The systems and methods can include an access door attached to a luggage handle housing, the access door disposed over an opening configured to receive and contain a removable power supply (e.g., a battery). The mechanisms and methods described herein can be used alone or in combination to ensure that the access door is secured in a closed configuration when desired by the user, including, but not limited to, to retain the removable power supply within a power supply housing or to protect the power supply and/or power supply housing from exposure to the elements. The mechanisms and methods described herein can protect against undesired or inadvertent opening of the access door, as well as undesired or inadvertent removal of the removable power supply. The exemplary handle assemblies disclosed herein can form all or part of the trolley component of luggage, which can be disposed along an upper edge of an article of luggage.

[0195] Referring to FIGS. 1-12, an example handle assembly 100 can include luggage handle housing 130. Luggage handle housing 130 can be configured to receive and contain handle 132, which is attached to a pair of telescopically-extendible rods 131A and 131B. In some embodiments, handle 132 can include button 133. Button 133 can permit, in response to being depressed by a user, telescopically-extendible rods 131 A and 13 IB to extend, such that handle 132 can be raised to permit a user to comfortably wheel an article of luggage to their intended destination. In some embodiments, a pair of spaced-apart tubes can be provided to receive telescopically-extendible rods 131A and 13 IB, to enclose or contain the rods when they are in an unextended configuration, e.g., when they are disposed within a luggage system during storage of the luggage system in, e.g., the trunk of a car or an overhead compartment of an airplane or train. Flandle 132 and button 133, and the operation thereof, are applicable to all of the exemplary handle assemblies depicted or described herein.

[0196] Access door 160 can be attached to luggage handle housing 130. In some embodiments, access door 160 can be hingedly attached to luggage handle housing 130. In some embodiments, access door 160 can include detents disposed on opposing sides of access door 160 to permit access door to be snap fit into luggage handle housing 130 in such a manner that it is permitted to swing open and closed. Luggage handle housing 130 can include corresponding openings to receive the detents to secure access door 160 to luggage handle housing 130. Access door 160 can be attached by means of a rod 164 extending through a rear portion of the access door, which rod interacts with luggage handle housing 130, e.g., with openings in luggage handle housing 130, to hingedly attach access door 160 to luggage handle housing 130. In some embodiments, access door 160 can completely encase a rod extending therethrough. In some embodiments, portions of a rod extending through the access door 160 can be surrounded by the access door, while other portions can be exposed. In this manner, material and weight savings can be realized, and/or the access door can be permitted to pivot more easily. In some embodiments, a channel and ridge system can be used to attach access door 160 to luggage handle housing 130, including in a manner similar to that described with respect to handle assembly 600. Access door 160 can include raised lip 162. Raised lip 162 can permit a user’s finger to reach under access door 160 and open it to expose power supply housing 120 or removable power supply 110 when it is disposed inside. In some embodiments, raised lip 162 can extend across substantially all of the front width of access door 160. In some embodiments, raised lip 162 can extend across a limited portion of access door 160, including, e.g., about 70%, about 60%, about 50%, about 40%, about 30%, or about 20% of the width of access door 160. Access door 160 can include first and second bumps 163A and 163B that extend outwardly from a front side surface or edge of access door 160. Bumps 163A and 163B can aid in securing access door 160 in a closed configuration by pressing against luggage handle housing 130 in such a manner that access door 160 is prevented from inadvertently opening. In some embodiments, there can be one bump that presses against luggage handle housing 130 to hold access door 160 in the closed position. In some embodiments, there can be multiple bumps. Bumps 163A and 163B can be positioned on any of the front, left, right, or rear surfaces of access door 160, and can extend a sufficient distance from those surfaces to interact with luggage handle housing 130 snugly while still permitting access door 160 to be opened and closed. In some embodiments, 163A and 163B can be excluded. Luggage handle housing 130 can include recess 135 along a front surface of luggage handle housing 130 to more easily permit a user’s fingers to reach under and lift up on access door 160 and/or raised lip 162.

[0197] Battery housing 120 can be attached to luggage handle housing 130. A removable power supply 110 (e.g., a battery) can be removably disposed in the power supply housing 120. Power supply housing 120 can be attached to luggage handle housing 130 by various suitable means, including, e.g., glued, press-fit, snap-fit, screwed, or other similar means. In some embodiments, including as depicted, power supply housing 120 can include holes or openings that can, e.g., facilitate removal and insertion of removable power supply 110 and/or save on materials and/or manufacturing costs. In some embodiments, power supply housing 120 can include, e.g., a push- push spring mechanism or a traditional spring mechanism, as described herein with respect to exemplary handle assembly 600. Removable power supply 110 can be a rechargeable DC power source, which can be used to charge a user’s devices, e.g., a laptop or cellphone, and can be recharged. Removable power supply 110 can include, e.g., USB-type DC electrical power supplying/discharging ports and/or micro-USB-type DC power recharging ports. In some embodiments, access door 160 can be configured such that it can be in a closed position while cables for charging devices or recharging removable power supply 110 are plugged in to rechargeable power supply 110. That is, openings or raised channels sufficient to permit a charging cord to pass through while the access door is in the closed position can be provided in the access door.

[0198] Access door 160 can be secured in a closed position by latch 145. Latch 145 can be attached to luggage handle housing 130 such that it is permitted to slide laterally with respect to luggage handle housing 130, including sliding at least a portion of latch 145 over a portion of access door 160 to secure access door 160 in the closed position. In some embodiments, latch 145 can slide over all or substantially all of the side (e.g., the depth from the front to rear of access door 160, where the rear of the access door is proximate the hinged edge) of access door 160. In some embodiments, latch 145 can slide over a portion of the side of access door, e.g., about 70%, about 60%, about 50%, about 40%, about 30%, or about 20% of the side of access door 160. In some embodiments, latch 145 can be spring-biased, such that it automatically slides back over access door 160 once it is in the closed position, or after it has been pushed out of the way from the force of, e.g., access door 160 being closed down upon it. In some embodiments, latch 145 can extend over all or a portion of a corner of access door 160. A recess can be provided in luggage handle housing 130 into which portions of the latch can slide as the latch is moved from an engaged position (e.g., disposed at least partially over at least a portion of access door 160) to a disengaged position (e.g., not disposed over any portion of access door 160), or vice-versa. In some embodiments, latch 145 can also include a protrusion to facilitate a user’s ability to more easily push or pull latch 145 to the engaged or disengaged positions. Latch 145 can include a curved lower surface that substantially matches the profile of luggage handle housing 130. Latch 145 can be disposed on a front corner of luggage handle housing 130, such that latch 145 sits on a top surface of luggage handle housing 130 and extends over the front comer and partially down the front surface of luggage handle housing 130, as shown. In this manner, latch 145 can be accessed by a user from various positions from the exterior of the luggage system that handle assembly 100 is disposed upon.

[0199] FIGS. 1, 6, and 9A depict latch 145 in the engaged position, wherein a portion of the latch is over the access door. In the disengaged position, where the latch is slid or moved out of the way of the access door, a use can pivot access door 160 open for access to removable power supply 110 and/or power supply housing 120 below. In some embodiments, latch 145 can be provided with an angled edge facing access door 160. The contact between access door 160 and the angled edge can push latch 145 back into luggage handle housing 130 in response to an upward force from the door opening, which can limit the likelihood of a situation where the door (or the power supply) can break or damage latch 145.

[0200] FIGS. 9A-9C show cutaway detail views of the region of handle assembly 100 that includes latch 145. Opening 149 can be formed in luggage handle housing 130, and can be configured to receive latch 145. Latch 145 can be secured within opening 149 by pin 147 that fits within an opening on the underside of latch 145, e.g., the side of 145 that faces and can be partially disposed within luggage handle housing 130. Opening 149 can include first and second chambers 157 and 158, which can be separated by raised regions (e.g., bumps or detents) on opposing sides of opening 149. The interaction of first and second chambers 157 and 158 and the corresponding raised regions can permit the latch to be‘locked’ or retained in either the open or closed configuration. That is, latch 145 can be retained in either first chamber 157 in the closed configuration or in second chamber 158 in the open configuration, and is not permitted to freely slide within opening 149, but instead requires some force to toggle between the two regions. In this manner, inadvertent movement of latch 145 from the open to the closed configurations can be prevented. In some embodiments, opening 149 can be a continuous region, free of raised regions.

[0201] Luggage handle housing 130 can also include first and second slots 148A and 148B, which can be formed as openings in luggage handle housing 130. In some embodiments, latch 145 can include extensions from the underside of the latch that correspond to, e.g., fit within slots 148A and 148B and can slide within the slots. The interaction or engagement of slots 148A and 148B with such extensions can ensure that latch 145 moves only along a desired path and/or can prevent latch 145 from twisting or spinning and coming out of alignment. In some embodiments, there can be one slot. In some embodiments, slots 148A and 148B can be omitted. The use of one or more slots can aid in ensuring proper engagement of latch 145 over access door 160 when in the closed configuration, to ensure that access door 160 is effectively prevented from opening.

[0202] Referring to FIGS. 13-23, an example handle assembly 200 can include luggage handle housing 230 and latch 245. Handle assembly 200 includes similar elements as handle assembly 100 (e.g., handle assembly 200 includes luggage handle housing 230, latch 245, and access door 260, which are similar to luggage handle housing 130, latch 145, and access door 260 of handle assembly 100). The operation of handle assembly 200, including but not limited to the operation of latch 245 and access door 260 and their corresponding features, is similar to that described herein with reference to handle assembly 100, including but not limited to the operation of latch 145 and access door 160 and their corresponding features.

[0203] Latch 245 can be disposed on a top surface of luggage handle housing 230 to secure access door 260 in a closed position over removable power supply 210 and power supply housing 220. Latch 245 can be disposed entirely on a top surface of luggage handle housing 230, without any portion of latch 245 extending over a front side of luggage handle housing 230. This can prevent latch 245 from being actuated, inadvertently or otherwise, from a front side of handle assembly 200. Luggage handle housing 230 can include one or more slots (e.g., similar to slots 148A and 148B) in which latch 245 can slide between the closed or open positions over access door 260. The slots can restrict the motion of latch 245 to be in a lateral direction substantially perpendicular to the edge of access door 260 that latch 245 is sliding over. In some embodiments, luggage handle housing can include an opening which can include two chambers, similar to opening 149 and chambers 157 and 158, as described with respect to handle assembly 100, which can retain latch 245 in the open or closed position.

[0204] Latch 245 can also include an angled surface or chamfer on an upper surface of the latch to enable the latch to more easily be pushed out of the way of, for example, the access door as it is being closed or the removable battery as it is being inserted. In some embodiments, latch 245 can be spring-biased, such that it automatically slides back over access door 260 once it is in the closed position, or after it has been pushed out of the way from the force of, e.g., access door 260 being closed down upon it. In some embodiments, a recess can be provided in luggage handle housing 230 to permit a portion of latch 245 to slide into or underneath a portion of luggage handle housing during operation of latch 245. That is, where the latch is in the open or disengaged position (e.g., not positioned over access door 260), a portion of latch 245 can slide into and/or underneath luggage handle housing 230. A bottom surface of latch 245 can be provided with one or more raised portions or detents that can assist in ensuring only lateral movement of the latch. In some embodiments, the raised portions or detents can engage with depressions or openings in luggage handle housing 230, resulting in a track in which latch 245 can slide along luggage handle housing 230. In some embodiments, latch 245 can be rigidly attached, e.g., integrally attached, or molded to the luggage handle housing, and can be provided with sufficient flexibility to flex out of the way of access door 260 and removable power supply 210, in response to force from a user pushing the latch out of the way or pressing access door 260 down onto the latch to force or deflect it out of the way of the closing door. In some embodiments, latch 245 can be made from, e.g., rubber, plastic, metal, spring metal, or the like.

[0205] Referring to FIGS. 24-34, an example handle assembly 300 can include luggage handle housing 330 and latch 345. Handle assembly 300 includes similar elements as handle assembly 100 (e.g. handle assembly 300 includes luggage handle housing 330, latch 345, and access door 360, which are similar to luggage handle housing 130, latch 145, and access door 160 of handle assembly 100). The operation of handle assembly 300, including but not limited to the operation of latch 345 and access door 360 and their corresponding features, is similar to that described herein with reference to handle assembly 100, including but not limited to the operation of latch 145 and access door 160 and their corresponding features.

[0206] Latch 345 can include thumb grip 347. Thumb grip 347 can provide a user with a tactile surface on which to push or press to slide latch 345 into the engaged or disengaged position over access door 360. Latch 345 can be connected to thumb grip 347 and can extend a distance away from a rear or side edge of latch 345 remote from the portion of latch 345 that extends over access door 360 when latch 345 is in the closed configuration. Portions of latch 345 and/or thumb grip 347 can be enclosed within luggage handle housing 330, e.g., leaving only the chamfered portion of latch 345 and thumb grip 347 exposed. The connection between latch 345 and thumb grip 347 can be disposed underneath the surface of luggage handle housing 330, as depicted in FIGS. 24-34, such that latch 345 is disposed on a top surface of luggage handle housing 330 and thumb grip 347 is disposed on a front surface of luggage handle housing 330.

In some embodiments, latch 345 and thumb grip 347 can be formed as an integral component. In some embodiments, all or a portion of the outermost surface of thumb grip 347 can be disposed beneath the front or outermost surface of luggage handle housing 330, which can prevent inadvertent actuation of thumb grip 347 and in turn latch 345. In some embodiments, all or a portion of the outermost surface of thumb grip 347 can be substantially flush with the front or outermost surface of luggage handle housing 330. Channel 348 can be provided in luggage handle housing 330, defining a region that is recessed beneath an outer surface of luggage handle housing 330 and in which luggage handle housing 330 can slide. Thumb grip 347 can be provided with a series of raised features to facilitate engagement between a user’ s finger and the thumb grip. In some embodiments, thumb grip 347 can include a rubberized portion to facilitate engagement between a user’s finger and the thumb grip.

[0207] FIGS. 35-45 depict an example handle assembly 400. Handle assembly 400 shares many of substantially the same features as handle assembly 300. Handle assembly 400 includes similar elements as handle assembly 300 (e.g. handle assembly 400 includes luggage handle housing 430 and latch 445, which are similar to luggage handle housing 330 and latch 345 of handle assembly 300). The operation of handle assembly 400 is similar to that described herein with reference to handle assembly 300. Latch 445 includes thumb grip 447. In handle assembly 400, all or substantially all of latch 445 and thumb grip 447 can be disposed outside of luggage handle housing 430. That is, no portions of latch 445 and thumb grip 447, and any connection between the two (e.g., integral or otherwise), are enclosed by luggage handle housing 430. In some embodiments, only the portions of latch 445 that connect it to luggage handle housing 430 can be enclosed by luggage handle housing 430, e.g., the portions extending into the tracks or opening in which the latch slides. Embodiments where all or substantially all of latch 445 and thumb grip 447 are disposed outside of luggage handle housing 430 can simplify the housing design and/or permit for a more efficient manufacturing process.

[0208] Referring to FIGS. 46-55, an example handle assembly can include luggage handle housing 530 and latch 545. Handle assembly 500 includes similar elements as handle assembly 100 (e.g. handle assembly 500 includes luggage handle housing 530 and access door 560, which are similar to luggage handle housing 130 and access door 160 of handle assembly 100). The operation of handle assembly 500, including but not limited to of access door 560 and its corresponding features, is similar to that described herein with reference to handle assembly 100, including but not limited to of access door 160 and its corresponding features.

[0209] Latch 545 can be pivotably attached to luggage handle housing 530 and can extend over access door 560 when in the engaged position. In the engaged position, latch 545 is capable of keeping access door 560 in the closed position, and securing removable power supply 510 within power supply housing 520. Latch 545 can pivot about an attachment point 582, such that in the disengaged position, latch 545 is out of engagement with access door 560 such that access door 560 can be opened or closed. In some embodiments, latch 545 and/or luggage handle housing 530 can include one or more tactile elements to guide or stop latch 545 at various locations.

[0210] Latch 545 can include knob 547, which can serve as an aid for a user to pivot latch 545 out of the way of access door 560 in order to gain access to removable power supply 510 and/or removable power supply 520, or to pivot latch 545 over access door 560 to secure access door 560 in the closed position. In some embodiments, all or a portion of latch 545 and/or knob 547 can be disposed beneath the surface of luggage handle housing 530, which can prevent inadvertent actuation of the latch and resulting inadvertent opening of access door 560.

[0211] Latch 545 can include a hook portion that engages with a catch on a top or bottom surface of access door 560, to retain access door 560 when latch 545 is pivoted into the engaged position. In some embodiments, latch 545 can be arranged or disposed under access door 560.

In some embodiments, latch 545 can be disposed such that it fits within an opening or pocket formed in access door 560 when latch 545 is in the engaged position, in order to retain access door 560 in the closed position. A portion of access door 560 can be modified (e.g., opposing sides of access door 560 need not be symmetrical) to permit for easier engagement of latch 545 over access door 560, e.g., as depicted in FIGS. 53 and 54. In some embodiments, a region of access door 560 over which latch 545 is expected to close can be thinner than other, remote regions of access door 560. Access door 560A can be utilized with handle assembly 500 can also include bumps 563AA and 563AB to permit snug engagement of the access door with luggage handle housing 530 to further prevent inadvertent opening of the access door, as further discussed with respect to handle assembly 100.

[0212] Referring to FIGS. 56-66, an example handle assembly 600 can include access door 660 hingedly attached to luggage handle housing 630. Handle assembly 600 includes similar elements as handle assembly 100 (e.g. handle assembly 600 includes luggage handle housing 630 and handle 632, which are similar to luggage handle housing 130 and handle 132 of handle assembly 100). The operation of handle assembly 600 is similar to that described herein with reference to handle assembly 100.

[0213] Access door 660 can be attached to luggage handle housing 630 along an axis that extends along a rear edge of access door 660, permitting access door 660 to pivot about that axis. A rear edge of access door 660 can include channel 680 that can be configured to attach or snap onto a corresponding ridge formed in or on luggage handle housing 630. Channel 680 and its corresponding ridge can be shaped such that access door 660 remains hingedly attached to luggage handle housing 630 but is free to swing open and closed, subject to force from a user. In some embodiments, access door 660 can be attached to luggage handle housing 630 by a rod and/or rod and spring system, or by a press-fit system including detents, along with

corresponding openings in luggage handle housing 630, including in a manner similar to that as described with respect to handle assembly 100. Access door 660 can include a lip (e.g., protrusion, ridge) 665 that can engage with a depression (e.g., recess) 650 in luggage handle housing 630. The engagement between lip 665 and depression 650 can be secure the access door closed and guard against inadvertent opening of access door 660. In some embodiments, the engagement between lip 665 and depression 650 can be sufficient to resist an upward force of removable power supply 610 pressing against a bottom surface of access door 660, e.g., when being forced upward via a push-push or standard spring mechanism disposed within power supply housing 620, as described herein. Access door 660 can be stiff but resilient such that it can be clipped in and out of depression 650 during use. The strength of the engagement of the lip with the depression can vary based on the materials used, the thickness and flexibility of the lip itself, and the interference or amount that the lip is inserted into the depression in the engaged position, so that the user can readily open and close the access door but also avoid inadvertent opening.

[0214] In some embodiments, access door 660 can be capable of deforming. The force of removable battery 610 pushing upward against a bottom surface of access door 660 can deform access door 660 to generate a moment pushing lip 665 further into depression 650, increasing the engagement between those features and ensuring that the access door stays closed until it is opened by a user. In some embodiments, material properties and the shape of access door 660 can be selected to increase engagement of lip 665 with depression 650. The thickness and/or flexibility of access door 660 can be varied over the width and/or depth of access door 660, to permit increased deformation of access door 660 when in the closed position that will induce a moment in access door 660.

[0215] Lip 665 can be disengaged from depression 650 in luggage handle housing 630 to permit access to and/or removal of a removable power supply or battery disposed in power supply housing 620, or to permit a battery or power supply to be inserted into power supply housing 620. In some embodiments, access door 660 can flex or deform so that, when pried upon, the door can bend and lip 665 can be pulled from depression 650, permitting access door 660 to be freely pivoted open about its hinged engagement with luggage handle housing 630. In some embodiments, lip 665 can be capable of deforming or flexing to a greater degree than the main body of access door 660, which can be comparatively more rigid. Access door 660 can include handle 662, which can extend from a front edge or surface of access door 660 to provide for a region on which a user can more easily grasp or pry access door 660 open. In some

embodiments, handle 662 can aid a user in flexing access door 660 in a sufficient amount to free lip 665 from depression 650.

[0216] FIGS. 63A-63B depict cutaway views that show, among other things, the interior of power supply housing 620. Power supply housing 620 can include push-push spring mechanism 675 disposed at the base of the battery housing. In the inactivated position, the springs of push- push spring mechanism 675 are compressed using internal mechanisms and are prevented from pushing removable power supply 610 up and out of the power supply housing 620. In response to a push, or downward force from the user, push-push spring mechanism 675 can be placed in the activated position and the springs of push-push spring mechanism 675 are free to decompress and exert an upward force on the bottom of removable power supply 610 to push it up and out of removable power supply housing 620. In response to a push or downward force while in the activated position, push-push spring mechanism 675 is returned to the inactivated position whereby the springs are compressed and prevented from exerting an upward force on removable power supply 610. In some embodiments, power supply housing 620 can include a spring that exerts an upward force (e.g., out of the bag) on the removable battery, which upward force is resisted by access door 660, more specifically in the depicted embodiment by the engagement of lip 665 with depression 650. The springs can be one or more simple spring devices (e.g., linear springs) providing a resisting force capable of pushing removable power supply 610 from power supply housing 620 so that the user can grasp and remove removable power supply 610. Simple or standard springs are interchangeable for push-push spring mechanism 675 in the variously described embodiments. While the various exemplary handle assemblies described herein may be disclosed or depicted with either simple springs or push-push spring mechanisms, unless otherwise stated, either type of mechanism can be implemented with any handle assembly for better battery retention. Either a spring or a push-push spring mechanism can be employed with any of the exemplary handle assemblies described herein. The use of a spring-only assembly can reduce cost and reduce the quantity of moving components in the handle assembly. The use of a push-push spring mechanism can prevent a battery or power supply from being forced up out of the power supply housing if the access door is inadvertently opened. In some embodiments, the removable power supply can be removed from the power supply housing by the force of a spring exerting a force against the bottom of the removable battery. Where a spring is used, the pivot axis of the access door can be dampened in order to slow down battery ejection and make the ejection and removal of the battery unobtrusive to a user.

[0217] Referring to FIGS. 67-77, an example handle assembly 700 can include access door 760 hingedly attached to luggage handle housing 730. Handle assembly 700 includes similar elements as handle assembly 600 (e.g. handle assembly 700 includes luggage handle housing 730 and lip 765, which are similar to luggage handle housing 630 and lip 665 of handle assembly 600). The operation of handle assembly 700 is similar to that described herein with reference to handle assembly 600.

[0218] Access door 760 can be attached to luggage handle housing 730 along a rear edge of access door 760, including, e.g., by press fit, rod/rod and spring, or channel and ridge systems as described with respect to handle assembly 600, permitting access door 760 to pivot about an axis. Access door 760 can include lip 765 that is capable of engaging with notch or depression 750, which can be attached to or integrally formed with luggage handle housing 730. Lip 765 can be positioned at a distance downward (e.g., underneath) from the top surface of access door 760 toward power supply housing 720 from a lower surface of access door 760. In some embodiments, lip 765 is not visible from the exterior of handle assembly 700 when access door 760 is in the closed position, i.e., when lip 765 is engaged with notch 750. Luggage handle housing 730 can be provided with a cut-out to receive lip 765, when in the closed position, and notch 750 can be disposed within the cut-out.

[0219] Luggage handle housing 730 can include recess 735, which can permit a user’s fingers to more easily slide under and engage with access door 760 to lift it open and/or disengage lip 765 from notch or depression 750. Access door 760 can include handle 762 along a front edge that can further facilitate a user’s interaction with and operation of access door 760. Handle 762 can extend outward and/or upward from the front edge of access door 760. In some embodiments, handle 762 can be excluded. In some embodiments, a user applying force to handle 762 in a prying motion can cause access door 760 to deform and deflect, thereby disengaging lip 765 from depression 750 such that access door 760 can be swung open about its hinge, e.g., pivoted about axis 780. Handle 762 can be interchangeably used with the raised lip on the access door as described with respect to the various embodiments.

[0220] Referring to FIGS. 78-88, an example handle assembly 800 can include access door 860 attached to luggage handle housing 830 and capable of toggling between a locked-closed position and an openable position. Handle assembly 800 includes similar elements as handle assembly 100 (e.g. handle assembly 800 includes luggage handle housing 830 and access door 860, which are similar to luggage handle housing 130 and access door 160 of handle assembly 100). The operation of handle assembly 800 is similar to that described herein with reference to handle assembly 100.

[0221] Access door 860 can be recessed such that the top surface of access door 860 is below or substantially flush with the top surface of luggage handle housing 830. Opening 849 can be provided in luggage handle housing 830. Opening 849 can include two chambers, 857 and 858, which can permit access door 860 to be toggled between a locked-closed position and an openable position. Corresponding openings and chambers can be provided on an opposite side of luggage handle housing 830. Access door 860 can pivot about an axis on or adjacent to the luggage handle housing perpendicular to chamber 858 of opening 849. In the locked-closed position, portions of the front edge of access door 860 can be located in recesses of luggage handle housing 830. Because portions of the front edge of access door 860 are located below or within luggage handle housing 830 in the locked-closed position, luggage handle housing serves as a barrier to access door 860 inadvertently opening until the access door is toggled to the openable position. In some embodiments, the corners of access door 860 can be disposed below the surface of luggage handle housing 830 when in the locked-closed position. In some embodiments, all or substantially all of the front edge of access door 860 can be disposed below the surface of luggage handle housing 830 when in the locked-closed position.

[0222] A user can push against raised lip 862, which can be located proximate the front edge of access door 860, to force access door 860 from the locked-closed position, in which the rear edge or axis of rotation of access door 860 is disposed in chamber 857, to the openable position, in which the rear edge or axis of rotation of access door 860 is disposed in changer 858. Once access door 860 is slid to the openable position, no portions of the front edge of access door 860 are covered by or contained within luggage handle housing 830. In this manner, access door 860 is permitted to freely swing open when its axis of rotation or rear edge is disposed in chamber 858. In the openable position, portions of the front edge of access door 860 are not covered by luggage handle housing 830, permitting access door 860 to pivot open for access to, insertion, and/or removal of removable power supply 810 to or from power supply housing 820.

[0223] Referring to FIGS. 89-102, an example handle assembly 900 can include latch 940 that extends over the top of removable power supply 910 when it is inserted within power supply housing 920, in order to secure the power supply in the housing. Latch 940 can be connected to push-button 950. Push-button 950 can be disposed on or near the surface of luggage handle housing 930, including on a vertical surface of luggage handle housing 930 adjacent to access door 960. In some embodiments, push-button 950 can be flush with the surface of luggage handle housing 930 before being pushed by a user, and when depressed can be beneath the surface of luggage handle housing 930. In some embodiments, the push-button can be disposed on alternative locations on or proximate to luggage handle housing 930, including to the side of access door 960 or on an exterior surface of luggage handle housing beneath the level of access door 960. Push-button 950 can be on a surface of the luggage that handle assembly 900 is installed within remote from luggage handle housing 930.

[0224] In some embodiments, latch 940 can be integrally formed from the same piece of material as push-button 950. Access door 960 can cover, e.g., any or all of removable power supply 910, power supply housing 920, and/or latch 940. Handle assembly 900 includes similar elements as handle assembly 100 (e.g. handle assembly 900 includes luggage handle housing 930, removable power supply housing 920, and access door 960, which are similar to luggage handle housing 130, removable power supply housing 120, and access door 160 of handle assembly 100). The operation of handle assembly 900 is similar to that described herein with reference to handle assembly 100.

[0225] Latch 940 can be pivoted out of the way of removable battery 910 by activation of push button 950. The upward-facing surface of latch 940 can be tapered to permit latch 940 to be pivoted out of the way in response to the downward force of the bottom surface of the removable battery as the removable battery is installed or inserted by a user. In this manner, removable power supply 910 can be installed without requiring a user to depress push-button 950 to pivot latch 940 out of the way of the opening of power supply housing 920.

[0226] Latch 940 can pivot about rod 980 rotatably attached to luggage handle housing 930 above and behind push-button 950. In some embodiments, latch 940 can pivot away from the user (e.g., toward the luggage). In some embodiments, latch 940 can pivot toward the user (e.g., away from the suitcase). In some embodiments, latch 940 can pivot laterally (e.g., side-to-side). The latch can also include spring (e.g., a torsion spring, extension spring, compression spring, or sheet metal-formed spring) 990, disposed on or near rod 980. Spring 990 can exert a force against latch 940 to keep it in the closed position until a user activates push-button 950 in order to release power supply 910 and power supply housing 920 below. In some embodiments, the force of a user pushing removable power supply 910 against the angled upper surface of latch 940 can be sufficient to overcome the force of spring 990 such that latch 940 is pivoted out of the way and the removable power supply can be inserted into removable power supply housing 920. In some embodiments, spring 990 can be a spring clip acting on latch 940. In some

embodiments, latch 940 is made from spring steel, obviating the need for spring 990, because the latch acts as both the latch and the spring. Access doors 960A and 960B can be implemented with handle assembly 900 (or any of the other handle assemblies disclosed herein). As discussed with respect to embodiments depicted and described herein, the access door can include bumps 963AA and 963AB, which can ensure that access door 960A has a snug fit within luggage handle housing 930 by interaction of pumps 963AA and 963 AB with the surface of luggage handle housing 930. Access door 960B includes another configuration of bumps 963BA and 963BB, which are wider than those disposed on the front edge of access door 960A. In some embodiments, openings or recesses can be formed in luggage handle housing 930 to receive bumps 963AA, 963AB, 963BA, or 963BB, such that the bumps on the access door can snap into the luggage handle housing for a more secure fit.

[0227] Referring to FIGS. 103-114, an example handle assembly 1000 can include lift arm 1040 for the purpose of lifting removable power supply 1010 upward from power supply housing 1020 and above the surface of luggage handle housing 1030 so that power supply 1010 can be accessed and removed by a user. Lift arm 1040 can include handle 1041, which can be shaped to permit a user to more easily lift up on lift arm 1040. In some embodiments, lift arm 1040 can be formed from one continuous material, for example plastic. In some embodiments, the lift arm can be made up of multiple portions or materials. Handle assembly 1000 includes similar elements as handle assembly 100 (e.g. handle assembly 1000 includes luggage handle housing 1030 and access door 1060, which are similar to luggage handle housing 130 and access door 160 of handle assembly 100). The operation of handle assembly 1000 is similar to that described herein with reference to handle assembly 100.

[0228] Power supply housing 1020 can be constructed such that a portion of the bottom of removable power supply 1010 is left exposed and can come into contact with lift arm 1040. In some embodiments, it is not necessary to include a spring in or adjacent to the battery housing, because the removable battery will be lifted out of the battery housing and above the luggage handle housing by lift arm 1040 alone. Power supply housing 1020 can only partially encase power supply 1010 when it is installed, in order to permit lift arm 1040 to have space to exert an upward force on power supply 1010 and lift it upward out of power supply housing 1020 without lift arm 1040 being stopped by power supply housing 1020. In some embodiments, power supply 1010 can be configured to slide into power supply housing 1020 until it is retained by features of lift arm 1040.

[0229] Lift arm 1040 can include tapered end portions 1042 and 1043 on either side of the assembly. Tapered end portions 1042 and 1043 can engage with clamp assemblies 1045 and 1046, respectively. The clamp assemblies are pivotably attached on or adjacent to power supply housing 1020, and are capable of swinging or pivoting such that tapered end portions 1042 and 1043 apply force on clamp assemblies 1045 and 1046 are capable of providing sufficient force to hold removable power supply 1010 in place. The force applied by tapered end portions 1042 and 1043 through clamp assemblies 1045 and 1046 (and optionally through grip pads 1045 and 1046) is substantially perpendicular to the force applied by lift arm 1040. Clamp assemblies 1045 and 1046 can include grip pads 1047 and 1048, respectively, which can engage with the removable power supply 1010 to grip it and hold it down when tapered end portions 1042 and 1043 of the lift arm are engaged with the clamp assemblies. Grip pads 1047 and 1048 can be made of, for example, mbber, or another suitable material to grip and prevent power supply 1010 from moving, preferably without damaging the power supply. In some embodiments, a detent feature can be provided on or adjacent to the battery housing. The detent feature can be configured to hold lift arm 1040 in place when a force is not being applied to remove power supply 1010. The force holding lift arm 1040 in place by the detent feature can be lower than the force applied by the clamp assemblies holding the power supply in place. Exemplary FIG. 105 depicts lift arm 1040 in the locked position, where tapered end portions 1042 and 1043 of lift arm 1040 are engaged with clamp assemblies 1045 and 1046 to push grip pads 1047 and 1048 against removable power supply 1010 to retain removable power supply 1010 within power supply housing 1020 and prevent it from falling out or being inadvertently removed from the luggage system. FIG. I l l depicts lift arm 1040 in the unlocked position, where tapered end portions 1042 and 1043 of lift arm 1040 have disengaged with clamp assemblies 1045 and 1046, by lifting or pushing up on lift arm 1040, including, e.g., by lifting up on handle 1041. When the tapered end portions of lift arm 1040 are disengaged from clamp assemblies 1045 and 1046, the pressure of grip pads 1047 and 1048 on the sides of removable power supply 1010 is removed and removable power supply is released and free to move. In some embodiments, grip pads 1047 and 1048 can be attached to clamp assemblies 1045 and 1046. In some embodiments, grip pads 1047 and 1048 can be affixed to removable power supply 1010, or attached to or adjacent to power supply housing 1020. In some embodiments, a gap can be provided between lift arm 1040 and the bottom of removable power supply 1010, which can permit the clamp assemblies to disengage from removable power supply 1010 before lift arm 1040 exerts an upward force on the removable battery to lift the removable battery up and out of power supply housing 1020.

[0230] Referring to FIGS. 115-125, an example handle assembly 1100 can include access door 1160 slideably attached to luggage handle housing 1130. Handle assembly 1100 includes similar elements as handle assembly 100 (e.g. handle assembly 1100 includes luggage handle housing 1130 and handle 1132, which are similar to luggage handle housing 130 and handle 132 of handle assembly 100). The operation of handle assembly 1100 is similar to that described herein with reference to handle assembly 100.

[0231] Access door 1160 can be formed from a thin sheet of rigid material, e.g., plastic, metal, or a textile, and can be capable of sliding into and/or through luggage handle housing 1130. Access door 1160 can include grip 1162 that extends across the entire or substantially the entire width of access door 1160, to facilitate a user’s push or pull force on access door 1160 to open or close access door 1160 over power supply housing 1120 and/or removable power supply 1110 if disposed therein. In some embodiments, grip 1162 can extend across a portion of the width of access door 1160, including as described herein with respect to raised lip 162 of handle assembly 100. In the open configuration, the front edge of access door 1160 can be slid such that it is completely out of the way of removable power supply 1110 when it is being inserted and/or removed from power supply housing 1120.

[0232] In some embodiments, grip 1162 can include tapered portions to permit access door 1160 to be more easily slid out of the way, for instance in response to a force from a bottom edge of removable power supply 1110 when it is being inserted into removable power supply housing 1120. The tapered portions can also permit access door 1160 to be more easily closed, e.g., over the edge of removable battery 1110. In some embodiments, luggage handle housing 1130 can be shaped such that grip 1162 fits snugly into a receiving recess on luggage handle housing 1130. Access door 1160 can be configured to slide and/or recede in any of various other directions, e.g., toward the user or laterally/side-to-side. In some embodiments, a receiving pocket can be provided on an interior portion of luggage handle housing 1130, such that access door 1160 slides into the receiving pocket during opening and is contained within the receiving pocket when in the open position. In some embodiments, access door 1160 can slide through an opening in luggage handle housing 1130 that is not associated with a receiving pocket, such that access door 1160 slides through an opening in luggage handle housing 1130 during opening and is disposed within the article of luggage when in the open configuration, e.g., as depicted in FIG. 122B. In some embodiments, tracks can be formed in luggage handle housing 1130 that are capable of receiving opposing edges (e.g. opposing lateral edges or opposing front and back edges) of access door 1160 to retain access door 1160 as it slides from closed to open configurations.

[0233] Referring to FIGS. 126-136, an example handle assembly 1200 can include an access door 1260 that is a living hinge door and is slideably attached to luggage handle housing 1230.

A living hinge door is made up of multiple rigid portions 1260A-1260E, each connected by flexible portions. In some embodiments, the rigid portions and the flexible portions can be formed from a common material, with the flexible portions formed of thinner regions of the material. Living hinge access door 1260 can include five rigid portions 1260A-1260E. In some embodiments, living hinge access door 1260 can include fewer or more rigid portions, e.g., 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, or 10 or more rigid portions. In some embodiments, the rigid portions can include sections of a stiff material encased in a flexible or soft material. Handle assembly 1200 includes similar elements as handle assembly 1100 (e.g. handle assembly 1200 includes luggage handle housing 1230 and grip 1262, which are similar to luggage handle housing 1130 and grip 1162 of handle assembly 1100). The operation of handle assembly 1200 is similar to that described herein with reference to handle assembly 1100.

[0234] Receiving pocket 1261 can be provided in luggage handle housing 1230. Receiving pocket 1261 can provide a compartment in which access door 1260 can be disposed when it is slid out of the way of removable power supply 1210 in order to install or remove removable power supply 1210, e.g., as depicted in FIG. 133B. Access door 1260 can include grip 1262, which can extend across all or a portion of the front edge of access door 1260, and can facilitate a user’s ability to push or pull access door 1260 open or closed.

[0235] Referring to FIGS. 137-147, an example handle assembly 1300 can include access door 1360 formed from a thin flexible material. In some embodiments, access door 1360 can be formed from, e.g., plastic, metal, or a textile. Access door 1360 can be approximately 0.5mm thick. In some embodiments, access door 1360 can be, e.g., between 0.1mm and 2mm thick, between 0.25mm and 1mm thick, or between 0.35mm and 0.75mm thick. Access door 1360 can slide along a track formed in or provided on luggage handle housing 1330. Handle assembly 1300 includes similar elements as handle assembly 1100 (e.g. handle assembly 1300 includes luggage handle housing 1330 and grip 1362, which are similar to luggage handle housing 1130 and grip 1162 of handle assembly 1100). The operation of handle assembly 1300 is similar to that described herein with reference to handle assembly 1100.

[0236] Luggage handle housing 1330 can include receiving pocket 1361, which can be capable of receiving access door 1360 when it is slid into the open position by a user, e.g., as depicted in FIG. 144B. Access door 1360 can include handle 1362 provided along the front edge of access door 1360, which can facilitate a user providing force to open or close access door 1360. In some embodiments, handle 1362 can be formed from a rigid material that is affixed onto or around the front edge of access door 1360. In some embodiments, grip 1362 can be formed from the same material as access door 1360, or can be a reinforced region of the same material as access door 1360. In the closed configuration, a portion of access door 1360 can be recessed beneath a portion of luggage handle housing 1330, e.g., the front comers of access door 1360 can be disposed beneath a bottom surface of luggage handle housing 1330. In some embodiments, handle 1362 can be disposed at a distance from the front edge of access door 1360 to permit all or substantially all of the front edge of access door 1360 to be disposed beneath a bottom surface of luggage handle housing 1330.

[0237] Referring to FIGS. 148-157, an example handle assembly 1400 can include access door 1460 hingedly attached to luggage handle housing 1430. Handle assembly 1400 includes similar elements as handle assembly 600 (e.g. handle assembly 1400 includes luggage handle housing 1430 and lip 1465, which are similar to luggage handle housing 630 and lip 665 of handle assembly 600). The operation of handle assembly 1400 is similar to that described herein with reference to handle assembly 600.

[0238] Access door 1460 can include raised lip 1462 to permit a user’s finger to reach under access door 1460 and open it to expose a power supply housing or power supply below.

Luggage handle housing 1430 can include recess 1435, which can permit the finger of a user to more easily access raised lip 1462 to pivot access door 1460 from a closed to an open position. Access door 1460 can be secured to luggage handle housing 1430 by the means disclosed herein.

[0239] Access door 1460 can include fastener 1468, which can interact with a fastener opening in luggage handle housing 1430. The fastener opening can be similar to that described with respect to handle assembly 700. The fastener opening can be separate from the opening provided for access to the battery housing or removable battery disposed therein. That is, there can be one opening provided in luggage handle housing 1430 from which a removable battery or power supply can be installed or removed, and a second, separate opening provided in luggage handle housing 1430 for fastener 1468 to be positioned in when access door 1460 is in a closed position. In some embodiments, fastener opening can be formed as part of the opening that exposes the battery housing. Fastener 1468 can protrude from the underside of access door 1460. Fastener 1468 can be integrally formed from the same material, e.g., plastic or polycarbonate, as access door 1460. The base of fastener 1468 can be formed along the curve of raised lip 1462. In some embodiments, fastener 1468 can be disposed at a distance away from the front edge of access door 1460 such that it is not touching raised lip 1462 along the front edge of access door 1460. In some embodiments, fastener 1468 can be disposed at the base of raised lip 1462. In some embodiments, fastener 1468 can be formed along the curve formed by raised lip 1462. Fastener 1468 can be wider at its base, where it connects to the body of access door 1460, than at a midsection of fastener 1468, to promote structural integrity while saving on material usage and weight.

[0240] In some embodiments, luggage handle housing 1430 can include a recessed region in which access door 1460 can sit when the access door is in the closed position. In this manner, inadvertent opening of access door 1460 can be prevented, as the edges of access door 1460 would be disposed at or below the top surface of luggage handle housing 1430 and would be less likely to inadvertently catch on an outside surface that could cause access door 1460 to open unexpectedly or unintendedly.

[0241] Fastener 1468 can include a lip or protrusion 1465, which can assist in keeping access door 1460 secured in a closed position against luggage handle housing 1430, e.g., so that access door 1460 does not inadvertently open in response to changes in the orientation of the luggage piece (e.g., where it is turned upside-down or sideways) or so that access door 1460 does not inadvertently open in response to bumping against other surfaces. Lip or protmsion 1465 can interact with hook 1439, which can be integrally formed with luggage handle housing 1430, in order to keep access door 1460 secured in the closed position.

[0242] To open access door 1460, the finger of a user can slide under raised lip 1462 of access door 1460, including by optionally sliding along or within recess 1435, which can be disposed under raised lip 1462 when access door 1460 is in the closed position. In response to force from a finger of the user, access door 1460 can deform enough to free lip or protrusion 1465 of fastener 1468 from engaging with, e.g.,‘locking-on to,’ hook 1439. Once lip or protmsion 1465 is free from hook 1439, access door 1460 is no longer deformed, e.g., access door 1460 deforms elastically.

[0243] When a user closes access door 1460, fastener 1468 can enter the fastener opening. Once inside, the force of access door 1460 closing can ensure that lip or protrusion 1465 of fastener 1468 engages with hook 1439 to ensure that access door 1460 will be retained in the closed position. The closing force of access door 1460 can be provided by the force of a user’s finger pushing down on the access door, the weight of the access door itself, or a spring or spring-like mechanism that forces access door 1460 closed when it is not held in the open position. In some embodiments, a user can press down on the top of access door 1460 to cause lip or protrusion 1465 to engage with hook 1439. In some embodiments, a spring can exert a torsional force on access door 1460 great enough to cause lip or protrusion 1465 to engage with hook 1439 without any force having been applied by a user, e.g., where a user lifts open access door 1460 and subsequently‘lets go’ or stops applying any force to the access door, which permits the spring to cause the access door to pivot to the closed position.

[0244] Referring to FIGS. 158-168, an example handle assembly 1500 can include access door 1560 hingedly attached to luggage handle housing 1530. Handle assembly 1500 includes similar elements as handle assembly 600 (e.g. handle assembly 1500 includes luggage handle housing 1530 and lip 1565, which are similar to luggage handle housing 630 and lip 665 of handle assembly 600). The operation of handle assembly 1500 is similar to that described herein with reference to handle assembly 600. [0245] Access door 1560 can include front surface 1561 that extends in a downward direction from a top surface of access door 1560, e.g., extending over a front corner of luggage handle housing 1530. Access door 1560 can be pivotably attached to luggage handle housing 1530 along a rear edge of access door 1560, including by any of the systems and methods for attachment of an access door to the luggage handle housing as described herein, including, e.g. with respect to handle assemblies 600 and/or 1400.

[0246] Front surface 1561 can extend along entire width of access door 1560. In some embodiments, front surface 1561 can extend along a portion of the width of access door 1560, e.g., 75%, 66%, 50%, or 33% of the width of access door 1560. Front surface 1561 can provide protection from contaminants, e.g., dust, dirt, or water, entering the removable power supply housing and damaging a removable battery that can be disposed therein. Front surface 1561 can provide a section for the finger of a user to apply upward force to access door 1560 to move it from the open to the closed position, and vice versa. Luggage handle housing 1530 can include indent 1532, which can permit the finger of a user to more easily access the underside of raised lip 1562 to actuate access door 1560 from a closed to an open position.

[0247] Luggage handle housing 1530 can be attached to power supply housing 1520, which can be disposed within an article of luggage to protect a removable battery disposed within power supply housing 1520 from the elements. When access door 1560 is in the open position, a removable battery disposed within power supply housing 1520 can be accessed by a user. In some embodiments, cables, e.g., charging cables, can be plugged into a removable battery while it is disposed within battery housing 1520, or the removable battery can be removed from power supply housing 1520 and used remote from the article of luggage.

[0248] Luggage handle housing 1530 can include a recessed region in which access door 1560 can sit when it is in the closed position. In some embodiments, the top surface of access door 1560 can be flush with the top surface of luggage handle housing 1530 when access door 1560 is in the closed position. In some embodiments, front surface 1561 can be flush with a front surface of luggage handle housing 1530 when access door 1560 is in the closed position. Where the outer surfaces of access door 1560 are flush or substantially flush with luggage handle housing 1530, inadvertent opening of access door 1560 can be prevented.

[0249] Access door 1560 includes integrally formed lip or protrusion 1565, which can keep or can aid in keeping access door 1560 secured in a closed position against luggage handle housing 1530, e.g., so that access door 1560 does not inadvertently open in response to changes in the orientation of the luggage piece (e.g., where it is turned upside-down or sideways) or so that access door 1560 does not inadvertently open in response to bumping against other surfaces. Lip or protrusion 1565 can interact with hook 1539, which can be integrally formed with luggage handle housing 1530, in order to keep access door 1560 secured in the closed position. In some embodiments, hook 1539 can be a separate component that is attached to luggage handle housing 1530. In some embodiments, lip or protrusion 1565 can be integrally formed on the back or underside of front surface 1561. Lip or protrusion 1565 can be disposed substantially at the midpoint of the width of access door 1560 and/or front surface 1561.

[0250] The systems and methods depicted and described herein will be understood by one skilled in the art to be compatible with various types of luggage, including soft-side (e.g., fabric or textile) or hard-side (e.g., plastic, polymer, or metal) luggage. The systems and methods depicted and described herein can also be capable of being implemented on or with luggage of various size or shape configurations, e.g., on carry-on or checked luggage. One skilled in the art will understand that the various components of each embodiment depicted and described herein can be combined. For example, various access doors are disclosed herein, and each of the various disclosed access doors can be used with other handle assembly embodiments. While various configurations of access doors are illustrated herein, in some embodiments, the various example luggage systems and/or handle assemblies can include access doors that pivot or more away from the user (e.g., toward the suitcase), toward the user (e.g., away from the suitcase), or laterally (e.g., side to side). That is, the access door can be configured to pivot along any of its various edges. While the exemplary access doors herein are depicted or described as attaching to the luggage handle housing by a particular means, one skilled in the art will understand that any of the variously depicted or disclosed means can be used to attach any of the disclosed access doors to the luggage handle housing. Additionally, in some embodiments, the access door can be omitted altogether. By way of further example, any of the disclosed latch features, e.g., latch 140, latch 240, latch 340, latch 440, latch 540, or latch 940 can be implemented along with any of the disclosed access doors, including to further ensure that the access door remains secured in the closed position when conditions warrant.

[0251] One skilled in the art will realize the invention can be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof. The foregoing embodiments are therefore to be considered in all respects illustrative rather than limiting of the invention described herein. It will be appreciated that the illustrated embodiments and those otherwise discussed herein are merely examples of the invention and that other embodiments, incorporating changes thereto, including combinations of the illustrated embodiments, fall within the scope of the invention.