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Title:
LONG-CHAIN ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBYL AMINE ADDITIVES HAVING AN OXY-CARBONYL CONNECTING GROUP
Document Type and Number:
WIPO Patent Application WO/1990/002785
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
Long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl polyamino additives which comprise a long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl moiety, a polyamino moiety and an oxy-carbonyl connecting group which joins the aliphatic hydrocarbyl moiety and the polyamino moiety are useful as dispersants in fuel compositions and in lubricating oil compositions.

Inventors:
BUCKLEY,Thomas,F.,III
Application Number:
PCT/US1989/003904
Publication Date:
March 22, 1990
Filing Date:
September 08, 1989
Export Citation:
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Assignee:
CHEVRON RESEARCH COMPANY.
International Classes:
C10L1/22; C10L1/222; C10L1/2383; C10L1/2387; C10M133/52; C10M133/54; C10M161/00; C10M163/00; C10N30/04; C10N40/25; (IPC1-7): C10M133/04; C10L1/22
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Claims:
I CLAIM:
1. A longchain aliphatic hydrocarbyl amine additive comprising a longchain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component, an amine component and an oxycarbonyl connecting group which joins said aliphatic hydrocarbyl component and said amine component, the connecting group having at least two oxygen atoms, a linking oxygen and a carbonyl oxygen and at least one carbon atom wherein the linking oxygen of the connecting group is covalently bonded to a carbon atom of said longchain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component and to a carbon atom of the connecting group and said longchain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component is of sufficient molecular weight and chain length that said additive is soluble in a fuel boiling in the gasoline range.
2. An additive according to Claim 1 wherein said amine component has at least one basic nitrogen atom titratable by strong acid.
3. An additive according to Claim 2 wherein said longchain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component has a chain at least about 50 carbon atoms.
4. An additive according to Claim 3 in which at least one basic nitrogen atom in said amine component is in a primary or secondary amino group.
5. An additive according to Claim 3 wherein the amine component is derived from a polyamine having from 2 to 12 amine nitrogen atoms and from 2 to 40 carbon atoms with a carbonmitrogen ratio between 1:1 and 10:1.
6. An additive according to Claim 5 in which said polyamine is a substituted polyamine with substituents selected from (A) hydrogen, (B) hydrocarbyl groups of from 1 to about 10 carbon atoms, (C) acyl groups of from 2 to about 10 carbon atoms, and (D) monoketo. SUBSTITUTE SHEET monohydroxy, mononitro, monocyano, lower alkyl and lower alkoxy derivatives of (B) and (C).
7. An additive according to Claim 5 wherein said polyamine is a polyalkylene polyamine wherein the alkylene group contains from 2 to 6 carbon atoms and the polyamine contains 2 to 12 amine nitrogen atoms and 2 to 24 carbon atoms.
8. An additive according to Claim 7 wherein said polyalkylene polyamine is selected from the group consisting of ethylene diamine, propylene diamine, butylene diamine, pentylene diamine, hexylene diamine, diethylene triamine, dipropylene triamine, triethylene tetramine, tetraethylene pentamine, and 1,3diamino propane.
9. An additive according to Claim 8 wherein said aliphatic hydrocarbyl component comprises a polymeric hydrocarbon moiety having an average molecular weight of about 700 to about 3000.
10. An additive according to Claim 9 wherein said aliphatic hydrocarbyl component comprises polyisobutyl having an average molecular weight of about 900 to about 2000.
11. An additive according to Claim 10 wherein said polyamine is ethylene diamine, diethylene triamine, triethylene tetramine, tetraethylene pentamine, or 1,3 diamino propane.
12. An additive according to Claim 11 wherein said connecting group is SUBSTITUTESHEET .
13. An additive according to Claim 12 wherein said aliphatic hydrocarbyl component comprises polyisobutyl having an average molecular weight of about 950 to about 1600.
14. An additive according to Claim 13 wherein said amine component is (CH 2_CH_NH)mH wherein m is 1 or 2.
15. An additive according to Claim 14 wherein said aliphatic hydrocarbyl component has an average molecular weight of about 950.
16. An additive according to Claim 14 wherein said aliphatic hydrocarbyl component has an average molecular weight of about 1300.
17. A longchain aliphatic hydrocarbyl amine additive of the formula. R_χ_Am wherein R is an aliphatic hydrocarbyl component having a at least 50 carbon atoms, X is a carbonylcontaining connecting group of the formula 0Z wherein Z has at least one carbonyl group and a total of from 1 to 6 carbon atoms; and Am is a amine component having at least one basic nitrogen atom.
18. An additive according to Claim 17 wherein X is selected from II SUBSTITUTE SHEET 39 II wherein Y is an alkyl group of from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; n is an integer from 0 to 4; and W is a straight or branched chain alkylene group of from 0 to 5 carbon atoms.
19. An additive according to Claim 18 wherein Am is selected from ethylene diamine, diethylene triamine, triethylene tetramine, tetraethylene pentaamine or 1,3 dia ino propane.
20. An additive according to Claim 19 wherein R is polyisobutyl having an average molecular weight of about 900 to about 2000.
21. An additive according to Claim 20 wherein X is II .
22. An additive according to Claim 21 wherein Am is —(CH2CH2NH)πιH wherein m is 1 or 2.
23. An additive according to Claim 22 wherein R is polyisobutyl24 or polyisobutyl32.
24. A longchain aliphatic hydrocarbyl aminocarbamate of the formula o II R—O—C— HtRiNH pH wherein R is an aliphatic hydrocarbyl group having at least 50 carbon atoms; Ri is alkylene of from 2 to 6 carbon atoms and p is an integer from 1 to 6. SUBSTITUTESHE .
25. An aminocarbamate according to Claim 24 wherein R is polypropyl, polybutyl or polyisobutyl.
26. An aminocarbamate according to Claim 25 wherein R is polyisobutyl having an average molecular weight of about 700 to about 2000.
27. An aminocarbamate according to Claim 26 wherein Ri is ethylene.
28. An aminocarbamate according to Claim 27 wherein p is 1 or 2.
29. An aminocarbamate according to Claim 28 wherein R is polyisobutyl24 or polyisobutyl32.
30. A fuel composition comprising a hydrocarbon boiling" in a gasoline or diesel range and from about 30 to about 5000 parts per million of a longchain aliphatic hydrocarbyl polyamino additive according to Claim 1.
31. A fuel composition comprising a hydrocarbon boiling in a gasoline or diesel range and from about 30 to about 5000 parts per million of an additive according to Claim 17.
32. A fuel composition comprising a hydrocarbon boiling in a gasoline or diesel range and from about 30 to about 5000 parts per million of an aminocarbamate according to Claim 23.
33. A fuel composition comprising a hydrocarbon boiling in a gasoline or diesel range and from about 30 to about 5000 parts per million of an aminocarbamate according to Claim 29.
34. A fuel concentrate comprising an inert stable oleophilic organic solvent boiling in the range of 150°F to 400°F and from about 5 to about 50 weight percent of an additive according to Claim 1.
35. A fuel concentrate comprising an inert stable oleophilic organic solvent boiling in the range of 150°F to 400°F and from about 5 to about 50 weight percent of an additive according to Claim 17.
36. A fuel concentrate comprising an inert stable oleophilic organic solvent boiling in the range of 150°F to 400°F and from about 5 to about 50 weight percent of an aminocarbamate according to Claim 23.
37. A fuel concentrate comprising an inert stable oleophilic organic solvent boiling in the range of 150βF to 400°F and from about 5 to about 50 weight percent of an aminocarbamate according to Claim 29.
38. " A lubricating oil composition comprising an oil of lubricating viscosity and a dispersant effective amount of an additive according to Claim 1.
39. A lubricating oil composition comprising an oil of lubricating viscosity and a dispersant effective amount of an additive according to Claim 17.
40. A lubricating oil composition comprising an oil of lubricating viscosity and a dispersant effective amount of an aminocarbamate according to Claim 23.
41. A lubricating oil composition comprising an oil of lubricating viscosity and a dispersant effective amount of an aminocarbamate according to Claim 29.
42. A lubricating oil concentrate comprising from about 90 to about 50 weight percent of an oil of lubricating viscosity and from about 10 to about 50 weight percent of an additive according to Claim 1. SUBSTITUTESHEET .
43. A lubricating oil concentrate comprising from about 90 to about 50 weight percent of an oil of lubricating viscosity and from about 10 to about 50 weight percent of an additive according to Claim 17.
44. A lubricating oil concentrate comprising from about 90 to about 50 weight percent of an oil of lubricating viscosity and from about 10 to about 50 weight percent of an aminocarbamate according to Claim 23.
45. A lubricating oil concentrate comprising from about 90 to about 50 weight percent of an oil of lubricating viscosity and from about 10 to about 50 weight percent of an aminocarbamate according to Claim 29. SUBSTITUTE SHEET.
Description:
LONG-CHAIN ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBYL AMINE ADDITIVES HAVING AN OXY-CARBONYL CONNECTING GROUP

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention

Numerous deposit-forming substances are inherent in hydrocarbon fuels. These substances when used in internal combustion engines tend to form deposits on and around constricted areas of the engine contacted by the fuel. Typical areas commonly and sometimes seriously burdened by the formation of deposits include carburetor ports, the throttle body and venturies, engine intake valves, etc.

Deposits adversely affect the operation of the vehicle. For example, deposits on the carburetor throttle body and venturies increase the fuel to air ratio of the gas mixture to the combustion chamber thereby increasing the amount of unburned hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide discharged from the chamber. The high fuel-air ratio also reduces the gas mileage obtainable from the vehicle.

Deposits on the engine intake valves when they get sufficiently heavy, on the other hand, restrict the gas mixture flow into the combustion chamber. This restriction starves the engine of air and fuel and results in a loss of power. Deposits on the valves also increase the probability of valve failure due to burning and improper valve seating. In addition, these deposits may break off and enter the combustion chamber possibly resulting in mechanical damage to the piston, piston rings, engine head, etc.

The formation of these deposits can be inhibited as well as removed after formation by incorporating an active detergent into the fuel. These detergents function to cleanse these deposit-prone areas of the harmful deposits, thereby enhancing engine performance and longevity. There are numerous detergent-type gasoline additives currently available which, to varying degrees, perform these functions.

SHEET

Two factors complicate the use of such detergent- type gasoline additives. First, with regard to automobile engines that require the use of nonleaded gasolines (to prevent disablement of catalytic converters used to reduce emissions), it has been found difficult to provide gasoline of high enough octane to prevent knocking and the concomitant damage which it causes. The chief problem lies in the area of the degree of octane requirement increase, herein called "ORI", which is caused by deposits formed by the commercial gasoline.

The basis of the ORI problem is as follows: each engine, when new, requires a certain minimum octane fuel in order to operate satisfactorily without pinging and/or knocking. As the engine is operated on any gasoline, this minimum octane increases and, in most cases, if the engine is operated on the same fuel for a prolonged period, will reach an equilibrium. This is apparently caused by an amount of deposits in the combustion chamber-. Equilibrium is typically reached after 5,000 to 15,000 miles of automobile operation.

The octane requirement increase in particular engines used with commercial gasolines will vary at equilibrium from 5 to 6 octane units to as high as 12 or 15 units, depending upon the gasoline compositions, engine design and type of operation. The seriousness of the problem is thus apparent. A typical automobile with a research octane requirement of 85, when new, may after a few months of operation require 97 research octane gasoline for proper operation, and little unleaded gasoline of that octane is available. The ORI problem also exists in some degree with engines operated on leaded fuels. U.S. Patent Nos. 3,144,311; 3,146,203; and 4,247,301 disclose lead-containing fuel compositions having reduced ORI problems.

The ORI problem is compounded by the fact that the most common method for increasing the octane rating of unleaded gasoline is to increase its aromatic content. This, however, eventually causes an even greater increase in the octane requirement. Moreover, some of the

presently used nitrogen-containing compounds used as deposit-control additives and their mineral oil or polymer carriers may also significantly contribute to ORI in engines using unleaded fuels.

It is, therefore, particularly desirable to provide deposit control additives which effectively control the deposits in intake systems of engines, without themselves eventually contributing to the problem.

In this regard, hydrocarbyl poly(oxyalkylene) aminocarbamates are commercially successful fuel additives which control combustion chamber deposits thus minimizing ORI.

The second complicating factor relates to the lubricating oil compatibility of the fuel additive. Fuel additives, due to their higher boiling point over gasoline itself, tend to accumulate on surfaces in the combustion chamber of the engine. This accumulation of the additive eventually finds its way into the lubricating oil in the crankcase of the engine via a "blow-by" process and/or via cylinder wall/piston ring "wipe down". In some cases, as much as 25%-30% of the non-volatile fuel components, including fuel additives, will eventually accumulate in the lubricating oil. Insofar as the recommended drain interval for some engines may be as much as 7,500 miles or more, such fuel additives can accumulate during this interval to substantial quantities in the lubricating oil. In the case where the fuel additive is not sufficiently lubricating oil compatible, the accumulation of such an oil-incompatible fuel additive may actually contribute to crankcase deposits as measured by a Sequence V-D test. The incompatibility of certain fuel additives in lubricating oils, i.e., oils which contain other additives, arises in spite of the fact that some fuel additives are also known to be lubricating oil dispersants. Several theories exist as to the cause of the lubricating oil incompatibility of certain fuel

HEET

additives. Without being limited to any theory, it is possible that some of these fuel additives when found in the lubricating oil interfere with other additives contained in the lubricating oil and either counterbalance the effectiveness of these additives or actually cause dissolution of one or more of these additives including possibly the fuel additive itself. In either case, the incompatibility of the fuel additive with other additives in the lubricating oil demonstrates itself in less than desirable crankcase deposits as measured by Sequence V-D engine tests.

In another theory, it is possible that the accumulation of the fuel additive into the lubricating oil during the drain interval period surpasses its maximum solubility in the lubricating oil. In this theory, this excess amount of fuel additive is insoluble in the lubricating oil and is what causes increased crankcase deposits.

• In still another theory, it is possible that the fuel additive will decompose in the lubricating oil during engine operation and the decomposition products are what cause increased crankcase deposits. In any case, lubricating oil incompatible fuel additives are less than desirable insofar as their use during engine operation will result in increased deposits in the crankcase. This problem can be severe. For example, hydrocarbyl poly(oxyalkylene) aminocarbamate fuel additives, including hydrocarbyl poly(oxybutylene) aminocarbamates, are known to possess dispersant properties in lubricating oil. In this regard, it is recognized that due to the poly(oxyalklylene group) the hydrocarbyl poly(oxyalkylene) aminocarbamates are substantially more expensive to synthesize than would be hydrocarbyl aminocarbamates and other hydrocarbyl poly¬ amino compositions having an oxy-carbonyl connecting group but without a poly(oxyalkylene) group. Accordingly, it would be particularly advantageous to develop such compositions due to their being less expensive.

SUBSTITUTESHEET

The present invention is directed to a novel class of dispersant additives which as a fuel additive controls combustion chamber deposits, thus minimizing

ORI, and as a lubricating oil additive is compatible with the lubricating oil composition. These additives are also useful, themselves, as dispersants in lubricating oil compositions. The novel additives of the present invention are long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl amine compositions having an oxy-carbonyl connecting group connecting an aliphatic hydrocarbyl component and an amine component.

Polyoxyalkylene carbamates comprising a hydroxy- or hydrocarbyloxy-terminated polyoxyalkylene chain of 2 to 5 carbon oxyalkylene units bonded through an oxy- carbonyl group to a nitrogen atom of a polyamine have been taught as deposit control additives for use in fuel compositions. See., e.g., U.S. Patent Nos. 4,160,648; 4,191,537; 4,236,020; and 4,288,612.

. Hydrocarbylpoly(oxyalkylene) polyamines are also taught as useful as dispersants in lubricating oil compositions. See., e.g., U.S. Patent No. 4,247,301. The use of certain polyoxyalkylene amines in diesel fuels to improve operation of engines equipped with injectors has been taught. See, e.g., U.S. Patent No. 4,568,358.

Polyoxyalkylene polyamines prepared by reacting an amine with a halogen-containing polyoxyalkylene polyol and a polyoxyalkylene glycol monoether derived from the reaction of a hydroxyl-containing compound having 1 to 8 hydroxyl groups and a halogen-containing compound are taught as fuel detergent additives. See, e.g., U.S. Patent No. 4,261,704.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed to a novel class of long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl amine additives which comprise a long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component, an amine component and an oxy-carbonyl connecting group which joins the aliphatic hydrocarbyl

SUBSTITUTESHEET

component and the amine component, the connecting group having at least two oxygen atoms, a linking oxygen and a carbonyl oxygen, and at least one carbon atom and wherein the linking oxygen atom of the connecting group is covalently bonded to a carbon atom of the aliphatic hydrocarbyl component and to a carbon atom of the remainder of the connecting group. The long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component is of sufficiently high molecular weight and of sufficiently long-chain length that the resulting additive is soluble in liquid hydrocarbons including fuels boiling in the gasoline range and is compatible with lubricating oils. These additives have advantageous dispersency when used in fuel compositions. In addition, unlike additives which contain an aliphatic hydrocarbyl component directly linked to an amine component, use of these additives in unleaded fuels do not cause the previously discussed problems with combustion chamber deposits and the consequent ORI. Additives having an aliphatic hydrocarbyl component directly linked to an amine component when used as fuel additives in unleaded fuel have been found to cause significant deposit build- up and the consequent ORI.

In addition, the present invention is directed to a fuel composition comprising a hydrocarbon boiling in the gasoline or diesel range and from about 10 to about 10,000 parts per million of an aliphatic hydrocarbyl additive of the present invention.

The present invention is also directed to fuel concentrates comprising an inert stable oleophilic organic solvent boiling in the range of 150°F to 400°F and from about 5 to about 50 weight percent of an aliphatic hydrocarbyl additive of the present invention. The additives of the present invention are also useful as dispersants and/or detergents for use in lubricating oil compositions. Accordingly, the present invention also relates to lubricating oil compositions comprising a major amount of an oil of lubricating viscosity and an amount of additive sufficient to provide

SUBSTITUTESHEET

dispersancy and/or detergency. The additives of the present invention may also be formulated in lubricating oil concentrates which comprise from about 90 to about 50 weight percent of an oil of lubricating viscosity and from about 10 to about 50 weight percent of an additive of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl amine additives of the present invention comprise a long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component and an amine component which are joined by an oxy-carbonyl connecting group through a linking oxygen. The connecting group may allow for thermal cleavage of the amine component from the aliphatic hydrocarbyl component so that the free remaining hydrocarbyl portion undergoes thermal oxidative decomposition in the combustion chamber and does not form deleterious deposits. The Preferred Long-Chain Aliphatic Hydrocarbyl Component The long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component will be of sufficient chain length to render the resulting additive soluble in liquid hydrocarbons, including fuels boiling in the gasoline range and compatible with lubricating oils.

The long chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component may be a aliphatic or alicyclic hydrocarbon group and, except for adventitious amounts of aromatic structure present in petroleum mineral oils, will be free of aromatic unsaturation. Such hydrocarbon groups may be derived from petroleum mineral oil or polyolefins, either homo-polymers or higher order polymers, of 1-olefins of from 2 to 6 carbon atoms, ethylene being co-polymerized with a higher homologue. The olefins may be mono- or polyunsaturated, but the polyunsaturated olefins require that the final product be reduced to remove substantially all of the residual unsaturation, save one olefinic moiety.

Illustrative sources for the high molecular weight hydrocarbons from petroleum mineral oils are naphthenic bright stocks. For the polyolefin,

SUBSTITUTESHEET

illustrative polymers include polypropylene, polyisobutylene, poly-1-butene, copoly er of ethylene and isobutylene, copolymer of propylene and isobutylene, poly-1-pentene, poly-4-methyl-l-pentene, poly-1-hexene, poly-3-methylbutene-l, polyisoprene, etc.

The long chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component will normally have at least 1 branch per 6 carbon atoms along the chain, preferably at least 1 branch per 4 carbon atoms along the chain, and particularly preferred that there be about 1 branch per 2 carbon atoms along the chain. These branched chain hydrocarbon groups are readily prepared by the polymerization of olefins of from 3 to 6 carbon.atoms and preferably from olefins of from 3 to 4 carbon atoms, more preferably from propylene or isobutylene. The addition polymerizable olefins employed are normally 1- olefins. The branch will be of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, more usually of from 1 to 2 carbon atoms and preferably methyl.

- The long chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component is of sufficiently high molecular weight to maintain detergency in the carburetor, fuel injectors and intake valves; typically chain lengths such that the long chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component has on the order of 50 carbons or greater suffice for such detergency.

The preferred long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component is derived from high molecular weight olefins or alcohols. Preferably high molecular weight alcohols prepared from the corresponding polymeric hydrocarbons or olefins may be used.

The polymeric hydrocarbons or olefins used to prepare the corresponding alcohols typically have an average molecular weight of about 500 to 5000. Preferred are polymeric hydrocarbons having an average molecular weight of about 700 to about 3000; more preferred are those from about 900 to about 2000; especially preferred are those of molecular weight of about 950 to about 1600. Preferred polymeric hydrocarbons used to prepare the alcohols include polypropylene, polyisopropylene.

ET

-9-

polybutylene and polyisobutylene. Preferred are those polymeric hydrocarbons having at least 50 carbon atoms. Particularly preferred are hydrocarbyl components which are derived from "reactive" polyisobutenes, that is polyisobutenes which comprise at least 50% of the more reactive methylvinylidene isomer. Suitable polyisobutenes include those prepared using BF 3 catalysis. The preparation of such polyisobutenes is described in U.S. Patent No. 4,605,808. Such reactive polyisobutenes yield high molecular weight alcohols in which the hydroxyl is at (or near) the end of the hydrocarbon chain. The preferred hydrocarbyl components are conveniently derived from alcohols which may be prepared from the corresponding olefins by conventional procedures. Such procedures include hydration of the double bond to give an alcohol. Suitable procedures for preparating such long-chain alcohols are described in I.T. Harrison and S. Harrison, 'Compendium of Organic Synthetic Methods,' Wiley - Interscience, New York (1971), pp. 119-122.

The Preferred Amine Component The amine component of the aliphatic hydrocarbyl amine additives of this invention is preferably derived from a polyamine having from 2 to about 12 amine nitrogen atoms and from 2 to about 40 carbon atoms. The polyamine is preferably reacted with an intermediate having an amino reactive site to produce the aliphatic hydrocarbyl amine additives finding use within the scope of the present invention. The intermediate is itself derived from an aliphatic hydrocarbyl alcohol by reaction with a connecting group precursor such as phosgene. The polyamine, encompassing diamines, provides the product, with, on average, at least about one basic nitrogen atom per product molecule, i.e., a nitrogen atom titratable by a strong acid. The polyamine preferably has a carbon-to- nitrogen ratio of from about 1:1 to about 10:1. The polyamine may be substituted with substituents selected from (A) hydrogen, (B) hydrocarbyl

SUBSTITUTE SHEET

-10-

groups of from 1 to about 10 carbon atoms, (C) acyl groups of from 2 to about 10 carbon atoms, and (D) monoketo, monohydroxy, mononitro, monocyano, lower alkyl and lower alkoxy derivatives of (B) and (C). "Lower", as used in terms like lower alkyl or lower alkoxy, means a group containing from 1 to about 6 carbon atoms. At least one of the substituents on one of the basic nitrogen atoms of the polyamine is hydrogen, e.g. ' , at least one of the basic nitrogen atoms of the polyamine is a primary or secondary amino nitrogen atom.

Hydrocarbyl, as used in describing the amine component of this invention, denotes an organic radical composed of carbon and hydrogen which may be aliphatic, alicyclic, aromatic or combinations thereof, e.g., aralkyl. Preferably, the hydrocarbyl group will be relatively free of aliphatic unsaturation, i.e., ethylene and acetylenic, particularly acetylenic unsaturation. The substituted polyamines of the present invention are generally, but not necessarily, N-substituted polyamines. Exemplary hydrocarbyl groups and substituted hydrocarbyl groups include alkyls such as methyl, ethyl, propyl, butyl, isobutyl, pentyl, hexyl, octyl, etc., alkenyls such as propenyl, isobutenyl, hexenyl, octenyl, etc., hydroxyalkyls, such as 2-hydroxyethyl, 3-hydroxypropyl, hydroxy-isopropyl, 4-hydroxybutyl, etc., ketoalkyls, such as 2-ketopropyl, 6-ketooctyl, etc., alkoxy and lower alkenoxy alkyls, such as ethoxyethyl, ethoxypropyl, propoxyethyl, propoxypropyl, 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethyl, 2- (2- (2-ethoxyethoxy)ethoxy)ethyl, 3,6^9,12- tetraoxatetradecyl, 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)hexyl, etc. The acyl groups of the aforementioned (c) substituents are such as propionyl, acetyl, etc. The more preferred substituents are hydrogen, Ci-Cβ alkyls and Ci-Cε hydroxyalkyls.

In a substituted polyamine the substituents are found at any atom capable of receiving them. The substituted atoms, e.g., substituted nitrogen atoms, are generally geometrically inequivalent, and consequently the substituted amines finding use in the present

SUBSTITUTESHEET

invention can be mixtures of mono- and poly-substituted polyamines with substituent groups situated at equivalent and/or inequivalent atoms.

The more preferred polyamine finding use within the scope of the present invention is a polyalkylene polyamine, including alkylene diamine, and including substituted polyamines, e.g., alkyl and hydroxyalkyl- substituted polyalkylene polyamine. Preferably, the alkylene group of the polyamine contains from 2 to 6 carbon atoms, there being preferably from 2 to 3 carbon atoms between the nitrogen atoms. Such alkylene groups • are exemplified by ethylene, 1,2-propylene, 2,2-dimethyl- propylene trimethylene, 1,3,2-hydroxypropylene, etc. Examples of such polyamines include ethylene diamine, diethylene triamine, di(trimethylene)triamine, dipropylene triamine, triethylene tetramine, tripropylene tetramine, tetraethylene pentamine, and pentaethylene hexamine. Such amines encompass isomers such as branched-chain polyamines and the previously mentioned substituted polyamines, including hydroxy- and hydrocarbyl-substituted polyamines. Among the polyalkylene polyamines, those containing 2-12 amine nitrogen atoms and 2-24 carbon atoms are especially preferred, and the C 2 -C 3 alkylene polyamines are most preferred, in particular, the lower polyalkylene polyamines, e.g., ethylene diamine, diethylene triamine, propylene diamine, dipropylene triamine, etc. Especially preferred are ethylene diamine and diethylene triamine. The amine component of the additives of the present invention also may be derived from heterocyclic polyamines, heterocyclic substituted amines and substituted heterocyclic compounds, wherein the heterocycle comprises one or more 5-6 membered rings containing oxygen and/or nitrogen. Such heterocycles may be saturated or unsaturated and substituted with groups selected from the aforementioned (A), (B), (C) and (D). The heterocycles are exemplified by piperazines, such as 2-methylpiperazine, N-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine, 1,2- bis-(N-piperazinyl)ethane, and N,N'-bis(N-piperazinyl)-

SUBSTITUTESHEET

piperazine, 2-methylimidazoline, 3-aminopiperidine, 2- aminopyridine, 2-(3-aminoethyl)-3-pyrroline, 3- aminopyrrolidine, N-(3- aminopropyl)-morpholine, etc.

Among the heterocyclic compounds, the piperazines are preferred.

Another class of suitable polyamines from which the amine component may be derived are diaminoethers represented by Formula IX

H2N-XHOX2HNH2 IX

wherein i and X 2 are independently alkylene from 2 to about 5 carbon atoms and r is an integer from 1 to about 10. Diamines of Formula IX are disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 4,521,610, which is incorporated herein by reference for its teaching of such diamines.

Typical polyamines that can be used to form the compounds of this invention by reaction with the intermediates include the following: ethylene diamine, 1,2-propylene diamine, 1,3-propylene diamine, diethylene triamine, triethylene tetramine, hexamethylene diamine, tetraethylene pentamine, dimethylaminopropylene diamine, N-(beta-aminoethyl)piperazine, N-(beta-aminoethyl) piperidine, 3-amino-N-ethylpiperidine, N-(beta- aminoethyl)morpholine, N,N*-di(beta-aminoethyl)- piperazine, N,N'-di(beta-aminoethylimidazolidone-2; N(beta-cyanoethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine, l-amino-3,6,9- triazaoctadecane, l-amino-3,6-diaza-9-oxadecane, N-(beta- a inoethyl)diethanolamine, N -acetyl- '-methyl-N-(beta- aminoethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine, N-acetonyl-1,2- propanediamine, N-(beta-amino ethyl)hexahydrotriazine, N- (beta-amino ethyl)hexahydrotriazine, 5-(beta-aminoethyl)- 1,3,5-dioxazine, 2-(2-amino-ethylamino)-ethanol, 2[2-(2- aminoethylamino)ethylamino]-ethanol. aliphatic hydrocarbyl aminocarbamate having at least one basic nitrogen atom. For example, a substituted aminoisocyanate, such as (R2) 2 NCH 2 CH 2 NCO, wherein R 2 is, for example, a hydrocarbyl group, reacts with the alcohol to produce the aminocarbamate additive finding use within

Where the connecting group is amine component of the resulting aliphatic hydrocarbyl aminocarbamate may also be derived from an amine- containing compound which is capable of reacting with an aliphatic hydrocarbyl alcohol to produce an the scope of the present invention. Typical aminoisocyanates that may be used to form the fuel additive compounds of this invention by reaction with a aliphatic hydrocarbyl alcohol include the following: N,N-(dimethyl)-aminoisocyanatoethane, generally, N,N- (dihydrocarbyl)-aminoisocyanatoalkane, more generally, N- (perhydrocarbyl)-isocyanatopolyalkylene polyamine, N,N- (dimethyl)aminoisocyanatobenzene, etc.

In many instances the polyamine used as a reactant in the production of the additive of the present invention is not a single compound but a mixture in which one or .several compounds, predominate with the average composition indicated. For example, tetraethylene pentamine prepared by the polymerization of aziridine or the reaction of dichloroethylene and ammonia will have both lower and higher amine members, e.g., triethylene tetramine, substituted piperazines and pentaethylene hexamine, but the composition will be mainly tetraethylene pentamine and the empirical formula of the total amine composition will closely approximate that of tetraethylene pentamine. Finally, in preparing the compounds of this invention, where the various nitrogen atoms of the polyamine are not geometrically equivalent, several substitutional isomers are possible and are encompassed within the final product. Methods of preparation of amines, isocyanates and their reactions are detailed in Sidgewick's "The Organic Chemistry of Nitrogen", Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1966; Nollers' "Chemistry of Organic Compounds", Saunders, Philadelphia, 2nd Ed. 1957; and Kirk-Othmer's "Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology", 2nd Ed., especially Volume 2, pp. 99-116.

SUBSTITUTESHEET

The Connecting Group The connecting group joining the aliphatic hydrocarbyl moiety and the polyamino moiety may be any relatively small diradical containing at least two oxygen atoms, a linking oxygen and a carbonyl oxygen and at least 1 carbon atom. Preferably the connecting group has from about 1 to about 6 carbon atoms. The connecting group which results and is used in the present invention is ordinarily a function of the method by which the components of the aliphatic hydrocarbyl component and the amine component are joined together. In some instances the linking oxygen may be regarded as having been the terminal hydroxyloxygen of the long chain alcohol from which the long chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component was derived. In such an instance, the remainder of the connecting group might be provided by the particular coupling agent used. The connecting group functions to join the two components so that an oxygen of the connecting group is covalently bonded to a carbon atom of the long chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component and to a carbon atom of the remainer of the connecting group. Preferred connecting groups include:

carbamates —0—C—NH—;

alkyl carbamates oxalates, malonates, succinates and the like

fl O

II esters — O CW - ; and

carbonates

SUBSTITUTE SHEET

where Y is an alkyl group of from 1 to 6 carbon atoms, n is an integer of from 0 to 4, and W is a straight or branched chain alkylene group of O to 20 carbon atoms.

Particularly preferred connecting groups include the carbamate group

(—-OC— H—)

Preferred Long-Chain Aliphatic Hydrocarbyl Amine Additives A generalized, preferred formula for the long- chain aliphatic amine additives of the present invention is as follows:

R - X - Am (I) wherein R is a long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component having about at least 50 carbon atoms as described herein above. Am is an amine component as described herein above and X is an oxy-carbonyl connecting group of the formula -0-Z- wherein Z comprises a carbonyl-containing component and preferably has from about 1 to about 6 carbon atoms. Thus, X is an oxy-carbonyl connecting group having at least two oxygen atoms, a linking oxygen and a carbonyl oxygen and at least one carbon atom, preferably from about 1 to about 6 carbon atoms and the linking oxygen of the connecting group is covalently bonded to a carbon atom of the aliphatic hydrocarbyl component and to a carbon atom of the remainder or the connecting group. Preferred connecting groups include:

O carbamates —0—C II— H—;

O alkyl carbamates —O—C II—NY—; oxalates, malonates, succinates and the like

fl

SUBSTITUTE SHEET

II esters — O CW - ; and

O

II carbonates —0—C—0—;

wherein Y is alkyl of from 1 to 5 carbon atoms, n is an integer of from 0 to 4, and W is straight or branched chain alkylene of 0 to 5 carbon atoms.

A particularly preferred connecting group is the carbamate group (i.e., O ). —o—C—NH—

Preferred Long-Chain Aliphatic Hydrocarbyl Aminocarbamates Having described the preferred long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component, and the preferred polyamme component, the preferred long-chain aliphatic aminocarbamate additive of the present invention is obtained by linking these components together through a carbamate linkage, i.e.,

wherein the linking oxygen may be regarded as having been the terminal hydroxyl oxygen of the long-chain alcohol from which the long chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl component was derived, and the carbonyl group -C(O)- is preferably provided by a coupling agent, e.g., phosgene.

The preferred long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl aminocarbamate employed in the present invention has at least one basic nitrogen atom per molecule. A "basic nitrogen atom" is one that is titratable by a strong acid, e.g., a primary, secondary, or tertiary amino nitrogen, as distinguished from, for example, an amido nitrogen, i.e..

SUBSTITUTESHEET

1

5 which is not so titratable. Preferably, the basic nitrogen is in a primary or secondary amino group.

The preferred long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl aminocarbamate has an average molecular weight of from about 200 to about 3000, preferably an average molecular 0 weight of from about 900 to about 2000, and most preferably an average molecular weight of from about 950 to about 1600.

An especially preferred class of long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl aminocarbamates can be described by 5 the following formula:

O

R-O-C II-NHtR l NHtpH wherein R is a polyisobutyl group having a chain length 0 of at least 50 carbon atoms; Ri is alkylene of from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms; and p is an integer of from 1 to about 6.

GENERAL PREPARATION The additives employed in the present invention may be conveniently prepared by first reacting the aliphatic hydrocarbyl alcohol with an appropriate coupling agent such as phosgene, diphenyl carbonate or the like to give an intermediate which is then capable of reacting with the polyamine to give the desired aliphatic 0 hydrocarbyl amine additive.

Preparation of such aliphatic hydrocarbyl alcohols is well known to those skilled in the art. See, e.g., H. C. Brown, Organic Synthesis via Boranes, John Wiley & Sons (1975). ^ For example, an aliphatic hydrocarbyl alcohol may be reacted with phosgene to give an aliphatic hydrocarbyl chloroformate intermediate which will then react with a polyamine to give aliphatic hydrocarbyl aminocarbonate additives of the present invention. Such additives would 0 have the formula

SUBSTITUTESHEET

wherein R and Am are as defined in connection with formula (I) above.

Similarly, other coupling agents such as diphenyl carbonate are reacted with the aliphatic hydrocarbyl alcohol to give a phenylcarbonate intermediate. The phenylcarbonate intermediate will then react with the polyamine to give additives of the present invention, plus free phenol.

Preparation of Long Chain Aliphatic Hydrocarbyl Aminocarbamates

The preferred aminocarbamate additives of the present invention can be most conveniently prepared by first reacting the appropriate long chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl alcohol with phosgene to produce a long chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl chloroformate. The chloroformate is then reacted with the appropriate polyamine to produce the desired long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl amino¬ carbamate.

Preparation of polyoxyalkylene and polyether aminocarbamates as disclosed in U.S. Patent Nos. 4,160,648; 4,191,537; 4,197,409; 4,236,020; 4,243,798; 4,270,930; 4,274,837; 4,288,612; 4,521,610; and 4,568,358, the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference.

In general, the reaction of the aliphatic hydrocarbyl alcohol and phosgene is usually carried out on an equimolar basis, although excess phosgene can be used to improve the degree of reaction. The reaction may be carried out at temperatures from about -10° to about 100°C, preferably in the range of about -0° to about 50 β C. The reaction is usually complete within about 2 to about 12 hours. Typical times of reaction are in the range of from about 6 to about 10 hours.

SUBSTITUTE SHEET

A solvent may be used in the chloroformylation reaction. Suitable solvents include benzene, toluene, Cg aromatic solvents, naphthenic solvents and the like.

The reaction of the resultant chloroformate with the amine may be carried out neat or preferably in solution. Temperatures of from about -10° to about 200°C may be used. The desired product may be obtained by water wash and stripping, usually with the aid of vacuum, of any residual solvent.

The mol ratio of polyamine to chloroformate will generally be in the range of about 2 to about 20 moles of polyamine per mole of chloroformate, and more usually 5 to 15 moles of polyamine per mole of chloroformate.

Since suppression of polysubstitution of the polyamine is usually desired, large molar excesses of the polyamine is preferred. Additionally, the preferred adduct is the monocarbamate compound, as opposed to the bis-carbamate or disubstituted amino ether.

* The reaction or reactions may be conducted with or without the presence of a reaction solvent. A reaction solvent is generally employed whenever necessary to reduce the viscosity of the reactants and products and to minimize the formation of undesired by-products. These solvents should be stable and inert to the reactants and reaction product. Depending on the temperature of the reaction, the particular chloroformate used, the mol ratios, as well as the reactant concentrations, the reaction time may vary from less than one minute to about three hours.

After the reaction has been carried out for a sufficient length of time, the reaction mixture may be subjected to extraction with a hydrocarbon-water or hydrocarbon-alcohol-water medium to free the product from any low molecular weight amine salts which may have formed and any unreacted polyamine. The product may then be isolated by evaporation of the solvent. Further purification may be effected by column chro atography on silica gel.

SUBSTITUTE SHEET

Depending on the particular application of the composition of this invention, the reaction may be carried out in the medium in which it will ultimately find use, e.g., polyether carriers or an oleophilic organic solvent or mixtures thereof and be formed at concentrations which provide a concentrate of an additive composition. Thus, the final mixture may be in a form to be used directly for blending in fuels or lubricating oils.

An alternative process for preparing the preferred aliphatic hydrocarbyl aminocarbamates employed in this invention involves the use of an arylcarbonate intermediate. That is to say, the aliphatic hydrocarbyl alcohol is reacted with an aryl chloroformate or a diarylcarbonate to form an alkyl arylcarbonate which is then reacted with the polyamine to form the aminocarbamate employed in this invention. Particularly useful aryl chloroformates include phenyl chloroformate, p-nitrophenyl chloroformate, 2,4-dinitrophenyl chloroformate, p-chlorophenyl chloroformate, 2,4- dinitrophenyl chloroformate, p-chlorophenyl chloroformate, 2,4-dichlorophenyl chloroformate, and p- trifluoro-methylphenyl chloroformate. Use of the alkyl aryl carbonate intermediate allows for conversion to aminocarbamates containing close to the theoretical basic nitrogen while employing less excess of polyamine, i.e., molar ratios of generally from 1:1 to about 5:1 of polyamine to the arylcarbonate, and additionally avoids the generation of hydrogen chloride in the reaction forming the aminocarbamate. Preparation of hydrocarbyl capped poly(oxyalkylene) aminocarbamates via an arylcarbonate intermediate are disclosed in U.S. Serial Nos. 586,533 and 689,616, the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference.

Fuel Compositions The long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl amine additives of this invention will generally be employed in a hydrocarbon distillate fuel. The proper concentration of this additive necessary in order to achieve the

desired detergency and dispersancy varies depending upon the type of fuel employed, the presence of other detergents, dispersants and other additives, etc.

Generally, however, from 30 to 5,000 weight parts per million (ppm), and preferably 100 to 500 ppm and more preferably 200 to 300 ppm of long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl amine additive per part of base fuel is needed to achieve the best results. When other detergents are present, a lesser amount of long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl amine additive may be used. For performance as a carburetor detergent only, lower concentrations, for example 30 to 70 ppm may be preferred. Higher concentrations, i.e., 2,000 to 5,000 ppm may result in a clean-up effect on combustion chamber deposits.

The deposit control additive may also be formulated as a concentrate using an inert stable oleophilic organic solvent boiling in the range of about 150 to -400 β F. Preferably, an aliphatic or an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent is used, such as benzene, toluene, xylene or higher-boiling aromatics or aromatic thinners. Aliphatic alcohols of about 3 to 8 carbon atoms, such as isopropanol, isobutylcarbinol, n-butanol and the like, in combination with hydrocarbon solvents are also suitable for use with the detergent-dispersant additive. In the concentrate, the amount of additive will be ordinarily at least 5 percent by weight and generally not exceed 50 percent by weight, preferably from 10 to 30 weight percent.

When employing certain of the long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl amine additives of this invention, particularly those having more than 1 basic nitrogen, it can be desirable to additionally add a demulsifier to the gasoline or diesel fuel composition. These demulsifiers are generally added at from 1 to 15 ppm in the fuel composition. Suitable demulsifiers include for instance L-1562 ® , a high molecular weight glycol-capped phenol available from Petrolite Corp., Tretolite Division, St.

SUBSTITUTE SHEET

Louis, Missouri, and OLOA 2503Z ® , available from Chevron Chemical Company, San Francisco, California. In gasoline fuels, other fuel additives may also be included such as antiknock agents, e.g., methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl, tetramethyl or tetraethyl lead, or other dispersants or detergents such as various substituted succinimides, amines, etc. Also included may be lead scavengers such as aryl halides, e.g., dichlorobenzene or alkyl halides, e.g., ethylene dibromide. Additionally, antioxidants, metal deactivators and demulsifiers may be present.

In diesel fuels, other well-known additives can be employed such as pour point depressants, flow improvers, cetane improvers, etc.

Lubricating Oil Compositions The long chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl amine additives of this invention are useful as dispersant additives when employed in lubricating oils. When employed in this manner, the additive is usually present in from 0.2 to 10 percent by weight to the total composition, preferably at about 0.5 to 8 percent by weight and more preferably at about 1 to 6 percent by weight. The lubricating oil used with the additive compositions of this invention may be mineral oil or synthetic oils of lubricating viscosity and preferably suitable for use in the crankcase of an internal combustion engine. Crankcase lubricating oils ordinarily have a viscosity of about 1300 CSt 0°F to 22.7 CSt agt 210 β F (99°C). The lubricating oils may be derived from synthetic or natural sources. Mineral oil for use as the base oil in this invention includes paraffinic, naphthenic and other oils that are ordinarily used in lubricating oil compositions. Synthetic oils include both hydrocarbon synthetic oils and synthetic esters. Useful synthetic hydrocarbon oils include liquid polymers of alpha olefins having the proper viscosity. Especially useful are the hydrogenated liquid oligomers of Ce to C 12 alpha olefins such as 1-decene trimer. Likewise, alkyl benzenes of proper viscosity such as didodecyl benzene,

SUBSTITUTE SHEET

can be used. Useful synthetic esters include the esters of both monocarboxylic acid and polycarboxylic acids as ' well as monohydroxy alkanols and polyols. Typical examples are didodecyl adipate, pentaerythritol tetracaproate, di-2-ethylhexyl adipate, dilaurylsebacate and the like. Complex esters prepared from mixtures of mono and dicarboxylic acid and mono and dihydroxy alkanols can also be used.

Blends of hydrocarbon oils with synthetic oils are also useful. For example, blends of 10 to 25 weight percent hydrogenated 1-decene trimer with 75 to 90 weight percent 150 SUS (100°F) mineral oil gives an excellent lubricating oil base.

Lubricating oil concentrates are also included within the scope of this invention. The concentrates of this invention usually include from about 90 to 50 weight percent of an oil of lubricating viscosity and from about 10 to 50 weight percent of the additive of this invention. Typically, the concentrates contain sufficient diluent to make them easy to handle during shipping and storage. Suitable diluents for the concentrates include any inert diluent, preferably an oil of lubricating viscosity, so that the concentrate may be readily mixed with lubricating oils to prepare lubricating oil compositions. Suitable lubricating oils which can be used as diluents typically have viscosities in the range from about 35 to about 500 Saybolt Universal Seconds (SUS) at 100 β F (38°C), although an oil of lubricating viscosity may be used.

Other additives which may be present in the formulation include rust inhibitors, foam inhibitors, corrosion inhibitors, metal deactivators, pour point depressants, antioxidants, and a variety of other well- known additives.

Also included within the scope of this invention are fully formulated lubricating oils containing a dispersant effective amount of a long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbyl amine additive. Contained in the fully

SUBSTITUTESHEET

-24-

formulated composition is:

1. an alkenyl succinimide, 2. a Group II metal salt of a dihydrocarbyl dithiophosphoric acid,

3. a neutral or overbased alkali or alkaline earth metal hydrocarbyl sulfonate or mixtures thereof, and 4. a neutral or overbased alkali or alkaline earth metal alkylated phenate or mixtures thereof. 5. A viscosity index (VI) improver. The alkenyl succinimide is present to act as a dispersant and prevent formation of deposits formed during operation of the engine. The alkenyl succinimides are well-known in the art. The alkenyl succinimides are the reaction product of a polyolefin polymer-substituted succinic anhydride with an amine, preferably a polyalkylene polyamine. The polyolefin polymer- substituted succinic anyhydrides are obtained by reaction of a polyolefin polymer or a derivative thereof with maleic anhydride. The succinic anhydride thus obtained is reacted with the amine compound. The preparation of the alkenyl succinimides has been described many times in the art. See, for example, U.S. Patent Nos. 3,390,082; 3,219,666; and 3,172,892, the disclosure of which are incorporated herein by reference. Reduction of the alkenyl substituted succinic anhydride yields the corresponding alkyl derivative. The alkyl succinimides are intended to be included within the scope of the term "alkenyl succinimide." A product comprising predominantly mono- or bis-succinimide can be prepared by controlling the molar ratios of the reactants. Thus, for example, if one mole of amine is reacted with one mole of the alkenyl or alkyl substituted succinic anhydride, a predominantly mono-succinimide product will be prepared. If two moles of the succinic anhydride are reacted per mole of polyamine, a bis-succinimide will be prepared. Particularly good results are obtained with the lubricating oil compositions of this invention when the

SUBSTITUTESHEET

alkenyl succinimide is a polyisobutene-substituted succinic anhydride of a polyalkylene polyamine. The polyisobutene from which the polyisobutene- substituted succinic anhydride is obtained by polymerizing isobutene can vary widely in its compositions. The average number of carbon atoms can range from 30 or less to 250 or more, with a resulting number average molecular weight of abut 400 or less to

3,000 or more. Preferably, the average number of carbon atoms per polyisobutene molecule will range from about 50 to about 100 with the polyisobutenes having a number average molecular weight of about 600 to about 1,500. More preferably, the average number of carbon atoms per polyisobutene molecule ranges from about 60 to about 90, and the number average molecular weight ranges from about 800 to 2,500. The polyisobutene is reacted with maleic anhydride according to well-known procedures to yield the polyisobutene-substituted succinic anhydride.

- In preparing the alkenyl succinimide, the substituted succinic anhydride is reacted with a polyalkylene polyamine to yield the corresponding succinimide. Each alkylene radical of the polyalkylene polyamine usually has from 2 up to about 8 carbon atoms. The number of alkylene radicals can range up to about 8. The alkylene radical is exemplified by ethylene, propylene, butylene, trimethylene, tetramethylene, pentamethylene, hexamethylene, octamethylene, etc. The number of amino groups generally, but not necessarily, is one greater than the number of alkylene radicals present in the amine, i.e., if a polyalkylene polyamine contains 3 alkylene radicals, it will usually contain 4 amino radicals. The number of amino radicals can range up to about 9. Preferably, the alkylene radical contains from about 2 to about 4 carbon atoms and all amine groups are primary or secondary. In this case, the number of amine groups exceeds the number of alkylene groups by 1. Preferably the polyalkylene polyamine contains from 3 to 5 amine groups. Specific examples of the polyalkylene polyamines include ethylenediamine, diethylenetriamine,

SUBSTITUTE SHEET

triethylene-tetramine, propylenediamine, tripropylene- tetramine, tetraethylenepentamine, trimethylenediamine, pentaethylenehexamine, di-(trimethylene)triamine, tri(hexamethylene)tetramine, etc.

Other amines suitable for preparing the alkenyl succinimide useful in this invention include the cyclic amines such as piperazine, morpholine and dipiperazines. Preferably the alkenyl succinimides used in the compositions of this invention have the following formula

wherein:

(a) R 2 represents an alkenyl group, preferably a substantially saturated hydrocarbon prepared by polymerizing aliphatic monoolefins. Preferably Ri is prepared from isobutene and has an average number of carbon atoms and a number average molecular weight as described above; (b) the "Alkylene" radical represents a substantially hydrocarbyl group containing from 2 up to about 8 carbon atoms and preferably containing from about 2-4 carbon atoms as described hereinabove;

(c) A represents a hydrocarbyl group, an amine- substituted hydrocarbyl group, or hydrogen. The hydrocarbyl group and the amine-substituted hydrocarbyl groups are generally the alkyl and amino-substituted alkyl analogs of the alkylene radicals described above. Preferably A represents hydrogen; (d) n represents an integer of from 1 to about 9, and preferably from about 3-5.

Also included within the term alkenyl succinimide are the modified succinimides which are disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 4,612,132 which is incorporated herein by reference.

SUBSTITUT SHEET

The alkenyl succinimide is present in the lubricating oil compositions of the invention in an amount effective to act as a dispersant and prevent the deposit of contaminants formed in the oil during operation of the engine. The amount of alkenyl succinimide can range from about 1 percent to about 20 percent weight of the total lubricating oil composition. Preferably the amount of alkenyl succinimide present in the lubricating oil composition of the invention ranges from about 1 to about 10 percent by weight of the total composition.

The alkali or alkaline earth metal hydrocarbyl sulfonates may be either petroleum sulfonate, synthetically alkylated aromatic sulfonates, or aliphatic sulfonates such as those derived from polyisobutylene. One of the more important functions of the sulfonates is to act as a detergent and dispersant. These sulfonates are well-known in the art. The hydrocarbyl group must have a-sufficient number of carbon atoms to render the sulfonate molecule oil soluble. Preferably, the hydrocarbyl portion has at least 20 carbon atoms and may be aromatic or aliphatic, but is usually alkylaromatic. Most preferred for use are calcium, magnesium or barium sulfonates which are aromatic in character.

Certain sulfonates are typically prepared by sulfonating a petroleum fraction having aromatic groups, usually mono- or dialkybenzene groups, and then forming the metal salt of the sulfonic acid material. Other feedstocks used for preparing these sulfonates include synthetically alkylated benzenes and aliphatic hydrocarbons prepared by polymerizing a mono- or diolefin, for example, a polyisobutenyl group prepared by polymerizing isobutene. The metallic salts are formed directly or by metathesis using well-known procedures.

The sulfonates may be neutral or overbased having base numbers up to about 400 or more. Carbon dioxide and calcium hydroxide or oxide are the most commonly used material to produce the basic or overbased sulfonates.

Mixtures of neutral and overbased sulfonates may be used.

SUBSTITUTE SHEET

The sulfonates are ordinarily used so as to provide from 0.3% to 10% by weight of the total composition. Preferably, the neutral sulfonates are present from 0.4% to 5% by weight of the total composition and the overbased sulfonates are present from 0.3% to 3% by weight of the total composition.

The phenates for use in this invention are those conventional products which are the alkali or alkaline earth metal salts of alkylated phenols. One of the functions of the phenates is to act as a detergent and dispersant. Among other things, it prevents the deposition of contaminants formed during high temperature operation of the engine. The phenols may be mono- or polyalkylated.

The alkyl portion of the alkyl phenate is present to lend oil solubility to the phenate. The alkyl portion can be obtained from naturally occurring or synthetic sources. Naturally occurring sources include petroleum hydrocarbons such as white oil and wax. Being derived from petroleum, the hydrocarbon moiety is a mixture of different hydrocarbyl groups, the specific composition of which depends upon the particular oil stock which was used as a starting material. Suitable synthetic sources include various commercially available alkenes and alkane derivatives which, when reacted with the phenol, yield an alkylphenol. Suitable radicals obtained include butyl, hexyl, octyl, decyl, dodecyl, hexadecyl, eicosyl, tricontyl, and the like. Other suitable synthetic sources of the alkyl radical include olefin polymers such as polypropylene, polybutylene, polyisobutylene and the like.

The alkyl group can be straight-chained or branch-chained, saturated or unsaturated (if unsaturated, preferably containing not more than 2 and generally not more than 1 site of olefinic unsaturation). The alkyl radicals will generally contain from 4 to 30 carbon atoms. Generally when the phenol is monoalkyl- substituted, the alkyl radical should contain at least 8 carbon atoms. The phenate may be sulfurized if desired.

1

It may be either neutral or overbased and if overbased will have a base number of up to 200 to 300 or more. 5 Mixtures of neutral and overbased phenates may be used.

The phenates are ordinarily present in the oil to provide from 0.2% to 27% by weight of the total composition. Preferably, the neutral phenates are present from 0.2% to 9% by weight of the total 0 composition and the overbased phenates are present from 0.2 to 13% by weight of the total composition. Most preferably, the overbased phenates are present from 0.2% to 5% by weight of the total composition. Preferred metals are calcium, magnesium, strontium or barium. The sulfurized alkaline earth metal alkyl phenates are preferred. These salts are obtained by a variety of processes such as treating the neutralization product of an alkaline earth metal base and an alkylphenol with sulfur. Conveniently the sulfur, in o elemental form, is added to the neutralization product and reacted at elevated temperatures to produce the sulfurized alkaline earth metal alkyl phenate.

If more alkaline earth metal base were added during the neutralization reaction than was necessary to 5 neutralize the phenol, a basic sulfurized alkaline earth metal alkyl phenate is obtained. See, for example, the process of Walker et al, U.S. Patent No. 2,680,096. Additional basicity can be obtained by adding carbon dioxide to the basic sulfurized alkaline earth metal 0 alkyl phenate. The excess alkaline earth metal base can be added subsequent to the sulfurization step but is conveniently added at the same time as the alkaline earth metal base is added to neutralize the phenol.

Carbon dioxide and calcium hydroxide or oxide are the most commonly used material to produce the basic or

"overbased" phenates. A process wherein basic sulfurized alkaline earth metal alkylphenates are produced by adding carbon dioxide is shown in Hanneman, U.S. Patent No. 3,178,368. The Group II metal salts of dihydrocarbyl dithiophosphoric acids exhibit wear, antioxidant and

SUBSTITUTE SHEET

-30-

thermal stability properties. Group II metal salts of phosphorodithioic acids have been described previously. See, for example, U.S. Patent No. 3,390,080, columns 6 and 7, wherein these compounds and their preparation are described generally. Suitably, the Group II metal salts of the dihydrocarbyl dithiophosphoric acids useful in the lubricating oil composition of this invention contain from about 4 to about 12 carbon atoms in each of the hydrocarbyl radicals and may be the same " or different and may be aromatic, alkyl or cycloalkyl. Preferred hydrocarbyl groups are alkyl groups containing from 4 to 8 carbon atoms and are represented by butyl, isobutyl, sec.-butyl, hexyl, isohexyl, octyl, 2-ethylhexyl and the like. The metals suitable for forming these salts include barium, calcium strontium, zinc and cadmium, of which zinc is preferred.

Preferably, the Group II metal salt of a dihydrocarbyl dithiophosphoric acid has the following formula:

R 3 0

^

Mi

R0

wherein

(e) R3 and R4 each independently represent hydrocarbyl radicals as described above, and

(f) Mi represents a Group II metal cation as described above.

The dithiophosphoric salt is present in the lubricating oil compositions of this invention in an amount effective to inhibit wear and oxidation of the lubricating oil. The amount ranges from about 0.1 to about 4 percent by weight of the total composition, preferably the salt is present in an amount ranging from about 0.2 to about 2.5 percent by weight of the total lubricating oil composition. The final lubricating oil

SUBSTITUTESHEET

-31-

composition will ordinarily contain 0.025 to 0.25% by weight phosphorus and preferably 0.05 to 0.15% by weight. Viscosity index (VI) improvers are either non- dispersant or dispersant VI improvers. Non-dispersant VI improvers are typically hydrocarbyl polymers including copolymers and terpolymers. Typically hydrocarbyl copolymers are copolymers of ethylene and propylene. Such non-dispersant VI improvers are disclosed in U.S.

Patents Nos. 2,700,633; 2,726,231; 2,792,288; 2,933,480; 3,000,866; 3,063,973; and 3,093,621 which are incorporated herein by reference for their teaching of non-dispersant VI improvers. Dispersant VI improvers can be prepared by functionalizing non-dispersant VI improvers. For example, non-dispersant hydrocarbyl copolymer and terpolymer VI improvers can be functionalized to produce aminated oxidized VI improvers having dispersant properties and a number average molecular weight of from 1,500 to 20,000. Such functionalized dispersant VI improvers are disclosed in U.S. Patents Nos. 3,864,268; 3,769,216; 3,326,804 and 3,316,177 which are incorporated herein by reference for their teaching of such dispersant VI improvers.

Other dispersant VI improvers include amine- grafted acrylic polymers and copolymers wherein one monomer contains at least one amino group. Typical compositions are described in British Patent No. 1,488,382; and U.S. Patent Nos. 4,89,794 and 4,025,452, which are incorporated herein by reference for their teaching of such dispersant VI improvers.

Non-dispersant and dispersant VI improvers are generally employed at from 5 to 20 percent by weight in the lubricating oil composition.

The following examples are offered to specifically illustrate this invention. These examples and illustrations are not to be construed in any way as limiting the scope of this invention.

EXAMPLES

SUBSTITUTE SHEET

EXAMPLE 1 Preparation of Polyisobutyl-24 Alcohol To a dry one liter three-necked round bottom flask equipped with an addition funnel, condenser, and a mechanical stirring apparatus 50g (0.0525 moles) of polyisobutene (PB 24) dissolved in 200 ml of dry tetrahydrofaran were added. The reaction vessel was cooled to 0°C while being protected from moisture using a nitrogen atmosphere. Then 53 ml of a 1M * solution of BH 3 /THF was added drop wise over about 25 minutes. The mixture was ' then warmed to room temperature and stirred for approximately three hours. At that point, 10 ml water were added drop wise to the mixture in a cautious manner to avoid excessive foaming. When the addition of water was complete, the vessel was again cooled to 0°C and then treated with 18 ml of aqueous 3M sodium hydroxide, followed by 15 ml of 30% hydrogen peroxide. The reaction mixture was then heated- to 50 β C with stirring for 2| hours. An additional 25 ml portion of 3M aqueous sodium hydroxide was added and the stirring was continued for an additional 0.5 hour. After cooling, the reaction mixture was extracted three times with 500 ml hexane. The combined organic phases were washed twice with water (about 500 ml each), once with brine (about 300 ml); and then dried, filtered, and stripped to give 45.2 ml of the product polyisobutyl alcohol [IR: OH-; 3460 cm-i, Hydroxyl No. 56]. The product was used in Example 2 without further purification.

EXAMPLE 2 Preparation of Polyisobutyl-24 Chloroformate To a 5 liter three-necked round bottom flask equipped with a mechanical stirrer and protected from moisture using a nitrogen (N 2 ) atmosphere, 833 g (0.86 mole of polyisobutyl-24 alcohol (prepared according to the procedure outlined in Example 1) in 2 1 dry toluene were added. The mixture was cooled to 0°C, then 100 ml (1.44 moles, 168 M%) of .condensed phosgene were added in

SUBSTITUTE SHEET

one portion. The homogeneous reaction mixture was allowed to warm to room temperature while gently being stirred for about 24 hours. The reaction mixture was then sparged vigorously for an additional 24 hours to remove excess phosgene and hydrogen chloride (which formed during the chlorformylation reaction). The chloroformate in toluene may be reacted with a polyamine (as outlined in Example 3) without further isolation and for purification. The IR spectrum showed an absorption peak at 1780 cm~i, characteristics for the chloroformate carbonyl group.

EXAMPLE 3 Preparation of Polyisobutyl-24 Diethylene - triamine Carbamate

A 988 g (1:04 mole) portion of polyisobutyl-24 chloroformate prepared according to the procedure outlined in Example 2, which had been diluted to 1800 ml with toluene was combined with 1800 ml of a solution containing 870 ml (8.05 moles) of diethylenetria ine in toluene using a Kenics static mixer (11 inches x 3/8 inch); the reaction mixture was discharged into a 5 liter receiver. The reaction mixture was stripped, and then diluted with 8 1 hexane. A lower layer containing excess diethylene triamine was removed. The upper layer was washed twice with 3 1 5% aqueous sodium hydroxide; phase separation was assisted by the addition of salt, NaCl (to give brine in situ). After a final wash with basic brine, the organic layer was dried (over Na 2 SO_ι), filtered and stripped to give the above-identified product as a viscous yellow liquid (AV = 64).

EXAMPLE 4 Preparation of Polyisobutyl-32 Alcohol A polyisobutenyl alcohol was prepared from polysobutene-32 (average molecular weight 1300) by following the procedure described in Example 1 but using the following proportions of materials: 555 g of polisobutene-32 was dissolved in 2 liters of tetrahydrofuran CTHF and then treated with 400 ml of a IM solution of BH 3 /THF. The reaction mixture was quenched

B STITUTESHETT

with 80 ml water, followed by 135 ml aqueous 3M sodium hydroxide and then followed by 55 ml of 30% hydrogen peroxide. After isolation, 542 g of the above-identified product were obtained as a thick hazy liquid, having a hydroxyl number of 48.0.

EXAMPLE 5 Preparation of Polyisobutyl-32 Chloroformate Polyisobutyl-32 chloroformate was prepared according to the procedure described in Example 2, using polyisobutyl-32 alcohol (prepared according to Example 4) and using the following proportions of materials: 326 g of polyisobutyl-32 alcohol was dissolved in 1.5 liter dry toluene and then treated with 25 ml phosgene to give about 350 g of the above-identified chloroformate as a pale yellow liquid. The chloroformate may be diluted with toluene and used to prepare the aminocarbamate without further isolation or purification. EXAMPLE 6

Prepara ' tion of Polyisobutyl-24 Ethylenediamine Carbamate

Polyisobutyl-24 ethylenediamine carbamate was prepared following the procedures described in Example 3 using a chloroformate prepared according to Example 2 using the following proportions of the following materials. A 2 liter solution of 415 g polyisobutyl-24 chloroformate in toluene was combined with a 2 liter solution of 540 ml of ethylene-diamine in toluene using a kenic static mixture. After work up (isolation), 430 g of the above-identified carbamate was obtained as a thick yellow oil (AV = 34)

EXAMPLE 7 Preparation of Polyisobutyl-32 Ethylenediamine Carbamate The above-identified carbamate was prepared by following the procedure described in Example 3 using a polyisobutyl-32 chloroformate prepared according to Example 5 and using the following proportions of the following materials. 550 g polyisobutyl-32 chloroformate in 2 liter toluene were combined with 188 ml ethylenediamine to yield the above-identified carbamate.

SUBSTITUTE SHEET

-35-

Example A The stability of certain fuel additives prepared according to the procedures outlined in Examples 1 to 3 was measured by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) . The TGA procedure employed Du Pont 951 TGA instrumentation coupled with a microcomputer for data analysis. Samples of the fuel additives. (Approximately 25 milligrams) were heated isothermally at 200°C under air flowing at 100 cubic centimeters per minute. The weight of the sample was monitored as a function of time. Incremental weight loss is considered to be a first order process. Kinetic data, i.e., rate constants and half-lives, were readily determined from the accumulated TGA data. The half-life measured by this procedure represents the time it takes for half of the additive to decompose. Half- life data for a fuel additive correlates to the likelihood that that additive will contribute to ORI. Lower half-lives represent a more easily decomposable product - one which will not as likely accumulate and form deposits in the combustion chamber. Higher half- lives, those approaching 900 minutes, would indicate an ORI problem in engine performance. The half-life results obtained are shown in Table I below.

TABLE I

TGA Half

Compound Time/Min

Polyisobutyl-241 Ethylenediamine Carbamate 120 Polyisobutyl-322 Ethylenediamine Carbamate 200 Comparison3 (F-309) 900

1 Polyisobutyl-24 = Mol. Wt. « 950

2 Polyisobutyl-32 = Mol. Wt. ** 1300

3 Polyisobutenyl-32 ethylenediamine prepared according to U.S. Patent 3,574,576.

SUBSTITUTESHEET