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Title:
A LATERAL SUPPORT AND AN ASSEMBLY
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/077196
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
The invention relates to a support for supporting a leg during skiing or skating. It is a lateral support (5) having a longitudinal direction (L) and lateral direction (W). It comprises a bottom (8) that has an upper surface (10) and a lower surface (9), as well as an inner edge (11) and an outer edge (12). At the lower surface (9) side of the bottom (8), there is at least one means (14) to fasten to a longitudinal rail (15). The support also comprises a support element (7) which has an inner surface (16) and an outer surface (17) and which proceeds obliquely upward from the inner edge (11), so that between the plane of the upper surface (9) of the bottom and the inner surface (16) of the support element (7) there is an angle (a) that is at most 120°. The invention also relates to an assembly which comprises a support for supporting a leg during skiing or skating.

Inventors:
MATTILA, Arto (Kidekatu 15, Kuopio, 70840, FI)
Application Number:
FI2018/050315
Publication Date:
April 25, 2019
Filing Date:
April 30, 2018
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
INNON OY (Kidekatu 15, Kuopio, 70840, FI)
International Classes:
A63C5/07; A63C3/02; A63C9/20; A63C11/00
Domestic Patent References:
WO2000050127A12000-08-31
Foreign References:
EP0732066A11996-09-18
US4196921A1980-04-08
US4113275A1978-09-12
FR2655870A11991-06-21
FR2586577A11987-03-06
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
KOLSTER OY AB (P.O.Box 204, Helsinki, Helsinki, 00181, FI)
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Claims:
A support for supporting a leg during skiing or skating, characterised in that it is a lateral support (5), the lateral support (5) having a longitudinal direction (L) and lateral direction (W), and comprising

a bottom (8) that has an upper surface (10) and a lower surface (9), as well as an inner edge (11) and an outer edge (12), and at the lower surface (9) side of the bottom (8) there is at least one means (14) to fasten to a longitudinal rail (15), and

a support element (7) which has an inner surface (16) and an outer surface (17) and which proceeds obliquely upward from the inner edge (11), so that between the plane of the upper surface (9) of the bottom and the inner surface (16) of the support element (7) there is an angle (a) that is at most 120°.

A support as claimed in claim 1, characterised in that it is a uniform piece.

A support as claimed in claim 1 or 2, characterised in that between the inner edge (11) and outer edge (12) of the bottom there is at least one longitudinal wall (13) protruding upward from the plane of the upper surface (10) of the bottom (8).

A support as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, characterised in that the support comprises two longitudinal walls (13). A support as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, characterised in that the support (5) comprises a lateral rest (18) on the side of the inner edge (11) of the bottom (8) for support to the edge (19) of the ski (3), the lateral rest (18) having an inner surface (20) and outer surface (21) and which proceeds downward from the plane of the lower surface (9) of the bottom (8).

An assembly which comprises a support for supporting a leg during skiing or skating, characterised in that the assembly comprises a ski (3) which has a tip part, centre part, and heel part, an installation plate (22) on the centre part of the ski (3), a tip part (23) of a binding, fixed to the installation plate (22), a lateral support (5) fixed to the installation plate (22), behind the tip part (23) of the binding, which has a longitudinal direction (L) and lateral direction (W) and it comprises a bottom (8) that has an upper surface (10) and a lower surface (9), as well as an inner edge (11) and an outer edge (12), and at the lower surface (9) side of the bottom (8) there is at least one means (14) to fasten to a longitudinal rail (15), and

- a support element (7) which has an inner surface (16) and an outer surface (17) and which proceeds obliquely upward from the inner edge (11), so that between the plane of the upper surface (9) of the bottom and the inner surface (16) of the support element (7) there is an angle (a) that is at most 120°.

7. A support as claimed in claim 6, characterised in that between the inner edge (11) and outer edge (12) of the bottom (8) there is at least one longitudinal wall (13) protruding upward from the plane of the upper surface (10) of the bottom (8).

8. A support as claimed in claim 6 or 7, characterised in that the sup- port comprises a lateral rest (18) on the side of the inner edge (11) of the bottom (8) for support to the edge (19) of the ski (3), the lateral rest (18) having an inner surface (20) and outer surface (21) and which proceeds downward from the plane of the lower surface (9) of the bottom (8).

9. An assembly as claimed in any one of the preceding claims 6 to 8, characterised in that the position of the lateral support (5) in the assembly is at the rear part of the installation plate (22).

10. An assembly as claimed in any one of the preceding claims 6 to 9, characterised in that the position of the lateral support (5) in the assembly is where the rear of the foot is set when a ski boot (1) is fastened to the tip part (23) of the binding.

Description:
A Lateral support and an assembly

Background of the invention

The invention relates to a support for supporting a leg during skiing or skating, as well as to an assembly comprising such a support. Brief description of the invention

The object of the invention is to develop a new type of lateral support. The object of the invention is achieved by a product characterised by what is disclosed in the independent claims. Preferred embodiments of the invention are disclosed in the dependent claims.

The support according to the invention may be used in skiing or skating activities to support a ski boot or skate so that, as a result of a more efficient edging force, the thrusting force is better utilised in a forward-directed movement. The support may be used in all forms of skiing, but the main use of the support is in skate skiing.

The later support is usually a uniform piece that comprises a polymer material, aluminium or another stiff and light-weight material. The material may also be a composite, which may feature fibre strengthening in addition to the polymer material, for example.

The lateral support is installed to the installation plate of a ski binding, and it usually replaces the heel part of the binding. It is also possible to place the lateral support between the front part and heel part of the binding, in which case also the heel part is in normal use. At the lower surface side of the bottom, there is at least one means to fasten to a longitudinal rail. The means may be a suitable form that is compatible with the rail. The form may be suitable groove-like form, for example.

The lateral support comprises a bottom that has an upper surface and a lower surface, as well as an inner edge and an outer edge. Between the inner edge and outer edge there may be at least one longitudinal wall protruding upward from the plane of the upper surface of the bottom. The wall is compatible with a groove in the bottom of the shoe. The cross section of the wall in the lateral direction of the ski may be a rectangle, isosceles triangle, or right-angled triangle, for example. A wall may consists of more than one successive partial walls.

The lateral support further comprises a support element that has an inner surface and an outer surface. The support element proceeds obliquely upward from the inner edge, usually the support element is on the inner side of the foot. Between the plane of the upper surface of the bottom and the inner surface of the support element there is a blunt angle. The blunt angle is at most 120° advantageously 100°- 115°, most advantageously 110° - 115°.

The inner surface does not necessarily proceed at the same angle all the time, but the inner surface may have different shapes. However, the straight between the inner edge and the highest point of the inner surface of the support element has said angle range. It is also possible that the inner surface is straight, whereby the angle between the plane of the upper surface of the bottom and the inner surface of the support element is the same all along the length of the support element.

The height of the support element is at least 25 mm measured perpendicularly upward from the plane of the upper surface of the bottom of the lateral support. The height is usually at least 30 mm, advantageously it is at least 40 mm. The height is usually no more than 80 mm, advantageously no more than 60 mm, and most advantageously no more than 50 mm.

The lateral support may comprise a lateral rest on the side of the inner edge of the bottom for support to the ski edge, usually the inner edge. The lateral rest has an inner surface and outer surface and it proceeds from the plane of the lower surface of the bottom downward as an extension of the support element. The inner surface of the lateral rest may have forms such that the lateral rest does not at all areas touch the ski edge, but the lateral rest always has a portion that rests on the ski edge. If a sturdy enough structure is achieved by other means, the lateral rest is not necessarily needed.

At the bottom of the lateral support there is usually a screw, pin, or an- other mechanism pointing downwards, which prevents the longitudinal sliding of the lateral support. The part referred to in the above is usually a separate piece from the rest of the lateral support although the lateral support may otherwise be a uniform piece.

Brief description of the figures

The invention will now be described in more detail in connection with preferred embodiments and with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 shows prior art situation as a cross section;.

Figures lb and lc are cross section of a skiing situation when a lateral support of the invention is being used; Figures 2a, 2b, and 2c are cross sections of a skiing situation when a second lateral support of the invention is being used;

Figures 3a and 3b show a third lateral support of the invention;

Figures 4 to 6 are side views of a skiing situation when a lateral support of the invention is being used;

Figure 7 is a rear view of a skiing situation;

Figure 8 is a perspective view of skis;

Figure 9 is cross section of a skiing situation when a fourth lateral support of the invention is being used. Detailed description of the invention

In the following drawings, the product and its operation are described in the position in which it is when being used. The surface of the ground, ice or snow has for reasons of simplicity been assumed to be a level surface.

Figure la shows an ordinary skiing situation. A foot F of a skier is inside a ski boot 1. The ski boot 1 is attached to a binding, the heel part 4 of which is seen in Figure 1. The binding is fixed to an installation plate 22 which in turn is fastened to a ski 3. Protrusions 6 of the heel part 4 of the binding match the grooves in a bottom 2 of the ski boot 1.

Edging is denoted by the arrow P2. The weight and thrusting force PI of the skier is obliquely directed in relation to the surface of show. The ski boot 1 bends to the side due to lack of torsional rigidity. The bottom part of the ski boot 1 twists in the longitudinal direction, and the rest of the heel part of the ski boot 1 bends in the vertical-lateral direction. Edging of the ski 3 is difficult and this causes lateral sliding of the ski 3, which for its part reduces the force directed to advancing.

Figures lb and lc show the inventive lateral support 5 fixed to the installation plate 22. The edge of the installation plate 22 forms a rail 15 on both longitudinal edges of the installation plate 22. The lateral support 5 has a means compatible with the rail 15, with the aid of which the lateral support 5 is fixed to the rail 15. In Figures lb and lc the means 14 is a trough compatible with the rail 15. The lateral support 5 comprises a support element 7, lateral rest 18, and bottom 8. On top of the ski 3, a skier's foot F is seen and the ski boot 1 that has a heel 2. In Figure lb, the weight PI of the person is on the inner side of the ski 3.

When the skier bends the foot and leg in relation to the snow surface S in order to improve the lateral grip of the ski 3 on snow or ice, the weight and thrusting force PI of the skier is obliquely directed in relation to the snow surface, as shown in Figure lc. The support element 7 of the lateral support 5 supports the foot at the edging stage when the heel is in contact with the ski. The lateral supports 5 improves the bending rigidity (rotation) between the ski 3 and ski boot 1, which makes edging of the ski 3 against the snow easier. The edging of the ski 3 provides the ski 3 and the skier with lateral grip on snow or ice.

The later support according to Figures lb and lc has walls 13 protruding upward from the plane of the bottom 8.

Figure 2a shows a smaller model of the lateral support 5, which comprises a support element 7, lateral rest 18, and bottom 8. The lateral support 5 also works as narrower and lower, providing almost as good a lateral support. There may be one wall 13 against the heel 2 of the ski boot 1. It is advantageously the side wall 13 closer to the support element 7. The walls 13 are not necessary needed. If there is one wall 13, only, it may be in the area of the bottom 8, in the area between the centre of the bottom 8 and the support element 7. In practice, the height of the support element 7 is usually at least 30 mm measured perpendicularly upward from the plane of the bottom 8. However, the height of the support element 7 must be such that it extends over the sole so that it supports the leg.

Figure 2b shows a lateral support 5, which comprises a support element 7, lateral rest 18, and bottom 8. The lateral support 5 does not have walls 13.

Figure 2c shows a lateral support 5, which comprises a support element

7, lateral rest 18, and bottom 8. The lateral support 5 has two walls 13. The support element 7 of the lateral support 5 may comprise a filler piece 25. The filler piece 25 may be separately fixed to the lateral support 5, and they may be of different thicknesses so that the contact of the support element 7 to the outer surface of the shoe may be adjusted.

The support restl8 of the lateral support 5 may comprise a filler piece 26. The filler piece 26 may be separately fixed to the lateral support 5, and they may be of different thicknesses so that the contact of the support rest 18 to the side wall of the ski may be adjusted.

Figures 3a and 3b show a lateral support 5, which comprises a support element 7, lateral rest 18, and bottom 8. The walls 13 consist of successive partial walls 13a, 13b, 13c, and 13d. The support element 7 of the lateral support 5 comprises a filler piece 25. The lateral support 5 has a mechanism 27 which prevents the lateral support 5 to slide in the longitudinal direction.

Figure 4 shows a longitudinal area PL of a ski boot, to which the lateral support 5 may be installed. The most advantageous place for the lateral support 5 is indicated by a solid line, other alternatives by a dotted line. As shown in Figure 4, the lateral support 5 may be used behind the front line of the leg (tibia), in the area of the rear of the foot, in the area between said front line and heel on the inner side of the foot F. Rear of the foot refers to the area of the foot that has an ankle bone and heel bone, and thus the lateral support 5 may be between the front part of the ankle bone and the rear part of the heel bone. In Figure 4, the weight PI of the person is evenly on the foot or heel. The most powerful thrust and edging usually takes place in this position.

Figure 5 shows a situation where the heel of the ski boot 1 has already come off the heel part of the binding in connection with a thrust. The arrow PI denotes the person's weight which has moved to the area of the ball of the foot. At this stage of the thrust, the edging of the ski has already been performed, and the ski 3 and the leg are relatively tilted in relation to the surface of the snow. At this stage, the need of edging is almost entirely over and the ski 3 is controlled by the ball of the foot part of the ski boot 1 and the tip part 23 of the binding. At this stage, the support element 7 of the lateral part 5 no longer supports the foot.

Figure 6 shows what happens at the final stage of the thrust after the situation of Figure 5. The arrow PI denotes the person's weight. The thrusting force is directed somewhat obliquely to the ski. The heel of the ski boot 1 is off the heel part of the binding at the final stage of the thrust.

Figure 7 shows the left foot LF and right foot RF of a skier from behind. The lateral support 5 has been installed on at least one rail of the heel part 4 of the binding. The arrows Pll and P12 denote the person's weight.

Figure 8 shows the inventive lateral supports 5 of the invention fixed to the installation plate 22. The ski 3 and the lateral support 5 have a longitudinal direction L and lateral direction W. The direction of travel of the skis 3 is indicated with the arrow D. The lateral support 5 is a uniform piece made of a polymer material, for example.

The lateral support 5 comprises a bottom 8 that has an upper surface 10 and a lower surface 9, as well as an inner edge 11 and an outer edge 12. Between the inner edge 11 and outer edge 12 there is at least one wall 13 protruding upward from the plane of the upper surface 10 of the bottom 8. The cross section of the wall 13 in the lateral direction W of the ski 3 may be a rectangle, isosceles triangle, or right-angled triangle, for example. At the lower surface 9 side of the bottom 8, there is at least one means 14 to fasten to a longitudinal rail 15. The means 14 may be a groove-like shape that is compatible with the rail 15.

The lateral support 5 further comprises a support element 7 that has an inner surface 16 and an outer surface 17. The support element 7 proceeds obliquely upward from the inner edge 11, so that between the plane of the upper surface 10 of the bottom 8 and the inner surface 16 of the support element 7 there is a blunt angle a. The blunt angle a is at most 120°, advantageously it is 100° to 115°. The inner surface 16 does not necessarily proceed at the same angle all the time, but the inner surface 16 may have different shapes. However, the straight between the inner edge 11 and the highest point of the inner surface 16 of the support element 7 has said angle range. The lateral support 5 also comprises a lateral rest

18 on the side of the inner edge 11 of the bottom 8 for support to the inner edge 19 of the ski 3. The lateral rest 18 has an inner surface 20 and outer surface 21 and it proceeds from the plane of the lower surface 9 of the bottom 8 downward as an extension of the support element 7. The inner surface 20 of the lateral rest 18 may have forms such that the lateral rest 18 does not at all areas touch the inner edge

19 of the ski 3, but the lateral rest 18 always has a portion that rests on the inner edge 19. At the bottom 8 of the lateral support there is usually a screw, pin, or an- other mechanism 24 pointing downwards, which prevents the longitudinal sliding of the lateral support 5.

Figure 9 is cross section of a skiing situation when a fourth lateral support of the invention is being used. The lateral support 5 differs from the lateral supports 5 presented in the above in that the rail fastening is different.

A person skilled in the art will find it obvious that, as technology advances, the basic idea of the invention may be implemented in many different ways. The invention and its embodiments are thus not restricted to the above-described examples but may vary within the scope of the claims. It is obvious that the details disclosed in the drawings may be combined into combinations of various kinds.