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Title:
LIGHTING SYSTEM
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2009/094118
Kind Code:
A3
Abstract:
A lighting system (10) is provided that includes at least one lighting device (14A,14B,14C), at least one connector (12), and a plurality of external power sources (20,22,24,26,27). The at least one lighting device (14A,14B,14C) includes at least one lighting source (18A,18B,18C), and an internal power source (16) applying a first electrical current to illuminate the at least one lighting source (18A,18B,18C), wherein the internal power source (16) supplies the first electrical current. The at least one connector (12) electrically connects to the at least one lighting device (14A,14B,14C). The plurality of external power sources (20,22,24,26,27) include at least first and second external power sources that are adapted to be electrically connected to the at least one lighting device (14A,14B,14C) by the at least one connector (12). The first external power source (20,22,24,26,27) supplies a second electrical current to the at least one lighting device (14A,14B,14C) to illuminate the at least one lighting source (18A,18B,18C) and the second external power source (20,22,24,26,27) supplies a third electrical current to illuminate the at least one lighting source (18A,18B,18C), such that the internal power source (16) and one of the plurality of external power sources (20,22,24,26,27) each supply electrical current to illuminate the at least one lighting source (18A,18B,18C) at different times.

Inventors:
CRAWFORD, John, D. (33616 St. Francis Drive, Avon, OH, 44011, US)
HOFFMAN, Peter, F. (33120 Heartwood Avenue, Avon, OH, 44011, US)
SPARTANO, David, A. (4934 Cessna Avenue, Brunswick, OH, 44212, US)
Application Number:
US2009/000284
Publication Date:
October 29, 2009
Filing Date:
January 20, 2009
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
EVEREADY BATTERY COMPANY, INC. (533 Maryville University Drive, St. Louis, MO, 63141, US)
CRAWFORD, John, D. (33616 St. Francis Drive, Avon, OH, 44011, US)
HOFFMAN, Peter, F. (33120 Heartwood Avenue, Avon, OH, 44011, US)
SPARTANO, David, A. (4934 Cessna Avenue, Brunswick, OH, 44212, US)
International Classes:
H05B37/02; F21L4/02
Foreign References:
US20060087800A12006-04-27
US6364504B12002-04-02
US7059743B22006-06-13
US5847948A1998-12-08
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ADAMS, Gregory, J. (Eveready Battery Company, Inc.25225 Detroit Roa, Westlake OH, 44145, US)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS

What is claimed is:

1. A lighting system (10) comprising: at least one lighting device (14A,14B,14C) comprising: at least one lighting source (18A,18B,18C); and an internal power source (16) supplying a first electrical power to illuminate said at least one lighting source (18A,18B,18C); at least one connector (12) electrically connected to said at least one lighting device (14A.14B.14C); and a plurality of external power sources (20,22,24,26,27) comprising at least: a first external power source (20,22,24,26,27) adapted to be electrically connected to said at least one lighting device (14A,14B,14C); and a second external power source (20,22,24,26,27) adapted to be electrically connected to said at least one lighting device (14A,14B,14C) by said at least one connector (12), wherein said first external power source (20,22,24,26,27) supplies a second electrical power to said at least one lighting device (14A,14B,14C) to illuminate said at least one lighting source (18A,18B,18C) and said second external power source (20,22,24,26,27) supplies a third electrical power to illuminate said at least one lighting source (18A,18B,18C), such that said internal power source (16) and one of said plurality of external power sources (20,22,24,26,27) each supply electrical power to illuminate said at least one lighting source (18A,18B,18C) at different times.

2. The lighting system (10) of claim 1, wherein said internal power source (16) supplies said first electrical power through a first electrical path (28) in said lighting device (14A,14B,14C), and said plurality of external power sources (20,22,24,26,27) supply an electrical power to said at least one lighting source (18A,18B,18C) through a second electrical path in said lighting device (14A,14B,14C) to bypass said first electrical path (28).

3. The lighting system (10) of claims 1 or 2, wherein said first, second, and third electrical powers are provided at at least two different voltage potentials.

4. The lighting device (10) of claims 1 or 2, wherein said at least one connector (12) comprises a universal connector on both ends, such that said at least one connector (12) electrically connects to a corresponding connector on substantially all of said at least one lighting devices (14A,14B,14C) and said plurality of external power sources (20,22,24,26,27).

5. A lighting system (10) comprising: a plurality of power sources comprising: a first power source (16); and a second power source (20,22,24,26,27); at least one connector (12) electrically connected to one of said plurality of power sources; and at least one lighting device (14A,14B,14C) comprising: at least one lighting source (18A,18B,18C); and said first power source (16) that is internal to said at least one lighting device (14A,14B,14C), wherein said first power source (16) supplies an electrical current through a first electrical path (28) to illuminate said at least one lighting source (18A,18B,18C), and said second power source (20,22,24,26,27) is external to said at least one lighting device (14A,14B,14C) and supplies said electrical current through a second electrical path (30) to bypass said first power source (16) and illuminate said at least one lighting source (18A,18B,18C) when said at least one lighting device (14A,14B,14C) is electrically connected to said second power source (20,22,24,26,27) by said at least one connector (12).

6. The lighting system (10) of claim 5, wherein said first and second power sources (16,20,22,24,26,27) provide said electrical current to said at least one lighting source (18A,18B,18C) at different voltage potentials.

7. The lighting device (10) of any one of claims 1, 2, 5, or 6, wherein said at least one lighting device (14A,14B,14C) comprises: a handheld lighting device (14A); a headlight lighting device (14B); and a spotlight lighting device (14C).

8. The lighting system (10) of any one of claims 1, 2, 5, or 6, wherein said plurality of power sources (16,20,22,24,26,27) further comprise at least one of: an alternating current (AC) power source (20); a direct current (DC) power source (22); an energy storage system (24); a solar power source (26); and a solar power energy storage system (27).

9. The lighting system (10) of claim 8, wherein said AC power source (20) receives an electrical current at a voltage potential ranging from approximately 90 VAC to 240 VAC and supplies said second electrical current at a voltage potential of approximately 12 Volts, said DC power source (20) supplies said third electrical current at a voltage potential of approximately 12 Volts, at least one of said energy storage system (24) and said solar power energy storage system (27) supplies a fourth electrical current at a voltage potential of approximately 3.6 Volts, and at least one of said solar power source (26) and said solar power energy storage system (27) supplies a fifth electrical current at a voltage potential between approximately 8 Volts and 15 Volts.

10. The lighting system (10) of any one of claims 1, 2, 5, or 6, wherein at least one of said at least one lighting device (14A,14B,14C) and said plurality of power sources (20,22,24,26,27) comprise a two-part housing including corresponding interlocking teeth (56) along at least a portion of connecting sides of each part of said two-part housing (54).

11. A lighting device (14A,14B,14C) comprising: a plurality of lighting sources (18A,18B,18C) configured to emit light; a plurality of first optical lenses (58A,58B,58B',58C), each of said plurality of first optical lenses (58A,58B,58B',58C) being in optical communication with one of said plurality of lighting sources (18A,18B,18C); and a second lens (60A,60B,60C) comprising: a plurality of portions (62,64), each of said plurality of portions (62,64) being in optical communication with one corresponding lighting source of said plurality of lighting sources (18A,18B,18C) and one corresponding first optical lens of said plurality of first optical lenses (58A,58B,58B',58C); and a plurality of surface configurations, wherein one of said plurality of surface configurations is formed on one corresponding portion of said plurality of portions to control (62,64) an illumination pattern of said emitted light.

12. The lighting device (14A,14,B14C) of claim 11, wherein a first surface configuration of said plurality of surface configurations is a flood surface configuration, such that light emitted from said corresponding lighting source (18A,18C) and reflected by said corresponding first optical lens (58A,58C) are directed to create a flood pattern.

13. The lighting device (14A,14,B14C) of claims 11 or 12, wherein a second surface configuration of said plurality of surface configurations is a spot surface configuration, such that light emitted from said corresponding lighting source (18B) and reflected by said corresponding first optical lens (58B,58B') is emitted to create a spot pattern.

14. The lighting device (14A,14,B14C) of claims 11 or 12 further comprising a housing (54) configured to enclose said plurality of lighting sources (18A,18B,18C), said plurality of first optical lenses (58A,58B,58B',58C), and said second lens (60A,60B,60C), wherein said second lens (60A,60B,60C) is substantially fixedly coupled to said housing (54).

15. The lighting device ( 14 A, 14B, 14C) of claims 11 or 12, wherein at least a portion of said plurality of first optical lenses (58A,58B,58B',58C) is a conically shaped optical lenses.

16. The lighting device ( 14A, 14B, 14C) of claims 11 or 12, wherein at least a portion of said plurality of first optical lenses (58A,58B,58B',58C) is a total internal reflection (TIR) lens.

17. The lighting device (14A,14B,14C) of claims 11 or 12, wherein one of said plurality of first optical lenses (58,58B') is a cone shape having a deeper focal point (66) with respect to a top (68) defining an opening (70) where light is directed out of said first optical lens (58,58B') than at least one other of said plurality of first optical lenses (58A,58C).

18. The lighting device (14A,14B,14C) of claim 17, wherein said cone shaped optical lens (58B,58B') having said deeper focal point (66) is a multiple-part optical lens, such that said cone shaped optical lens (58B,58B') comprises multiple parts that are attached to form said cone shaped optical lens (58B,58B').

19. The lighting device (14A,14B,14C) of claims 11 or 12, wherein said at least portion of said plurality of first optical lenses (58A,58B,58B',58C) comprises a polycarbonate material.

20. The lighting device (14A,14B,14C) of claims 11 or 12, wherein said second lens (60A,60B,60C) comprises a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) material.

21. The lighting device (14A,14B,14C) of claims 11 or 12, wherein a first lighting source (18A) of the plurality of lighting sources (18A,18B,18C), a first optical lens (58A) of said plurality of first optical lenses (58A,58B,58B',58C), and a first portion (62) of said second lens (60A,60B,60C) of said plurality of portions (62,64) are configured to project light in a first illumination pattern, and a second lighting source (18B) of said plurality of lighting sources (18A,18B,18C), a second optical lens (58B,58B') of said plurality of first optical lenses (58A,58B,58B',58C), and a second portion (64) of said second lens (60A,60B,60C) of said plurality of portions (62,64) are configured to project light in a second illumination pattern, and said first and second illumination patterns at least partially overlap to form a third illumination pattern.

22. The lighting device (14A,14B,14C) of claim 21 further comprising a controller (36) for controlling first and second intensities of said first and second illumination patterns, respectively, with respect to one another, wherein said third illumination pattern is altered when said controller (36) alters said first and second intensities.

23. An energy storage system (24) comprising: a plurality of battery cells configured to be electrically connected to a power source (20,22,26,27), said plurality of battery cells comprising: a first battery cell (78); and a second battery cell (80); and a controller (82) in communication with said first and second battery cells (78,80), said controller (82) controls an electrical current supplied to said first and second battery cells (78,80), such that a first charging method is utilized when a voltage potential of said first and second battery cells (78,80) is less than a first voltage potential threshold, respectively, and a second charging method is utilized when said voltage potential of said first and second battery cells (78,80) is equal to or greater than said first voltage potential threshold, wherein said first charging method charges at least one of said first and second battery cells (78,80) at a greater rate than said second charging method, and said first charging method is utilized to charge said first battery cell (78) prior to being utilized to charge said second battery cell (80) when said voltage potential of said first battery cell (78) is below said first voltage potential threshold and greater than said voltage potential of said second battery cell (80).

24. The energy storage system (24) of claim 23, wherein said substantially constant electrical current is supplied to said first battery cell (78) prior to providing said electrical current to said second battery cell (80) when said voltage potential of said first battery cell (78) is greater than said voltage potential of said second battery cell (80).

25. The energy storage system (24) of claims 23 or 24, wherein said first charging method comprises supplying a substantially constant electrical current, and said second charging method comprises supplying an electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential.

26. The energy storage system (24) of claims 23 or 24, wherein said first charging method comprises said controller (82) controlling a supply of an electrical current to said first and second battery cells (78,80), such that a substantially constant electrical current is supplied to said first battery cell (78) for a period of time when said voltage potential of said first battery cell (78) is below said first voltage potential threshold, and then controlling said substantially constant electrical current being supplied to said second battery cell (80) when said voltage potential of said second battery cell (80) is below said first voltage potential threshold.

27. The energy storage system (24) of claims 23 or 24, wherein said second charging method comprises said controller (82) controlling a supply of an electrical current to said first and second battery cells (78,80), such that said electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential is supplied to said first battery cell (78) when substantially all of said plurality of battery cells have a voltage potential of at least one of equal to or greater than said first voltage potential threshold.

28. An energy storage system (24) comprising: a plurality of battery cells configured to be electrically connected to a power source (20,22,26,27), said plurality of battery cells comprising: a first battery cell (78); and a second battery cell (80); and a controller (82) in communication with said first and second battery cells (78,80), said controller (82) controls an electrical current supplied to said first and second battery cells (78,80), such that a substantially constant electrical current is supplied to said first and second battery cells (78,80) for a period of time when a voltage potential of said first and second battery cells (78,80) is less than a first voltage potential threshold, respectively, and controlling an electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential that is supplied to said first and second battery cells (78,80) when said voltage potential of said first and second battery cells (78,80) is equal to or greater than said first voltage potential threshold, said substantially constant electrical current is supplied to said first battery cell (78) prior to providing an electrical current to said second battery cell (80), wherein said voltage potential of said first battery cell (78) is below said first voltage potential threshold, and said voltage

potential of said first battery cell (78) is greater than said voltage potential of said second battery cell (80).

29. The energy storage system (24) of claims 23, 24, or 28, wherein said electrical current supplied to at least a portion of said plurality of battery cells has a voltage potential of approximately eight volts (8V) to twelve volts (12V).

30. The energy storage system (24) of claims 23, 24, or 28, wherein said controller (82) controls said electrical current supplied to said plurality of battery cells based upon a monitored temperature of at least one of said plurality of battery cells.

31. The energy storage system (24) of claims 23, 24, or 28, wherein said plurality of battery cells are electrically connected in series in a trilobe cartridge (81).

32. The energy storage system (24) of claims 23, 24, or 28, wherein at least a portion of said plurality of battery cells are at least one comprising: a lithium battery cell; a lithium-ion (Li-Ion) battery cell; and a nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery cell.

33. The energy storage system (24) of claims 23, 24, or 28, wherein said controller (36) tapers off an electrical current supplied to said first battery cell (78) when utilizing the second charging method.

34. A method (1240) of charging a plurality of battery cells in an energy storage system (24), said method (1240) comprising the steps of: charging one of a first battery cell (78) and a second battery cell (78) utilizing a first charging method (1246) when at least one of said first and second battery cells (78,80) have a voltage potential less than a first voltage potential threshold; charging one of said first battery cell (78) and second battery cell (80) utilizing a second charging (1256) method when said first and second battery cells (78,80) have a voltage potential equal to or greater than said first voltage potential threshold, wherein said

first charging method (1246) charges said first and second battery cells (78,80) at a quicker rate than said second charging method; and charging said first battery cell (78) utilizing said first charging method (1246) prior to charging said second battery cell (80) when said voltage potential of said first battery cell (78) is below said first voltage potential threshold, and when said voltage potential of said first battery cell (78) is greater than said voltage potential of said second battery cell (80).

35. The method (1240) of claim 34, wherein said first charging method comprises supplying a substantially constant electrical current, and said second charging method comprises supplying an electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential.

36. A method (1020) of charging a plurality of battery cells in an energy storage system (24), said method (1020) comprising the steps of: charging one of a first battery cell (78) and a second battery cell (80) by supplying a substantially constant electrical current (1026) when at least one of said first and second battery cells (78,80) have a voltage potential less than a first voltage potential threshold; charging one of said first and second battery cells (78,80) by supplying an electrical current (1026) at a substantially constant voltage potential when said first and second battery cells (78,80) have a voltage potential equal to or greater than said first voltage potential threshold; and charging said first battery cell (78) by supplying said substantially constant electrical current (1026) prior to charging said second battery cell (80) when said voltage potential of said first battery cell (78) is below said first voltage potential threshold, and when said voltage potential of said first battery cell (78) is greater than said voltage potential of said second battery cell (80).

37. The method (1020,1240) of claims 34, 35, or 36 further comprising the step of supplying said substantially constant electrical current to said first battery cell (78) for a period of time when said voltage potential is below said voltage potential threshold, and then supplying said substantially constant electrical current to said second battery cell (80) when said voltage potential of said second battery cell (80) is below said first voltage potential threshold.

38. The method (1020,1240) of claims 34, 35, or 36 further comprising the step of supplying said electrical current to said first battery cell (78) based upon a monitored temperature of at least said first battery cell (78).

39. The method (1020,1240) of claims 34, 35, or 36 further comprising the step of supplying said electrical current at said substantially constant voltage potential to said first battery (78) when substantially all of a plurality of battery cells that have a voltage potential of at least one of equal to and greater than said first voltage potential threshold.

40. The method (1020,1240) of claims 34, 35, or 36, wherein said electrical current is supplied at a voltage potential of approximately eight volts (8 V) to twelve volts (12V).

41. The method (1020, 1040) of claims 34, 35, or 36, wherein at least a portion of the plurality of battery cells are at least one comprising: a lithium battery cell; a lithium-ion (Li-Ion) battery cell; and a nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery cell.

Description:

LIGHTING SYSTEM

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. § 119(e) to U.S. Provisional Patent

Application No. 61/023,632, filed on January 25, 2008, by John Crawford et al., the entire disclosure of which is hereby incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The present invention generally relates to a lighting system, and more particularly, to a lighting system with at least one lighting device having an internal power source and adapted to be electrically connected to at least one external power source.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] Generally, a mobile lighting device, such as a flashlight, is powered by a power source that is internal to the flashlight, such as a battery. Typically, the batteries of the flashlight device can be replaced when the state of charge of the batteries is below an adequate state of charge for providing electrical power for the light source of the flashlight. Since the flashlight is being powered by batteries, the flashlight can generally emit light while not being electrically connected to a power source that is external to the flashlight, such as an alternating current (AC) wall outlet.

[0004] Additionally, when the batteries of the flashlight have a state of charge that is below an adequate state of charge level, the batteries can be replaced with other batteries. If the removed batteries are rechargeable batteries, then the removed batteries can be recharged using an external recharging device, and re-inserted into the flashlight. When the removed batteries are not rechargeable batteries, then the non-rechargeable batteries are replaced with new batteries.

[0005] Alternatively, a flashlight may contain an electrical connector in order to connect to a specific type of power source, such as the AC wall outlet, in addition to the batteries. Typically, when the flashlight is connected to the stationary external power supply, the flashlight can continue to illuminate light, but the mobility of the flashlight is now hindered. If the flashlight is directly connected to the AC wall outlet, then the mobility of the flashlight is generally eliminated. When the flashlight is not directly connected to the AC wall outlet, such as by an extension cord, the flashlight has limited mobility.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, a lighting system is provided that includes at least one lighting device, at least one connector, and a plurality of external power sources. The at least one lighting device includes at least one lighting source, and an internal power source applying a first electrical power to illuminate the at least one lighting element, wherein the internal power source supplies the first electrical power. The at least one connector electrically connects to the at least one lighting device. The plurality of external power sources include at least first and second external power sources that are adapted to be electrically connected to the at least one lighting device by the at least one connector. The first external power source supplies a second electrical power to the at least one lighting device to illuminate the at least one lighting source and the second external power source supplies a third electrical power to illuminate the at least one lighting source, such that the internal power source and one of the plurality of external power sources each supply electrical power to illuminate the at least one lighting source at different times. In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, a lighting system is provided that includes a plurality power sources, at least one connector, and at least one lighting device. The plurality of power sources include a first power source and a second power source. The at least one connector electrically connects to one of the plurality of power sources. The at least one lighting device includes at least one lighting source, wherein the first power source is internal the at least one lighting device. The first power source supplies an electrical current through a first electrical path to illuminate the at least one lighting source, and the second power source is external to the at least one lighting device and supplies the electrical current through a second electrical path to bypass the first power source and illuminate the at least one lighting source when the at least one lighting device is electrically connected to the second power source by the at least one connector. In accordance with yet another aspect of the present invention, a lighting device is provided that includes a plurality of lighting sources configured to emit light and a plurality of first optical lenses, each of the plurality of first optical lenses being in optical communication with one of the plurality of lighting sources and a second lens. The second lens includes a plurality of portions, wherein each of the plurality of portions is in optical communication with one corresponding lighting source of the plurality of lighting sources

and one corresponding first optical lens of the plurality of first optical lenses. The second lens further includes a plurality of surface configurations, wherein one of the plurality of surface configurations is formed on one corresponding portion of the plurality of portions to control an illumination pattern of said emitted light. In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, an energy storage system includes a plurality of battery cells configured to be electrically connected to a power source. The plurality of battery cells includes a first battery cell and a second battery cell. The energy storage system further includes a controller in communication with the first and second battery cells, the controller controls an electrical current supplied to the first and second battery cells, such that a first charging method is utilized when a voltage potential of the first and second battery cells is less than a first voltage potential threshold, respectively. A second charging method is utilized when the voltage potential of the first and second battery cells is equal to or greater than the first voltage potential threshold, wherein the first charging method charges at least one of the first and second battery cells at a greater rate than the second charging method. The first charging method is utilized to charge the first battery cell prior to being utilized to charge the second battery cell when the voltage potential of the first battery cell is below the first voltage potential threshold and greater than the voltage potential of the second battery cell. In accordance with yet another aspect of the present invention, an energy storage system includes a plurality of battery cells configured to be electrically connected to a power source. The plurality of battery cells includes a first battery cell and a second battery cell. The energy storage system further includes a controller in communication with the first and second battery cells, the controller controls an electrical current supplied to the first and second battery cells, such that a substantially constant electrical current is supplied to the first and second battery cells for a period of time when a voltage potential of the first and second battery cells is less than a first voltage potential threshold, respectively, and controlling an electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential that is supplied to the first and second battery cells when the voltage potential of the first and second battery cells is equal to or greater than the first voltage potential threshold. The substantially constant electrical current is supplied to the first battery cell prior to providing an electrical current to the second battery cell, wherein the voltage potential of the first battery cell is below the first voltage

potential threshold, and the voltage potential of the first battery cell is greater than the voltage potential of the second battery cell. In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, a method of charging a plurality of battery cells in an energy storage system includes the steps of charging one of a first battery cell and a second battery cell utilizing a first charging method when at least one of the first and second battery cells have a voltage potential less than a first voltage potential threshold, and charging one of the first battery cell and second battery cell utilizing a second charging method when the first and second battery cells have a voltage potential equal to or greater than the first voltage potential threshold, wherein the first charging method charges the first and second battery cells at a quicker rate than the second charging method. The method further includes the step of charging the first battery cell utilizing the first charging method prior to charging the second battery cell when the voltage potential of the first battery cell is below the first voltage potential threshold, and when the voltage potential of the first battery cell is greater than the voltage potential of the second battery cell. In accordance with yet another aspect of the present invention, a method of charging a plurality of battery cells in an energy storage system includes the steps of charging one of a first battery cell and a second battery cell by supplying a substantially constant electrical current when at least one of the first and second battery cells have a voltage potential less than a first voltage potential threshold, and charging one of the first and second battery cells by supplying an electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential when the first and second battery cells have a voltage potential equal to or greater than the first voltage potential threshold. The method further includes the step of charging the first battery cell by supplying the substantially constant electrical current prior to charging the second battery cell when the voltage potential of the first battery cell is below the first voltage potential threshold, and when the voltage potential of the first battery cell is greater than the voltage potential of the second battery cell. These and other features, advantages, and objects of the present invention will be further understood and appreciated by those skilled in the art by reference to the following specification, claims, and appended drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The present invention will now be described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which: Fig. 1 is a schematic view of a lighting system having a plurality of lighting devices and a plurality of external power sources, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 2 A is a circuit diagram of a handheld lighting device of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 2B is a circuit diagram of the handheld lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 3 A is a circuit diagram of a headlight lighting device of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 3B is a circuit diagram of the headlight lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 4A is a circuit diagram of a spotlight lighting device of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 4B is a circuit diagram of the spotlight lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 5 A is a circuit diagram of an energy storage system of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 5B is a circuit diagram of the energy storage system of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 6 is a flow chart illustrating a method of an electrical current supported by an external power source bypassing an internal power source of a lighting device of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 7A is front perspective view of a handheld lighting device of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 7 A' is a front perspective view of a handheld lighting device of a lighting system, illustrating vertical heat sink fins, in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 7B is an exploded view of the handheld lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

Fig. 7C is a cross-sectional view of the handheld lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 7D is an exploded view of a handheld lighting device of a lighting system, in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 8 A is a front perspective view of a headlight lighting device of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 8B is an exploded view of the headlight lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 8C is a cross-sectional view of the headlight lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 8D is an exploded view of an internal power source of the headlight lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 9 A is a side perspective view of a spotlight lighting device of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 9B is an exploded view of the spotlight lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 9C is a cross-sectional view of the spotlight lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 1OA is a front perspective view of an energy storage system of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 1OB is an exploded view of the energy storage system of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 1OC is a cross-sectional view of the energy storage system of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 1OD is a perspective view of a trilobe cartridge housing a battery cell, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 1 IA is a top perspective view of a solar power source of a lighting system in a solar radiation harvesting position, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 1 IB is an exploded view of the solar power source of the lighting system in a solar radiation harvesting position, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

Fig. 11C is a front perspective view of the solar power source of the lighting system in a rolled-up position, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 12A is a front perspective view of an electrical connector of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 12B is an exploded view of the electrical connector of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 12C is a cross-sectional view of the electrical connector of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 13 A is a front perspective view of an optic pack of a handheld lighting device of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 13 B is a top plan view of the optic pack of the handheld lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 13C is a side plan view of the optic pack of the handheld lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 13D is a top plan view of an optic pack of a handheld lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 14A is a top perspective view of an optic pack of a headlight lighting device of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 14B is a top plan view of the optic pack of the headlight lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 14C is a side plan view of the optic pack of the headlight lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 15A is a side perspective view of an optic pack of a spotlight lighting device of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 15B is a top plan view of the optic pack of the spotlight lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 15C is a front plan view of the optic pack of the spotlight lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 15D is a side plan view of the optic pack of the spotlight lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 16A is a top perspective view of a lens of the optic pack of the spotlight lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

Fig. 16B is a top plan view of the lens of the optic pack of the spotlight lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 16C is a front plan view of the lens of the optic pack of the spotlight lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 16D is a side plan view of the lens of the optic pack of the spotlight lighting device of the lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 17A is a flow chart illustrating a method of controlling at least one component of a lighting device of a lighting system based upon a temperature of at least one component in the lighting device, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 17B is a flow chart illustrating a method of controlling at least one component of a lighting device of a lighting system based upon a rate of temperature change of at least one component in the lighting device, in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 18 is a graph illustrating the current and voltage supplied to a battery cell with respect of a period of time when charging the battery cell, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 19 A is a flow chart illustrating a method of charging at least one battery cell of a device or system of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 19B is a flow chart illustrating a method of charging at least one battery cell of a device or system of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 2OA is an illustration of an illumination pattern emitted by a lighting device of a lighting system, wherein lighting sources of the lighting device are emitting light at substantially a spot end of a cross-fading spectrum, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 2OB is an illustration of an illumination pattern emitted by a lighting device of a lighting system, wherein lighting sources of the lighting device are emitting light at substantially a flood end of a cross-fading spectrum, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

Fig. 2OC is an illustration of an illumination pattern emitted by a flood lighting source of a lighting device of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 2OD is an illustration of an illumination pattern emitted by a spot lighting source of a lighting device of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 2OE is an illustration of an illumination pattern created by the cross-fading of the illumination patterns illustrated in Figs. 2OC and 2OD, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 2OF is a graph illustrating an intensity of an illumination pattern at a target of light emitted by a flood lighting source of a lighting device of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 2OG is a graph illustrating an intensity of an illumination pattern at a target of light emitted by a spot lighting source of a lighting device of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 2OH is a graph illustrating an intensity of an illumination pattern at a target created by the cross-fading of the illumination patterns of Figs. 2OF and 2OG, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 21 is a flow chart illustrating a method of cross-fading lighting sources of a lighting device to emit light in an illumination pattern, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 22 is a flow chart illustrating a method of dimming a light emitted by lighting sources of a lighting device in a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 23 is a flow chart illustrating a method of determining an electrochemical composition of a power source of a device or system of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 24 is a chart illustrating a state of charge with respect to a voltage potential and an internal resistance of a battery cell with different electrochemical compositions, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

Fig. 25 is a flow chart illustrating a method of determining a state of charge of a power source of a device or system of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 26 is a flow chart illustrating a method of determining an electrochemical composition of a power source and a state of charge of the power source of a device or system of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 27 is an exemplary illustration of an illumination pattern emitted by a lighting source of a lighting device in a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 28 is a circuit diagram generally illustrating test circuitry for detecting the electrochemical composition of a power source of a device or system of a lighting system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 29 is a flow chart illustrating a routine for determining the electrochemical composition of a power source of a device or system of a lighting system, in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 30 is a circuit diagram generally illustrating test circuitry for detecting the electrochemical composition of multiple battery cells, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 31 A is a flow diagram illustrating a routine for determining the electrochemical composition of a power source of a device or system of a lighting system, in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention; Fig. 3 IB is a flow diagram illustrating a routine for determining the electrochemical composition of a power source of a device or system of a lighting system, in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention; and Fig. 32 is a graph illustrating changes in voltage realized for three battery types during the detection test, according to one example.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Before describing in detail embodiments that are in accordance with the present invention, it should be observed that the embodiments include combinations of method steps and apparatus components related to a lighting system and method of operating thereof. Accordingly, the apparatus components and method steps have been represented, where

appropriate, by conventional symbols in the drawings, showing only those specific details that are pertinent to understanding the embodiments of the present invention so as not to obscure the disclosure with details that will be readily apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art having the benefit of the description herein. Further, like reference characters in the description and drawings represent like elements. In this document, relational terms, such as first and second, top and bottom, and the like, may be used to distinguish one entity or action from another entity or action, without necessarily requiring or implying any actual such relationship or order between such entities or actions. The terms "comprises," "comprising," or any other variation thereof, are intended to cover a non-exclusive inclusion, such that a process, method, article, or apparatus that comprises a list of elements does not include only those elements but may include other elements not expressly listed or inherent to such process, method, article, or apparatus. An element proceeded by "comprises . . . a" does not, without more constraints, preclude the existence of additional identical elements in the process, method, article, or apparatus that comprises the element.

I. LIGHTING SYSTEM In reference to Figs. 1-11 , a lighting system is generally shown at reference identifier

10. The lighting system 10 includes at least one lighting device 14, at least one electrical connector generally indicated at 12, and one or more power sources 16,20,22,24,26,27. According to one embodiment, the at least one lighting device includes a handheld lighting device generally indicated at 14 A, a headlight lighting device generally indicated at 14B, and a spotlight lighting device generally indicated at 14C. For purposes of explanation and not limitation, the invention is generally described herein with regards to the at least one lighting device including the handheld lighting device 14 A, the headlight lighting device 14B, and the spotlight lighting device 14C; however, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the lighting system 10 can include a combination of the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C and/or additional lighting devices. The at least one lighting device typically includes at least one lighting source and an internal power source, generally indicated at 16, that supplies a first electrical current to illuminate the at least one lighting source, as described in greater detail herein. However, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that other embodiments include devices that emit the at least one lighting device 14A,14B,14C and/or

the internal power source 16. According to one embodiment, the lighting system 10 can include non-lighting devices, such as, but not limited to, a weather radio, a global positioning satellite (GPS) system receiver, an audio player, a cellular phone, the like, or a combination thereof. According to one embodiment, the at least one lighting source includes a white flood light emitting diode (LED) 18A, a white spot LED 18B, and a red flood LED 18C. Typically, the white flood LED 18A and white spot LED 18B emit a white light having two different illumination patterns, wherein the white flood LED 18A illumination pattern disperses the emitted light over a greater area than the white spot LED 18B, as described in greater detail below. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the white flood LED 18 A, white spot LED 18B, and red flood LED 18C can be any desirable color, such as, but not limited to, white, red, blue, suitable colors of light in the visible light wavelength spectrum, infrared, suitable colors of light in the non- visible light wavelength spectrum, the like, or a combination thereof. According to one embodiment, the flood beam pattern illuminates a generally conical shaped beam having a circular cross-section with a target size in diameter of approximately two meters (2m) or greater at a target distance of approximately one hundred meters (100m), and the spot beam pattern illuminates a generally conical shaped beam having a circular cross-section with a target size in diameter of approximately less than one meter (Im) at a target distance of two meters (2m). Thus, the flood beam pattern can be defined as the light being emitted at a half angle of twelve degrees (12°) or greater with respect to the lighting source 18 A, and the spot beam pattern can be defined as the light being emitted at a half angle of less than twelve degrees (12°) with respect to the lighting source 18B. According to one embodiment, the spot lighting source 18B can have a half angle of less than or equal to approximately five degrees (5°) for the handheld and headlight lighting devices 14A,14B, and a half angle of less than or equal to approximately two degrees (2°) for the spotlight lighting device 14C. The red flood LED 18C can have a similar illumination pattern to the white flood LED 18A while emitting a red-colored light. According to one embodiment, the term illumination pattern generally refers to the size and shape of the illuminated area at a target distance, angles of the emitted light, the intensity of the emitted light across the beam, the illuminance of the beam (e.g., the total luminous flux incident on a surface, per unit area), or a combination thereof. The shape of the illumination pattern can be defined as the target area

containing approximately eighty percent to eighty-five percent (80%- 85%) of the emitted light. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the flood and/or the spot illumination patterns can form or define shapes other than circles, such as, but not limited to, ovals, squares, rectangles, triangles, symmetric shapes, non-symmetric shapes, the like, or a combination thereof. It should further be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C can be other combinations of lighting sources with different illumination patterns, such as, but not limited to, two or more flood lighting sources, two or more spot lighting sources, or a combination thereof. For purposes of explanation and not limitation, the invention is generally described herein with regards to the at least one lighting source including the white flood LED 18 A, the white spot LED 18B, and the red flood LED 18C. However, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the lighting system 10 can include lighting devices 14A,14B,14C having a combination of lighting sources 18A,18B,18C and/or additional lighting sources. According to one embodiment, the light sources 18A,18B,18C are connected to a LED circuit board 19, as described in greater detail below. The plurality of power sources include a plurality of external power sources, wherein the plurality of external power sources include at least first and second external power sources that are adapted to be electrically connected to the at least one lighting device by the at least one electrical connector 12. Typically, the electrical connector 12 electrically connects the external power source to the lighting device 14A,14B,14C. By way of explanation and not limitation, the plurality of external power sources can include an alternating current (AC), such as a 120 Volt wall outlet, power source 20, a direct current (DC) power source 22, such as an outlet in a vehicle, an energy storage system generally indicated at 24, a solar power source 26, a solar power energy storage system 27, the like, or a combination thereof. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that other types of external power sources can be configured to connect with the lighting device 14A,14B,14C. For purposes of explanation and not limitation, the handheld lighting device 14A can be adapted to be held by a single hand of a user, wherein the hand of the user wraps around the longitudinally extending handheld lighting device 14 A. Thus, a thumb of the user's hand is positioned to actuate at least one switch SW1,SW2,SW3, or SW4, which alters the light emitted by the handheld lighting device 14 A, as described in greater detail herein. The

headlight lighting device 14B can be adapted to be placed over a user's head using a headband 21, wherein the user actuates the at least one switch SW1,SW2,SW3, or SW4 using one or more fingers of the user's hand in order to alter the light emitted from the headlight lighting device 14B, as described in greater detail herein. Thus, a user generally directs the light emitted by the headlight lighting device 14B by moving their head. Additionally or alternatively, the spotlight lighting device 14C is adapted to be held in the hand of a user, wherein the user's hand wraps around a handle portion 17 of the spotlight lighting device 14C. Typically, a user's hand is positioned on the handle portion 17, such that an index finger of the user's hand can actuate switches SW1,SW2, or SW3, and a middle finger of the user's hand can be used to actuate switch SW4, which alters the light emitted by the spotlight lighting device 14C, as described in greater detail herein. Generally, the spotlight lighting device 14C illuminates objects with the light emitted from the lighting source 18B at a greater distance than objects illuminated by light emitted from the handheld lighting device 14A and headlight lighting device 14B. Typically, the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C include the internal power source 16, and are electrically connected to the external power sources 20,22,24,26, or 27 by the electrical connector 12. The lighting devices 14A,14B,14C can be electrically connected to the external power sources 20,22,24,26, or 27 at the discretion of the user of the lighting system 10, such that the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C are not consuming electrical power from the internal power source 16 when the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C are electrically connected to one of the external power sources 20,22,24,26, or 27. Thus, if a user does not desire to consume the electrical power of the internal power source 16 or the state of charge of the internal power source 16 is below an adequate level, the user can electrically connect one of the external power sources 20,22,24,26, or 27 to the lighting device 14A,14B,14C, such that the electrically connected power source 20,22,24,26, or 27 supplies an electrical current to the lighting source 18A,18B,18C, according to one embodiment. Further, one or more of the external power sources can be a rechargeable power source that can be charged by other external power sources of the lighting system 10, or other power sources external to the lighting system 10. According to one embodiment, the first external power source supplies a second electrical current to the at least one lighting device to illuminate the at least one lighting source 18,18B,18C, and the second external power source supplies a third electrical current to

illuminate the at least one lighting source 18A,18B,18C, such that the internal power source 16 and one of the plurality of external power sources each supply electrical current to illuminate the at least one lighting source 18A,18B,18C at different times, as described in greater detail herein. The first, second, and third electrical currents are supplied at at least two different voltage potentials. According to one embodiment, the AC power source 20 receives electrical current from an AC source at a voltage potential ranging from substantially ninety Volts (90 VAC) to two hundred forty Volts (240 VAC) at fifty hertz (50 Hz) or sixty hertz (60 Hz), and supplies an electrical current to the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C at a voltage potential of about substantially 12 Volts, the DC power source 22 supplies the electrical current at a voltage potential of about substantially 12 Volts, the energy storage system 24 and solar power energy storage system 27 supply the electrical current at a voltage potential of about substantially 3.6 Volts, and the solar power source 26 supplies the electrical current at a voltage potential of substantially 8 Volts. According to one embodiment, the internal power source 16 can be an electrochemical cell battery configured as a 1.5 Volt power source, such as, but not limited to, an alkaline battery, a nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery, or the like. Alternatively, the internal power source 16 can be an electrochemical cell battery configured as a 3.6 Volt - 3.7 Volt power source, such as a lithium ion (Li-Ion) battery, or the like. Thus, the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C can be supplied with an electrical current having a voltage potential ranging from and including approximately 1.5 Volts to 12 Volts in order to illuminate the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C. It should be appreciated that the electrical currents supplied by the power sources 16,20,22,24,26,27 can be approximately equal, such that a voltage potential differs, different electrical currents, or a combination thereof. According to one embodiment, the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C can each include a first electrical path generally indicated at 28, and a second electrical path generally indicated at 30, wherein both the first electrical path 28 and second electrical path 30 are internal to the lighting device 14A,14B,14C (Figs. 2B, 3B, and 4B). Typically, the internal power source 16 provides the electrical current to the lighting source 18A,18B,18C through the first electrical path 28, and the plurality of external power sources 20,22,24,26,27 supply the electrical current via the electrical connector 12 to the lighting source 18A,18B,18C through the second electrical path 30, such that the second electrical path 30 bypasses the first electrical path 28. According to an alternate embodiment, the external power sources 20,22,24,26,27, when

connected to the lighting device 14A,14B,14C, supply the electrical current via the electrical connector 12 through the second electrical path 30 to illuminate the lighting element 18A,18B,18C and supply an electrical current to the internal power source 16 to recharge the internal power source. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that in such an embodiment, the internal power source 16 is a rechargeable power source (Fig. 1). According to another embodiment, the lighting device 14A,14B,14C is not configured to be electrically connected to the external power sources 20,22,24,26,27, and thus, is not adapted to be connected to the connector 12. The lighting devices 14A,14B,14C typically include the internal power source 16 and are configured to connect to one of the external power sources 20,22,24,26, or 27 at a time. A battery voltage monitor generally indicated at 34 is in electrical communication with the internal power source 16 and the external power sources 20,22,24,26,27, when one of the external power sources 20,22,24,26, or 27 is connected. The battery voltage monitor 34 determines if the internal power source 16 and external power source 20,22,24,26,27 have a voltage potential. According to one embodiment, a processor or microprocessor 36 powers or turns on transistors QlO of the battery voltage monitor 34, so that the lighting device 14A,14B, or 14C can determine if the internal power source 16 or the connected external power source 20,22,24,26, or 27 has a voltage potential. Thus, the battery voltage monitor 34 activates a switch to turn on one of an internal battery selector, generally indicated at 38, or an external battery selector, generally indicated at 40. According to one embodiment, the internal battery selector 38 is turned on by switching transistors Q8, which can be back-to- back field-effect transistors (FETs), and the external battery selector 40 is turned on by switching transistors Q9, which can be back-to-back FETs. In regards to Figs. 1-6, a method of supplying electrical current from the power sources 16,20,22,24,26,27 is generally shown in Fig. 6 at reference identifier 1000. The method 1000 starts at step 1002, and proceeds to step 1004, wherein the at least one switch SWl or SW4 is actuated, according to one embodiment. At step 1006, the voltage potential of at least one of the power sources 16,20,22,24,26,27 are determined. At decision step 1008, it is determined if an external power source 20,22,24,26,27 is connected to the lighting device 14A,14B,14C. According to one embodiment, the external power sources 20,22,24,26,27 have a greater voltage potential than the internal power source 16 when the external power source 20,22,24,26,27 is charged (e.g., energy storage system 24), and thus, by determining

the voltage potential of the power sources 16,20,22,24,26,27 at step 1006, when there are multiple determined voltage potentials, then the higher voltage potential is assumed to be the external power source 20,22,24,26,27. If it is determined at decision step 1008 that there is not an external power source

20,22,24,26, or 27 connected to the lighting device 14A,14B,14C, then the method 1000 proceeds to step 1010, wherein the internal battery selector 38 is turned on. At step 1012, electrical current is supplied from the internal power source 16 to a lighting source 18A,18B,18C through the first electrical path 28, and the method 1000 then ends at step 1014. However, if it is determined at decision step 1008 that one of the external power sources 20,22,24,26, or 27 is connected to the lighting device 14A,14B,14C, then the method 1000 proceeds to step 1016, wherein the external battery selector 40 is turned on. At step 1018, electrical current is supplied from the external power source 20,22,24,26, or 27 to the lighting source 18A,18B,18C through the second electrical path 30, and the method 1000 then ends at step 1014. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that if the external power source 20,22,24,26, or 27 is connected to the lighting device 14A,14B,14C, after the switch SWl or SW4 has been actuated to turn on the lighting source 18A,18B,18C, then the method 1000 starts at step 1002, and proceeds directly to step 1006, wherein the voltage potential of the power sources 16,20,22,24,26,27 is determined. With regards to Figs. 1-5 and 7-11, the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C can include a voltage regulator 42 (Figs. 2B, 3B, and 4B). According to one embodiment, the voltage regulator 42 is a 3.3 voltage regulator, wherein the voltage regulator 42 receives an electrical current from the internal power source 16, the external power source 20,22,24,26, or 27, or a combination thereof. Typically, the voltage regulator 42 determines which of the internal power source 16 and the external power source 20,22,24,26,27 have a higher voltage potential, and uses that power source 16,20,22,24,26, or 27 to power the processor 36. However, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the voltage regulator 42 can include hardware circuitry, execute one or more software routines, or a combination thereof to default to the internal power source 16 or the external power source 20,22,24,26,27, when present, to power the processor 36. Thus, the voltage regulator 42 regulates the voltage of the selected power source 16,20,22,24,26,27 to supply electrical power at a regulated voltage potential to the processor 36.

Additionally or alternatively, the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C can include a converter 44, a voltage limiter 46, at least one LED driver, a reference voltage device 48, at least one fuel gauge driver, a temperature monitor device generally indicated at 50, or a combination thereof, as described in greater detail herein. The processor 36 can communicate with a memory device to execute one or more software routines, based upon inputs received from the switches SW1,SW2,SW3,SW4, the temperature monitor device 50, the like, or a combination thereof. According to one embodiment, the converter 44 is a buck-boost converter that has an output DC voltage potential from the input DC voltage potential, and the voltage limiter 46 limits the voltage potential of the electrical current supplied to the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C to suitable voltage potentials. The plurality of LED drivers can include, but are not limited to, a flood LED driver 52A, a spot LED driver 52B, and a red LED driver 52C that corresponds to the respective lighting source 18A,18B,18C. According to one embodiment, the reference voltage device 48 supplies a reference voltage potential of 2.5 Volts to the processor 36 and temperature monitor device 50. According to one embodiment, the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C, the AC power source 20, the DC power source 22, or a combination thereof include components that are enclosed in a housing generally indicated at 54. Additionally or alternatively, the energy storage system 24, the solar power source 26, the solar energy storage system 27, or a combination thereof can include components that are enclosed in the housing 54. According to one embodiment, the housing 54 is a two-part housing, such that the housing 54 includes corresponding interlocking teeth 56 that extend along at least a portion of the connecting sides of the housing 54. According to one embodiment, the interlocking teeth 56 on a first part of the two-part housing interlock with corresponding interlocking teeth 56 of a second part of the two-part housing in order to align the corresponding parts of the housing 54 during assembly of the device. The interlocking teeth 56 can also be used to secure the parts of the housing 54. However, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that additional connection devices, such as mechanical connection devices (e.g., threaded fasteners) or adhesives, can be used to connect the parts of the housing 54. Further, the interlocking teeth 56 can be shaped, such that a force applied to a portion of the housing 54 is distributed to other portions of the two-part housing 54 along the connection point of the interlocking teeth 56.

In accordance with an alternate embodiment shown in Fig. 7D, the housing 54 of the handheld lighting device 14A can be a tubular housing, wherein the internal power source 16 and the circuit board 39 are contained in a longitudinally extending bore of the tubular housing 54. An end cap, generally indicated at 59, can enclose a first end or a front end of the tubular housing 54. According to one embodiment, the end cap 59 includes an optic pack 57, which includes at least the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C, wherein the optic pack 57A is described in greater detail below. Thus, the end cap 59 can be a light emitting end of the handheld lighting device 14 A. Additionally, a tail cap assembly, generally indicated at 88, can be used to enclose a second end of the tubular housing 54. The tail cap assembly 88 includes a connector 92, as described in greater detail below. According to one embodiment, the tubular housing 54 can include external features, such as thermally conductive heat sink fins 74. According to an alternate embodiment, an external component 61 can be attached to the tubular housing 54, wherein the external component 61 includes external features, such as the thermally conductive heat sink fins 74. The external component 61 can be attached to the tubular housing 54 by any suitable form of attachment, such as, but not limited to, a mechanical attachment device, an adhesive, the like, or a combination thereof. According to one embodiment, the handheld lighting device 14A has the internal power source 16, which includes three (3) AA size batteries connected in series. Typically, at least two of the AA batteries are positioned side-by-side, such that the three (3) AA size batteries are not each end-to-end, and a circuit board 39 is positioned around the three (3) AA size batteries within the housing 54. According to one embodiment, the internal power source 16 of the headlight lighting device 14B is not housed within the same housing as the light sources 18A,18B,18C, but can be directly electrically connected to the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C and mounted on the headband 21 as the housing 54 enclosing the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C. Thus, the internal power source 16 of the headlight lighting device 14B differs from the external power sources 20,22,24,26,27 that connect to the headlight lighting device 14B with the electrical connector 12. Further, the headlight lighting device 14B can include one or more internal power sources 16 that have batteries enclosed therein. Typically, the internal power source 16 of the headlight lighting device 14B includes three (3) AAA size batteries, as shown in Fig. 8D. Typically, AAA size batteries are used in the headlight lighting device 14B in order to reduce the weight of the headlight lighting device 14B, which is generally supported by the user's head, when compared to the weight of other

size batteries (e.g., AA size batteries, C size batteries, etc.). According to one embodiment, the spotlight lighting device 14C has the internal power source 16, which includes six (6) AA size batteries, each supplying about 1.5 Volts, and electrically coupled in series to provide a total voltage potential of about nine Volts (9 V). Typically, the six (6) AA size batteries are placed in a clip device 23 and inserted into the handle 17 of the housing 54 of the spotlight lighting device 14C, as shown in Fig. 9B. However, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that batteries of other shapes, sizes, and voltage potentials can be used as the internal power source 16 of the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C. In regards to Figs. 1 and 10A- 1OC, the solar power source 26 includes a film material

29 having panels, wherein the panels receive radiant solar energy from a solar source, such as the sun. According to one embodiment, the film material 29 includes one (1) to five (5) panels. The film material 29, via the panels, receives or harvests the solar energy, such that the solar energy is converted into an electrical current, and the electrical current is propagated to the lighting device 14A,14B,14C or the energy storage system 24,27 through the electrical connector 12. According to one embodiment, the solar radiation received by the solar power source 26 is converted into an electrical current having a voltage potential of approximately eight volts (8V) to fifteen volts (15V). Further, film material 29 can be a KONARKA™ film material, such as a composite photovoltaic material, in which polymers with nano particles can be mixed together to make a single multi-spectrum layer (fourth generation), according to one embodiment. According to other embodiments, the film material 29 can be a single crystal (first generation) material, an amorphous silicon, a polycrystalline silicon, a microcrystalline, a photoelectrochemical cell, a polymer solar cell, a nanocrystal cell, and a dyesensitized solar cell. Additionally, the solar power source 26 can include protective cover films 31 that cover a top and bottom of the film material 29. For purposes of explanation and not limitation, the protective cover film 31 can be any suitable protective cover film, such as a laminate, that allows solar radiation to substantially pass through the protective cover film 31 and be received by the film material 29. According to one embodiment, the film material 29 and the protective cover film 31 are flexible materials that can be rolled or wound about a mandrel 33. The mandrel 33 can have a hollow center, such that the electrical connector 12 or other components can be stored in the mandrel 33. Straps 35 can be used to secure the film material 29 and the protective cover film 31 to the mandrel when the film material 29 and protective cover film 31 are

rolled about the mandrel 33 or in a rolled-up position, according to one embodiment. Additionally, the straps 35 can be used to attach the solar power source 26 to an item, such as, but not limited to, a backpack or the like, when the film material 29 and protective cover film are not rolled about the mandrel 33 or in a solar radiation harvesting position. Additionally or alternatively, end caps 37 can be used to further secure the film material 29 and protective cover film 31 when rolled about the mandrel 33, and to provide access to the hollow interior of the mandrel 33. According to an alternate embodiment, the film material 29 can be a foldable material, such that the film material 29 can be folded upon itself in order to be stored, such as when the solar power source 26 is in a non-solar radiation harvesting position. Further, the film material 29, when in the folded position, can be stored in the mandrel 33, other suitable storage containers, or the like. Additionally, the protective cover film 31 can be a foldable material, such that both the film material 29 and protective cover film 31 can be folded when in a non-solar radiation harvesting position. The film material 29 and protective cover film 31 can then also be un-folded when the film material 29 is in a solar radiation harvesting position. With respect to Figs 1-5 and 7-11, the electrical connector 12 includes a plurality of pins 41 connected to a plurality of electrical wires 43 that extend longitudinally through the electrical connector 12, according to one embodiment. Typically, the plurality of pins 41 are positioned, such that the pins 41 matingly engage to make an electrical connection with a electrical component of the device 14A,14B,14C,20,22,24,26,27 that is connected to the electrical connector 12. Thus, the electrical wires 43, and the pins 41, can communicate or propagate an electrical current between one of the light devices 14A,14B,14C and one of the external power sources 20,22,24,26, or 27 and between the external power sources (i.e. the AC power source 20 to the energy storage system 24) at different voltage potentials. According to one embodiment, the electrical connector 12 communicates an intelligence signal from the power source 20,22,24,26,27 to the lighting device 14A,14B,14C, such that the lighting device 14A,14B,14C can confirm that the electrical connector 12 is connecting a suitable external power source to the connected lighting device 14A,14B,14C. According to one embodiment, the connector 41 includes an outer sleeve 45 having a first diameter and an inner sleeve 47 having a second diameter, wherein the second diameter is smaller than the first diameter. The connector 41 can further include a retainer 49 that

surrounds at least a portion of the plurality of pins 41 and the electrical wires 43, according to one embodiment. The retainer 49, in conjunction with other components of the electrical connector 12, such as the outer sleeve 45 and inner sleeve 47, form a water-tight seal, so that a waterproof connection between the pins 41 and the electrical components of the connected device 14 A, 14B, 14C,20,22,24,26,27. Additionally or alternatively, the connector 41 includes a quarter-turn sleeve 51 , which defines at least one groove 53 that extends at least partially circumferentially, at an angle, around the quarter-turn sleeve 51. According to one embodiment, the electrical connector 12 includes a flexible sleeve 55 at the non-connecting end of the quarter-turn sleeve 51 that connects to a protective sleeve 59. Typically, the protective sleeve 59 extends longitudinally along the length of the electrical connector 12 to protect the wires 43, and the flexible sleeve 55 allows the ends of the electrical connector 12 to be flexible so that the pins 41 can be correctly positioned with respect to a receiving portion of the device 14A,14B,14C,20,22,24,26, or 27. The spotlight lighting device 14C can also include a switch guard 32, according to one embodiment. Additionally or alternatively, the devices 14A,14B,14C,20,22,24,26,27 can include the tail cap assembly 88. The tail cap assembly 88 includes a hinge mechanism 90, wherein at least one cover is operably connected to the hinge mechanism 90, such that the at least one cover pivots about the hinge mechanism 90. According to one embodiment, a connector 92 is attached or integrated onto a cover 94, wherein the connector 92 is the corresponding male portion to the electrical connector 12. The connector 92 can include a flange that is positioned to slidably engage the groove 53 of the electrical connector 12 when the connector 92 is being connected and disconnected from the electrical connector 12, according to one embodiment. The connector 92 is electrically connected to the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C when the cover 94 is in a fully closed positioned, such that when one of the external power sources 20,22,24,26, or 27 is connected to one of the lighting devices 14A,14B, or 14C by the electrical connector 12 being connected to the connector 92, the external power source 20,22,24,26,27 propagates an electrical current to the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C. When the cover 94 is in an open position, the connector 92 is not electrically connected to the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C, and the internal power source 16 can be inserted and removed from the lighting device 14A,14B,14C.

According to an alternate embodiment, the tail cap assembly 88 includes a second cover 96 that covers the connector 92 when in a fully closed position. Typically, the second cover 96 is operably connected to the hinge mechanism 90, such that the second cover pivots about the hinge mechanism 90 along with the cover 94. When the second cover 96 is in the fully closed position, the electrical connector 12 cannot be connected to the connector 92, and when the second cover 96 is in an open position, the electrical connector 12 can be connected to the connector 92. Thus, the connector 92 does not have to be exposed to the environment that the lighting device 14A,14B,14C is being operated in, when the connector 92 is not connected to the electrical connector 12. Further, the tail cap assembly 88 can include a fastening mechanism 98 for securing the cover 94,96 when the cover 94,96 is in the fully closed position.

II. OPTIC PACK In regards to Figs. 1-5, 7-9, 13-16, and 20A-20H, the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C have a plurality of lighting sources enclosed in the housing 54, wherein at least one light source 18A,18B,18C of the plurality of light sources emits lights. According to one embodiment, each of the light sources 18A,18B,18C are in optical communication with a corresponding optic pack generally indicated at 57A,57B,57C. Typically, the optic pack 57A,57B,57C includes an optical lens, such that a plurality of optical lenses are enclosed in the housing 54, wherein each of the plurality of light sources 18A,18B,18C is in optical communication with one optical lens of the plurality of optical lenses. According to one embodiment, the plurality of optical lenses include a first optical lens 58 A associated with the white flood LED 18 A, a second optical lens 58B or 58B' associated with the white spot LED 18B, and a third optical lens 58C associated with the red flood LED 18C. Typically, the optical lens 58A,58B,58B',58C reflects at least a portion of the light emitted by the corresponding lighting source 18A,18B,18C, wherein at least a portion of the light emitted by the corresponding lighting sources 18A,18B,18C passes through the optical lens 58A,58B,58B',58C, as described in greater detail herein. A lens generally indicated at 60A,60B,60C is substantially fixedly coupled to the housing 54. Thus, the optic pack 57A,57B,57C can include the optical lens 58A,58B,58B',58C and the lens 60A,60B,60C, wherein the corresponding light source 18A,18B,18C can be connected to the LED circuit board 19 and inserted into the

corresponding optic pack 57A,57B,57C. According to one embodiment, the optic pack 57A including optical lens 58A,58B,58C and lens 6OA is associated with the handheld lighting device 14A, the optic pack 57B including optical lens 58A,58B',58C and lens 6OB is associated with the headlight lighting device 14B, and the optic pack 57C including optical lens 58A,58B,58C and lens 6OC is associated with the spotlight lighting device 14C. The lens 60A,60B,60C is a single lens having a portion that is in optical communication with a corresponding light source 18A,18B,18C and corresponding optical lens 58A,58B,58C, according to one embodiment. The lens 60A,60B,60C also includes a plurality of surface configurations, such that at least one surface configuration of the plurality of surface configurations is formed on each portion of the lens 60A,60B,60C to control an illumination pattern of the light emitted from the corresponding lighting source 18A,18B,18C. According to one embodiment, a first portion 62 of the lens 60A,60B,60C has a first surface configuration that is a flood surface configuration. Thus, the light emitted from the corresponding light source (e.g., white flood LED 18A and red flood LED 18C) and reflected by the corresponding optical lens 58A,58C are directed through the flood surface configuration to produce a flood pattern. Additionally, a second portion 64 of the lens 60A,60B,60C can include a second surface configuration that is a spot surface configuration. Thus, the light emitted from the corresponding light source (e.g., white spot LED 18B) and reflected by the corresponding optical lens 58B' is directed through the spot surface configuration to produce a spot pattern. According to one embodiment, at least a portion of the plurality of the surface configurations are generally formed by chemically treating the portion of the lens 60A,60B,60C. Typically, at least one chemical agent is applied to the desired portion of the lens 60A,60B,60C surface (e.g., the first portion 62), and the chemical agent alters the surface configuration, which results in the light emitted from the corresponding light source (e.g., white flood LED 18A and red flood LED 18C) to be dispersed at greater angles than the light emitted through a smooth or non-treated portion of the lens 60A,60B,60C (e.g., the second portion 64). According to one embodiment, the flood beam pattern illuminates a circular target size in diameter of approximately two meters (2 m) or greater at a target distance of approximately one hundred meters (100 m), and the spot beam pattern illuminates a circular target size in diameter of approximately less than one meter (1 m) at a target distance of two meters (2 m). Thus, the flood beam pattern generally illuminates a target size at a first target

distance having a greater diameter than the spot beam pattern at a second target distance, such that the light emitted in the flood pattern is emitted at greater angles with respect to the light source (e.g., the white flood LED 18A and red flood LED 18C) than light emitted in the spot pattern. According to one embodiment, the flood beam pattern can be defined as the light being emitted at a half angle of twelve degrees (12°) or greater with respect to the lighting source 18 A, and the spot beam pattern can be defined as the light being emitted at a half angle of less than twelve degrees (12°) with respect to the lighting source 18B. Additionally or alternatively, the white LED light sources 18A,18B are CREE XR-E™ LEDs, and the red LED light source 18C is a CREE-XR™ 7090 LED. According to one embodiment, the spot lighting source 18B, and corresponding optic pack 57B, can have a half angle of less than or equal to approximately five degrees (5°) for the handheld and headlight lighting devices 14A,14B, and a half angle of less than or equal to approximately two degrees (2°) for the spotlight lighting device 14C. For purposes of explanation and not limitation, an exemplary illumination pattern that is emitted by a lighting source 18A,18B,18C is shown in Fig. 27. The illumination pattern has a diameter D at a target, wherein the diameter D corresponds to an angle θ, with which the light is emitted with respect to an optical axis of the lighting source 18A,18B,18C. Thus, the illumination pattern of light emitted by the lighting source 18A,18B,18C can be defined by the size or diameter D of the illumination pattern at the target, the shape of the illumination pattern, the intensity of the light emitted, the angle with which the light is emitted from the lighting source 18A,18B,18C, or a combination thereof. Typically, the light emitted by the white flood LED 18A and red flood LED 18C have a greater size or diameter D at a target, and the light is emitted at a greater angle θ with respect to the optical axis of the lighting source than the white spot LED 18B. With regards to Figs. 13A-13C, the optic pack 57A of the handheld lighting device 14A includes the first, second, and third optical lens 58A,58B,58C and the lens 6OA. The first portion 62 of the lens 60A,60B, substantially covers and corresponds with the first optical lens 58A and the third optical lens 58C, and the second portion 64 of the lens 60A,60B,60C substantially covers and corresponds with the second optical lens 58B. Thus, the first portion 62 in conjunction with the first optical lens 58 A and the third optical lens 58C produce a flood pattern of light emitted by the white flood LED 18A and the red flood

LED 18C, respectively. Further, the second portion 64 in conjunction with the second optical lens 58B emit a spot pattern of illuminated light emitted by the white spot LED 18B. In reference to Figs. 14A-14C, the optic pack 57B of the headlight lighting device 14B is shown, wherein the optic pack 57B includes the first, second, and third optical lens 58A,58B,58C and the lens 6OB. According to one embodiment, the first portion 62 of the lens 6OB substantially covers and is associated with the first optical lens 58 A and the third optical lens 58C, such that the corresponding white flood LED 18A and red flood LED 18C are directed through the first portion 62 to produce a flood pattern of illuminated light. The second portion 64 of the lens 60A,60B,60C substantially covers and corresponds to the second optical lens 58B, such that light emitted from the white spot LED 18B is emitted through the second portion 64 to produce a spotlight pattern. With respect to Figs. 15A-15D, the optic pack 57C of the spotlight lighting device 14C includes the first optical lens 58A, a second optical lens 58B', the third optical lens 58C, and the lens 6OC. The first portion 62 of the lens 6OC substantially covers and corresponds to the first optical lens 58 A and the third optical lens 58C, such that light emitted from the white flood LED 18 A and the red flood LED 18C is emitted through the first portion 62 to produce a flood pattern. The second portion 64 of the lens 6OC substantially covers and corresponds to the second optical lens 58B', such that light emitted by the white spot LED 18B is emitted through the second portion 64 to produce a spot pattern. Additionally, the second optical lens 58B' that is included in the optic pack 57C of the spotlight lighting device 14C can have a focal point 66 that is deeper with respect to a top 68 that defines an opening 70, wherein light is directed out of the second optical lens 58B' that is deeper than at least one other focal point of the plurality of optical lenses in the optic pack 57C. Additionally, the second optical lens 58B' can be a multiple-part optical lens, according to one embodiment. Thus, the multiple parts of the second optical lens 58B' can be attached to one another to form the second optical lens 58B' in the final assembly. The multiple parts of the second optical lens 58B' can be attached by suitable mechanical devices, pressure fitting, adhesives, the like, or a combination thereof. According to one embodiment, the second optical lens 58B' has a seam 72 that extends circumferentially around the second optical lens 58B' that separates the second optical lens 58B' into two parts. According to an alternate embodiment, the second optical lens 58B' has a seam that extends longitudinally along the second optical lens 58B' to separate the second optical lens 58B' into two parts.

According to one embodiment, the optical lenses 58A,58B,58B',58C are conically shaped reflectors. Specifically, the conically shaped optical lenses 58A,58B,58B',58C are total internal reflection (TIR) optical lenses, according to one embodiment. The apex (vertex) of each cone shaped optical lens 58A,58B,58B',58C has a concave surface that generally engages the corresponding LED 18A,18B,18C. By way of explanation and not limitation, at least one of the optical lenses 58A,58B,58B',58C have a refractive index of 1.4 to 1.7. Additionally or alternatively, the optical lenses 58A,58B,58B',58C are made of a polycarbonate material, and the lens 60A,60B,60C is made of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) material. Further, the housing 54 can define an indentation 73, as shown in Figs. 7B,7C, 8B, 8C, 9B, and 9C, wherein a portion of the lens 60A,60B,60C is inserted in the indentation 73 to fixedly connect the lens 60A,60B,60C to the housing 54, according to one embodiment. Additionally, the first and second potions 62,64 of the lens 60A,60B,60C are optically aligned with the corresponding light source 18A,18B,18C and optical lens 58A,58B,58B',58C when the lens 60A,60B,60C is inserted into the indentation 73. Alternatively, the lenses 58A,58B,58B',58C can be, but are not limited to, plano-convex lenses, biconvex or double convex lenses, positive meniscus lenses, negative meniscus lenses, parabolic lenses, the like, or a combination thereof, according to one embodiment. According to one embodiment, the optic pack 57A,57B,57C can include a central lens section, an outside internal reflection form, a top microlens array, and a small microlens array (Fig. 13D). The microlenses can be the surface configurations on the portions 62,64 of the lens 60A,60B,60C,60D. Typically, the central lens section can concentrate the light into a range of angles, and the outside internal reflection form can guide the light in the direction the light is to be emitted (e.g., a forward direction). The top microlens array can spread the light into a particular pattern, such as the flood illumination pattern, according to one embodiment. The small microlens array can be used to eliminate a square shape in the illumination pattern, such as for the white spot LED 18B, according to one embodiment. Thus, an output surface remains flat. An input side lens can create an image on the lighting source 18A,18B,18C. Typically, in order to avoid a direct imaging of the lighting source 18A,18B,18C, a smaller array of microlens are substantially opposite an internal lens, according to one embodiment. Thus, the microlens or microlens array can collect small images and overlap in a far field to mix spectral non-uniformity from the lighting source 18A,18B,18C.

According to an alternate embodiment, the optic pack 57A,57B,57C is a hybrid of components instead of the embodiment as described above. In this embodiment, the sidewalls of the TIR lens can be reflectors, and a central lens portion can function as spreading optics to spread out the light and form the illumination pattern.

III. HEAT DISSIPATION With regards to Figs. 1-4 and 7-9, the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C each include at least one lighting source 18A,18B,18C that generate thermal energy (heat) as a by-product, and the housing 54 that encloses the at least one lighting source 18A,18B,18C generally confines the heat and protects the components therein, according to one embodiment. The housing 54 is in thermal communication with at least one of the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C, such that thermal radiation transfers directly or indirectly from the at least one lighting source 18A,18B,18C to the housing 54. The housing 54 includes a body and a plurality of thermally conductive heat sink fins 74. According to one embodiment, at least a portion of the plurality of thermally conductive heat sink fins 74 extend horizontally with respect to a normal operating position of the at least one lighting device 14A,14B,14C, shown in Figs. 7 A, 8 A, and 9 A. According to an alternate embodiment, at least a portion of the thermally conductive heat sink fins 74 extend vertically with respect to a normal operating position of the at least one lighting device (Fig. 7A'). According to one embodiment, the housing 54 is made of a thermally conductive material, such as, but not limited to, thixo molded magnesium alloy, or the like. Additionally or alternatively, at least a portion of the thermally conductive material of housing 54 can be covered with an emissivity coating, wherein the emissivity coating increases the heat dissipation capabilities of the thermally conductive material. According to one embodiment, the emissivity coating can be a material with a heat conductive rating of approximately 0.8, such that the emissivity coating provides a high emissivity and promotes adequate radiant heat transfer. For purposes of explanation and not limitation, the emissivity coating can be, but is not limited to, a DUPONT® Raven powder material. Typically, the emissivity coating is applied to the housing 54 and baked onto the housing 54 after the molding process in order to provide a durable finish. The thermally conductive heat sink fins 74, whether extending horizontally (Fig. 7A) in one embodiment, vertically (Fig. 7A') in another embodiment, or a combination thereof,

can include at least a first thermally conductive heat sink fin 74A and a second thermally conductive heat sink fin 74B that define an approximately five millimeter (5 mm) spacing 76 between the first and second thermally conductive heat sink fins 74A,74B. In one exemplary embodiment, a horizontal thickness of the thermally conductive heat sink fins 74 can range from and include approximately 0.75 mm to one millimeter (1 mm), and the height of the thermally conductive heat sink fins 74A,74B range from and include approximately four millimeters (4 mm) to 5.8 mm. However, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the above dimensions can be altered to provide a thermally conductive heat sink fin 74 with a greater amount of surface area, which generally dissipates heat with greater efficiency than a thermally conductive heat sink fin with less surface area under substantially the same operating conditions. According to one embodiment, a thermal conductive gap filler is dispersed between the housing 54 and the LED circuit board 19. The thermal conductive gap filler can generally be selected to have characteristics including, but not limited to, thermal conductivity, adhesive, electrical non-conductivity, the like, or a combination thereof. Thus, the thermal conductive gap filler can be used to conduct heat from the LED circuit board 19 to the housing 54. According to one embodiment, the thermal conductivity of the thermal conductive material is one watt per meter degree of Celsius (W/mC). One exemplary thermal conductive material that can be used as the gap filler is GAP PAD™ manufactured by Bergquist Company. The thermal conductive gap filling material can have an adhesive property, which further forms a connection between the LED circuit board 19 and the housing 54. Typically, the thermal conductive gap filling material is a dielectric material. At least one temperature monitoring device 50 can be in thermal communication with at least one of the LED circuit board 19 and the housing 54. In one exemplary embodiment, the temperature monitoring device 50 is a thermistor that monitors the temperature of at least one component of the lighting device 14A,14B,14C. By way of explanation and not limitation, the temperature monitoring device 50 can be a positive temperature coefficient (PTC) thermistor, a negative temperature coefficient (NTC) thermistor, or a thermocouple. According to one embodiment, the temperature monitoring device 50 is in thermal communication with at least one other component, such that the temperature monitoring device 50 directly monitors the thermal radiation emitted by the component or a rate of change in the emitted thermal radiation over a period of time. Additionally, the temperature

monitoring device 50 communicates the monitored temperature to the processor 36. The processor 36 has hardware circuitry or executes one or more software routine to determine a temperature of at least one other component of the lighting device 14A,14B,14C based upon the monitored temperature. The processor 36 can then alter the electrical power supplied to the at least one light source 18A,18B,18C in order to control the thermal radiation emitted by the light source 18A,18B,18C to the LED circuit board 19. By way of explanation and not limitation, the electrical power can be altered by altering the electrical current, the voltage potential of the electrical power, or a combination thereof. According to one embodiment, wherein the rate of change of the emitted thermal radiation is monitored, the rate of change of emitted thermal radiation is monitored with respect to a commanded or selected light output function for the lighting source 18A,18B,18C. Thus, the temperature of a component, such as the housing 54, can be determined to a degree by measuring the rate of change of the LED circuit board 19 temperature during a period of time at a specific current output. Typically, the rate of change in the temperature of the component is a function of convection heat transfer (e.g., wind), conduction heat transfer (e.g., the lighting device 14A,14B,14C being held), and radiation heat transfer (e.g., solar radiation). For purposes of explanation and not limitation, in operation, one of the white flood

LED 18 A, white spot LED 18B, and red flood LED 18C, or a combination thereof, are illuminated and emit thermal radiation, which is transferred to the LED circuit board 19. According to one embodiment, the temperature monitor device 50 is in thermal communication with the LED circuit board 19, such that the temperature monitor device 50 determines the temperature of the LED circuit board 19. The temperature monitor device 50 communicates the monitored temperature data, which includes, for example, resistance, of the LED circuit board 19 or data to processor 36, wherein the processor 36 determines an approximate temperature of the housing 54 based upon the monitored temperature of the LED circuit board 19. If the monitored temperature or the determined temperature are at or exceed a temperature value, then the processor 36 reduces the electrical power supplied to the white flood LED 18A, white spot LED 18B, red flood LED 18C, or a combination thereof, in order to reduce the amount of thermal radiation emitted by the LEDs 18A,18B,18C. The temperature value or threshold value that is compared to one of the monitored temperature or the determined temperature can be a temperature value, according to

embodiment. The electrical power supplied may be controlled by altering the electrical current supplied to the lighting source 18A,18B,18C, such as by using pulse width modulation (PWM) control. By reducing the electrical power supplied to the LEDs 18A,18B,18C, the thermal radiation emitted by the LEDs 18A,18B,18C is reduced, and the temperature of the LED circuit board 19 and housing 54 is also reduced. Therefore, reducing the electrical power, which reduces the amount of light emitted by the LEDs 18A,18B,18C, results in a temperature controlled lighting device that maintains a selected temperature for the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C. According to an alternate embodiment, the temperature monitoring device 50 is in thermal communication with the housing 54, such that the thermal monitoring device 50 monitors the temperature of the housing 54. The temperature monitoring device 50 then communicates the monitored temperature of the housing 54 or data to the processor 36, wherein the processor 36 processes the data and determines an approximate temperature of the LED circuit board 19 based upon the monitored temperature of the housing 54. The processor 36 can alter the electrical power supplied to the LEDs 18A,18B,18C based upon the monitored temperature of the housing 54, the determined temperature of the LED circuit board 19, or a combination thereof, in order to reduce the amount of thermal radiation emitted by the LEDs 18A,18B,18C. Additionally or alternatively, the processor 36 can increase the electrical power supplied to the LEDs 18A,18B,18C based upon a monitored temperature monitored by the temperature monitoring device 50, the determined temperature determined by the processor 36, or a combination thereof, without regard to the component that the temperature monitoring device 50 is in thermal communication with. Typically, the electrical power can be altered by altering the electrical current, which can be controlled by using PWM control. Thus, the supplied electrical power to the LEDs 18A,18B,18C can be increased in order to emit more illumination from the LEDs 18A,18B,18C, when the temperature within the lighting device 14A,14B,14C is maintained at a suitable temperature, such that one of the monitored temperature of the determined temperature are below a second temperature value or threshold value. With respect to Figs. 1-4, 7-9, and 17A, a method of controlling the electrical power supplied to the lighting source 18A,18B,18C is generally shown in Fig. 17A at reference identifier 1040, according to one embodiment. The method 1040 starts at step 1042, and

proceeds to step 1044, wherein the temperature of a first component is monitored. According to one embodiment, the first component is the LED circuit board 19, which is monitored by the temperature monitoring device 50. According to an alternate embodiment, the first component is housing 54, wherein the temperature of the housing 54 is monitored by the temperature monitoring device 50. At step 1046, an approximate temperature of a second component is determined based upon the temperature monitored at step 1044. According to one embodiment, the second component is either the LED circuit board 19 or the housing 54, wherein the temperature monitoring device 50 is not in direct thermal communication with the second component. It is then determined at decision step 1048 whether one of the monitored or determined temperature is above a first value. For purposes of explanation and not limitation, when the temperature monitoring device 50 monitors the temperature of the LED circuit board 19, the first value is approximately sixty-six degrees Celsius (66°C), such that the LED board 19 is operating at approximately sixty-six degrees Celsius (66°C) and the housing 54 is presumed to have an operating temperature of approximately fifty-five degrees Celsius (55°C). If it is determined at decision step 1048 that one of the monitored or determined temperature is above the first value, then the method 1040 proceeds to step 1050, wherein the electrical current supplied to the light source 18A,18B,18C is decreased. The method 1040 then ends at step 1052. When it is determined at decision step 1048 that one of the monitored or determined temperature is not above the first value, then the method 1040 proceeds to decision step 1054. At decision step 1054, it is determined if one of the monitored or determined temperature is below a second value. If it is determined at decision step 1054 that one of the monitored or determined temperature is below the second value, then the method 1040 proceeds to step 1056, wherein the electrical current supplied to the light source 18A,18B,18C is increased. The method 1040 then ends at step 1052. However, if it is determined at decision step 1054 that one of the monitored or determined temperatures is not below the second value, then the method 1040 proceeds to step 1058. At step 1058, the electrical current being supplied to the light source 18A,18B,18C is maintained, and the method 1040 then ends at step 1052. With respect to Figs. 1-4, 7-9, and 17B, a method of controlling the electrical power supplied to the lighting source 18A,18B,18C is generally shown in Fig. 17B at reference

identifier 1200, according to one embodiment. The method 1200 starts at step 1202, and proceeds to step 1204, wherein a temperature of a first component is monitored over a period of time. At step 1206, a rate of change of the emitted thermal radiation or monitored temperature is determined. According to one embodiment, the rate of change can be determined based upon comparing the current temperature of the component to a previous temperature of the component. Thus, the temperature of the component is monitored over a period of time. At step 1208, the temperature of a second component is determined based upon the determined temperature rate of change of the first component. At decision step 1210, it is determined if one of the determined temperature rate of change or determined temperature of the second component is above a first value. If it is determined at decision step 1210 that one of the determined temperature rate of change or determined temperature of the second component is above the first value, then the method 1200 proceeds to step 1212. At step 1212, the electrical current supplied to the lighting source is decreased, and the method 1200 then ends at step 1214. However, if it is determined at decision step 1210 that one of the determined temperature rate of change or determined temperature of the second component is not above the first value, then the method 1200 proceeds to decision step 1216. At decision step 1216, it is determined if one of the determined temperature rate of change or the determined temperature of the second component is below the second value. If it is determined at decision step 1216 that one of the determined temperature rate of change or the determined temperature of the second component is below a second value, then the method 1200 proceeds to step 1218. At step 1218, the electrical current supplied to the lighting source 18A,18B,18C is increased, and the method 1200 then ends at step 1214. If it is determined at decision step 1216 that one of the determined temperature rate of change or the determined temperature of the second component is not below the second value, then the method 1200 proceeds to step 1220. At step 1220, the electrical current being supplied to the lighting source 18A,18B,18C is maintained, and the method 1200 then ends at step 1214. Therefore, the monitored temperature of a component of the lighting device

14A,14B,14C and the determined approximate temperature of other components in the lighting device 14A,14B,14C can be used for controlling different components or devices within the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C.

By way of explanation and not limitation, one exemplary use is to protect the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C from overheating when the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C are LEDs. Typically, LEDs have an LED junction, and it can be undesirable for a temperature of such an LED junction be exceeded for extended periods of time. When the LED junction temperature is exceeded for extended periods of time, the LED life can be shortened. Thus, the monitored and determined temperatures can be used to prevent the LED junction from exceeding a temperature for an extended period of time. Another exemplary use is to maintain the temperature of the housing 54 at a desirable temperature. Thus, by monitoring the temperature of the LED circuit board 19, the approximate temperature of the housing 54 can be determined so that the temperature of the housing 54 can be maintained at a desirable level. A third exemplary use can be to determine an approximate temperature of the internal power source 16, so that the internal power source 16 is operated under desirable conditions, as set forth in greater detail below. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that other components, devices, or operating conditions of the lighting device 14A,14B,14C can be controlled based upon the monitored and determined temperatures.

IV. ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEM In regards to Figs. 1, 5A-5B, 10A- 1OD, 18, 19 A, and 19B, the energy storage system

24 and the solar power energy storage system 27 include a plurality of battery cells including at least a first battery cell 78 and a second battery cell 80, according to one embodiment. The exemplary embodiments described herein are generally discussed with respect to the first and second battery cells 78,80; however, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that any suitable number of battery cells can be used in the energy storage system 24 or the solar power energy storage system 27, such as, but not limited to, there (3) or four (4) battery cells used in the energy storage system 24 or the solar power energy storage system 27. A power source, such as the external power sources, including the AC power source 20, the DC power source 22, and the solar power source 26 can be electrically connected to the plurality of battery cells with the electrical connector 12. Thus, the battery cells 78,80 can be configured to electrically connect to the external power source 20,22,26,27. According to one embodiment, the power source 20,22,26,27 supplies an electrical current to the energy storage system 24 having a voltage potential of approximately eight Volts (8 V) to twelve Volts (12 V). A controller 82 is in communication with the plurality of battery cells, and

controls the electrical current supplied to the battery cells 78,80 based upon the controller's 82 hardware circuitry, executing one or more software routines, or a combination thereof. The controller 82 can be a microprocessor or another suitable controlling device that controls the electrical current propagated between the plurality of battery cells and the power source 20,22,26,27, according to one embodiment. According to one embodiment, the controller 82 controls the electrical power supplied to the plurality of battery cells 78,80, such that the battery cells 78,80 can be charged using a quick charging method and a fully charged charging method. Generally, the quick charging method increases the state of charge of the battery cell 78,80 at a higher rate during a period of time than the fully charged charging method during the same length of time. Typically, the battery cell 78,80 is first charged using the quick charging method, and then charged using the fully charged charging method in order to obtain a one hundred percent (100%) state of charge. Typically, the quick charging rate charges the battery cells 78,80 at a quicker rate than the fully charged charging method. According to one embodiment, the quick charging method can include applying a substantially constant electrical current, and the fully charged charging method can include applying an electrical current that is tapered off in order to maintain a substantially constant voltage potential. Additionally or alternatively, the controller 82 can control the supply of electrical current to the battery cells 78,80 based upon a monitored temperature of at least one of the battery cells 78,80. A method of charging the battery cells 78,80 is generally shown in Fig. 19A at reference identifier 1240, according to one embodiment. The method 1240 starts at step 1242, and proceeds to decision step 1244. At decision step 1244, it is determined if at least one of the battery cells 78,80 has a voltage potential or state of charge below a first state of charge. If it is determined at decision step 1244 that at least one battery cell 78,80 is below the first voltage potential threshold, then the method 1240 proceeds to step 1246. At step 1246, the battery cell 78,80 is charged using the quick charging method. According to one embodiment, the quick charging method includes supplying a substantially constant electrical current to the battery cell 78,80. At decision step 1248, it is determined if the battery cell 78,80 has a state of charge that is equal to or greater than the first voltage potential threshold. If it is determined at decision step 1248 that the battery cell 78,80 state of charge is not equal to or greater than the first voltage potential threshold, then the method 1240 returns to step 1246. However, if it is determined at decision step 1248 that the battery cell 78,80 has a state of

charge that is equal to or greater than the first voltage potential threshold, then the method 1240 returns to step 1244. If it is determined at decision step 1244 that none of the battery cells 78,80 have a voltage potential that is below the first voltage potential threshold, then the method 1240 proceeds to step 1250. At step 1250, the battery cell 78,80 is charged using the fully charged charging method. According to one embodiment, the fully charged charging method includes supplying an electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential. At decision step 1252, it is determined if the battery cell 78,80 state of charge is equal to or greater than a second voltage potential threshold. If it is determined at decision step 1252 that the battery cell 78,80 state of charge is less than the second voltage potential threshold, then the method 1240 returns to step 1250. However, if it is determined at decision step 1252 that the battery cell 78,80 state of charge is equal to or greater than the second voltage potential threshold, then the method 1240 proceeds to step 1254, wherein it is determined if all of the battery cells 78,80 are fully charged. If it is determined at decision step 1254 that all of the battery cells 78,80 are not fully charged, then the method 1240 returns to step 1250. However, if it is determined at decision step 1254 that all of the battery cells 78,80 are fully charged, then the method 1240 ends at step 1256. The controller 82 controls the electrical power supplied from the external power source 20,22,26,22, such that a substantially constant electrical current is supplied to the first and second battery cells 78,80, when a voltage potential of the first and second battery cells 78,80 is less than the voltage potential threshold, respectively. In this embodiment, the battery cells 78,80 are rechargeable cells and the external power source 20,22,26,27 provides a charging current. The controller 82 also controls the electrical current supplied by the external power source 20,22,26,27, such that the electrical current is supplied at a substantially constant voltage potential from the external power source 20,22,26,27 to the first and second battery cells 78,80, when the voltage potential of the first and second battery cells 78,80 is equal to or greater than the first voltage potential threshold, respectively. The controller 82 controls the electrical current supplied from the external power source 20,22,26,27, such that the external power source 20,22,26,27 supplies a substantially constant electrical current to the first battery cell 78 prior to providing the substantially constant electrical current to the second battery cell 80, when the voltage potential of the first battery cell 78 is greater than the voltage potential of the second battery cell 80, and the voltage

potential of both the first and second battery cells 78,80 is below the first voltage potential threshold. According to one embodiment, the first and second battery cells 78,80 are Li-Ion battery cells. However, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that other types of electrochemical composition can be used in the battery cells, such as, but not limited to lithium or nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery cells. It should further be appreciated by those skilled in the art that one or more battery cells having one or more electrochemical compositions can be used in the energy storage system 24 or the solar power energy storage system 27. Typically, the battery cell 78,80 selected first for charging is the battery cell 78,80 with the greatest voltage potential that is less than a first voltage potential threshold, wherein the controller 82 begins to control the substantially constant electrical current supplied to the charging battery cell 78,80, rather than an electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential. According to one embodiment, the selected battery cell 78,80 continues to be charged until the voltage potential of the selected battery cell 78,80 is at least equal to the first voltage potential level threshold, wherein the controller 82 can then select another battery cell 78,80 that is below the first voltage potential threshold . However, if none of the battery cells 78,80 have a voltage potential below the first voltage potential threshold, the controller 82 can begin an electrical current have a substantially constant voltage potential supplied to the battery cell 78,80 that has a first voltage potential threshold at least equal to the first voltage potential threshold. The substantially constant electrical current is supplied to the selected battery cell 78,80 until the voltage potential of the selected battery cell 78,80 is at a second voltage potential. The controller 82 then controls the external power source 20,22,26,27 to supply the substantially constant electrical current to another battery cell 78,80. For purposes of explanation and not limitation, the first voltage potential threshold can be the voltage potential of the battery cells 78,80 having an approximately seventy percent (70%) state of charge, and the second voltage potential threshold can be the voltage potential of the battery cells 78,80 having an approximately one hundred percent (100%) state of charge, wherein the controller 82 controls the electrical current to then be supplied to another or non-first-selected battery cell 78,80. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that there can be any number of suitable voltage potential values of the battery cells

78,80, wherein the controller 82 controls the electrical current supplied to the battery cells 78,80 to efficiently charge the battery cells 78,80 within an allotted charging time period. According to an alternate embodiment, the selected battery cell 78,80 can be charged for a predetermined period of time in which the controller 82 then selects another battery cell 78,80 that has a voltage potential less than the first voltage potential threshold. If it is determined that none of the battery cells 78,80 of the energy storage system 24 have a voltage potential less than the first voltage potential threshold, then the controller 82 then selects one of the battery cells 78,80 to supply an electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential and allowing the electrical current to taper. With respect to Fig. 18, the chart illustrates the relationship between the electrical current and the voltage potential of the electrical current applied to the battery cells 78,80 during the charging period. During a first period of time, such as when at least one of the battery cells 78,80 has a voltage potential below the first voltage potential threshold, the substantially constant current is supplied to the battery cell 78,80. During this period of time, the voltage potential of the electrical current progressively increases until a point where the battery cell 78,80 obtains a state of charge, or when the voltage potential of the battery cell 78,80 is at the first voltage potential threshold. At this point, the electrical current supplied to the battery cell 78,80 has a substantially constant voltage potential, and the amount of electrical current progressively decreases or tapers off. The point wherein the charging of the battery cell 78,80 changes from supplying a substantially constant current to an electrical current, a substantially constant voltage potential is when the battery cell 78,80 has a voltage potential of 4.2 Volts, according to one embodiment. According to one embodiment, when the battery cells 78,80 are Li-Ion battery cells, the battery cells 78,80 can be charged by first selecting the battery cell 78,80 that has a voltage potential below the first voltage potential threshold for providing a substantially constant electrical current prior to providing an electrical current of a substantially constant voltage potential to any of the other battery cells 78,80. This quick charge is based upon chemical properties of the Li-Ion battery cell, which allows the battery cell 78,80 to obtain a quick charge by receiving a substantially constant electrical current until the battery cell 78,80 state of charge ranges from approximately seventy percent (70%) to approximately one hundred percent (100%). Then, the electrical current having a substantially constant voltage potential can be applied to the battery cell 78,80 in order to continue to charge the battery cell

78,80 at a slower rate, so that the state of charge of the battery cell 78,80 can be one hundred percent (100%). Therefore, by first providing a substantially constant electrical current to the first battery cell 78,80 prior to providing an electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential to any other battery cells 78,80, the battery cells 78,80 within the energy storage system 24,27 can be efficiently charged within the allowed charging time, when compared to fully charging the first selected battery and then fully charging another battery. In such an example, the charging period of a Li-Ion battery has a more efficient charging ratio (e.g., percent of state of charge increase to charging time) during the charging period, wherein the substantially constant current is supplied rather than the electrical current supplied at a substantially constant voltage potential. By way of explanation and not limitation, if a Li-Ion battery cell is at zero percent

(0%) state of charge and a substantially constant current is supplied to the Li-Ion battery cell until the state of charge is seventy percent (70%) during a first period of time. The state of charge is increased during a second period of time to one hundred percent (100%) by supplying an electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential. When using the method described herein, the substantially constant current is supplied to the battery cells below a state of charge prior to supplying the electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential. Thus, both the battery cells 78,80 are charged to seventy percent (70%) state of charge in a shorter time period than it would take to fully charge one battery cell. A user charging the battery cells has two battery cells at seventy percent (70%) state of charge rather than one battery cell at one hundred percent (100%) state of charge, and therefore, the ability to power the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C for a longer time. According to one embodiment, the energy storage system 24 can receive electrical power from a plurality of different electrical sources that provide the electrical power within a range of voltages. By way of explanation and not limitation, the energy storage system 24 can receive electrical power from the AC power source 20 and the DC power source 22, which provides electrical power at approximately a voltage potential of 12 Volts, and the solar power source 26 that supplies electrical power at a voltage potential of approximately eight Volts (8 V). Further, the energy storage system 24 can provide electrical power to the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C at a voltage potential of approximately 3.6 Volts. According to one embodiment, the energy storage system 24 can include other types of electrical outlets,

which are not received by the electrical connector 12, such as, but not limited to, a universal serial bus (USB) and an energy-to-go (ETG) connector. Thus, the energy storage system 24 can be used to provide electrical power to other devices, such as, but not limited to, computers, cellular phones, personal data assistants (PDAs), the like, or a combination thereof. A method of controlling the electrical current provided from the external power sources 20,22,26,27 to the energy storage system 24 is generally shown in Fig. 19B at reference identifier 1020. The method 1020 starts at step 1022, and proceeds to decision step 1024, wherein it is determined if at least one battery cell 78,80 is below a first voltage potential threshold. If it is determined at decision step 1024 that at least one battery cell 78,80 is below the first voltage potential threshold, the method 1020 proceeds to step 1026, wherein a substantially constant current is provided to the battery cell 78,80 with the greatest voltage potential that is below the first voltage potential threshold. At step 1028, it is determined if the voltage potential of the selected battery cell 78,80 is equal to or greater than the first voltage potential threshold. If it is determined at decision step 1028 that the voltage potential of the selected battery cell 78,80 is equal to or greater than the first voltage potential threshold, then the method 1020 returns to step 1024. However, if it is determined at decision step 1028 that the voltage potential of the selected battery cell 78,80 is less than the first voltage potential threshold, then the method 1020 returns to step 1026. If it is determined at decision step 1024 that at least one battery cell 78,80 is not below the first voltage potential threshold, then the method 1020 proceeds to step 1030, wherein an electrical current is provided at a substantially constant voltage potential to the battery cell 78,80 with the lowest voltage potential equal to or greater than the first voltage potential threshold. At decision step 1032, it is determined if the voltage potential of the selected battery cell 78,80 equal to or greater than a second voltage potential threshold. If it is determined at decision step 1032 that the voltage potential of the selected battery cell 78,80 is less than the second voltage potential threshold, then the method 1020 returns to step 1030. However, if it is determined at decision step 1032 that the voltage potential of the selected battery cell 78,80 is equal to or greater than the second voltage potential threshold, then the method 1020 proceeds to step 1034, wherein it is determined if all of the battery cells 78,80 are fully charged. If it is determined at decision step 1034 that not all of the battery cells 78,80 are fully charged, then the method 1020 returns to step 1030. However, if it is

determined at decision step 1034 that all of the battery cells 78,80 are fully charged, then the method 1020 ends at step 1036. According to one embodiment, the lighting system 10 can include the solar power energy storage system 27, wherein the solar power energy storage system 27 can be electrically connected to the plurality of solar power sources 26 using the electrical connector 12. Thus, the solar power energy storage system 27 can receive electrical energy from the plurality of solar power sources 26 and store the electrical power in the battery cells 78,80. The solar power energy storage system 27 can sum the solar radiation received and converted to an electrical current by the solar power source 26, and store the energy in the battery cells 78,80. Additionally or alternatively, the solar power energy storage system 27 can sum the solar radiation received and converted to an electrical current by the solar power source 26, wherein the electrical power is summed and passed through the solar energy storage system 27 to the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the battery cells 78,80 for storing the energy in the solar power energy storage system 27 can be any desirable electrochemical composition, and any suitable number of battery cells 78,80 can be used. The solar power energy storage system 27 can also be electrically connected to other external power sources, such as the AC power source 22 and the DC power source 20, in order to charge the battery cell 78,80. According to one embodiment, the solar power energy storage system 27 charges the battery cell 78,80 using the charging method described above for charging the battery cell 78,80 of the energy storage system 24. Further, the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C can be electrically connected to the solar power energy storage system 27 by the electrical connector 12 in order for the solar power energy storage system 27 to provide an electrical current to the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C to illuminate the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C. With respect to Fig. 10D, the battery cells 78,80 can be housed in a trilobe cartridge

81. The energy storage system 24 can be configured to receive the trilobe cartridge 81. Typically, there are three (3) battery cells serially electrically connected, which are housed in the trilobe cartridge 81. According to one aspect, an energy storage system comprises: a plurality of battery cells configured to be electrically connected to a power source, the plurality of battery cells comprising: a first battery cell; and a second battery cell; and a controller in communication

with the first and second battery cells, the controller controls an electrical current supplied to the first and second battery cells, such that a first charging method is utilized when a voltage potential of the first and second battery cells is less than a first voltage potential threshold, respectively, and a second charging method is utilized when the voltage potential of the first and second battery cells is equal to or greater than the first voltage potential threshold, wherein the first charging method charges at least one of the first and second battery cells at a greater rate than the second charging method, and the first charging method is utilized to charge the first battery cell prior to being utilized to charge the second battery cell when the voltage potential of the first battery cell is below the first voltage potential threshold and greater than the voltage potential of the second battery cell. Also, the substantially constant electrical current can be supplied to the first battery cell prior to providing the electrical current to the second battery cell when the voltage potential of the first battery cell is greater than the voltage potential of the second battery cell. The first charging method can comprise supplying a substantially constant electrical current, and the second charging method can comprise supplying an electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential. At least a portion of the plurality of battery cells can be at least one comprising: a lithium battery cell; a lithium-ion (Li-Ion) battery cell; and a nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery cell. An electrical current supplied to at least a portion of the plurality of battery cells can have a voltage potential of approximately eight volts (8 V) to twelve volts (12V). The controller can taper off an electrical current supplied to the first battery cell when utilizing the second charging method. The controller can control an electrical current supplied to the plurality of battery cells based upon a monitored temperature of at least one of the plurality of battery cells. The first charging method can comprise the controller controlling a supply of an electrical current to the first and second battery cells, such that a substantially constant electrical current is supplied to the first battery cell for a period of time when the voltage potential of the first battery cell is below the first voltage potential threshold, and then controlling the substantially constant electrical current being supplied to the second battery cell when the voltage potential of the second battery cell is below the first voltage potential threshold. The second charging method can comprise the controller controlling a supply of an electrical current to the first and second battery cells, such that the electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential is supplied to the first battery when substantially all of the plurality of battery cells have a voltage potential of

at least one of equal to or greater than the first voltage potential threshold. The plurality of battery cells can be electrically connected in series in a trilobe cartridge. According to another aspect, an energy storage system comprises: a plurality of battery cells configured to be electrically connected to a power source, the plurality of battery cells comprising: a first battery cell; and a second battery cell; and a controller in communication with the first and second battery cells, the controller controls an electrical current supplied to the first and second battery cells, such that a substantially constant electrical current is supplied to the first and second battery cells for a period of time when a voltage potential of the first and second battery cells is less than a first voltage potential threshold, respectively, and controlling an electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential that is supplied to the first and second battery cells when the voltage potential of the first and second battery cells is equal to or greater than the first voltage potential threshold, the substantially constant electrical current is supplied to the first battery cell prior to providing an electrical current to the second battery cell, wherein the voltage potential of the first battery cell is below the first voltage potential threshold, and the voltage potential of the first battery cell is greater than the voltage potential of the second battery cell. Additionally, the electrical current supplied to at least a portion of the plurality of battery cells can have a voltage potential of approximately eight volts (8 V) to twelve volts (12V). The controller can control the electrical current supplied to the plurality of battery cells based upon a monitored temperature of at least one of the plurality of battery cells. The plurality of battery cells can be electrically connected in series in a trilobe cartridge. According to yet another aspect, a method of charging a plurality of battery cells in an energy storage system can comprise the steps of: charging one of a first battery cell and a second battery cell utilizing a first charging method when at least one of the first and second battery cells have a voltage potential less than a first voltage potential threshold; charging one of the first battery cell and second battery cell utilizing a second charging method when the first and second battery cells have a voltage potential equal to or greater than the first voltage potential threshold, wherein the first charging method charges the first and second battery cells at a quicker rate than the second charging method; and charging the first battery cell utilizing the first charging method prior to charging the second battery cell when the voltage potential of the first battery cell is below the first voltage potential threshold, and when the

voltage potential of the first battery cell is greater than the voltage potential of the second battery cell. Also, the method can comprise the step of supplying the electrical current to the first battery cell based upon a monitored temperature of at least the first battery cell. The method can comprise the step of utilizing the first charging method to supply a substantially constant electrical current to the first battery cell for a period of time when the voltage potential is below the first voltage potential threshold, and then utilizing the first charging method to supply the substantially constant electrical current to the second battery cell when the voltage potential of the second battery cell is below the first voltage potential threshold. The method can comprise the step of supplying the electrical current at the substantially constant voltage potential to the first battery when substantially all of a plurality of battery cells that have a voltage potential of at least one of equal to and greater than the first voltage potential threshold. The electrical current can be supplied at a voltage potential of approximately eight volts (8 V) to twelve volts (12V). At least a portion of the plurality of battery cells can be at least one comprising: a lithium battery cell; a lithium-ion (Li-Ion) battery cell; and a nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery cell. The first charging method can comprise supplying a substantially constant electrical current, and the second charging method can comprise supplying an electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential. According to another aspect, a method of charging a plurality of battery cells in an energy storage system comprises the steps of: charging one of a first battery cell and a second battery cell by supplying a substantially constant electrical current when at least one of the first and second battery cells have a voltage potential less than a first voltage potential threshold; charging one of the first and second battery cells by supplying an electrical current at a substantially constant voltage potential when the first and second battery cells have a voltage potential equal to or greater than the first voltage potential threshold; and charging the first battery cell by supplying the substantially constant electrical current prior to charging the second battery cell when the voltage potential of the first battery cell is below the first voltage potential threshold, and when the voltage potential of the first battery cell is greater than the voltage potential of the second battery cell. Additionally, the method can comprise the step of supplying the electrical current to the first battery cell based upon a monitored temperature of at least the first battery cell. The method can comprise the step of supplying the substantially constant electrical current to the

first battery cell for a period of time when the voltage potential is below the voltage potential threshold, and then supplying the substantially constant electrical current to the second battery cell when the voltage potential of the second battery cell is below the first voltage potential threshold. The method can comprise the step of supplying the electrical current at the substantially constant voltage potential to the first battery when substantially all of a plurality of battery cells that have a voltage potential of at least one of equal to and greater than the first voltage potential threshold. The electrical current can be supplied at a voltage potential of approximately eight volts (8 V) to twelve volts (12V). At least a portion of the plurality of battery cells can be at least one comprising: a lithium battery cell; a lithium-ion (Li-Ion) battery cell; and a nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery cell

V. CROSS-FADE AND DIMMING In reference to Figs. 1-4, 7-9, and 20-22, according to one embodiment, at least one of the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C include a plurality of lighting sources 18A,18B,18C including a first lighting source and a second lighting source. Typically, the first lighting source emits light in a first illumination pattern, and the second lighting source emits light in a second illumination pattern that may be different than the first illumination pattern. According to one embodiment, the term illumination pattern generally refers to the size and shape of the illuminated area at a target distance, angles of the emitted light, the intensity of the emitted light across the beam, the illuminance of the beam (e.g., the total luminous flux incident on a surface, per unit area), or a combination thereof. The shape of the illumination pattern can be defined as the target area containing approximately eighty percent to eighty- five percent (80% - 85%) of the emitted light. Cross-fading generally refers to sharing or adjusting the electrical power supplied to two or more light sources in order to yield a selected illumination pattern, such that the intensity distribution of the emitted light is altered to create the selected illumination pattern. According to one embodiment, the first lighting source is the white flood LED 18A and the second lighting source is the white spot LED 18B. Typically, the first and second illumination patterns of the white flood LED 18A and white spot LED 18B are directed in substantially the same direction, such that the first and second illumination patterns of the white flood LED 18 A and the white spot LED 18B at least partially overlap to yield or create a third illumination pattern. The controller or processor 36 alters an intensity of the light

emitted from the white flood LED 18 A and white spot LED 18B with respect to one another, wherein the third illumination pattern is altered when the processor 36 alters the intensity of the white flood 18A and white spot LED 18B. However, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that two or more illumination patterns emitted by two or more lighting sources can be cross-faded that have the same illumination pattern, different illumination patterns, illumination patterns other than spot and/or flood, the same color, different colors, or a combination thereof, according to one embodiment. Generally, by cross-fading the lighting sources of the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C, the available power is proportionally shifted between the white flood LED 18 A and the white spot LED 18B, which controls the relative intensity of the LEDs 18A,18B. The third illumination pattern is yielded by a combination of the first and second illumination patterns of the white flood LED 18A and the white spot LED 18B, respectively, such that when the power supplied to one of the LEDs 18A,18B is increased, the power supplied to the other LED 18A,18B can be proportionally decreased, according to one embodiment. The electrical power can be altered by controlling the electrical current, the voltage, pulse width modulation (PWM), pulse frequency modulation (PFM), the like, or a combination thereof. According to one embodiment, wherein the electrical power is controlled by PWM, the perceived brightness of the white flood LED 18A and white spot LED 18B, the third illumination pattern can be altered by changing the PWM duty cycle. According to one embodiment, a default PWM frequency is approximately one hundred hertz (100 Hz), which is a ten millisecond (10 ms) period, which is altered to change the intensity of the LEDs 18A,18B. By way of explanation and not limitation, the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C have, such as, but not limited to, the first switch SWl for activating and deactivating the white LEDs 18A,18B, the second switch SW2 for increasing the power supplied to the white spot LED 18B, the third switch SW3 for increasing the power supplied to the white flood LED 18A, and the fourth switch SW4 for activating and deactivating the red flood LED 18C. Thus, in order to alter the intensities of the white flood LED 18A and white spot LED 18B, and ultimately alter the third illumination pattern, one of the second and third switches SW2,SW3 is actuated in order to indicate which lighting source 18A,18B is to be supplied with additional electrical power. However, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the second and third switches SW2,SW3 can be a single switching device, such as a rocker switch.

Depending upon which of the second and third switches SW2,SW3 is actuated, the power supplied to the other lighting source of the white flood LED 18A and white spot LED 18B is supplied with proportionally less electrical power. Typically, when the second or third switch SW2,SW3 is actuated, the PWM duty cycle for the corresponding LED 18A,18B is increased, while the PWM duty cycle for the non-corresponding LED 18A,18B is decreased while maintaining a constant period. For purposes of explanation and not limitation, when the second switch SW2 is actuated to increase the power supplied to the white spot LED 18B, the third illumination pattern is created having a greater light intensity in the center of the pattern than the outer portions of the pattern, as shown in Fig. 17A. Alternatively, when the third switch S W3 is actuated in order to increase the power supplied to the white flood LED 18 A, the third illumination pattern is created, wherein the outer portions of the third illumination pattern have a greater light intensity than the center portion of the third illumination pattern, as shown in Fig. 17B. Another example of cross-fading to create the third illumination pattern is shown in

Figs. 20C-20E, according to one embodiment. Fig. 2OC shows an exemplary first illumination pattern emitted by the white flood LED 18 A, and Fig. 2OD shows an exemplary second illumination pattern emitted by the white spot LED 18B. As described herein, the target illuminated by the light emitted from the white spot LED 18B is smaller than the target size illuminated by the white flood LED 18 A. When the exemplary first and second illumination patterns of Figs. 2OC and 2OD are combined, the third illumination pattern is created, as shown in Fig. 2OE. Thus, the third illumination pattern has the diameter of the illuminated target size from the light emitted by the white flood LED 18 A, while having a greater intensity in the center of the third illumination pattern based upon the additional light intensity emitted by the white spot LED 18B. In regards to Fig. 2OF, an illumination pattern is shown with an intensity at a target, wherein the illumination pattern is representative of the light emitted by the white flood LED 18 A, according to one embodiment. The intensity at a target, as shown in Fig. 2OG, is representative of a second illumination pattern created by a light emitted from the white spot LED 18B. Thus, the intensity at a target illustrated in Fig. 2OH represents the cross-fading of the intensities of the white flood LED 18A and the white spot LED 18B, which illuminates the target with the diameter of the illumination pattern emitted by the white flood LED 18A

with greater intensity in the center due to the illumination pattern emitted by the white spot LED 18B. According to one embodiment, a default setting when the lighting device

14A,14B,14C is turned on by actuating the first switch SWl is employed, such that both the white flood LED 18A and white spot LED 18B receive fifty percent (50%) of the cycle time. Additionally or alternatively, there can be any number of cross-fading levels across a cross- fading spectrum, which have corresponding PWM duty cycles for the lighting sources 18A,18B. For purposes of explanation and not limitation, there can be a suitable number of cross-fading levels in order to control the proportional intensity of the lighting sources 18A,18B, such that there are thirty-eight (38) cross-fading levels in the cross-fading spectrum, wherein each level takes 78.9 milliseconds (ms) so that the electrical current supplied to the lighting sources LEDs 18A,18B can be varied over the entire available spectrum in approximately three seconds (3s). Cross-fading levels are a plurality of levels that yield the cross-fading spectrum, wherein each level represents an amount of electrical power supplied to the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C. According to one embodiment, the cross-fading levels are linear, such that the change of electrical power supplied to the lighting sources 18A,18B at the different cross- fading levels is a linear change. According to an alternate embodiment, the cross-fading levels are non-linear, such that the change of electrical power supplied to the lighting sources 18A,18B at the different cross-fading levels is a non-linear change. Additionally or alternatively, the cross-fading levels can correspond to an increase or decrease in light intensity that is noticeable by the human eye (e.g., approximately thirty percent (30%)). According to one embodiment, a method of cross-fading the first and second illumination patterns to alter the third illumination is generally shown in Fig. 21 at reference identifier 1060. The method 1060 starts at step 1062, and proceeds to decision step 1064, wherein it is determined if the switch SW2 associated with the white spot LED 18B is depressed or actuated, according to one embodiment. If it is determined at decision step 1064 that the switch SW2 is depressed, then the method 1060 proceeds to decision step 1066. At decision step 1066 it is determined if a spot percentage is less than one hundred percent (100%), wherein the spot percentage represents the percentage of total light intensity emitted by the white spot LED 18B. If it is determined at decision step 1066 that the spot percentage is less than one hundred percent (100%), then the method 1060 proceeds to step 1068 and the

spot percentage in incremented. Thus, the percentage of the total light intensity emitted by the white spot LED 18B is increased, and the percentage of total light intensity emitted by the white flood LED 18B is proportionally decreased, according to one embodiment. This effectively shifts a higher concentration of the output light illumination beam from a flood illumination pattern to a spot illumination pattern. At step 1070, the On Time is calculated. The calculated On Time represents the total time the white spot LED 18B is on, which corresponds to the intensity of the light emitted by the white spot LED 18B, according to one embodiment. The method 1060 then ends at step 1072. However, if it is determined at decision step 1066 that the spot percentage is not less than one hundred percent (100%), then the method 1060 proceeds to decision step 1074. At decision step 1074, it is determined if the Percent On Time (%0n_Time) is less than one hundred percent (100%). According to one embodiment, the Percent On Time (%0n_Time) is the total time the white spot LED 18B is on, which is typically represented by a percentage of the total PWM period. If it is determined that the Percent On Time (%On_Time) is not less than one hundred percent (100%) at decision step 1074, then the method 1060 ends at step 1072. However, if it is determined at decision step 1074 that the Percent On Time (%0n_Time) is less than one hundred (100%), then the method 1060 proceeds to step 1076, wherein the Percent On Time (%0n_Time) is incremented. According to one embodiment, when the Percent On Time (%On_Time) is incremented, the intensity of the light emitted by the white spot LED 18B is increased. Thus, the intensity of the light emitted by the white flood and spot LEDs 18A,18B is increased when the cross-fade is at an end (i.e. spot end) of a cross-fade spectrum. Generally, the spot end of the cross- fade spectrum can be the end of the cross-fade spectrum where the output light illumination pattern is substantially concentrated with the spot illumination pattern. The method 1060 then proceeds to step 1070, wherein the On Time is calculated, and the method 1060 then ends at step 1072. When it is determined at decision step 1064 that the switch SW2 is not depressed, then the method 1060 proceeds to decision step 1078. At decision step 1078 it is determined if the switch SW3 associated with the white flood LED 18A is depressed. If it is determined at decision step 1078 that the switch SW3 is depressed, the method proceeds to decision step 1080, wherein it is determined if the spot percentage is greater than zero percent (0%). When it is determined that the spot percentage is greater than zero percent (0%) at decision step 1080, then the method 1060 proceeds to step 1082. At step 1082, the spot percentage is

decremented. Typically, when the spot percentage is decremented, the intensity of the light emitted by the white spot LED 18B is decreased and the intensity of the light emitted by the white flood LED 18 A is proportionally increased, according to one embodiment. The method 1060 then proceeds to step 1083, wherein the On Time is calculated, and ends at step 1072. Typically, the On Time calculated for the white spot LED 18B at step 1083 can be calculated in the same manner as the On Time calculated in step 1070 for the white flood LED 18 A. However, if it is determined at decision step 1080 that the spot percentage is not greater than zero percent (0%), then the method 1060 proceeds to decision step 1084. At decision step 1084, it is determined if the Percent On Time (%On_Time) is less than one hundred percent (100%). If it is determined at decision step 1084 that the Percent On Time (%On_Time) is less than one hundred percent (100%) then the method 1060 proceeds to step 1086, wherein the Percent On Time (%On_Time) is incremented. Thus, the intensity of the light emitted by the white flood and spot LEDs 18A,18B is increased when the cross-fade is at an end (i.e. flood end) of the cross-fade spectrum. Generally, the flood end of the cross- fade spectrum can be the end of the cross-fade spectrum where the output light illumination pattern is substantially concentrated with the flood illumination pattern. The method 1060 then proceeds to step 1070 to calculate the On Time, and the method 1060 then ends at step 1072. Further, when it is determined at decision step 1078 that the switch SW3 is not depressed, the method 1060 then ends at step 1072. Additionally or alternatively, the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C can have a dimming feature to control the intensity of the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C. According to one embodiment, the first switch SWl can be depressed for a predetermined period of time in order to activate the dimming feature, which would then increase or decrease the electrical current provided to both the white flood LED 18 A and the white spot LED 18B by the power source 16,20,22,24,26,27. Similarly, the fourth switch SW4 can be depressed for a predetermined period of time in order to increase or decrease the electrical current supplied to the red flood LED 18C. Typically, by increasing or decreasing the electrical current supplied to the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C, the intensity of the light emitted by the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C is altered accordingly. Typically, increasing or decreasing the electrical current supplied to the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C is accomplished by reducing or increasing the duty cycle of the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C.

By way of explanation and not limitation, there can be a suitable number of dimming levels of a dimming spectrum in order to control the dimming of the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C. According to one embodiment, thirty-eight (38) dimming levels are provided across the dimming spectrum, wherein each dimming level takes approximately 78.9 milliseconds (ms) to change between dimming levels when the corresponding switch SW1,SW2 is continuously being depressed. Thus, the time for total transition across the spectrum for each lighting source 18A,18B,18C is approximately three seconds (3 s). Dimming levels are a plurality of dimming levels that yield the dimming spectrum, wherein each level represents an amount of electrical power supplied to the lighting source 18A,18B,18C. Typically, when either the minimum or maximum dimming level is selected (e.g., the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C are emitting the minimum or maximum amount of light), the dimming state will be maintained at the minimum or maximum dimming level for a predetermined period of time before changing to another level when the switch SW1,SW4 is depressed. According to one embodiment, the selected dimming conditions of the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C is maintained when the cross-fading feature is activated. Additionally or alternatively, the selected cross-fading pattern is maintained when the dimming feature is activated. According to one embodiment, a method of dimming the lighting sources

18A,18B,18C to increase or decrease the intensity of the light emitted by the lighting source 18A,18B,18C is generally shown in Fig. 22 at reference identifier 1100. The method 1100 starts at step 1102, and proceeds to decision step 1104, wherein it is determined if a dimming state value (Dim state) is equal to a first predetermined dimming value (DIM). According to one embodiment, the first predetermined dimming value (DIM) is a value that is not at the minimum or maximum end of the dimming spectrum, but instead is an intermediate position in the dimming spectrum. If it is determined at decision step 1104 that the dimming state value (DIM state) is equal to the first predetermined dimming value (DIM), then the method 1100 proceeds to decision step 1106. At decision step 1106 it is determined if the Percent On Time (%0n_Time) is greater than zero percent (0%). According to one embodiment, the Percent On Time (%On_Time) related to the total light intensity of the light emitted by the lighting source 18A,18B,18C. Thus, the Percent On Time (%On_Time) is equal to a percentage of the total PWM period, according to one embodiment. If it is determined at decision step 1106 that the Percent On

Time (%On_Time) is greater than zero percent (0%), then the method 1100 proceeds to step 1108, wherein the Percent On Time (%On_Time) is decremented. Typically, when the Percent On Time (%0n_Time) is decremented, the intensity of the light emitted by the lighting source 18A,18B,18C is decreased. At step 1110, the On Time is calculated, wherein the calculated On Time represents the total time that the lighting source 18A,18B,18C is on, which relates to the intensity of the light emitted by the lighting source 18A,18B,18C. At step 1112, the dimming state value (Dim state) is set to equal the first predetermined dimming value (DIM), and the method 1100 then ends at step 1114. However, if it is determined at decision step 1106 that the Percent On Time

(%0n_Time) is not greater than zero percent (0%), then the method 1100 proceeds to step 1116. At step 1116, the dimming state value (Dim state) is set to equal a second predetermined dimming value (DIM DELA Y). According to one embodiment, the second predetermined dimming value (DIM DELA Y) is a value at substantially the minimum end of the dimming spectrum, and thus, the dimming state of the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C will be maintained for a predetermined period of time when the switch SW1,SW4 is depressed. Generally, the minimum end of the dimming spectrum is the end of the dimming spectrum where the light emitted by the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C is at an approximately minimum value. The method 1100 then ends at step 1114. When it is determined at decision step 1104 that the dimming state value (Dim state) is not equal to the first predetermined dimming value (DIM), then the method 1100 proceeds to decision step 1118. At decision step 1118, it is determined if the dimming state value (Dim state) is equal to the second predetermined dimming value (DIM DELA Y). If it is determined at decision step 1118 that the dimming state value (Dim state) is equal to the second predetermined dimming value (DIM DEL A Y) then the method 1100 proceeds to decision step 1120. At decision step 1120, it is determined if a delay counter value (Delay counter) is less than a predetermined delay value (DELA Y LIMIT). According to one embodiment, the predetermined delay value (DELA Y LIMIT) is the time that the dimming state will be maintained at the minimum and maximum ends of the dimming spectrum when the switch SWl, SW4 is depressed. If it is determined at decision step 1120 that the delay counter value (Delay counter) is less than the predetermined delay value (DELA Y LIMIT), then the method 1100 proceeds to step 1122, wherein the delay counter value (Delay counter) is incremented. Typically, the

delay counter value (Delay counter) continues to be incremented to represent the increase in time that the dimming state has been maintained at the minimum or maximum end of the dimming spectrum. At step 1124, the dimming state value (Dim state) is set to equal the second predetermined dimming value (DIM DEL A Y), and the method 1100 ends at step 1114. However, if it is determined at decision step 1120 that the delay counter value

(Delay counter) not less than the predetermined delay value (DELA Y LIMIT), then the method 1100 proceeds to step 1126, wherein the delay counter value (Delay counter) is reset to zero (0). At step 1128, the dimming state value (Dim state) is set to equal a third predetermined dimming value (BRIGHTEN), and the method 1100 then ends at step 1114. Thus, the dimming state has been maintained at the minimum end of the dimming spectrum for the predetermined period of time, and the delay counter value (Delay counter) is reset, and the light intensity of the light emitted by the lighting source 18A,18B,18C is increased. When it is determined that the dimming state value (Dim state) is not equal to the second predetermined dimming value (DIM DELA Y), then the method 1100 proceeds decision step 1130. At decision step 1130, it is determined if the dimming state value (Dim state) is equal to the third predetermined dimming value (BRIGHTEN). If it is determined at decision step 1130 that the dimming state value (Dim state) is equal to the third predetermined dimming value (BRIGHTEN), then the method 1100 proceeds to decision step 1132. At decision step 1132, it is determined if the Percent On Time (%0n_Time) is less than one hundred percent (100%). When it is determined that that the Percent On Time (%0n_Time) is less than one hundred percent (100%), then the method 1100 proceeds to step 1134, wherein the Percent On Time (%0n_Time) is incremented. Typically, when the Percent On Time (%0n_Time) is incremented, the intensity of the light emitted by the lighting source 18A,18B,18C is increased. At step 1136, the On Time is calculated, and at step 1138, the dimming state value (Dim state) is set to equal the third predetermined dimming value (BRIGHTEN). The method 1100 then ends at step 1114. Generally, the maximum end of the dimming spectrum is the end of the dimming spectrum where the light emitted by the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C is at an approximately maximum value. However, if it is determined at decision step 1132 that the Percent On Time

(%0n_Time) is not less than one hundred percent (100%), then the method 1100 proceeds to

step 1140. At step 1140, the dimming state value (Dim state) is set to equal a fourth predetermined dimming value (BRIGHTEN DELAY). According to one embodiment, the fourth predetermined dimming value (BRIGHTEN DELAY) represents the maximum end of the dimming spectrum. The method 1100 then ends at step 1114. Generally, the minimum end of the dimming spectrum is the end of the dimming spectrum where the light emitted by the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C is at an approximately maximum value. When it is determined at decision step 1130 that the dimming state value (Dim state) is not equal to the third predetermined dimming value (BRIGHTEN), then the method 1100 proceeds to decision step 1142. At decision step 1142, it is determined if the dimming state value (Dim state) is equal to the fourth predetermined dimming value (BRIGHTEN DELAY). If it is determined at decision step 1142 that the dimming state value (Dim state) is equal to the fourth predetermined dimming value (BRIGHTEN DELAY) then the method proceeds to decision step 1144. At decision step 1144, it is determined if the delay counter value (Delay counter) is less than the predetermined delay value (DELAY LIMIT). If it is determined at decision step 1144 that the delay counter value (Delay counter) is less than the predetermined delay value (DELA Y LIMIT), then the delay counter value (Delay counter) is incremented at step 1146. At step 1148, the dimming state value (Dim_state) is set to equal the fourth predetermined dimming value (BRIGHTEN DELAY), and the method 1100 then ends at step 1114. However, if it is determined at decision step 1144 that the delay counter value

(Delay counter) is not less than the predetermined delay value (DELA Y LIMIT), then the method 1100 proceeds to step 1150, wherein the delay counter value (Delay counter) is reset to zero (0). At step 1152, the dimming state value (Dim_state) is set to the first predetermined dimming value (DIM), and the method 1100 then ends at step 1114. When it is determined at decision step 1142 that the dimming state value (Dim state) is not equal to the fourth predetermined dimming value (BRIGHTEN DELAY), then the method 1100 ends at step 1114. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art, that the method 1100 can continuously run while the lighting device 14A,14B,14C is on, such that when the method 1100 ends at step 1114, the method 1100 starts again at step 1102. Additionally or alternatively, the controller 36 can receive the measured temperature from the temperature monitoring device 50, and alter or limit the available cross-fading levels and/or dimming levels that can be implemented. Thus, if the temperature monitoring device

50 measures the temperature of the LED circuit board 19, and it is determined that the measured temperature is at or approaching an undesirable level, than one or more of the cross-fading and/or dimming levels can be deactivated so that the user cannot control the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C to be supplied with the needed electrical power to illuminate the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C at the greater intensities, according to one embodiment. In such an embodiment, where the temperature of the lighting device 14A,14B,14C is being maintained by minimizing the electrical power supplied to the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C, the user does not have the ability to increase the intensity (e.g., supply electrical power) to levels that would otherwise increase the temperature of the lighting device 14A,14B,14C. With respect to Figs. 1-5, 7-11, 23-26, and 28-32, the internal power source 16 and external power sources, such as the AC power source 20, the DC power source 22, the energy storage system 24, the solar power source 26, and the solar power energy storage system 27, can have a variety of electrochemical compositions, wherein the electrochemical composition can be determined in order to control one or more features of the lighting device 14A,14B,14C, according to one embodiment. Typically, the lighting device 14A,14B,14C has a load that is in electrical communication with the power source, such as the white flood LED 18 A, white spot LED 18B, and red flood LED 18C, being in electrical communication with one of the internal power source 16, the AC power source 20, the DC power source 22, the energy storage system 24, the solar power source 26, and the solar power energy system 27. An electrochemical composition device, such as the processor 36, can then determine the electrochemical composition of certain power sources, such as the internal power source 16, the energy storage system 24, and the solar power energy storage system 27, according to one embodiment. According to one embodiment, the electrochemical composition device can be a stand-alone unit or combined with another unit, device, or system, such as, but not limited to, the lighting device 14A,14B,14C, a battery recharging device, a cell phone, a personal digital assistance (PDA), a multimedia player, or the like. The lighting device 14A, 14B, 14C may be powered by one of a number of different types of electrochemical cell batteries. For example, a single AA-size alkaline electrochemical cell battery having an electrochemistry that includes an alkaline electrolyte and electrodes generally made up of zinc and manganese dioxide (Zn/MnO 2 ) as the active electrochemical materials, according to one embodiment may be employed. According to another embodiment, a lithium AA-size LiFeS 2 electrochemical cell may be employed as the

power source. According to further embodiments, a nickel metal hydride (NiMH) electrochemical cell, a lithium electrochemical cell, a lithium ion electrochemical cell, and a lead acid electrochemical cell may be employed as the power source. Different types of batteries cells employing different chemical compositions provide different power capabilities. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that additional or alternative electrochemical compositions of power sources can be determined. The processor 36 can determine the electrochemical composition of the power source

16,24,27 by executing one or more software routines and/or by receiving data to determine a voltage potential of the power source 16,24,27 under at least one operating condition of the lighting device 14A,14B,14C with respect to the load. The processor 36 can then determine an electrical current supplied by the power source 16,24,27 to the load, and detect the electrochemical composition of the power source 16,24,27 based upon the determined voltage potential under the operating condition and the determined electrical current. According to one embodiment, the processor 36 determines an open circuit voltage

(V oc ) and a closed circuit voltage (V cc ) under known load conditions. The open circuit voltage (V oc ) and the closed circuit voltage (V cc ) can be subtracted and divided by the determined electrical current provided to the load in order to determine the internal resistance (Rim ema i) of the power source 16,24,27. Based upon the internal resistance (Rim ema i) of the power source 16,24,27, the electrochemical composition of the power source 16,24,27 can then be determined. Thus, the internal resistance (Rimemai) of the power source 16,24,27 can be represented by the following equation:

(V 00 -V *J cc/ _ p

I ~ 1 ^ Internal According to another embodiment, the processor 36 determines the internal resistance

(R ]NTERNAL ) of the power source 16,24,27 based on the open circuit voltage, closed circuit voltage, and the known load resistance R LOAD , as set forth in the following equation: In this embodiment, the electrical current need not be determined by the processor 36.

Instead, the internal resistance of the power source 16,24,27 is determined by the difference between the open circuit voltage (V oc ) and the closed circuit voltage (V cc ) multiplied by the known load resistance (R L0AD ) divided by the closed circuit voltage (V cc ). It should be

appreciated that the above determinations of internal resistance generally apply to determining the internal resistance of a single cell battery. However, it should be appreciated that the internal resistance of multiple cells, such as two battery cells, may be determined. It should be appreciated that other suitable determinations for the internal resistance can be employed, according to other embodiments. The processor 36 can then use the internal resistance (Rim e mai), the magnitude of the voltage (e.g., the open circuit voltage (V oc ) and the closed circuit voltage (V cc )), temperature data (e.g., data received from the temperature monitoring device 50), stored hierarchical correction data, a lookup table of known internal resistance (Ri ntema i) values for different electrochemical compositions, or a combination thereof, to determine the electrochemical composition of the power source 16,24,27. Typically, the lookup table data is stored in a memory device. Additionally, the determined open circuit voltage (V oc ) can be used as a cross-reference with the internal resistance (R lntema i) of the processor 36 to determine the electrochemical compositions of the power source 16,24,27. The controller 36 can then control one or more operating parameters of the lighting device 14A,14B,14C based upon the determined electrochemical composition of the power source 16,24,27. By way of explanation and not limitation, the determined electrochemical composition of the power source 16,24,27 can be used to determine the state of charge of the power source 16,24,27, as described in greater detail herein. Additionally or alternatively, the determined electrochemical composition of the power source 16,24,27 can be used to alter the electrical current supplied to the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C in conjunction with the temperature data received by the processor 36 from the temperature monitoring device 50. Thus, the heat emitted by the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C can be monitored by the temperature monitoring device 50, and the electrical current supplied to the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C can be controlled according to a desired lighting device 14A,14B,14C operating temperature with respect to the electrochemical composition of the internal power source 16. According to one embodiment, the processor 36 determines the electrochemical composition of the power source 16,24,27 at predetermined time intervals, such as, but not limited to, detecting the electrochemical composition every five minutes (5 min). By detecting the electrochemical composition of the power source 16,24,27 at predetermined time intervals, the power consumption of the processor 36 and processing load of the

processor 36 for the electrochemical composition determination is limited when compared to continuously determining the electrochemical composition of the power source 16,24,27. Further, by determining the electrochemical composition of the power source 16,24,27 at predetermined time intervals, the processor 36 can confirm or correct the previous electrochemical composition determination and/or determine the electrochemical composition of the newly connected power source 16,24,27. According to one embodiment, a method of determining the electrochemical composition of the power source 16,24,27 is generally shown in Fig. 23 at reference identifier 1160. The method 1160 starts at step 1162, and proceeds to step 1164, wherein an open circuit voltage is determined. At step 1166, a closed circuit voltage is determined. Typically, the closed circuit voltage can be determined with respect to a known load. At step 1167, an operating electrical current is determined. According to one embodiment, the operating electrical current is determined by measuring the operating current. The method 1160 then proceeds to step 1168, wherein the internal resistance (Rim ema i) of a source is determined based upon the open circuit voltage, the closed circuit voltage, and the operating electrical current. At step 1170, the electrochemical composition of the source (e.g., power source 16,24,27) is determined based upon the internal resistance (R ln temai) and the open circuit voltage, and the method 1160 then ends at step 1172. As illustrated in Fig. 24, the percentage depth of discharge, a voltage potential, and the internal resistance (Rim ema i) of a power source differs based upon the electrochemistry composition of the power source. Typically, the voltage potential of the power source changes based upon the percent depth of discharge at one rate of change, and the internal resistance (Rimemai) of the power source alters based upon the percent of discharge at a second rate of change. Thus, by comparing the voltage potential and the internal resistance (Rim ema i) when the electrochemistry composition of the power source is determined, the percent depth of discharge can then be determined. Referring to Fig. 28, electrochemistry composition test circuitry 490 is illustrated for detecting chemistry composition of a power source 16,24,27, according to one embodiment. By way of explanation and not limitation, the power source or cell illustrated in Fig. 28 is internal power 16. It should be appreciated that the test circuitry 490 may be built into the lighting device 14A,14B,14C and may be included as part of the control circuitry. Alternately, the test circuitry 490 may be a separate circuit. Test circuitry 490 can employ

hardware circuitry that is adapted to electrically connect to the power source 16,24,27, and the processor 36 powered by a voltage supply of five volts (+5V), according to one example. It should be appreciated that a voltage boost circuit may be employed to boost a voltage of the power source 16,24,27 to five Volts (5 V) to power the processor 36. It should further be appreciated that the test circuitry 490 can include a separate processor. The test circuitry includes a known load resistance R L0A0 connectable via a switch, shown as a field effect transistor (FET) Q, in parallel with the power source 16,24,27. According to one embodiment, the load resistance R LOAD has a known value of 2.2 ohms. Connected in series with the load resistance R LOAD is the transistor Q for switching the load resistance R LOAD in or out of a closed circuit with the power source 16,24,27. Switch Q may be implemented as an FET transistor controlled by an output of the processor 36. Transistor Q may be controlled by the processor 36 to apply the load resistance R LOAD across the power source 16,24,27 to allow for measurement of the closed circuit voltage and current, and may be opened to allow for measurement of the open circuit voltage of the power source 16,24,27. Voltage measurements may be taken from the positive (+) terminal of power source 16,24,27 by an RC circuit coupled to the processor 36. It should be appreciated that according to the illustrated test circuit 490, a switch SW may be actuated by depression to initiate the chemistry composition test, according to one embodiment. However, it should be appreciated that the test circuitry 490 may be implemented automatically by the processor 36 based on time intervals, or other triggering events such as activating one or more light sources or changing (replacing) one or more batteries. Further, three LEDs are shown connected to the processor 36, The three LEDs may include light sources of the lighting device, or may include additional lighting indicators that may be used to indicate the determined type of power source 16,24,27 electrochemical composition. For example, a first LED may be employed to indicate detection of a lithium battery cell, a second LED may be employed to indicate detection of a nickel metal hydride battery cell, and a third LED may be used to indicate detection of an alkaline battery cell. Referring to Fig. 29, a method of determining the electrochemical composition of a power source 16,24,27 is generally illustrated at reference identifier 500, according to another embodiment. The method 500 starts at step 502, and proceeds to step 504 to apply a load resistance R LOAD to the power source 16,24,27 for a test time period, according to one example. In one exemplary embodiment, the load resistance R LOAD is about 2.2 ohms, and

the test time period is approximately 100 milliseconds. During the chemistry detection test, method 500 determines an open circuit voltage V in step 506 and a closed circuit voltage

V cc in step 508. The open circuit voltage V is determined with the load not applied to the power source 16,24,27, such that the battery circuit is open-circuited and no current flows in or out of the power source 16,24,27, whereas the closed circuit voltage V cc is determined when the known load resistance R LOAD is applied across the power source 16,24,27 terminals, such that current flows across the load resistance R LOAD - The method 500 then proceeds to step 510, wherein the internal resistance (IN TERNAL ) of the power source 16,24,27 is determined based upon the open circuit voltage V and closed circuit voltage V . According to one embodiment, current may also be used to determine the internal resistance of the power source 16,24,27. The internal resistance value is determined as a decimal equivalent value, according to the disclosed embodiment, which is determined based on a multiplication factor, such as 1/1000* of the actual resistance. It should be appreciated that the internal resistance may be determined as an actual ohmic value, according to another embodiment. The battery chemistry detection method 500 then proceeds to decision step 512 to compare the open circuit voltage V QC to a voltage threshold. According to one embodiment, the voltage threshold can be about 1.65 Volts. If the open circuit voltage V is greater than the voltage threshold of 1.65 Volts, method 500 determines that the power source 16,24,27 is a lithium cell in step 514. If the open circuit voltage V QC is not greater than the voltage threshold (e.g., 1.65

Volts), method 500 proceeds to decision step 518 to determine if the internal resistance value is less than a low first value. According to one embodiment, the low first value is 89. If the internal resistance value is less than the low first value (e.g., 89), method 500 determines that the battery cell is a nickel metal hydride (NiMH) in step 520. If the internal resistance Rπ MTERNAL value is equal to or greater than the low first value of 89, method 500 proceeds to decision step 524 to determine if the internal resistance ^ IN TE R N AL va ^ ue * s m a ran g e between the low first value (e.g., 89) and a high second value. According to one embodiment, the high second value is 150. If the internal resistance value is between the low first value (e.g., 89) and the high second value (e.g., 150), method 500 determines that the power source 16,24,27 is a lithium cell in step 526. It should be appreciated that the power source 16,24,27 may be determined to be a lithium battery cell

which has a voltage less than or equal to the voltage threshold (e.g., 1.65 Volts) and has an internal resistance value between the low first value (e.g., 89) and the high second value (e.g., 150) when the lithium battery cell has been partially discharged, as opposed to a fully charged lithium battery cell. Additionally or alternatively, if the voltage of a cell is above approximately four volts (4V), then it can be determined that the cell has a lithium-ion electrochemical composition, and if the voltage of the cell is above approximately two volts (2V), then it can be determined that the cell has a lead acid electrochemical composition. If the internal resistance value is greater than or equal to the high second value (e.g., 150) in decision step 524, method 500 proceeds to step 528 to determine that the power source 16,24,27 is an alkaline battery cell. It should be appreciated that method 500 may be repeated at select intervals or based on any of the number of triggering events, such as replacement of the batteries, actuation of a light source, and other events. It should further be appreciated that the internal resistance value and chemistry composition of multiple cells (e.g., power source 16,24,27 includes multiple cells) employed in the lighting device 10 may be determined, according to further embodiments. At least a portion of the multiple cells can have the same electrochemical composition, a different electrochemical composition, or a combination thereof. In one embodiment, multiple battery cells connected in series may be tested to determine the internal resistance R 1NXERNA L °f eacn battery cell and the electrochemical composition of each battery cell, as shown by the circuit 550 in Fig. 30. In this embodiment, a plurality of battery cells, labeled BAT 1-BAT n are shown connected in series, such that the positive terminal of one battery electrically contacts the negative terminal of an adjoining connected battery. Each battery cell generates a voltage potential and, in a series connection, the voltage potentials are summed together. The chemistry detection circuit 550 is shown including the processor 36 having a plurality of voltage sensing lines for sensing voltages V 1 -V n , which measure the voltage potential at the positive terminals of each of the plurality of batteries BAT 1-BAT n, respectively. The sensed voltage of BAT 1 is voltage V 1 , the sensed voltage of BAT 2 is the difference between voltages V 2 and V 1 , etc. By way of explanation and not limitation, BAT 1-BATn are illustrated in Fig! 30 as internal power source 16. The battery chemistry detection circuit 550 includes three switches, shown as FET transistors Q 1 -Q nJ e acn having a control line for receiving a control signal from processor 36.

Transistor Q 1 switches the known load resistance R L0AD into a closed circuit connection with the first battery BAT 1 in response to a control signal from the processor 36. Transistor Q 2 switches the load resistance R LOAD into a closed circuit connection with batteries BAT 1 and BAT 2. Transistor Q n switches the load resistance R LOAD into connection with batteries BAT 1-BAT n. When transistor Q 1 is closed, the load resistance R LOAD is applied across the first battery BAT 1, such that current flows through the first battery BAT 1 and the load resistance R L0AD . During a test procedure, the open circuit voltage for voltage potential V 1 is measured when the load resistance R LOAD is not applied across the battery BAT 1 , and the closed circuit voltage V cc is measured while the load resistance R LOAD is applied across battery BAT 1. When transistor Q 2 is closed, the open and closed circuit voltages of the voltage potentials V 1 and V 2 are measured during the test procedure. Similarly, when transistor Q n is closed, the open and closed circuit voltages of voltage potentials V 1 -V n are measured during the test procedure. It should be appreciated that the open circuit voltage of the first battery BAT 1 is determined by sensing voltage V 1 , whereas the open circuit voltage of the second battery

BAT 2 is determined by subtracting the voltage V 1 from voltage V 2 , and the open circuit voltage of BAT n is determined by subtracting voltage V n-1 from voltage V n . The closed circuit voltages are also similarly measured. The internal resistance of each battery may be determined according to the following equations:

a

T? J- T? — V oc2+l - V * cc2+l p

^INTERNALl " " 1 ^INTERNAU ~ ■■ * 1 ^LOAD

V cc2+1 V ocl represents the open circuit voltage of battery BAT 1, and V cc] represents the closed circuit voltage of battery BAT 1. V oc2 represents the open circuit voltage of battery BAT 2, and V cc2 represents the closed circuit voltage of battery BAT 2. The internal resistance R^ JERMALI is the internal resistance of the first battery BAT 1. The internal resistance R 1NT E RNA L 2 * S tne mtema ^ resistance of the second battery BAT 2. It should be

appreciated that the internal resistance of further batteries up to BAT n may likewise be determined. It should further be appreciated that the battery chemistry detection circuit 550 may detect different types of batteries, such as alkaline, nickel metal hydride and lithium battery cells used in various combinations. While one example of a battery chemistry detection circuit 550 has been illustrated for detecting chemistry of a plurality of battery cells in a series connection, it should be appreciated that other configurations of circuit 550 may be employed to detect other arrangements of batteries, such as a plurality of batteries connected in parallel and/or series, in various battery cell numbers and combinations. Referring to Figs. 3 IA, 3 IB, and 32, a method of determining the electrochemical composition of a power source 16,24,27 is generally illustrated in Figs. 31 A and 3 IB at reference identifier 600, according to another embodiment. In this embodiment, the method 600 determines a recovery time period for the power source 16,24,27 under test to return to a predetermined percentage of its voltage, and further determines the electrochemical composition of the power source 16,24,27 based on the determined recovery time. It should also be appreciated that method 600 determines the electrochemical composition of the power source 16,24,27 as a function of the determined recovery time, in combination with one or more of the internal resistance, the open circuit voltage (V oc ), and the closed circuit voltage

( γ cc )- With particular reference to Fig. 32, the output voltages of three different batteries having different electrochemical compositions (e.g., the power sources 16,24,27 having different electrochemical compositions, battery cells within the power sources 16,24,27 having different electrochemical compositions, or a combination thereof) are illustrated during a test procedure to detect battery chemistry. Included in the test is a lithium battery cell having a voltage shown by line 650, an alkaline battery cell having a voltage shown by line 652 and a nickel metal hydride battery cell having a voltage shown by line 654. Each of the batteries were subjected to a load resistance R LOAD of about 0.1 ohms for a time period of about 11 milliseconds. Prior to application of the load, the battery cells each had a substantially constant voltage, and during application of the load resistance, the output voltage drops significantly as shown during the time period from 0.000 to 0.011 seconds. At time period 0.011 seconds, the load resistance is no longer applied and the voltage of each of the battery cells recovers over a period of time. The period of time that it takes each battery

cell to recover to percentage threshold of 98.5 percent of the voltage prior to applying the load is referred herein as the recovery time. It should be appreciated that in the example shown, a battery cell that recovers to 98.5 percent of the preload voltage in less than 1 millisecond is determined to be a nickel metal hydride battery, whereas the lithium and alkaline battery cells have a longer recovery time, according to the present embodiment of the chemistry detection test process. Returning to Figs. 3 IA and 3 IB, method 600 starts at step 602, and proceeds to step

604 to apply a known load resistance R LOAD to the battery cell for a test period. According to one example, the known load resistance R L0AD can be about 0.1 ohms, and the test period can be about 11 milliseconds. It should be appreciated that the test period may include other time periods, and that the load resistance R LOAD may have other values. During the chemistry detection test, method 600 determines an open circuit voltage V oc in step 606 and a closed circuit voltage V cc in step 608. The open circuit voltage V oc is determined with the load resistance not applied to the battery cell such that the battery circuit is open-circuited and no current flows in or out of the battery cell, whereas the closed circuit voltage -V cc is determined when the known load resistance R L0AD is applied across the battery cell terminals such that current flows across load resistance R L0AD - The method 600 then proceeds to step 610, wherein the internal resistance R 1NJERNAL of the battery cell is determined based upon the open circuit voltage V and closed circuit voltage V . According to one embodiment, the internal resistance R 1N JE RNAL can be determined as the difference between the open circuit voltage V oc and the closed circuit voltage V cc multiplied by the resistance load R L0AD multiplied by a multiplication factor of 1000 and divided by the closed circuit voltage V cc , as shown in the following equation:

_ <(V w -V cc 3)CR WAP )>ClQO0 KENTERNAL ~ v

The internal resistance value R 1NJERNA L ma ^ ^ e determined as a decimal equivalent value, based on a multiplication factor such as 1000, or may include the actual ohmic value of resistance. Routine 600 then proceeds to step 612 to determine the recovery time of the battery to reach a percent of the output voltage prior to application of the load. According to one

embodiment, the battery reaches 98.5 percent of the output voltage prior to application of the load when determining the recovery time. The recovery time is monitored from the time that the load resistance R L0A0 is no longer applied to the battery until the voltage of the battery rises to about 98.5 percent of the voltage prior to applying the load. While a recovery time based on 98.5 percent is disclosed according to the present embodiment, it should be appreciated that the recovery time may be based on other percentage values or voltage levels. The battery chemistry detection method 600 then proceeds to decision step 614 to compare the open circuit voltage V oc to a first voltage threshold. According to one embodiment, the first voltage threshold is about 1.65 Volts. If the open circuit voltage V oc is greater than the voltage threshold (e.g., 1.65 Volts), method 600 determines that the battery cell is a lithium cell in step 616. Method 600 then ends at step 638. If the open circuit voltage V oc is not greater than the first voltage threshold (e.g., 1.65

Volts), method 600 proceeds to decision step 620 to determine if the determined recovery time is less than a time period. According to one embodiment, the time period is 1 millisecond. If the recovery time is determined to be less than the time period (e.g., 1 millisecond), routine 600 proceeds to determine that the battery cell is a nickel metal hydride (NiMH) cell in step 622. Since any fresh lithium cell would have been detected in step 614, step 620 is able to detect a nickel metal hydride battery cell based on the recovery time. If the recovery time is not less than the time period (e.g., 1 millisecond), method 600 proceeds to decision step 626 to determine if the closed circuit voltage V is less than a second voltage threshold. According to one embodiment, the second voltage threshold is 0.9 Volts. If the closed circuit voltage V cc is less than the second voltage threshold (e.g., 0.9

Volts), method 600 determines that the battery cell is an alkaline battery cell in step 628. The method 600 then ends at step 638. Accordingly, a low closed circuit voltage below the second voltage threshold (e.g., 0.9 Volts) is used to determine that an alkaline battery cell is present. If the closed circuit voltage is not less than the second voltage threshold (e.g., 0.9

Volts), method 600 proceeds to decision step 632 to determine if the open circuit voltage V oc is greater than a third voltage threshold. According to one embodiment, the third voltage threshold is 1.60 Volts. If the open circuit voltage is greater than the third voltage threshold (e.g., 1.60 Volts), method 600 proceeds to step 628 to determine that the cell is an alkaline battery cell. Accordingly, an open circuit voltage V greater than the third voltage threshold

(e.g., 1.60 Volts) at the step 632 of method 600 is indicative of a fresh high capacity alkaline battery cell. If the open circuit voltage V OC is not less than the second voltage threshold (e.g., 0.9

Volts) and not greater than the third voltage threshold (e.g., 1.60 Volts), method 600 proceeds to decision step 634 to determine if the internal resistance R 1N TER NA1 count is less than a value. According to one embodiment, the value is 50. If the internal resistance value is less than the value (e.g., 50), method 600 determines that the battery cell is a nickel metal hydride battery cell in step 622. Accordingly, the internal resistance count may be employed to determine the presence of a nickel metal hydride battery cell. If the internal resistance count is not less than the value (e.g., 50), method 600 proceeds to decision step 636 to determine if the open circuit voltage V oc is greater than a fourth voltage threshold. According to one embodiment, the fourth voltage threshold is 1.5 Volts. If the open circuit voltage V oc is greater than the fourth voltage threshold (e.g., 1.5

Volts), method 600 proceeds to step 616 to determine that the cell is a lithium battery cell and then supplies the first higher power to the light source in step 618. Otherwise, if the open circuit voltage V is not greater than the fourth voltage threshold (e.g., 1.5 Volts), method

600 proceeds to step 628 to determine the cell is an alkaline battery cell. Accordingly, step 636 is able to distinguish between a lithium battery cell and an alkaline battery cell based on the open circuit voltage V oc . While chemistry detection and control method 600 advantageously determines the chemistry composition of a battery cell based on internal resistance, recovery time, open circuit voltage and closed circuit voltage, it should be appreciated that the method 600 may look to one or more or any combination of these characteristics to determine the chemistry composition of the battery cell. It should further be appreciated that the method 600 may control any of a number of devices, including lighting devices, cameras, cell phones and other electrically powered devices based on the determined chemistry composition. Further, it should be appreciated that a stand alone battery chemistry detection device may be employed to determine the chemistry of the battery cell, which device may then be useful to provide an indication of the battery cell type and/or to control operation of an electronic device. Additionally or alternatively, the energy storage system 24 and solar power energy storage system 27 can include the controller or microprocessor 82, which determines the electrochemical composition of the battery cells 78,80. Typically, the controller 82

implements substantially the same one or more software routines and/or receives similar data as the processor 36, as described above. Thus, the energy storage system 24 and solar power energy storage system 27 can determine the electrochemical composition of the power source that is internal to the system 24,27, and can control other operating characteristics of the system accordingly.

VII. ELECTRICAL FUEL GAUGING With regards to Figs. 1-5, 7-11, 23-26, and 28-32, the lighting devices 14A,14B,14C can have a fuel gauging device 84, which indicates the state of charge of the power source 16,20,22,24,26,27 that is currently providing electrical current to the light sources, such as the white flood LED 18A, the white spot LED 18B, and the red flood LED 18C. According to one embodiment, the fuel gauging device 84 works in conjunction with the electrochemical composition device, such as the determination made by the processor 36 of the lighting device 14A,14B,14C and/or the controller 82 of the energy storage systems 24,27, so that the fuel gauging device 84 first obtains the electrochemical composition of the power source 16,20,22,24,26,27 determined by the processor 36,82 prior to determining the state of charge of the power source 16,20,22,24,26,27. According to one embodiment, the fuel gauging device 84 determines and indicates the state of charge for the power sources 16,24,27 that the processor 36 determines the electrochemical composition. Additionally or alternatively, the fuel gauging device 84 includes a processor, according to one embodiment. According to an alternate embodiment, at least one of the fuel gauging device and the electrochemical composition device are not included in the lighting device 14A,14B,14C, such that the fuel gauging device and electrochemical detection device are individual and separate devices, are used with a recharger device, a cellular phone, a personal digital assistant (PDA), a multimedia device, or the like. With respect to Fig. 24, the fuel gauging device 84 determines the state of charge of the power source based upon the internal resistance of the power source and the closed circuit voltage (V ccv )- Thus, when the processor 36,82 obtains the internal resistance of the power source and the closed circuit voltage (V ccv ), the processor 36,82 can use lookup tables, as represented by the graph of FIG. 14, to determine the state of charge or the percent depth of discharge of the power source 16,24,27 due to the different characteristics of the exemplary

electrochemical compositions of the power sources 16,24,27. The fuel gauging device 84 can then provide the state of charge, for example, as a data signal. The fuel gauging device 84 also includes a state of charge indicator. In one example, the indicator is a graphical display that displays the remaining charge as a percentage. In another example, the indicator displays the remaining charge as an estimate of the remaining time the monitored power source 16,24,27 can continue to supply an adequate amount of power to illuminate the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C. According to one embodiment, the fuel gauging device 84 includes one or more fuel gauging LEDs 86. Thus, when multiple LEDs 86 are used, the LEDs 86 can be one or more colors to indicate the different states of charge of the power source 16,24,27. According to one embodiment, a green LED can be used to indicate that the power source 16,24,27 is at an adequate state of charge, and a red LED can be used to indicate that the power source 16,24,27 is at an inadequate state of charge. Alternatively, when a single LED 86 is used, a multi-color LED can be used in order to indicate the different states of charge of the power source 16,24,27. Further, each LED 86 can be in electrical communication with an LED driver. According to one embodiment, the green LED can be connected to a first fuel gauge LED driver generally indicated at 87A, and the red LED can be connected to a second fuel gauge LED driver generally indicated at 87B. However, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that any suitable number of LEDs and fuel gauging LED drivers can be used in the fuel gauging device 84. Additionally or alternatively, the fuel gauging 84 does not illuminate the fuel gauging

LED 86 when the lighting device 14A,14B,14C is being powered by one of the AC power source 20, the DC power source 22, or the solar power source 26, since such power sources 20,22,24 can provide a greater amount of electrical power than the internal power source 16, the energy storage system 24, and the solar energy storage system 27. Additionally, since the internal power source 16, the energy storage system 24, and the solar energy storage system 27 can include battery cells that have different electrochemical compositions, the electrochemical composition of the internal power source 16, the energy storage system 24, and the solar energy storage system 27 is determined, and the fuel gauging device 84 indicates the state of charge of the power source 16,24,27. According to one embodiment, the fuel gauging device 84 does not continuously illuminate the fuel gauging LEDs 86, and thus, illuminates the fuel gauging LEDs 86 in predetermined time intervals. In such an embodiment, the fuel gauging device 84 can indicate

the state of charge of the power source 16,24,27 at substantially the same predetermined time interval as the processor 36 determining the electrochemical composition of the power source 16,24,27. According to an alternate embodiment, the fuel gauging device 84 can illuminate the fuel gauging indicates, such as, but not limited to, LEDs 86 continuously. Alternatively, the fuel gauging device 84 can include a fuel gauging switch or button, which is depressed or actuated by a user to activate the fuel gauging device 84 and illuminate the fuel gauging LEDs 86. According to this embodiment, the processor 36,82 can determine the electrochemical composition of the power source 16,24,27 when the fuel gauging button is depressed. According to one embodiment, the fuel gauging switch is one of the first, second, third, or fourth switches SW1,SW2,SW3, or SW4, which can be a multi-functional switch. According to an alternate embodiment, the fuel gauging switch is an additional switch on one or more of the devices 14A,14B,14C,26,27 or the lighting system 20. According to one embodiment, a method of determining a state of charge of a load or power source 16,24,27 is generally shown in Fig. 25 at reference identifier 1180. The method 1180 starts at step 1182, and proceeds to step 1184, wherein a closed circuit voltage (Vccv) is determined. At step 1186, an internal resistance (Rimemai) of the power source 16,24,27 is determined. The method 1180 then proceeds to step 1188, wherein the state of charge of the power source 16,24,27 is determined based upon the closed circuit voltage (V ccv ) and the internal resistance (Rin tema i)- The method 1180 then ends at step 1190. According to one embodiment, a method of determining an electrochemical composition of a power source 16,24,27 and determining the state of charge of the power source 16,24,27 is generally shown in Fig. 16 at reference identifier 1230. The method 1230 starts at step 1232, and proceeds to step 1164, wherein an open circuit voltage (V ocv ) is determined. At step 1166, a closed circuit voltage (V ccv ) is determined. At step 1168, an internal resistance (R ln temai) of the power source 16,24,27 is determined based upon the open circuit voltage (V 0C v), the closed circuit voltage (V ccv ), and an operating electrical current. At step 1170, the electrochemical composition of the power source 16,24,27 is determined based upon the internal resistance (Rimemai), the open circuit voltage (V ocv ) 5 and the closed circuit voltage (V CCv ). The method 1230 then proceeds to step 1188. At step 1188, the state of charge of the power source 16,24,27 is determined based upon the closed circuit voltage (V ccv ) and the internal resistance (Rimemai), and the method 1230 then ends at step 1234.

Additionally or alternatively, the lighting devices 14 A, 14B, 14C can include a lockout function, which prevents the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C from being illuminated at undesirable times, such as a user mistakenly actuating one or more of the switches SW1,SW2,SW3, or SW4, to illuminate one or more of the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C. According to one embodiment, the lockout function can be activated by pressing one or more of the switches SW1,SW2,SW3, or SW4 in a predetermined combination, for a defined period of time, the like, or a combination thereof. According to one embodiment, the fuel gauging LEDs 86 can be used to indicate when the lockout function is activated and deactivated. For purposes of explanation and not limitation, if the fuel gauging LED 86 is a tri-color LED that illuminates in green, yellow, and red, the fuel gauging LEDs 86 can be illuminated in a green-yellow-red sequence when the lockout function is activated. Also, the fuel gauging LEDs 86 can be illuminated in a red-yellow-green sequence when the lockout function is deactivated. According to one embodiment, the fuel gauging LEDs 86 can also be used as an indicator for locating the lighting device 14A,14B,14C when the lighting device 14A,14B,14C is not in the user's physical possession. By way of explanation and not limitation, a user can activate an indication setting on the lighting device 14A,14B,14C, such as, but not limited to, when the internal battery source 16 is inserted into the housing 54. Thus, the user can select the indicator to be active when the lockout function is activated, the lockout function is deactivated, or a combination thereof. Typically, when the indicator function is activated, the fuel gauging LEDs 86 illuminate in predetermined intervals when the lighting sources 18A,18B,18C are not illuminated, and thus, a user can locate the lighting device 14A,14B,14C by seeing the fuel gauging LEDs 86 flashing in the predetermined intervals. While the invention has been described in detail herein in accordance with certain embodiments thereof, many modifications and changes therein may be affected by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the invention. Accordingly, it is our intent to be limited only by the scope of the appending claims and not by way of the details and instrumentalities describing the embodiments shown herein.