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Title:
A LOAD BEARING MODULE ASSEMBLY, TRANSPORTER AND METHOD FOR CONSTRUCTING A STRUCTURE
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/2019/006491
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A load bearing module assembly (10) for use in constructing a structure, in particular a multi-storey structure, comprises: at least one first load bearing module (100) for forming a first wall portion of said structure; and at least one second load bearing module (200) for forming a second wall portion of said structure wherein said at least one first load bearing module (100) and said at least one second load bearing module (200) are connected by at least one connection, such as a joint (15), enabling relative motion between said first and second load bearing modules (100,200) during construction. Load bearing assembly (10) allows convenient construction of multi-storey structures in relatively confined spaces without use of scaffolding.

Inventors:
JUKIC, Daniel (69B Walters Drive, Osborne Park, Western Australia 6017, 6017, AU)
Application Number:
AU2018/050652
Publication Date:
January 10, 2019
Filing Date:
June 27, 2018
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
PRO9 GLOBAL LIMITED (69B Walters Drive, Osborne Park, Western Australia 6017, 6017, AU)
International Classes:
E04B2/90; E04B1/344; E04B2/56; E04G21/16
Foreign References:
US20120317898A12012-12-20
US20120311939A12012-12-13
AU1489783A1983-12-01
JPS5062312U1975-06-07
US5444945A1995-08-29
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
WATERMARK INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY PTY LTD (Level 1, 109 Burwood RoadHawthorn, Victoria 3122, 3122, AU)
Download PDF:
Claims:
CLAIMS:

1 . A load bearing module assembly for use in constructing a structure, said assembly comprising:

at least one first load bearing module for forming a first wall portion of said structure; and

at least one second load bearing module for forming a second wall portion of said structure

wherein said at least one first load bearing module and said at least one second load bearing module are connected by at least one connection, such as a joint, enabling relative motion between said first and second load bearing modules during construction.

2. The load bearing assembly as claimed in claim 1 wherein each connection bears at least part of the load resulting from the motion of the first load bearing module relative to the first said connection optionally employing a framework comprising a plurality of structural members.

3. The load bearing assembly as claimed in claim 1 or 2 wherein said at least one first load bearing module and said at least one second load bearing module are connected by a plurality of connections, optionally where the first and second load bearing modules have dimensions sufficient to form the entire or at least a substantial portion of a wall to be included in a structure. 4. The load bearing assembly as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein said connection(s) take the form of pivot joint(s) pivotably connecting said at least one first load bearing module and said at least one second load bearing module enabling said at least one second load bearing module to rotate relative to said first load bearing module, said pivot joint having a limit placed on its rotation, for example to a maximum of 180Q, so that only movement of one load bearing module into its final position relative to another load bearing module is permitted.

5. The load bearing assembly of any one of the preceding claims wherein said connection(s) enable relative motion between the first and second load bearing modules in other motions for example enabling a load bearing module to move in a generally parallel direction a selected distance past a portion of another load bearing module, said selected distance optionally being sufficient to enable fixing of one load bearing module to a surface disposed below the other load bearing module.

6. The load bearing assembly of any one of the preceding claims further comprising an actuator means to enable said relative motions and to assist in vertical positioning and alignment of load bearing modules, said actuator means being selected from the group consisting of a linear or rotational actuator such as an electric motor with a reduction gearbox, hydraulic, pneumatic and recirculation ball screw actuators could be used, said linear actuator translating linear motion to rotational motion of one load bearing module relative to the other.

7. The load bearing assembly of claim 6 wherein said linear actuator includes a trunnion mounted linear actuator powered by an electric motor, a plurality of said linear actuators being selected to manage loads dependent on the weight of the load bearing modules of the assembly.

8. The load bearing assembly of claim 6 wherein said structure is a multistorey structure, the first wall portion forming part of a wall of a first storey of the structure and the second wall portion forming part of a wall of a second storey of the structure, said second storey of said structure being above said first storey of the structure.

9. The load bearing assembly of any one of the preceding claims wherein said connection(s) are removable following construction with the first and second load bearing modules being fixed in a desired relative position within the structure by a fixing means, said fixing means optionally being a floor slab of the structure.

10. The load bearing assembly of claim 9 wherein the pivot joint has dimensions enabling the first and second building load bearing modules to be spaced apart by a selected distance, the selected distance optionally corresponding with a dimension of a floor slab.

1 1 . The load bearing assembly of claim 4 wherein said pivot joint is a swing arm, or swing arm assembly, each having a first arm and a second arm connected together at a pivot having a rotatable shaft extending through respective bores in each swing arm actuated by an actuator means, said rotatable shaft and/or each bore being provided with a bearing arrangement; and the rotatable shaft being removable from the pivot.

12. The load bearing assembly of claim 1 1 wherein a swing arm assembly includes an assembly of inter-connected generally planar swing arms, each swing arm being connected to at least two other swing arms at respective pivotable joints and including an actuator means to operate the swing arm assembly.

13. The load bearing assembly of claim 1 1 or 12 wherein said first and second arms are connected to the respective first and second load bearing modules by connection means including portions in the form of structural members, for example beams or plates.

14. The load bearing assembly of claim 13 wherein said first and second arms are only allowed a limited degree of rotation; optionally between +90Q and -90Q, so that when the arms are disposed at right angles, no further movement is permitted in one of the clockwise or anti-clockwise directions.

15. A method for constructing a structure comprising:

locating in a selected position a load bearing module assembly comprising:

a first load bearing module for forming a first wall portion of said structure; and a second load bearing module for forming a second wall portion of said structure

wherein said first load bearing module and said second load bearing module are connected by at least one connection, such a joint, enabling relative motion between said first and second load bearing modules during construction of a wall section of said structure.

16. The method of claim 15 for constructing a multi-storey structure wherein the first wall portion forms part of a wall of a first storey of the structure and the second wall portion forms part of a wall of a second storey of the structure, said second storey of said structure being above said first storey of the structure.

17. The method of claim 15 or 16 further comprising fixing said first and second load bearing modules in position within the structure by a fixing means, said fixing means optionally being a floor slab of the structure, said joint enabling the first and second load bearing modules to be spaced apart by a selected distance, the selected distance optionally corresponding with a dimension of the floor slab. 18. The method of any one of claims 15 to 17 further comprising fixing the first load bearing module to a selected surface through a track member in the form of a channel.

19. A transporter for the load bearing assembly as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 14 or for the method of constructing a structure as claimed in any one of claims 15 to 18 comprising a prime mover; a platform; at least first and second load bearing modules located on the platform; a plurality of wheel sets; and a control unit to control operation of the wheel sets to locate the transporter in a desired location at a construction site.

20. The transporter of claim 19 having self-levelling capability.

Description:
A LOAD BEARING MODULE ASSEMBLY, TRANSPORTER AND METHOD FOR CONSTRUCTING A STRUCTURE

The present invention relates to a load bearing module assembly, transporter and method for constructing a structure, such as a multi-storey structure, using such load bearing module assemblies to form a wall section of the structure.

A range of approaches for constructing structures, especially building structures, is known in the art. One such approach involves the connection of panels with various fastening systems following abutment of neighbouring panels. A range of panel types exist though a failing of a range of patent prior art is the likely unacceptable cost to building companies, especially where the panels have significant weight or require any complexity of components such as connectors or complexity of methods of construction. Construction is a conservative industry and unless sometimes strict cost targets can be met by a construction system, it is unlikely to be adopted.

Other problems of construction are more easily tackled. Some objectives for construction systems may involve avoidance of scaffolding and lifting equipment as well as the need for safety in construction. Construction hazards are well known to the industry and indeed the public. However, challenges remain for the economic construction of multi-storey structures which typically involve more complex construction methods requiring the use of construction cranes, scaffolding and formwork which may be challenging for sites with relatively confined space.

It is an object of the present invention to facilitate the construction of multistorey structures using load bearing modules in a manner that aims to address challenges as described above.

With this object in view, the present invention provides a load bearing module assembly for use in constructing a structure, said assembly comprising: at least one first load bearing module for forming a first wall portion of said structure; and

at least one second load bearing module for forming a second wall portion of said structure wherein said at least one first load bearing module and said at least one second load bearing module are connected by at least one connection, such as a joint, enabling relative motion between said first and second load bearing modules during construction. Each connection bears at least part of the load resulting from the motion of the first load bearing module relative to the first and has the structural properties necessary to do this. This may require the connection to employ a framework comprising a plurality of structural members. A plurality of connections are preferably used, particularly as loads borne by connection(s) increase in proportion to the weight of the load bearing modules required for a given application.

The first and second load bearing modules, desirably lightweight in comparison to concrete for example, may conveniently have dimensions sufficient to form the entire or at least a substantial portion of a wall to be included in a structure. That is, monolithic wall sections may be connected by the connection(s); in that case enabling relative motion between the first and second wall sections.

Desirably, connection(s) may take the form of pivot joint(s) pivotably connecting said at least one first load bearing module and said at least one second load bearing module enabling said at least one second load bearing module to rotate relative to said first load bearing module during a construction stage. The joint has a limit placed on its rotation, for example to a maximum of 180 Q , so that only movement of one load bearing module into its final position relative to another load bearing module is permitted.

The connection(s), or joint(s), may also enable relative motion between the first and second load bearing modules in other motions for example enabling a load bearing module to move in a generally parallel direction a selected distance past a portion of another load bearing module during an earlier construction stage than where relative rotation of the at least first and second load bearing modules is implemented. The selected distance may be sufficient to enable fixing of one load bearing module to a surface disposed below the other load bearing module. The surface could form part of a floor or foundation slab.

The load bearing assembly typically requires, and so may further comprise, an actuator means to enable the above described relative motions and advantageously to generally assist in vertical positioning and alignment of load bearing modules. The actuator means may include manual operation or a driving device such as an electric motor. In the latter case, the actuator means may be a linear or rotational actuator such as an electric motor with a reduction gearbox. Alternatively, other linear actuator means such as hydraulic, pneumatic or recirculation ball screw actuators could be used, the linear actuator still translating to rotational motion of one load bearing module relative to the other. A preferred linear actuator includes a trunnion mounted linear actuator, conveniently powered by an electric motor. A plurality of such linear actuators may be required to manage loads dependent on the weight of the load bearing modules of the assembly. Where a plurality of linear actuators are used, operation may be controlled by a control system which advantageously synchronises operation of each linear actuator to appropriately bear the load of the load bearing modules and thereby enable the desired safe and smooth rotation of one load bearing module relative to another.

Conveniently, the structure is a multi-storey structure in which case the first wall portion forms part of a wall of a first storey of the structure and the second wall portion forms part of a wall of a second storey of the structure, said second storey of said structure being above said first storey of the structure in a manner which advantageously avoids the cost and space requirements of scaffolding methods.

However, it is possible for the load bearing module assembly to be used in constructing a wall portion of a single storey of a structure.

The connection(s) may be removable following construction with the first and second load bearing modules being fixed in a desired relative position within the structure by a fixing means. The fixing means may be a floor slab of the structure. In this case at least, the pivot joint may have dimensions enabling the first and second building load bearing modules to be spaced apart by a selected distance, the selected distance conveniently corresponding with a dimension of the floor slab. Upper and lower load bearing modules or wall sections comprised of one or more load bearing modules are also desirably connected by a fixing means including one or more fish or angle plates. Such fixing means may be arranged at spaced locations along a wall portion. Where any connection or joint is removable, it is also desirably re-usable and so more cost effective.

An advantageous connection or joint may be described as a swing arm, or swing arm assembly, each having a first arm and a second arm connected together at a pivot having a rotatable shaft extending through respective bores in each swing arm actuated by an actuator means as described above. The rotatable shaft and/or each bore may be provided with a bearing arrangement such as a bush or ball bearing arrangement. The rotatable shaft may be removable from the pivot following construction also allowing its re-use.

Swing arm assemblies, where used, may include an assembly of interconnected swing arms, each swing arm being connected to at least two other swing arms at respective pivotable joints and operable using an actuator for example as above described. Such a swing arm assembly may operate analogously to a pantograph jack. Such a swing arm assembly may include bracing members or other structural members if required to bear loads from a load bearing module.

The first and second arms may be generally planar, though may be provided with some curvature, and of strength and rigidity suitable for the construction of multi-storey structures. Without limitation, suitable materials may include metals and metal alloys including, for example, aluminium and steel. Fibre reinforced composite materials could also be used. The first and second arms of the swing arm may be connected to the respective first and second load bearing modules by any convenient connection means which may include portions in the form of structural members, for example beams or plates. Each swing arm could be mounted on a moveable frame for fit-up and positioning convenience. Where a plurality of first and second load bearing modules are comprised within the load bearing module assembly, the connection means may be connected to each of the constituent first and second load bearing modules. The swing arm conveniently enables the first and second arms to rotate relative to each other so that the first and second load bearing modules are spaced apart by a selected distance, the selected distance conveniently corresponding with a dimension of a floor slab where the first and second load bearing modules form wall portions of different storeys of a multi-storey structure. The arms are only allowed a limited degree of rotation, for example between +90 Q and -90 Q , so that when the arms are disposed at right angles, no further movement is permitted in one of the clockwise or anti-clockwise directions.

The load bearing module assembly may, in an embodiment which makes construction easier, be fixed in a position corresponding with a desired orientation of the wall portions formed by the first and second load bearing modules by at least one fixing means. The at least one fixing means may include one or more stays connected between a selected surface and a wall portion of the load bearing module assembly. Such stays brace the load bearing module assembly in position during construction and would typically be removed following construction. The selected surface may include the ground, a foundation slab or a floor slab.

Another convenient fixing means may include a track member to which the first load bearing module is connected by connection means. A desirable track member is in the form of a channel into which a bottom portion of the first load bearing module of the load bearing module assembly may be located, engaged and/or fastened into position, for example using threaded fasteners and bolts may conveniently be used for fastening. Track members may also be deployed - in similar manner - at the top of a load bearing module (or wall section). Track members may have the same section as the load bearing modules, conveniently of U or C shaped section. Side walls of the track members may have unequal heights.

The load bearing module assembly may include a mobility device, such as a trolley, to allow the load bearing module assembly to be moved, on wheels or rollers, to a desired location. The load bearing module is engaged with the trolley in a manner that allows easy removal once the trolley is no longer required, that is, after a relevant construction stage is complete. The trolley is advantageously provided with guide means to assist correct alignment of each load bearing module engaged with it. The guide means may take the form of vertically extending brackets, frames, panels or plates.

As load bearing modules may be large, particularly where used to form a whole wall, a transporter for the load bearing modules to site may be required, for example a self propelled modular transporter or trailer (SPMT). An advantageous transporter for the load bearing assembly as above described comprises a prime mover; a platform; at least first and second load bearing modules located on the platform; a plurality of wheel sets; and a control unit (which may communicate with or form part of the actuator control system described above) to control operation of the wheel sets to locate the transporter in a desired location at a construction site. Such a transporter advantageously includes self-levelling capability to enable operation on uneven surfaces.

As a plurality of such load bearing module assemblies are likely to be required to construct a structure, the load bearing module assembly preferably includes connection means for connecting it to at least one further load bearing module assembly. The connection means, which may advantageously take the form described in the Applicant's co-pending Australian Provisional Application No. 2017902629 filed 5 July 2017 under Attorney Docket No. P42404AUP1 and the contents of which are hereby incorporated herein by reference may be located on sides of the first and second load bearing modules. In one embodiment, an assembled plurality of such load bearing modules assemblies forms a wall section, preferably the entire wall or at least a substantial portion of a wall where this reduces construction costs.

Conveniently, each load bearing module of the load bearing module assembly is a single core load bearing module comprising first and second sheet members disposed around a core, conveniently of insulating material. A preferred form of load bearing module comprises:

a first sheet member having first and second sides;

a second sheet member spaced from the first sheet member and having first and second sides corresponding with the first and second sides of the first sheet member; and

an insulating portion extending at least between said first and second sheet members wherein said load bearing module includes a plurality of laterally extending structural members, at least one structural member corresponding with the first side of the load bearing module and at least one further structural member corresponding with the second side of the load bearing module and wherein said at least one structural member is provided with connecting components for connecting said building panel to an adjacent building component. Such load bearing modules are described in the Applicant's copending Australian Provisional Patent Application No. 2017902629, filed 5 July 2017, under Attorney Docket No. P42404AUP1 the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference. The first and second load bearing modules may have the same or different structure. The first and second load bearing modules may also have the same or different dimensions. As alluded to above, the first and second load bearing modules may have dimensions sufficient to form the entire or at least a substantial portion of a wall to be included in a structure. In such case, there is significant potential for cost savings as the number of load bearing modules per wall section requiring connection can be reduced. A single load bearing module could itself form a wall section of substantial length compared to a wall section comprised of connected load bearing modules.

The load bearing module assembly, as above described may conveniently be used in a method for constructing a structure comprising:

locating in a selected position a load bearing module assembly comprising: a first load bearing module for forming a first wall portion of said structure; and

a second load bearing module for forming a second wall portion of said structure

wherein said first load bearing module and said second load bearing module are connected by at least one connection, such a joint, enabling relative motion between said first and second load bearing modules during construction of a wall section. Such a method forms a further aspect of the present invention.

Such relative motion advantageously includes rotating said second first load bearing module relative to said first load bearing module to a position to form a wall section of the structure. However, the connection(s) or joint(s) may enable additional motions such as enable one load bearing module to move in a generally parallel direction a selected distance past a portion of the other load bearing module during an earlier construction stage than where relative rotation of the first and second load bearing modules is implemented. The selected distance may be sufficient to enable fixing of one load bearing module to a surface disposed below the other load bearing module. The surface could form part of a floor or foundation slab. Conveniently, the method enables construction of a multi-storey structure in which case the first wall portion forms part of a wall of a first storey of the structure and the second wall portion forms part of a wall of a second storey of the structure, said second storey of said structure being above said first storey of the structure. However, it is possible for the load bearing module assembly to be used in constructing a wall portion of a single storey of a structure.

The method may further comprise fixing said first and second load bearing modules in position within the structure by a fixing means. The fixing means may be a floor slab of the structure. In this case, at least, the joint may enable the first and second load bearing modules to be spaced apart by a selected distance, the selected distance conveniently corresponding with a dimension of the floor slab. Upper and lower load bearing modules or wall sections are also desirably connected by a fixing means including one or more fish or angle plates. Such fixing means may be arranged at spaced locations along a wall portion. The pivot joint, advantageously being as described above, may then be removed.

An advantageous joint in the form of a swing arm or swing arm set has been described above. Other forms of connection could be used including moveable frames of structural members, which could include swing arms, adapted to bear required loads for the load bearing module(s).

The load bearing module assembly may, in an embodiment which makes construction easier, be fixed in a position corresponding with a desired orientation of the wall portions formed by the first and second load bearing modules by at least one fixing means. The at least one fixing means may include one or more stays connected between a selected surface and a wall portion of the load bearing module assembly. Such stays brace the load bearing module assembly in position during construction and would typically be removed following construction. The selected surface may include the ground, a foundation slab or a floor slab. When the first and second load bearing modules are in correct position, the stays may be removed.

As a plurality of such load bearing module assemblies are likely to be required to construct a structure, the method requires the load bearing module assembly to be connected to at least one further load bearing module assembly by connection means. The connection means, advantageously as described above, may be located on sides of the first and second load bearing module assemblies. The swing arms of each load bearing module assembly may be connected by a single rotatable shaft enabling a wall section comprised of a plurality of connected second load bearing modules to be rotated into position above the wall section comprised of a plurality of connected first load bearing modules.

A range of structures, especially buildings, may be constructed using the load bearing modules and method as above described. An advantage of the method is the ability, in many if not most circumstances, to construct multi-storey structures in relatively confined spaces without the cost and space requirements of scaffolding.

The load bearing module assembly and methods of constructing structures using such load bearing modules is expected to be cost effective while enabling good thermal and acoustic insulation properties and avoiding use of scaffolding and heavy lifting equipment during construction. Wall sections can also be constructed in a convenient and safe manner.

The load bearing module assembly, transporter and method for constructing a structure will be further understood from the following description of preferred embodiments thereof in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a load bearing module forming part of a load bearing module assembly in accordance with one of the embodiments of the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a section view of the load bearing module of Fig. 1 .

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of a load bearing module assembly including first and second load bearing modules connected by a joint in accordance with a first embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 4 is a view of first and second load bearing modules prior to being assembled into the load bearing module assembly of Fig. 3 by the joint.

Fig. 5 is a view of the load bearing module assembly made by the first and second load bearing modules shown in Fig. 4 following fabrication of the joint.

Fig. 6 is a view of a further arrangement of first and second load bearing modules prior to being assembled into a load bearing module assembly by the joint. Fig. 7 A is a view of the load bearing module assembly made by the first and second load bearing modules shown in Fig. 6 at the beginning of a construction method for multi-storey buildings in accordance with a second embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 7B shows the load bearing module assembly of Fig. 7A following connection of the first load bearing module to a foundation slab.

Fig. 8 shows the load bearing module assembly of Fig. 7 at a first mid- rotation stage in which the second load bearing module is rotated relative to the first load bearing module.

Fig. 9 shows the load bearing module assembly of Figs. 7 and 8 at a second mid-rotation stage, later than the first, in which the second load bearing module is rotated relative to the first load bearing module.

Fig. 10 shows the load bearing module assembly of Figs. 7 to 9 when rotation of the second load bearing module relative to the first load bearing module is complete.

Fig. 1 1 shows a second stage in construction of the second storey of a building in accordance with the construction method using the load bearing module assembly shown in Figs. 7 to 10.

Fig. 12 schematically shows a third stage in construction of the second storey of a building in accordance with the construction method using the load bearing module assembly shown in Figs. 7 to 10.

Fig. 13 schematically shows a first stage in the construction of a building in accordance with a third embodiment of the construction method.

Fig. 14 schematically shows a second stage in the construction of a building in accordance with the third embodiment of the construction method.

Fig. 15 schematically shows a third stage in the construction of a building in accordance with the third embodiment of the construction method.

Fig. 16 schematically shows a fourth stage in the construction of a building in accordance with the third embodiment of the construction method.

Fig. 17 schematically shows a fifth stage in the construction of a building in accordance with the third embodiment of the construction method.

Fig. 18 schematically shows a sixth stage in the construction of a building in accordance with the third embodiment of the construction method. Fig. 19 schematically shows a seventh stage in the construction of a building in accordance with the third embodiment of the construction method.

Fig. 20 schematically shows an eighth stage in the construction of a building in accordance with the third embodiment of the construction method.

Fig. 21 schematically shows a ninth stage in the construction of a building in accordance with a third embodiment of the construction method.

Fig. 22 shows a detail of the pivot joint in position in the seventh stage of the construction method in accordance with the third embodiment of the construction method in which the first and second load bearing modules have the same dimensions.

Fig. 23 shows a detail of the pivot joint of Fig. 22 prior to completion of the seventh stage of the construction method.

Fig. 24 shows a detail of the pivot joint in position in the seventh stage of the construction method in accordance with a fourth embodiment of the construction method in which the first and second load bearing modules have different dimensions.

Fig. 25 shows a detail of the pivot joint of Fig. 24 prior to completion of the seventh stage of the construction method.

Fig. 26 shows an exploded view of fixing means in the form of connection plates as deployed in the construction stages depicted in Figs. 19 to 21 .

Fig. 27 shows the building assembly of a fifth embodiment of the construction mode and in which the first and second load bearing modules are replaced with monolithic wall sections.

Figs. 28A to 28H show a sequence of stages in the construction of a wall using a trunnion mounted actuator/swing arm assembly for lifting a second load bearing module into position above a first load bearing module to form a substantial portion of a wall.

Fig. 29 shows a schematic diagram of a transporter suitable for transporting first and second load bearing modules as shown in Fig. 27 together with connecting joints.

Referring first to Figs. 1 to 3, there is shown a suitable single core load bearing module 100 to be included within load bearing module assembly 10 for use in constructing a multi-storey building. Load bearing module 100 is formed with a first sheet member 100A and a second sheet member 100B, spaced from first sheet member 100A, each sheet member 100A, 100B having corresponding first side 100J and corresponding second side 100K. The first and second sheet members 100A and 100B are formed of a lightweight material such as MgO. Other materials that could be used, without limitation, are fibre cement board, plaster board, wood and wood substitutes, treated metal, polymers and polymer composites. Concrete is not preferred as a material. Sheet members 100A and 100B need not be made of the same material. Reference to Figs. 1 and 2 shows that side 100A is an outer side of the wall section 10 and side 100B is an inner side of the wall section 10. The first sheet member 100A may, for example, therefore be required to be made of a weatherproof corrosion resistant material. Inner sheet member 100B, not having the same demands placed on it, may not be required to be made of the same material. The selection will depend on cost considerations.

An insulating portion or core 100C extends at least between said first and second sheet members 100A and 100B. The insulating portion 100C is formed from a suitable insulating material, preferably a rigid thermosetting polymer such as polyurethane (PU) foam or polyisocyanurate (PIR) foam. Expanded polystyrene foam could also be used. A convenient density for PU foam is 45 kg/m 3 . Such foams are to be formulated with good fire retardant properties in accordance with applicable standards. The insulating portion 100C may be adhered or bonded together by any suitable technique. Thickness of a load bearing module including first and second sheet members 100A, 100B and insulating portion 100C may be as desired though for the illustrated construction would be 100 to 150mm, say 125mm.

At first side 100J of each load bearing module 100 is laterally extending structural member 100F which is embedded in the insulating layer 100C. At second side 100K of each load bearing module 100 is laterally extending member 100E which is likewise embedded in insulating layer 100C. Structural members 100E and 100F provide each load bearing module 100 with required structural rigidity without adding excessive weight. To that end, structural members 100E and 100F are formed with a suitable structural section, here C-section, of a material durable under construction conditions. Metal, such as structural steel, has been employed here.

As shown, the pair of structural members 100E and 100F extend the whole length of the respective first and second sides 100J and 100K of load bearing modules 100. However, structural members 100E and 100F need not extend the whole length of the first and second sides 100J and 100K and a greater number of structural members could perhaps be provided.

Load bearing modules of like construction may be used for both the first and second load bearing modules. For convenience, the first load bearing module will be numbered 100 and the second load bearing module will be numbered 200. Reference lettering is the same for load bearing modules 100 and 200. Load bearing modules 100 and 200 may have different dimensions. For example, load bearing module 200 could have different thickness and/or width than module 100.

Referring to Fig. 3, there is shown a load bearing module assembly 10 for use in constructing a multi-storey structure which comprises a first load bearing module 100 and a second load bearing module 200. The first and second load bearing modules 100, 200 each form a wall portion of the structure and are connected by a connection 16 including a joint 15 for enabling relative motion between the first and second load bearing modules 100, 200 during construction.

Joint 15 is a pivot joint pivotably connecting first load bearing module 100 and second load bearing module 200 enabling second load bearing module 200 to rotate relative to said first load bearing module 100 during a construction stage as will be described below.

Joint 15 also enables other relative motion between the first and second load bearing modules 100. For example, and as will be described referring to Figs. 6 to 7B, joint may - through translation of rotation at the joint 15 into linear motion of a load bearing module - enable load bearing module 100, to move in a generally parallel direction past a portion of second load bearing module 200 (or vice versa) during an earlier construction stage than where relative rotation of the first and second load bearing modules 100, 200 is implemented. An actuator means, as described below, is used to operate joint(s) 15. Joint 15 may be described as a swing arm having a first arm 1 10 and a second arm 210 connected together at a pivot 15 having a removable rotatable shaft 17 located, in a neat fit, through respective bores 1 12, 212 formed in each arm 1 10 and 210. Rotation of rotatable shaft 17 by suitable actuator means causes the desired relative motion of first load bearing module 100 relative to second load bearing module 200. Rotatable shaft 17 is only required up to a certain stage in construction and can be removed for re-use, assisting the cost efficiency of the construction method. The actuator means may be a rotational actuator such as an electric motor with a reduction gear box, as preferred in this embodiment and referenced M. Alternatively, linear actuator means such as hydraulic, pneumatic or recirculation ball screw actuators could be used. A suitable linear actuator is described below.

First and second arms 1 10 and 210 are generally planar, though provided with some curvature, and are of strength and rigidity suitable for the construction of a multi-storey structures. Suitable materials include metals or metal alloys including steel or aluminium. Non-metallic composite materials including such materials reinforced with mineral or organic fibres could also be used.

The first and second arms 1 10, 210 are respectively connected to the first and second load bearing modules 100, 200 through structural members in the form of beams 1 15, 215 which are fastened to the load bearing modules 100, 200 by suitable removable fasteners, here metal screws.

The joint 15 includes a bearing arrangement 19 for rotatable shaft 17. The bearing arrangement 19 is a ball bearing arrangement located in bore 1 12.

Referring now to Fig. 4, there is shown a stage prior to fabrication of load bearing module assembly 10. Load bearing module 100 is connected to foundation slab 160 with a portion 105 overlapping the slab. A brace 400 is fixed into position to secure load bearing module 100 in a vertical orientation. Load bearing module 200 is engaged with a mobility device in the form of trolley 300 by guide means in the form of brackets 301 which also secure load bearing module 200 in a vertical orientation. Trolley 300 is moved on its wheels towards load bearing module 100.

As shown in Fig. 5, trolley 300 reaches the position of stay 400. Bores 1 12 and 212 of arms 1 10 and 210 are brought into alignment and rotatable shaft 17 is located through the bores 1 12 and 212 to form load bearing module assembly 10. It will be noted that load bearing modules 100 and 200 are spaced apart by some distance though, as a vertical wall is required, in parallel relation.

As shown in Fig. 6, load bearing modules 100 and 200 could be engaged with respective trolleys 300A and 300B and moved into correct position in relation to foundation slab 160. The foundation slab 160 has a track member 620 in the form of a C or U shaped channel fixed to it by threaded fasteners. Load bearing module 100 is to be fixed to that track member 620 in the same manner as described in the Applicant's Australian Provisional Application No. 2017902629 (Attorney Docket No. P42404AUP1 ), already incorporated herein by reference. Track member 620 could be located in the desired position by a method as described in the Applicant's Australian Provisional Application No. 2018901822 filed 24 May 2018, the contents of which are hereby incorporated herein by reference.

Again, the load bearing modules 100 and 200 are held in vertical orientation by guide brackets 301 . Dimensions of trolley 300C space the load bearing modules 100, 200 a correct distance apart to enable swing arms 1 10 and 210 to be connected to them through beams 1 15 and 215.

Referring now to Figs. 7A to 14, bores 1 12 and 212 of arms 1 10 and 210 are brought into alignment and rotatable shaft 17 is located through the bores 1 12 and 212 to form load bearing module assembly 10. In addition, the trolleys 300A and 300B include linear actuators (for example as described below) to assist in vertical positioning and alignment here enabling the load bearing module assembly 10 to be lifted to remove packer 303 from trolley 300B. Trolley 300B can also be removed. Figs. 23 and 25 show details of the joint 15. A suitable linear actuator is a trunnion mounted linear actuator 350 powered by a 12v or 24v electric motor M as available for example as Actuator LA37 from Linak and operation is described below with reference to Figs. 28A to 28H below. Other forms of actuator could be used.

The actuators are then operated to slowly lower load bearing module 100 into position with portion 105 overlapping foundation slab 160 and so that it is engaged with track member 620. Joint 15 also allows this lowering motion in which the load bearing module 100 moves a short selected distance parallel to load bearing module 200 to enable fixing of the load bearing module assembly 10 to the foundation slab 160 through fixing of structural member 100E of load bearing module 100 to the track member 620 by threaded fasteners. Brace 400 to hold the vertical orientation of load bearing module 100 is then installed. Exterior finish may then be applied to sheet 100A of load bearing module 100 if this is required. Finishes could be applied offsite, prior to installation. The result is shown in Fig. 7B.

Trolleys 300A are then removed and building panel 200 is rotated relative to load bearing module 100 through pivoting about joint 15 in direction R as shown in Figs. 8 to 10. As shown by Figs. 1 0, 22 and 24, the counter-clockwise rotation is limited by the joint 15 when arms 1 10 and 210 (or arms 1 10 and 810) are disposed at right angles (90 Q ) with load bearing module 200 in position to form a wall portion of the second storey. At this point no further counter-clockwise rotation is permitted. At this point, the bases of structural members 100E and 200E are spaced apart by a space D though with portion 205 of load bearing module 200 closing the space to the outside. Load bearing module 200 forms a wall portion of the second storey of the multi-storey structure; and load bearing module 100 forms a wall portion of the first storey of the multi-storey structure. It will be understood that if the wall was constructed on the opposite side of foundation slab 160, the rotation would be clockwise.

Fig. 1 1 shows the portion of the multi-storey structure with a further brace 450 fitted into position to secure the wall portion into position. Floor 600, as shown in dashed outline in Fig. 12, is then fitted into position, floor 600 also fixing the first and second load bearing modules 100 and 200 into position. Space D is approximately the depth of floor 600. Floor 600 can be installed as desired. For example, floor 600 could be a wooden floor with beams and joists constructed in the space D with depth variable in size to accommodate the floor thickness. Alternatively, form work may be erected to form a false floor at a level equal to the top of lower load bearing module 100. Concrete is then poured into the formation to create the floor slab 600 and the formwork is removed following setting.

Referring now to Figs. 13 to 21 , the load bearing module assembly may comprise a plurality of connected load bearing modules 100 and 200 to form respective wall sections 1000 and 2000, wall section 2000 being shown supported by two trolleys 300A. It will be understood that wall section 1000 could also be positioned, analogously with the above description, using like trolleys. It may also be understood that wall sections 1000 and 2000 could be fabricated as such without need for interconnection of smaller load bearing modules.

Adjacent load bearing modules 100 and 200 for each storey of the building may be connected using the preferred connection arrangement described in the Applicant's co-pending Australian Provisional Patent Application No. 2017902629 filed 5 July 2017 under Attorney Docket No. P42404AUP1 , slots 70 for this purpose being shown in each of structural members 100E and 200E. Slots 70 co-operate with complementary studs (not shown) of structural members of adjacent load bearing modules. The outer sheets 100A and 200A also overlap insulation portions of adjacent load bearing modules at the overlapping portions 100G and 200G.

As shown in Figs. 13 and 14, the swing arm members 1 10 and 210 are connected to a plurality, here three, load bearing modules 100 and 200 by structural beams 1 15A and 215A respectively in addition to being connected to each load bearing module 100 and 200 through structural beams 1 15 and 215 respectively.

Stays or braces 400 are installed being connected to structural beams 1 15A. As many braces 400 are deployed as are required to provide the required structural rigidity for this construction stage. Braces 400 are to be installed prior to movement, through rotation, of wall section 2000 into position.

Wall section 2000 is moved into position using trolleys 300A so that bores 1 12 and 212 of arms 1 10 and 210 are brought into alignment and rotatable shaft 17 is located through the bores 1 12 and 212 of each illustrated swing arm 1 10 and 210 to form a load bearing module assembly 10. It will be noted that wall sections 1000 and 2000 are spaced apart by some distance though, as a vertical wall is required, in parallel relation.

Figs. 15 to 17 schematically illustrate counter-clockwise rotation of wall section 2000 around connection 16 comprised of joints 15 and rotatable shaft 17 into position above wall section 1000 with trolleys 300A moved out of the way for re-use in a further construction stage. It will be understood that if the wall was constructed on the opposite side of foundation slab 160, the rotation of wall section 2000 would be clockwise in direction.

As shown by Figs. 22 and 24, the counter-clockwise rotation is limited by the joint 15 when arms 1 10 and 210 (or arms 1 10 and 810) are disposed at right angles (90 Q ) with wall section 2000 in position to form a wall portion of the second storey. At this point no further counter-clockwise rotation is permitted. At this point, the bases of structural members 100E and 200E are spaced apart a distance D though with portion 2005 of load bearing module 200 closing the gap to the outside. Wall section 2000 forms a wall portion of the second storey of the multi-storey structure and load bearing module 1000 forms a wall portion of the first storey of the multi-storey structure.

Referring to Figs. 19 to 21 and 26, structural members 100E and 200E, once in position require support through connection by a member with similar or greater structural strength. To this end, structural members 100E and 200E are connected to each other by angle or fish connection plates 205A, 205B. These fish connection plates 205A, 205B are placed back to back in space 630 in alignment with structural members 100E and 200E. Fish plates 205A and 205B are then fixed together and to structural members 100E and 200E with nuts and bolts. Bolts for connecting fish plates 205A and 205B together are located through apertures 205C.

Figs. 18 to 20 show the wall portion 1200 of the multi-storey structure with further braces 450 fitted into position, in connection with structural beams 215A to secure the wall section into correct position above and in alignment with wall section 1000. The number of braces 450 is selected to provide the wall portion 1200 with required structural strength for this stage of construction.

Floor slab 600, as shown in Fig. 21 , is then fitted into position (for example as described above) within space 630, floor slab 600 also fixing the first and second load bearing modules 100 and 200 into position. Distance D is approximately the depth of floor slab 600. Braces 400 and 450 may be removed at this stage.

As described above, the load bearing modules 100 and 200 are not required to have the same dimensions. Indeed, a combination of load bearing modules having different dimensions, and as described in the Applicant's co- pending Australian Provisional Patent Application No. 2017902629 (Attorney Docket P42404AUP1 ), incorporated by reference is desirable. Figs. 24 and 25 provide a schematic illustration of this possibility. Here, load bearing module 800, having the same single core construction as load bearing modules 100 and 200, has a narrower dimension, of 70 to 100mm, say 85mm, than the latter load bearing modules, i.e 125mm in the described embodiment.

Referring to Fig. 27, there is shown a further assembly in which the first and second load bearing modules 101 and 201 have dimensions sufficient to form the entire or at least a substantial portion of a wall. That is, the load bearing modules form monolithic wall sections 101 and 201 which are connected by a plurality of swing arm assembly connections 16 including the same connections 16 involving pivot joints 15 driven by a linear actuator as above described; in this case enabling relative motion between the first and second wall sections 101 and 201 . Construction proceeds as above described as indicated by the trolleys 300A and 300B, packers 303, brackets 215 and 215A and braces 400. A plurality of linear actuators 350 may be required to balance loads of the load bearing modules and not exceed the design limits of an individual linear actuator 350. Operation of each linear actuator 350 is controlled by a control system C - as indicated by dashed lines leading to the actuators (not shown) - which advantageously synchronises operation of each linear actuator to appropriately bear the load of the wall sections 101 and 201 and thereby enable the desired safe and smooth rotation of one wall section relative relative to another.

Construction for an assembly comprising relatively large load bearing modules 101 and 201 using such a linear actuator 350 (one shown and described for ease of illustration) is schematically shown in Figs. 28A to 28E where connection between wall portions made up of first and second load bearing modules 101 and 201 is made by a frame of swing arms 1 10, 210, 1 12, 212 somewhat resembling a pantograph jack though not quite the same as is apparent from the geometry of Figs. 28A to 28H. Swing arms 1 10 and 210 are connected at pivot joint 15. Swing arms 1 12 and 212 are connected at joint 356. Swing arms 1 10 and 1 12 are connected at joint 1 10A correspondent with the first load bearing module 101 and connected to supporting frame 1 1 15. Swing arms 210 and 212 are connected at joint 21 OA correspondent with the second load bearing module 201 and connected to supporting frame 1215. It will be noted that supporting frames 1 1 15 and 1215 are comprised of a number of structural members showing that the load to be borne by the frames 1 1 15 and 1215 is greater than that borne by the beams 1 15 and 215 elsewhere in the description. The scale is also shown by the operator 990.

The actuator 350 comprises a housing or barrel 352 acting as drive shaft and an inner shaft 354. Barrel 352 is trunnion mounted to joint 356 and inner shaft 354 is trunnion mounted to joint 15.

As motor M is operated, for example under control of control system C, barrel 352 travels over inner shaft 354 exerting loads on the swing arms 1 12, 212, 1 10 and 210 which causes load bearing module 201 to move upward in a circular direction as swing arms 1 12 and 212 open outward. Swing arms 1 10 and 210 similarly open outward. From the starting position shown in Fig. 28A, the load bearing module 201 moves through a range of angles as shown in Figs. 28B to 28D to a final position as shown in Figs. 28E and 28F. The final position corresponds with 180 Q of rotation for load bearing module 201 relative to load bearing module 101 .

Figs. 28G and 28H show the braces 400 and 450 used to support the wall section 1200 as shown elsewhere in the description. Braces 400 should be installed prior to operation of the motor M and linear actuator 350. Braces 450 are required to support the upper load bearing module 201 until the floor slab (not shown but essentially the same as floor slab 600 described is located into position in space 630.

Referring to Fig. 29, there is shown a suitable transporter 800 for the load bearing modules or wall sections 101 and 201 as shown in Fig. 27 but also suitable for transport of other load bearing modules and assemblies, such as those described above. Transporter 800 is of the self-propelled modular transporter or trailer (SPMT) type with prime mover not shown but of conventional design for prime movers. Monolithic wall sections 101 and 201 may be located in block 808 above the platform 807 of the transporter 800. A diesel-fuelled power pack 804 drives the transporter 800 and, in particular, the wheels and wheel sets 802, a number of which are provided. Control unit 804A, which may communicate with or form part of control system C, enables the power pack 804 to control operation of the wheel sets 802 to locate the transporter 800 in a desired location at the construction site, the transporter 800 being able to move in up to a 360 degree circle if required. Transporter 800 also has self-levelling capability, a useful characteristic where ground surface 890 is uneven. A crane 810 is available for loading and unloading of equipment stored on the transporter 800.

Exemplary specifications for transporter 800 include:

• Ability to carry 350m 2 of full size 3 metre high, 8 metre width and 125mm thickness load bearing modules as well as other module sizes. Load limit may be 10 to 15 tonnes.

Structures constructed using the load bearing modules and methods of construction described above can be constructed cost effectively without need for scaffolding or heavy lifting equipment. The load bearing module insulation also enables good thermal and acoustic properties to be achieved with the potential for high energy rating buildings.

Modifications and variations to the load bearing module assembly, transporter and methods for constructing a structure as described herein will be apparent to the skilled reader of this disclosure. Such modifications and variations are deemed within the scope of the present invention.