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Title:
INTERFACE FOR ENABLING A SPLITBOARD BINDING TO BE MOUNTED TO ANY SNOWBOARD
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/032349
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An interface for enabling a splitboard binding to be mounted to any snowboard is provided. The interface includes a baseplate that includes a disc for mounting the baseplate to a snowboard. The disc is configured to correspond with a common snowboard binding hole pattern to thereby allow the baseplate to be mounted on most snowboards. The interface further includes a puck that is configured to mount to the top surface of the baseplate. The puck is configured to interlock with many types of splitboard bindings. In this way, splitboard bindings can be mounted to a snowboard.

Inventors:
SMITH, Dallas (4724 South 3730 West, Taylorsville, Utah, 84129, US)
Application Number:
US2018/044857
Publication Date:
February 14, 2019
Filing Date:
August 01, 2018
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
SMITH, Dallas (4724 South 3730 West, Taylorsville, Utah, 84129, US)
International Classes:
A63C10/18; A63C9/00; A63C10/10; A63C10/14; A63C10/20
Foreign References:
US5499837A1996-03-19
US5890729A1999-04-06
US5354088A1994-10-11
US5984324A1999-11-16
US5909893A1999-06-08
US5713594A1998-02-03
US20130200594A12013-08-08
US20030132610A12003-07-17
US6062584A2000-05-16
Other References:
"Understanding Splitboard Bindings", W82, 30 October 2015 (2015-10-30), XP055570908, Retrieved from the Internet
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
TUCKER, Brian (36 S. State Street, #1900Salt Lake City, 84111, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

What is claimed:

1. An interface for enabling a splitboard binding to be mounted to a snowboard comprising:

a baseplate having an opening;

a disc configured to insert into the opening in the baseplate, the disc including holes by which the disc can be mounted to a snowboard via a binding hole pattern of the snowboard, the disc being configured to secure the baseplate to the snowboard when the disc is mounted to the snowboard; and

a puck that is configured to mount to the baseplate, the puck being configured to receive and secure a splitboard binding.

2. The interface of claim 1, wherein the opening of the baseplate and the disc are circular.

3. The interface of claim 1, wherein the opening of the baseplate includes an inward facing surface.

4. The interface of claim 3, wherein the disc includes an outward facing surface that aligns with the inward facing surface when the disc is inserted into the opening.

5. The interface of claim 4, wherein the inward facing surface includes notches that interface with notches in the outward facing surface to prevent the disc from rotating relative to the baseplate.

6. The interface of claim 1, wherein the baseplate includes a plurality of holes positioned around the opening, the puck being configured to mount to the baseplate via the plurality of holes.

7. The interface of claim 6, wherein the puck includes arrays of holes to enable the puck to be mounted to the baseplate in multiple positions.

8. The interface of claim 6, wherein the plurality of holes in the baseplate form a 3.5 inch by 1 inch pattern.

9. The interface of claim 1, wherein the puck includes opposing ledges that extend lengthwise along the puck.

10. The interface of claim 1, wherein the disc comprises a plurality of discs each of which includes holes that are arranged in a different pattern.

11. The interface of claim 10, wherein the plurality of discs includes a first disc with a 3x3 hole pattern and a second disc with a hole pattern matching a 3D binding hole pattern.

12. The interface of claim 1, wherein the baseplate includes at least one arched opening at opposing ends.

13. The interface of claim 12, wherein each of the at least one arched opening comprises an arched arrangement of holes.

14. The interface of claim 12, wherein each of the at least one arched opening comprises an arched slot.

15. The interface of claim 12, wherein the at least one arched opening at opposing ends comprises a plurality of arched openings at opposing ends.

16. An interface for enabling a splitboard binding to be mounted to a snowboard comprising:

a baseplate having an opening, the opening including a notched inward facing surface; a disc having a notched outward facing surface that interfaces with the notched inward facing surface, the disc including holes by which the disc can be mounted to a snowboard via a binding hole pattern of the snowboard; and

a puck that is configured to mount to the baseplate, the puck being configured to receive and secure a splitboard binding.

17. The interface of claim 16, wherein the puck includes opposing ledges by which the splitboard binding is secured.

18. The interface of claim 16, wherein the baseplate includes at least one arched opening at opposing ends.

19. An interface for enabling a splitboard binding to be mounted to a snowboard comprising:

a baseplate having an opening, the opening including an inward facing surface;

a disc having an outward facing surface that interfaces with the inward facing surface to secure the baseplate to a snowboard when the disc is secured to the snowboard; and

a puck that is configured to mount to the baseplate, the puck being configured to receive and secure a splitboard binding.

20. The interface of claim 19, wherein the disc includes a plurality of holes arranged in a pattern that corresponds with a mounting hole pattern of the snowboard.

Description:
INTERFACE FOR ENABLING A SPLITBOARD BINDING

TO BE MOUNTED TO ANY SNOWBOARD

BACKGROUND

[0001] A splitboard is a snowboard that splits into two halves. These halves can then be worn similar to cross-country skis (commonly referred to as "touring mode") to thereby allow the snowboarder to ascend the mountain. After ascending to a desired location, the snowboarder can combine the halves to form a snowboard (commonly referred to as "riding mode") for descending the mountain.

[0002] Interfaces have been developed to allow a "splitboard binding" to be mounted to the splitboard in both touring and riding modes. For touring mode, each half of the splitboard includes a touring bracket to which the front of the splitboard binding is coupled in a pivoting manner. Each splitboard half or the splitboard binding may also include a climbing bar (or heel riser, rest or lock) to provide support when climbing steeper terrain (i.e., when the heel is lifted substantially above the splitboard). For riding mode, two pairs of "pucks" or other structures are mounted on the splitboard so that the splitboard bindings can be coupled across the two halves. Typically, these pucks are configured to allow a slider plate or base plate of the splitboard binding to slide overtop and/or interlock with the pucks. In short, these interfaces allow the splitboard bindings to be quickly and easily moved between the touring and riding modes.

BRIEF SUMMARY

[0003] The present invention extends to an interface for enabling a splitboard binding to be mounted to any snowboard. The interface includes a baseplate that includes a disc for mounting the baseplate to a snowboard. The disc is configured to correspond with the common snowboard binding hole patterns to thereby allow the baseplate to be mounted on most snowboards. The interface further includes a puck that is configured to mount to the top surface of the baseplate. The puck is configured to interlock with many types of splitboard bindings. In this way, splitboard bindings can be mounted to a snowboard.

[0004] In some cases, the baseplate can include a hole pattern that matches a bolt pattern of a traditional splitboard to thereby allow other providers' pucks/adapters to be coupled to the baseplate. In this way, the present invention can enable many types of splitboard bindings to be mounted to a traditional snowboard. [0005] In some embodiments, the present invention is implemented as an interface for enabling a splitboard binding to be mounted to a snowboard. The interface includes: a baseplate having an opening; a disc configured to insert into the opening in the baseplate, the disc including holes by which the disc can be mounted to a snowboard via a binding hole pattern of the snowboard, the disc being configured to secure the baseplate to the snowboard when the disc is mounted to the snowboard; and a puck that is configured to mount to the baseplate, the puck being configured to receive and secure a splitboard binding.

[0006] In other embodiments, the present invention is implemented as an interface for enabling a splitboard binding to be mounted to a snowboard. The interface includes: a baseplate having an opening, the opening including a notched inward facing surface; a disc having a notched outward facing surface that interfaces with the notched inward facing surface, the disc including holes by which the disc can be mounted to a snowboard via a binding hole pattern of the snowboard; and a puck that is configured to mount to the baseplate, the puck being configured to receive and secure a splitboard binding.

[0007] In other embodiments, the present invention is implemented as an interface for enabling a splitboard binding to be mounted to a snowboard. The interface includes: a baseplate having an opening, the opening including an inward facing surface; a disc having an outward facing surface that interfaces with the inward facing surface to secure the baseplate to a snowboard when the disc is secured to the snowboard; and a puck that is configured to mount to the baseplate, the puck being configured to receive and secure a splitboard binding.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0008] Understanding that these drawings depict only typical embodiments of the invention and are not therefore to be considered limiting of its scope, the invention will be described and explained with additional specificity and detail through the use of the accompanying drawings in which:

[0009] Figure 1 A illustrates a top perspective exploded view of an interface for enabling a splitboard binding to be mounted to any snowboard in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present invention;

[0010] Figure IB illustrates a top perspective view of the interface of Figure 1 A;

[0011] Figure 1C illustrates a bottom view of the interface of Figure 1 A;

[0012] Figure ID illustrates a top view of the interface of Figure 1 A; and

[0013] Figure IE illustrates a side view of the interface of Figure 1 A. [0014] Figure 2A illustrates a top perspective view of a baseplate of the interface of Figures 1A-1E;

[0015] Figure 2B illustrates a bottom perspective view of the baseplate;

[0016] Figure 2C illustrates a top perspective view of another baseplate that can be used with the interface of the present invention;

[0017] Figure 3 A illustrates a top perspective view of a disc of the interface of the present invention;

[0018] Figure 3B illustrates a top view of the disc;

[0019] Figure 3C illustrates a side view of the disc;

[0020] Figure 4A illustrates a top perspective view of another disc that can be used with the interface of the present invention;

[0021] Figure 4B illustrates a top view of the disc;

[0022] Figure 4C illustrates a side view of the disc;

[0023] Figure 5A illustrates a bottom perspective view of a puck of the interface of Figures 1A-1E;

[0024] Figure 5B illustrates a bottom view of the puck;

[0025] Figure 5C illustrates a side view of the puck;

[0026] Figure 6A illustrates top perspective views of additional embodiments of a baseplate and a puck that can be used with the interface of the present invention;

[0027] Figure 6B illustrates a top view of the baseplate and puck of Figure 6 A; and

[0028] Figure 7 illustrates an example of how the interface of the present invention can be mounted to a traditional snowboard.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0029] As introduced in the background, unlike a traditional snowboard binding, a splitboard binding is configured to selectively mount to a splitboard in either the touring or riding mode. Accordingly, to use a splitboard, a snowboarder will not only need to invest in the splitboard itself, but will also need to invest in these specialized splitboard bindings. However, many snowboarders that use a splitboard, or at least those that use splitboard bindings, may still desire to ride their traditional snowboards. The present invention provides a way for snowboarders to use their splitboard bindings on their traditional snowboards.

[0030] Figures 1A-1E illustrate various views of an interface 100 for enabling a splitboard binding to be mounted to any snowboard. Interface 100 includes a baseplate 101, a puck 102 that is configured to mount to baseplate 101 via T-nuts 104 (or another suitable coupler) and bolts (not shown), and a disc 103 that is configured to be inserted into an opening in baseplate 101 and by which interface 100 is mounted to the snowboard. Figures 2 A and 2B illustrate baseplate 101 in isolation, while Figure 2C illustrates another embodiment of a baseplate 201. Figures 3A-3C and 4A-4C illustrate a disc 103 with different hole patterns. Figures 5A-5C illustrate puck 102 in isolation.

[0031] As shown, baseplate 101 is rectangular in shape (although other shapes could be used) and includes a central opening 101a for receiving disc 103. The inward facing surface lOlal of opening 101a is notched to correspond with notches in the outward facing surface 103a of disc 103. The circular shape of disc 103 and opening 101a allow disc 103 to be inserted at any rotational position while the corresponding notches prevent baseplate 101 from rotating relative to disc 103 once disc 103 is inserted into opening 101a and mounted to the snowboard.

[0032] Disc 103 includes a number of holes 103b that are arranged in patterns that correspond with the various binding hole patterns commonly used on snowboards (e.g., 4x4, 2x4, 3D, Burton Channel, etc). Accordingly, by selecting a disc 103 with the appropriate hole pattern, interface 100 can be mounted to virtually any modern snowboard. Additionally, to allow interface 100 to be used on a vintage snowboard that employs the "5-bolt" hole pattern, each end of baseplate 101 can include arched arrangements of mounting holes 101c (such as is shown in Figures 2A and 2B) or arched slots 201c (such as is shown in Figure 2C). Bolts can be inserted through mounting holes 101c or arched slots 201c into the outer four holes of the 5-bolt hole pattern while a bolt can be inserted through a hole 103b in disc 103 and into the center hole of the 5-bolt hole pattern.

[0033] In Figures 2A and 2B, there are three arched arrangements of mounting holes 101c at each end while in Figure 2C, there are three arched slots 201c at each end. In either case, the spacing of the arched arrangements/slots allows baseplate 101 to be mounted to a snowboard with the vintage 5-bolt hole pattern in multiple positions so that the toe will be spaced a desirable distance from the edge of the snowboard. Likewise, the arched arrangements/slots allow baseplate 101 to be rotated so that the foot will be positioned at a desired angle.

[0034] Surface lOlal of opening 101a is angled outwardly while surface 103a of disc 103 is angled inwardly such that baseplate 101 will be secured to the top surface of the snowboard once disc 103 is mounted. More specifically, as couplers (such as bolts) that extend through holes 103b are tightened into the holes of a snowboard, surface 103a will apply a downward force against surface lOlal thereby sandwiching baseplate 101 between the snowboard and disc 103. Prior to tightening disc 103 within opening 101a, baseplate 101 can be rotated to a desired orientation relative to the snowboard so that the snowboarder's feet will be properly angled such as is shown in Figure 7.

[0035] Puck 102 includes a top surface 102a, a bottom surface 102b, and opposing ledges 102c that extend lengthwise along puck 102. In some embodiments, such as is shown in Figure 5C, top surface 102a can be wider than bottom surface 102b thereby causing ledges 102c to be formed along the underside of top surface 102a. However, ledges 102c could be formed in another manner. Puck 102 can include holes 102d that extend through top and bottom surfaces 102a/102b and that align with corresponding holes 101b in baseplate 101 (e.g., forming four corners of a rectangular shape).

[0036] Referring to Figure 1A, T-nuts 104 (or another suitable coupler) can be positioned underneath baseplate 101 to extend through holes 101b when baseplate 101 is secured to the snowboard. Then, bolts (or another type of fastener) can be inserted through holes 102d in puck 102 to engage with t-nuts 104 to thereby mount puck 102 to baseplate 101 with top surface 102a facing upward away from the snowboard. Ledges 102c will therefore face downward towards the snowboard. The dimensions of ledges 102c can be configured to match the dimensions of the slider track or base plate of a splitboard binding so that the splitboard binding can be coupled to puck 102. This will allow the splitboard binding to be used on a snowboard. For example, if the snowboarder has Voile splitboard bindings, the Voile Slider Track can slide overtop puck 102 to interlock underneath ledges 102c.

[0037] In some embodiments, holes 101b can be configured to align with a bolt pattern of a traditional splitboard (i.e., in a 3.5 inch by 1 inch pattern). In such embodiments, other providers' pucks/adapters (which have a 3.5 inch by 1 inch bolt hole pattern) can be coupled to baseplate 101/201 in place of puck 102. In this way, baseplate 101/201 can be used to mount the other providers' pucks/adapters to a traditional snowboard.

[0038] As shown in Figures 6 A and 6B, in some embodiments, puck 102 may include arrays of holes 102d that allow puck 102 to be coupled to baseplate 101 in a number of relative positions. For example, in Figures 6A and 6B, each array includes three holes 102d. When the center hole in each array is aligned with holes 101b, puck 102 will align with baseplate 101. In contrast when the leading or trailing hole in each array is aligned with holes 101b, puck 102 will be offset relative to baseplate 101 towards the toe or heel respectively. Accordingly, by including an array of holes 102d, the position of the riders toe relative to the edge of the snowboard can be adjusted without detaching baseplate 101. Similarly, when puck 102 includes arrays of holes 102d, baseplate 101 can be configured with a single arched slot 201c at each end (or equally a single arched arrangement of holes 101c). By including a single arched slot 201c (or arched arrangement of holes 101c), the length of baseplate 101 can be shortened to thereby ensure that it does not overhang the edge of the snowboard.