Login| Sign Up| Help| Contact|

Patent Searching and Data


Title:
INVERTED FILAMENT WINDER METHOD FOR PIPELINE REHABILITATION
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2018/208930
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A pipe lining apparatus and methodology having a UV-curable, resin-impregnated reinforcement filament that is helically wound onto the inner surface of a tubular first lining layer disposed within a pipe by an inverted filament winding apparatus, the apparatus having a UV light to initiate curing of the filament as it is applied to the lining layer so as to bond the filament to the lining layer and rigidify the filament. A rigid second layer is then applied onto the filament winding layer and the first lining layer.

Inventors:
WEISENBERG, Kent (5245 Old Kings Road, Jacksonville, FL, 32254, US)
Application Number:
US2018/031823
Publication Date:
November 15, 2018
Filing Date:
May 09, 2018
Export Citation:
Click for automatic bibliography generation   Help
Assignee:
SIPP TECHNOLOGIES, LLC (4151 North Seneca Street, Wichita, KS, 67204, US)
International Classes:
H04M15/00; H04W4/24; H04W24/08
Foreign References:
US20150006280A12015-01-01
US20130083679A12013-04-04
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SAITTA, Thomas, C. (Driver McAfee Hawthorne & Diebenow, PLLC1 Independent Drive,Suite 120, Jacksonville FL, 32202, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
Claims

I claim:

1. A method of helically winding a continuous reinforcement filament on the interior of a tubular member comprising the steps of: providing a continuous reinforcement filament comprising a UV-curable resin in an uncured state; applying said continuous reinforcement filament in a helical pattern on the inner wall of a tubular member; and exposing said continuous reinforcement filament to UV light as it is applied to said inner wall of said tubular member to at least partially cure said UV-curable resin.

2. The method of claim 1, further comprising the step of subsequently exposing said continuous reinforcement filament to additional UV light to fully cure said UV-curable resin.

3. The method of claim 1, wherein said continuous reinforcement filament further comprises a heat-curable resin; and further comprising exposing said continuous reinforcement filament to a heat source to fully cure said heat-curable resin.

4. The method of claim 1, further comprising the step of forming said tubular member by applying an elastomeric coating to the inner wall of a pipe.

5. The method of claim 2, further comprising the step of forming said tubular member by applying an elastomeric coating to the inner wall of a pipe.

6. The method of claim 3, further comprising the step of forming said tubular member by applying an elastomeric coating to the inner wall of a pipe.

7. The method of claim 1, further comprising the step of applying a coating which cures to form a rigid member onto said continuous reinforcement filament and said tubular member after said continuous reinforcement filament has been applied and exposed to said UV-light.

8. The method of claim 2, further comprising the step of applying a coating which cures to form a rigid member onto said continuous reinforcement filament and said tubular member after said continuous reinforcement filament has been exposed to said additional UV light.

9. The method of claim 3, further comprising the step of applying a coating which cures to form a rigid member onto said continuous reinforcement filament and said tubular member after said continuous reinforcement filament has been applied, whereby the curing of said rigid coating supplies said heat to fully cure said heat-curable resin.

10. The method of claim 4, further comprising the step of applying a coating which cures to form a rigid member onto said continuous reinforcement filament and said tubular member after said continuous reinforcement filament has been applied and exposed to said UV-light.

11. The method of claim 1 , further comprising the step of repeating one or more times said steps of providing a continuous reinforcement filament comprising a UV-curable resin in an uncured state; applying said continuous reinforcement filament in a helical pattern on the inner wall of a tubular member; and exposing said continuous reinforcement filament to UV light as it is applied to said inner wall of said tubular member to at least partially cure said UV-curable resin; such that said continuous reinforcement filament is applied multiple times on said inner wall of said tubular member.

12. The method of claim 11, wherein said repeating step comprises at least once applying said continuous reinforcement filament in an opposite helical pattern on the inner wall of said tubular member.

13. The method of claim 1, further comprising the step of providing an inverted filament winder comprising a rotating applicator arm and a UV light positioned on said rotating applicator arm, whereby said step of applying said continuous reinforcement filament in a helical pattern on the inner wall of a tubular member is accomplished by passing said continuous reinforcement filament comprising a UV-curable resin in an uncured state through said rotating applicator arm to expose said continuous reinforcement filament to said UV light.

14. The method of claim 13 , wherein said inverted filament winder comprises a spool, whereby said step of providing a continuous reinforcement filament comprising a UV-curable resin in an uncured state comprises disposing said continuous reinforcement filament comprising said UV- curable resin in an uncured state on said spool.

15. The method of claim 7, further comprising the step of providing an inverted filament winder comprising a rotating applicator arm and a UV light positioned on said rotating applicator arm, whereby said step of applying said continuous reinforcement filament in a helical pattern on the inner wall of a tubular member is accomplished by passing said continuous reinforcement filament comprising a UV-curable resin in an uncured state through said rotating applicator arm to expose said continuous reinforcement filament to said UV light.

Description:
INVERTED FILAMENT WINDER METHOD FOR PIPELINE

REHABILITATION

Background of The Invention

This invention relates generally to methods and apparatuses for applying lining structures to internal pipe surfaces, and more particularly relates to such methods and apparatuses wherein the linings include wound reinforcement filaments applied to internal tubular surfaces, and even more particularly relates to such methods and apparatuses wherein the linings are adapted and adaptable for use in the structural repair or remediation of degraded, damaged or leaking pipes, or such linings are adapted and adaptable to improve or upgrade qualities and characteristics of pipes prior to or after use or installation. In particular, the invention relates to apparatuses and methods for applying a unidirectional or bidirectional wound filament as a component of the multi-layer lining such that the lining possesses significantly increased hoop strength, beam bending strength and significantly reduces the potential for lining creep failure.

Typically, when municipal engineers, reliability engineers, and other end users search for rehabilitation or preventative maintenance solutions for water or industrial pipes, they highly prefer a "no dig'Vtrenchless solution which is much cheaper than the other types of methods so the users will not be constrained by the budgets. Many end users/clients would also prefer to spend money on a long-term pipe rehabilitation that closely duplicates the design of their original pipe system. Additionally, trenchless pipe rehabilitation has little negative impacts on the surrounding areas of the pipeline system since it only needs to make a few openings on the pipes to let the lining device get into them and most of the rehabilitation process is finished underground. There are many known compositions for internal pipe linings that provide improved properties or may be used to repair degraded or damaged pipes already in use. A cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) is one of several trenchless rehabilitation methods used to repair existing pipelines. In CIPP application, a resin-saturated felt tube made of polyester, fiberglass cloth or a number of other materials suitable for resin impregnation, is inverted or pulled into a damaged pipe first, then hot water, UV light, ambient cured or steam is used to cure the resin and form a tight-fitting, joint less and corrosion- resistant replacement pipe. Another important trenchless pipe rehabilitation method is referred to by the acronym SIPP, which stands for sprayed-in-place pipe, and application of the linings typically involves single or multiple passes of equipment applying one or more polymeric material layers to the interior of the pipe to form a "pipe-in-a-pipe". There are, however, many problems or drawbacks associated with these lining methods.

While CIPP can repair a pipe with limited bend geometries, sags or deflections, this lining method cannot completely prevent wrinkling and stretching. Except for very common sizes, CIPP liners are not usually stocked and must be made specifically for each project. The liner material used for common sizes is normally a felted fabric (non-woven) or a bi-directional fabric and does not go around bends well without wrinkling and going out of round on corners. These wrinkles and defects can seriously reduce the liner strength against internal pressure loads and cause lining cracking and leaking issues. If the CIPP liner material is designed to have shorter circumference compared to the host pipe to remove wrinkles, this will create small annuluses or circumferential gaps between the liner and the host pipe into which water and/or effluent will infiltrate. In contrast, SIPP can spray polymeric lining materials directly onto pipe wall to create liners without wrinkles or folds, and this lining method can also get rid of annuluses or circumferential gaps between the liner and the host pipe via applying multi-layer liner structure (references if need). However, current SIPP technologies or any other pipeline rehabilitation technologies that utilize polymeries or more specifically thermosetting plastic materials as the structural member/barrier for the containment of pressurized fluid in an existing host pipe are constrained to the creep failure behavior of the polymeric materials under long term continuous stress. The large nonlinear stress- strain behavior of thermoplastic polyurethanes exhibits strong hysteresis, rate dependence and softening. There is no technology available in the SIPP market that can be applied to meet the structural requirements of AWWA M28 for class IV lining for pressure pipe. This holds true for many other pipe lining/pipe rehabilitation technologies as well. To overcome this issue many SIPP vendors try to increase the lining structure wall thickness which is not cost effective and it will reduce the cross-sectional diameter and the flow capacity of the rehabilitated pipes. The higher wall thickness needs more application time, which will add the potential for application error and mechanical failure while lining. Additionally, and maybe most importantly, current thermosetting polymers used in lining industries cannot be applied as one single thick membrane in large diameter pipes (diameter>10") due to the exothermic reaction and the resulting tertiary stage induced by the internal stresses in the component. This results in the requirement of application in multiple layers which means multiple passes of the lining device which equates to significant increase in time and cost. Cost is not the only detriment to applying linings in multiple passes, other potential ramifications that can lead to failure are lack of inter-coat adhesion from passing the "recoat" window of the polymeric materials, infusing debris, dust or moisture from the outside environment via being pulled into the pipe over the preceding liner coat by the umbilical.

Creep is the tendency of a solid material to move slowly or deform permanently under the influence of mechanical stresses. It can occur as a result of long-term exposure to high levels of stress that are still below the yield strength of the material. The rate of deformation (strain rate) is a function of the material properties, exposure time, exposure temperature and the applied structural load. In the initial creep stage of loading of ductile material the creep rate decreases rapidly with time and then reaches the secondary stage where the deformation rate slows down and becomes steady unless exposed to high stresses that exceeds material yielding strength. In the tertiary stage, the strain rate exponentially increases with stress because of necking phenomena or internal voiding decreases the effective area of the material. Strength is quickly lost in tertiary stage while the material's shape is permanently changed and fractures will happen finally. Due to the nature of polymeric materials SIPP liners probably can meet the requirements of structure strength for short-term period but the material strength will decrease severely and the liner will start creeping till failure after a long-term use.

For potable water applications, the internal pipe lining is required to meet the American Water Works Association (A WW A) standards and in particular the standards set out below. Class IV linings are the strongest structural pipe linings of which the internal pressure and external load resistance capabilities do not rely on the material adhesion on the host pipe and the structural support from the pipe wall. This type of lining possesses the following characteristics:

4.2.4.1 Class IV linings, termed fully structural or structurally independent, possess the following characteristics: 1. The lining has a long-term hoop strength which equal to or greater than the MAOP of the pipe to be rehabilitated. This hoop strength is tested independently from the host pipe. 2. The lining has long-term resistance to external and live loads and the resistance is independent from the host pipe. 3. The lining has a short-term hoop strength which equal to or greater than all short-term loads, such as sustained and surge (vacuum and occasional and recurrent surge) pressures and live loads even if these loads are in excess of the capacity of the host pipe. This hoop strength is tested independently from the host pipe. 4.2.4.2 Class IV linings are sometimes considered to be structurally equivalent to new replacement pipe, although such linings will have markedly different properties in terms of buckling and longitudinal bending resistance than the original host pipe. These linings should be designed with adequate load resistance for all reasonable assumptions of loading conditions independent of the host pipe. By necessity, they will be of smaller internal diameters than the host pipe. However, their design should also consider practical implications to facilitate the continued service objectives of the host pipe such as the ability to provide water to service lines and mains without compromising the hydrostatic integrity of the overall lining system. (See AWWA M28, Chapter l l-3rd ed.)

4.2.4.3 Class IV linings can also be used in circumstances similar to those for Class II and III, but their use is essential for host pipes suffering from generalized external corrosion where the mode of pipe failure has been, or is likely to be, longitudinal cracking. The host pipe suffers full loss of hoop strength because of the longitudinal crack. Other catastrophic modes (e.g. spiral cracks, circumferential cracks, a leadite style joint failure blow-out) can also happen on the pipe wall where more liner structural resistance is required than traditional hole spanning structural resistance.

4.2.4.4 Some available pipe rehabilitation technologies can offer Class II, Class III and even Class IV linings, while a given lining system may be rated as Class IV for MAOP levels up to a threshold value and as a Class II and III system at higher pressures.

It is an object of this invention to provide an apparatus and methodology for producing an internally wound helical filament winding reinforcement on the interior surface of a tubular member. It is a further object to provide an apparatus and methodology for producing a multilayer internal pipe lining structure having filament winding as a reinforcement element to increase the lining structure strength, more specifically hoop strength and to address the various problems and shortcomings of lining material creeping discussed above. It is a further object to provide an apparatus and methodology for applying a filament reinforcement comprising a UV-curable resin and curing the filament reinforcement by exposing the filament to UV light during the helical winding application process. Summary of The Invention

This invention provides in various embodiments an apparatus and methodology to form a pipe lining structure which is composed of one or more lining material layers and a spirally or helically wound reinforcement filament embedded on or between the layers. In a representative lining process, an elastomeric layer is applied to the interior of a pipe, then an inverted wound layer made of high-strength, UV-curable resin-impregnated fibers or similar members in the form of a continuous filament (i.e., a string, wire, thread, cloth or bundle of fibers) is adhered to the elastomeric layer by the apparatus of the invention, and finally a second rigid layer is sprayed on top of the elastomeric layer and the winding to form the composite lining structure. The filament winding is "sandwiched" between the lining layers, and since the winding material has much higher modulus and tensile strength compared to the rigid lining material it will share and reduce the total stress on the rigid lining when applying internal pressure loads on the rehabilitated pipe. As a result of the presence of the filament winding in the lining structure, the stress on the rigid liner will decrease significantly compared to that of a rigid liner without filament winding in the same liner wall thickness. The reduction of lining structure stress can increase the working life of the liners against creep failure.

The filament winding is made of fibers or similar members saturated with a UV-light-cure resin composition, forming a prepreg filament that is applied to the interior of the elastomeric first layer of the lining by a filament winding apparatus advancing through the pipe bore. The apparatus comprises a rotating applicator arm incorporating a UV light, the applicator arm being radially extensible and retractable relative to the configuration of the pipe wall, such that the end of the arm maintains close proximity to the interior of the first liner layer. The filament winding is retained on a spool and fed out through the applicator arm so as to be wound in a helical or spiral manner onto the first liner layer. The UV light is mounted at or adjacent the end of the applicator arm and initiates resin curing on the surface of the prepreg filament, thereby creating a tacky or adhesive surface which adheres to the surface of the first liner layer to retain the filament winding in place. Additional UV lights may be annularly mounted to the exterior of the apparatus in order to more fully cure the resin. Alternatively, the resin may be a hybrid of UV-curable resin and heat- curable resin, such that the UV light cures the prepreg filament so as to be sufficiently rigid to withstand the weight of the wheeled apparatus as it advances in the pipe and the prepreg filament is subsequently fully cured by heating, such as by the exothermic heat produced by the curing of the rigid layer applied onto the first layer and the partially cured filament winding.

Alternatively expressed, the invention is a method of helically winding a continuous reinforcement filament on the interior of a tubular member comprising the steps of: providing a continuous reinforcement filament comprising a UV-curable resin in an uncured state; applying said continuous reinforcement filament in a helical pattern on the inner wall of a tubular member; and exposing said continuous reinforcement filament to UV light as it is applied to said inner wall of said tubular member to at least partially cure said UV-curable resin. Furthermore, further comprising the step of subsequently exposing said continuous reinforcement filament to additional UV light to fully cure said UV-curable resin; wherein said continuous reinforcement filament further comprises a heat-curable resin; and further comprising exposing said continuous reinforcement filament to a heat source to fully cure said heat-curable resin; further comprising the step of forming said tubular member by applying an elastomeric coating to the inner wall of a pipe; further comprising the step of applying a coating which cures to form a rigid member onto said continuous reinforcement filament and said tubular member after said continuous reinforcement filament has been applied and exposed to said UV-light; whereby the curing of said rigid coating supplies said heat to fully cure said heat-curable resin; further comprising the step of repeating one or more times said steps of providing a continuous reinforcement filament comprising a UV-curable resin in an uncured state; applying said continuous reinforcement filament in a helical pattern on the inner wall of a tubular member; and exposing said continuous reinforcement filament to UV light as it is applied to said inner wall of said tubular member to at least partially cure said UV-curable resin; such that said continuous reinforcement filament is applied multiple times on said inner wall of said tubular member; wherein said repeating step comprises at least once applying said continuous reinforcement filament in an opposite helical pattern on the inner wall of said tubular member; further comprising the step of providing an inverted filament winder comprising a rotating applicator arm and a UV light positioned on said rotating applicator arm, whereby said step of applying said continuous reinforcement filament in a helical pattern on the inner wall of a tubular member is accomplished by passing said continuous reinforcement filament comprising a UV-curable resin in an uncured state through said rotating applicator arm to expose said continuous reinforcement filament to said UV light; wherein said inverted filament winder comprises a spool, and/or whereby said step of providing a continuous reinforcement filament comprising a UV-curable resin in an uncured state comprises disposing said continuous reinforcement filament comprising said UV-curable resin in an uncured state on said spool.

Brief Description of The Drawings

Figure 1 is a flow chart illustrating an embodiment of the method of forming a multi-layer pipe liner comprising wound filament reinforcement.

Figure 2 is a flow illustrating a second embodiment of the method of forming a multi-layer pipe liner comprising wound filament reinforcement, wherein plural layers of wound filament reinforcement are applied.

Figure 3 is a partially exposed, partially cross-sectional view of a multi-layer pipe liner in place within a pipe.

Figure 4 is an illustration of an embodiment of the spool and applicator arm of the inverted filament winder apparatus, the spool being loaded with prepreg filament.

Figure 5 is an illustration similar to Figure 4 of an unloaded spool.

Figure 6 is a cross-sectional end view of the spool and applicator arm of Figure 4, taken along line 6-6.

Figure 7 is a partial cross-sectional view of the spool and applicator arm of Figure 4. Figure 8 is an end view of an embodiment of the inverted filament winder apparatus. Detailed Description of The Invention

With reference to the figures, which are meant to be non-limiting as to the scope of the invention and which are not to scale, the inventive methodology and an apparatus are described in various embodiments. The term "filament" as used herein shall mean an elongated member such as a string, wire, thread, cloth strip, bundle of fibers, such as carbon fiber or fiberglass for example, or similar members, and the terms "impregnated" or "prepreg" as used herein shall mean that a filament is coated or infused with a curable resin.

The method comprises, in a first embodiment shown in Fig. 1, the steps of applying 100 a first liner 11 to the inside of a pipe 20, advancing 101 an inverted filament winder through the pipe 20, expelling 102 UV-curable resin-impregnated filament reinforcement 14 through a rotating applicator arm 32 onto the interior of the first liner layer 11 while exposing the filament 14 to UV light to partially cure and adhere the filament 14 to the first liner layer 11 , (optionally) exposing

103 the adhered filament 14 to additional UV light to further cure the filament 14, and applying

104 a second liner layer 12 onto the first liner layer 1 1 and the wound filament reinforcement 14.

The method, in a second embodiment shown in Fig. 2, comprises the steps of applying 110 the first liner 11 to the inside of the pipe 20, advancing 111 the inverted filament winder through the pipe 20, expelling 112 UV-curable resin-impregnated filament reinforcement 14 through the rotating applicator arm 32 onto the interior of the first liner layer 11 while exposing the filament 14 to UV light to partially cure and adhere the filament 14 to the first liner layer 1 1, applying 1 13 one or more additional layers of UV-curable resin-impregnated filament reinforcement 14 through the rotating applicator arm 32 onto the interior of the first liner layer 11 while exposing to UV light to partially cure and adhere filament 14 to the first liner layer 11, (optionally) exposing 114 the adhered filament 14 to additional UV light to further cure the filament 14, and applying 1 15 the second liner layer 12 onto the first liner layer 11 and the wound filament reinforcement 14.

Furthermore, it is also to be understood that the method may consist of utilizing the inverted filament winding apparatus to deposit the UV-curable resin impregnated filament 14 in helical fashion onto the interior surface of any tubular member with simultaneous curing of the resin. In a non-limiting representative embodiment, the method produces a multi-layer or laminate pipe liner 200 with filament winder reinforcement 14 disposed or embedded between two liner layers 11/12. As a representative and non-limiting example, the liner 200 may comprise a first or outer tubular layer 11 composed of a low modulus, high elongation, flexible, elastomeric material disposed within and bonded to a pipe 20, a second or inner tubular layer 12 disposed within and bonded to the first layer 1 1 and which is composed of a rigid, durable, thermoset polymeric material, and one or more wound resin-impregnated (prepreg) filaments 14 possessing high-strength (>4500MPa), high modulus (>200GPa), low elongation (<2%) that is sandwiched between the first and second layers 11/12.

Before starting the pipe lining process for in-situ pipes 20 being repaired or lined, the pipe 20 should be cleaned using conventional methods, such as blasting and pigging, etc. The pipe 20 is then lined internally, preferably by spray application, with a polymeric material to form the first or elastomeric liner layer 11. The first liner layer 11 is most preferably approximately 1-12 mm in thickness upon curing, with the optimal thickness being determined by pipe diameter. The first layer 1 1 mechanically bonds to the inner surface of the pipe or conduit 20, which may be composed of metal, polymer or concrete.

The prepreg filament winding 14 is then applied to the interior of the first layer 11 using an inverted filament winding apparatus 30, as illustrated in Figures 4-8. The apparatus 30 is "inverted" in the sense that the filament 14 is wound onto the interior of a tubular member as opposed to being wound externally onto the exterior of a cylindrical or tubular member. The filament winding apparatus 30 comprises a carriage or frame 38 that is typically provided with wheels 39 such that the winding apparatus 30 may be pulled, pushed or powered through the pipe 20. The winding apparatus 30 further comprises a spool 31 which retains the uncured prepreg filament 14, the spool 31 preferably oriented with its axis of rotation parallel to the axis of travel of the winding apparatus 30 through the pipe 20 in order to prevent imparting torsional stresses on the filament 14 as it is unwound from the spool 31.

In one embodiment the filament 14 is impregnated with the UV-curable resin, or a hybrid resin comprising a UV-curable resin component and a heat curable resin component (such that exothermic heat resulting from the curing of the rigid layer 12 performs the final curing of the resin-impregnated filament 14 after the initial curing by exposure to UV light), prior to disposition of the prepreg filament 14 on the spool 31. Alternatively, the apparatus 30 may be constructed such that the resin is coated or infused on or into the filament 14 within the apparatus 30 prior to delivery of the filament 14 through the applicator arm 32.

The winding apparatus 30 further comprises an applicator arm 32 extending radially outward beyond the circumference of the spool 31, the applicator arm 32 being powered for rotational movement about a centrally located axis parallel to the axis of travel of the winding apparatus 30 through the pipe 20. A follower arm 34 and follower roller 35 extend generally laterally from the end of the applicator arm 32, such that as the filament 14 is expelled through the aperture 36 at the end of the applicator arm 32, the follower roller 35 passes over the filament 14 to press it against the inner surface of the first liner layer 1 1 for better adhesion. The applicator arm 32 is structured to include an extension/retraction mechanism 33, i.e., a structure that allows for the lengthening and shortening of the applicator arm 32 in the radial direction, the extension/retraction mechanism 33 preferably being automatically responsive to changes in the interior diameter of the interior pipe wall 20 or any other inner surface, such as a mechanism comprising the telescoping structure and spring assembly shown in Fig. 6, a gas cylinder, equivalent mechanical constructs, or the like. This allows the follower roller 35 and the applicator arm 32 to adapt to imperfections in the interior pipe wall 20 and/or in the inner surface of the first liner layer 1 1 by moving radially inward or outward as needed. Powered feed rollers 37 are disposed within the applicator arm 32 to pull the filament 14 from the spool 31 and deliver it through the applicator arm aperture 36.

A UV light 40 is positioned on, at or adjacent the end of the applicator arm 32 such that the prepreg filament winding 14 is exposed to UV light as it is expelled from the applicator arm 32 and is pressed onto the first liner layer 11 by the follower roller 35. This exposure initiates curing or partially cures the UV-curable resin present in the filament 14, producing a tacky or temporarily adhesive surface that adheres and bonds the filament winding 14 to the first liner layer 11. With this methodology, apparatus and composition, the pre-cured filament 14 being deposited remains in a pliable, easily-handled state, as opposed to the stiff wire reinforcement required in earlier systems, the stiffness of the wire being necessary to maintain it in the expanded helical configuration. In one embodiment, an annular ring of UV lights 41 are positioned on the apparatus 30 such that additional curing of the filaments 14 now affixed to the inner wall of the first layer 11 occurs as needed. In another embodiment, the resin utilized for the filaments 14 is a hybrid resin comprising a UV-curable resin component and a heat curable resin component, such that final curing of the filaments 14 occurs by "shadow" curing when the second layer 12 is applied, the heat from the exothermic curing reaction of the second layer 12 providing the heat to cure the heat- curable resin and rigidify the wound filament 14.

The filament 14 is spirally or helically wound onto the first layer 11. The pitch and spacing of the wound filament 14 is determined by the advancement speed of the filament winder apparatus 30 and the rotational speed of the applicator arm 32, such that the method may produce a tightly spaced spiral or a more open spiral. In addition, multiple passes may be made through the pipe 20, or multiple filament winder apparatuses 30 may be utilized to deliver a plurality of helical windings 14. The additional windings 14 may be deposited between or cross over the first winding 14.

Since it is required to wind the filament 14 inside the host pipe 20 during the application process, the filament 14 is preferably retained on a spool 31 and stored in the apparatus 30. In this way, the filament 14 can be unwound directly from the rotatable spool 31 and adhered onto the elastomeric first liner 11 following linear and rotational motion of applicator arm 32 to create the helical filament shape. Alternatively, the filament 14 may be stored on a spool external to the pipe 20 and delivered to the applicator arm 32, in which case the winding direction of the filament 14 must be kept alternating in the application process, i.e., the filament 14 will be wound in one direction for a certain amount of rotations, then it will be wound in the opposite rotating direction but move in the same lining direction. The alternating winding motions can also avoid the filament 14 from winding and accumulating on the winding apparatus 30. The pitch distance (typically 0.5"-16") of the wound filament 14 and the size/diameter (typically 0.02"-0.50") of the filament 14 will usually depend on the host pipe 20 diameter and the internal working pressure - based on the thickness of the liner 200 vs. the surface area of the unreinforced liner 200 that can resist the stress between the reinforcement filament 14 pitches at the given pressure.

A preferred curing time for the filament winding 14 is in the range of 0.1 to 3 seconds depending on the pipe size and the speed of the rehabilitation lining process. After the helically wound filament 14 is sufficiently cured, the rigid lining material layer 12 is then sprayed on top of the elastomeric layer 11 and the filament winding 14. The second layer 12 preferably has a snap cure rate of approximately 3 to 300 seconds and a final or full cure rate or 1 hour to 24 hours and is applied at a thickness of approximately 3 to 100 mm, dependent on the host pipe size.

The application of elastomeric layer 11, filament winding 14 and rigid layer 12 can be finished in the same lining pass with an apparatus comprising the necessary functionalities or in separate passes by separate apparatuses, but the winding of filament 14 must be finished before the rigid lining application in the same pass. The rigid layer 12 is applied in the same lining pass right after the reinforcement fiber is at least substantially fixed and cured on the elastomeric layer 11.

It is understood that equivalents and substitutions to some of the elements and steps disclosed above may be obvious to those of skill in the art, and therefore the true scope and definition of the invention is to be as set forth in the following claims.